c# pdf reader text : Delete pages in pdf software SDK cloud windows wpf web page class SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft8-part658

2.1 Geometric primitives andtransformations
59
(a)
(b)
(c)
Figure 2.13 Radial lens distortions: (a) barrel, (b) pincushion, and (c) fisheye. The fisheye
image spans almost 180
from side-to-side.
where r2
c
= x2
c
+y2
c
and 
1
and 
2
are called the radial distortion parameters.4 After the
radial distortion step, the final pixel coordinates can be computed using
x
s
= fx
0
c
+c
x
y
s
= fy
0
c
+c
y
:
(2.79)
Avariety of techniques can be used to estimate the radial distortion parameters for a given
lens, as discussed in Section6.3.5.
Sometimes the above simplified model does not model the true distortions produced by
complex lenses accurately enough (especially at very wide angles). A more complete ana-
lyticmodel also includes tangential distortions anddecentering distortions (Slama1980), but
these distortions are not covered inthis book.
Fisheye lenses (Figure2.13c) require a model that differs from traditional polynomial
models of radial distortion. Fisheye lenses behave, to a first approximation, as equi-distance
projectors of angles away from the optical axis (XiongandTurkowski1997), which is the
same as the polar projection described by Equations (9.229.24). XiongandTurkowski
(1997) describe how this model can be extended with the addition of an extra quadratic cor-
rection in  and how the unknown parameters (center of projection, scaling factor s, etc.)
can be estimated from a set of overlapping fisheye images using a direct (intensity-based)
non-linear minimization algorithm.
For even larger, less regular distortions, a parametric distortion model using splines may
be necessary (Goshtasby1989). If the lens does not have a single center of projection, it
4
Sometimes the relationship between x
c
and ^x
c
is expressed theother way around,i.e., x
c
=^x
c
(1+ 
1
^r
2
c
+
2
^r4
c
). Thisis convenientifwemapimagepixelsinto (warped)raysby dividingthrough byf. Wecan thenundistort
the rays and havetrue 3Drays in space.
Delete pages in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages of pdf reader; delete page in pdf preview
Delete pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete page pdf
60
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
may become necessary to model the 3D line (as opposed to direction) corresponding to each
pixel separately (Gremban,Thorpe,andKanade1988;Champleboux,Lavall´ee,Sautotetal.
1992; Grossberg and Nayar 2001; Sturm and Ramalingam 2004; Tardif, Sturm, Trudeau et
al. 2009). SomeofthesetechniquesaredescribedinmoredetailinSection6.3.5, which
discusses how to calibrate lens distortions.
There is one subtle issue associated with the simple radial distortion model that is often
glossed over. We haveintroduceda non-linearitybetween the perspective projectionandfinal
sensor array projection steps. Therefore, we cannot, in general, post-multiply an arbitrary 3
3matrix K with a rotation to put it into upper-triangular form andabsorb this into the global
rotation. However, this situation is notas bad as itmayat first appear. For many applications,
keeping the simplified diagonal form of (2.59) is still an adequate model. Furthermore, if we
correct radialand other distortions to an accuracy where straight lines are preserved, we have
essentially convertedthesensor backintoa linear imager and the previous decompositionstill
applies.
2.2 Photometric image formation
In modeling the image formation process, we have described how 3D geometric features in
the world are projected into 2D features in an image. However, images are not composed of
2D features. Instead, they are made up of discrete color or intensity values. Where do these
values come from? How do they relate to the lighting in the environment, surface properties
andgeometry, camera optics, andsensor properties (Figure2.14)? In this section, wedevelop
aset of models to describe these interactions and formulate a generative process of image
formation. A more detailed treatment of these topics can be found in other textbooks on
computer graphics and image synthesis (Glassner1995;Weyrich,Lawrence,Lenschetal.
2008; Foley, van Dam, Feiner et al. 1995; Watt 1995; Cohen and Wallace 1993; Sillion and
Puech 1994).
2.2.1 Lighting
Images cannot exist without light. To produce an image, the scene must be illuminated with
one or more light sources. (Certain modalities such as fluorescent microscopy and X-ray
tomography do not fit this model, but we do not deal with them in this book.) Light sources
can generally be divided into point and area light sources.
Apoint light source originates at a single location in space (e.g., a small light bulb),
potentially at infinity (e.g., the sun). (Note that for some applications such as modeling soft
shadows (penumbras), the sun may have to be treated as an area light source.) In addition to
its location, a point light source has an intensity and a color spectrum, i.e., a distribution over
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pdf pages acrobat; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages pdf file; delete pages from pdf preview
2.2 Photometric image formation
61
n
^
surface
light 
source
image plane
sensor 
plane
optics
Figure 2.14 A simplified model of photometric image formation. Light is emitted by one
or more light sources and is then reflected from an object’s surface. A portion of this light is
directed towards the camera. This simplified model ignores multiple reflections, which often
occur inreal-world scenes.
wavelengths L(). The intensity of a light source falls off with the square of the distance
between the source and the object being lit, because the same light is being spread over a
larger (spherical) area. A light source may also have a directional falloff (dependence), but
we ignore this in our simplified model.
Area lightsources are more complicated. A simple area light source such as a fluorescent
ceiling light fixture with a diffuser can be modeled as a finite rectangular area emitting light
equally in all directions (CohenandWallace1993;SillionandPuech1994;Glassner1995).
Whenthedistributionis strongly directional, afour-dimensionallightfieldcanbeusedinstead
(Ashdown1993).
Amore complex light distribution that approximates, say, the incident illumination onan
object sitting in an outdoor courtyard, can often be represented using an environment map
(Greene1986) (originallycalleda reflectionmap (BlinnandNewell1976)). This representa-
tion maps incident light directions ^v to color values (or wavelengths, ),
L(^v;);
(2.80)
and is equivalent to assuming that all light sources are at infinity. Environment maps can be
representedas a collection of cubical faces (Greene1986), as a single longitude–latitude map
(BlinnandNewell1976), or as the image of a reflecting sphere (Watt1995). A convenient
way to get a rough model of a real-world environment map is to take an image of a reflective
mirroredsphere and tounwrap this imageonto the desiredenvironment map(Debevec1998).
Watt(1995)givesanicediscussionofenvironmentmapping,includingtheformulasneeded
to map directions to pixels for the three most commonly used representations.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page in pdf file; delete page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
add and remove pages from pdf file online; delete page pdf file reader
62
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
n
^
v
i
d
x
n
^
v
r
^
d
y
^
θ
i
φ
i
φ
r
θ
r
^
^
(a)
(b)
Figure 2.15
(a) Light scatters when it hits a surface. (b) The bidirectional reflectance
distribution function (BRDF) f(
i
;
i
;
r
;
r
)is parameterized by the angles that the inci-
dent, ^v
i
,and reflected, ^v
r
,light ray directions make with the local surface coordinate frame
(
^
d
x
;
^
d
y
;^n).
2.2.2 Reflectance and shading
When light hits anobject’s surface, it is scattered and reflected(Figure2.15a). Many different
models have been developed to describe this interaction. In this section, we first describe the
most general form, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function, and then look at some
more specializedmodels, including the diffuse, specular, and Phong shading models. We also
discuss how these models can be used to compute the global illumination corresponding to a
scene.
The Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF)
The most general model of light scattering is the bidirectional reflectance distribution func-
tion (BRDF).
5
Relative to some local coordinate frame on the surface, the BRDF is a four-
dimensional function that describes how much of each wavelength arriving at an incident
direction ^v
i
is emitted in a reflected direction ^v
r
(Figure2.15b). The function can be written
in terms of the angles of the incident and reflected directions relative to the surface frame as
f
r
(
i
;
i
;
r
;
r
;):
(2.81)
The BRDF is reciprocal, i.e., because of the physics of light transport, you can interchange
the roles of ^v
i
and ^v
r
and still get the same answer (this is sometimes called Helmholtz
reciprocity).
5
Actually, even moregeneral models oflight transport exist, including some that model spatial variation along
the surface, sub-surface scattering, and atmospheric effects—see Section12.7.1—(Dorsey,Rushmeier,andSillion
2007; Weyrich, Lawrence, Lensch etal.2008).
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
delete pdf pages; delete pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET PDF - How to Delete Text from PDF File in VB.NET. VB.NET Programming Guide to Delete Text from PDF File Using XDoc.PDF SDK for VB.NET.
cut pages from pdf preview; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
2.2 Photometric image formation
63
Most surfaces are isotropic, i.e., there are no preferred directions on the surface as far
as light transport is concerned. (The exceptions are anisotropic surfaces such as brushed
(scratched) aluminum, where the reflectance depends on the light orientation relative to the
direction of the scratches.) For anisotropic material, we can simplify the BRDF to
f
r
(
i
;
r
;j
r
i
j;) or f
r
(^v
i
;^v
r
;^n;);
(2.82)
since the quantities 
i
,
r
and 
r
i
can be computed from the directions ^v
i
,^v
r
,and ^n.
To calculate the amount of light exiting a surface point p in a direction ^v
r
under a given
lighting condition, we integrate the product of the incoming light L
i
(^v
i
;) with the BRDF
(some authors call this step a convolution). Taking into account the foreshortening factor
cos
+
i
,we obtain
L
r
(^v
r
;) =
Z
L
i
(^v
i
;)f
r
(^v
i
;^v
r
;^n;) cos
+
i
d^v
i
;
(2.83)
where
cos
+
i
=max(0;cos
i
):
(2.84)
If the light sources are discrete (a finite number of point light sources), we can replace the
integral with a summation,
L
r
(^v
r
;) =
X
i
L
i
()f
r
(^v
i
;^v
r
;^n;)cos
+
i
:
(2.85)
BRDFs for a given surface can be obtained through physical modeling (Torranceand
Sparrow1967;Cook andTorrance 1982; Glassner 1995),heuristicmodeling(Phong1975),or
throughempiricalobservation (Ward1992;Westin,Arvo,andTorrance1992;Dana,vanGin-
neken, Nayar et al. 1999; Dorsey, Rushmeier, and Sillion 2007; Weyrich, Lawrence, Lensch
et al. 2008).
6
Typical BRDFs can often be split into their diffuse and specular components,
as described below.
Diffuse reflection
The diffuse component (also known as Lambertian or matte reflection) scatters light uni-
formly in all directions and is the phenomenon we most normally associate with shading,
e.g., the smooth (non-shiny) variation of intensity with surface normal that is seen when ob-
serving a statue (Figure2.16). Diffuse reflection also often imparts a strong body color to
the light since it is caused by selective absorption and re-emission of light inside the object’s
material (Shafer1985;Glassner1995).
6
Seehttp://www1.cs.columbia.edu/CAVE/software/curet/foradatabase ofsomeempirically sampled BRDFs.
C# Word - Delete Word Document Page in C#.NET
doc.Save(outPutFilePath); Delete Consecutive Pages from Word in C#. int[] detelePageindexes = new int[] { 1, 3, 5, 7, 9 }; // Delete pages.
add and delete pages in pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete page from pdf file online; delete page from pdf document
64
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 2.16 This close-up of a statue shows both diffuse (smooth shading) and specular
(shiny highlight) reflection, as well as darkening in the grooves and creases due to reduced
light visibility and interreflections. (Photo courtesy of the Caltech Vision Lab,http://www.
vision.caltech.edu/archive.html.)
While light is scattered uniformly in all directions, i.e., the BRDF is constant,
f
d
(^v
i
;^v
r
;^n;) = f
d
();
(2.86)
the amount of light depends on the angle between the incident light direction and the surface
normal 
i
.This is because the surface areaexposed to a given amount of light becomes larger
at oblique angles, becoming completely self-shadowedas the outgoingsurface normal points
away from the light (Figure2.17a). (Think about how you orient yourself towards the sun or
fireplace to get maximum warmth and how a flashlight projected obliquely against a wall is
less bright than one pointing directly at it.) The shading equation for diffuse reflection can
thus be written as
L
d
(^v
r
;) =
X
i
L
i
()f
d
()cos
+
i
=
X
i
L
i
()f
d
()[^v
i
^n]
+
;
(2.87)
where
[^v
i
^n]
+
=max(0;^v
i
^n):
(2.88)
Specular reflection
The second major component of a typical BRDF is specular (gloss or highlight) reflection,
which depends strongly on the direction of the outgoing light. Consider light reflecting off a
mirrored surface (Figure2.17b). Incident light rays are reflected in a direction that is rotated
by 180
around the surface normal ^n. Using the same notation as in Equations (2.292.30),
2.2 Photometric image formation
65
v
i
= 1
 ^
0 < 
v
i
< 1
 ^
v
i
n <
0
^  ^
v
i
= 0
^  ^
v
i
v
n
^
v
-v
s
i
180°
v
^
^
(a)
(b)
Figure 2.17 (a) The diminutionof returned lightcausedbyforeshortening depends on ^v
i
^n,
the cosine of the angle between the incident light direction ^v
i
and the surface normal ^n. (b)
Mirror (specular) reflection: The incident light ray direction ^v
i
is reflected onto the specular
direction ^s
i
around the surface normal ^n.
we can compute the specular reflection direction ^s
i
as
^s
i
=v
k
v
?
=(2^n^n
T
I)v
i
:
(2.89)
The amount of light reflected in a given direction ^v
r
thus depends on the angle 
s
=
cos 1(^v
r
^s
i
)between the view direction ^v
r
and the specular direction ^s
i
.For example, the
Phong(1975)modelusesapowerofthecosineoftheangle,
f
s
(
s
;) = k
s
() cos
k
e
s
;
(2.90)
while theTorranceandSparrow (1967) micro-facet model uses a Gaussian,
f
s
(
s
;) = k
s
() exp( c
2
s
2
s
):
(2.91)
Larger exponents k
e
(or inverse Gaussian widths c
s
)correspond to more specular surfaces
with distinct highlights, while smaller exponents better model materials withsofter gloss.
Phongshading
Phong(1975)combinedthediffuseandspecularcomponentsofreflectionwithanotherterm,
which he called the ambient illumination. This term accounts for the fact that objects are
generallyilluminatednotonly by point light sources butalsobya general diffuse illumination
corresponding to inter-reflection (e.g., the walls in a room) or distant sources, such as the
66
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
-90 -80 -70 -60 -50 -40 -30 -20 -10 0
10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90
Ambient
Diffuse
Exp=10
Exp=100
Exp=1000
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
-0.5
-0.4
-0.3
-0.2
-0.1
0.0
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.4
0.5
Ambient
Diffuse
Exp=10
Exp=100
Exp=1000
(a)
(b)
Figure 2.18 Cross-section through a Phong shading model BRDF for a fixed incident illu-
mination direction: (a) component values as a function of angle away from surface normal;
(b) polar plot. The value of the Phong exponent k
e
is indicated by the “Exp” labels and the
light source is at an angle of 30
away from the normal.
blue sky. In the Phong model, the ambient term does not depend on surface orientation, but
depends on the color of both the ambient illumination L
a
() and the object k
a
(),
f
a
() = k
a
()L
a
():
(2.92)
Putting all of these terms together, we arrive at the Phong shading model,
L
r
(^v
r
;) = k
a
()L
a
() + k
d
()
X
i
L
i
()[^v
i
^n]
+
+k
s
()
X
i
L
i
()(^v
r
^s
i
)
k
e
: (2.93)
Figure2.18 shows a typical set of Phong shading model components as a function of the
angle away from the surface normal (in a plane containing both the lighting directionand the
viewer).
Typically, the ambient and diffuse reflection color distributions k
a
() and k
d
() are the
same, since they are both due to sub-surface scattering (body reflection) inside the surface
material (Shafer1985). The specular reflection distribution k
s
() is often uniform (white),
since it is caused by interface reflections that do not change the light color. (The exception
to this are metallic materials, such as copper, as opposed to the more common dielectric
materials, such as plastics.)
The ambient illumination L
a
() often has a different color cast from the direct light
sources L
i
(), e.g., it may be blue for a sunny outdoor scene or yellow for an interior lit
with candles or incandescent lights. (The presence of ambient sky illumination in shadowed
areas is what often causes shadows to appear bluer than the corresponding lit portions of a
scene). Note also that the diffuse component of the Phong model (or of any shading model)
depends on the angle of the incoming light source ^v
i
,while the specular component depends
on the relative angle between the viewer v
r
and the specular reflection direction ^s
i
(which
itself depends on the incoming light direction ^v
i
and the surface normal ^n).
2.2 Photometric image formation
67
ThePhongshadingmodelhas been superseded in terms of physical accuracy by anumber
of more recently developed models in computer graphics, including the model developed by
Cook and Torrance(1982)basedontheoriginalmicro-facetmodelof Torrance and Sparrow
(1967). Until recently, most computer graphics hardware implemented the Phong model but
the recent advent of programmable pixel shaders makes the use of more complex models
feasible.
Di-chromatic reflection model
TheTorranceandSparrow (1967) model of reflection also forms the basis of Shafer’s (1985)
di-chromatic reflection model, which states that the apparent color of a uniform material lit
from a single source depends on the sum of two terms,
L
r
(^v
r
;) =
L
i
(^v
r
;^v
i
;^n;) + L
b
(^v
r
;^v
i
;^n;)
(2.94)
=
c
i
()m
i
(^v
r
;^v
i
;^n) + c
b
()m
b
(^v
r
;^v
i
;^n);
(2.95)
i.e., theradianceof the lightreflected atthe interface, L
i
,andtheradiance reflectedat the sur-
face body, L
b
.Each of these, in turn, is a simple product between a relative power spectrum
c(), whichdepends onlyonwavelength, anda magnitude m(^v
r
;^v
i
;^n), whichdepends only
ongeometry. (This model can easily be derivedfrom a generalized version of Phong’s model
by assuming a single light source and no ambient illumination, and re-arranging terms.) The
di-chromatic model has been successfully used in computer vision to segment specular col-
ored objects with large variations in shading (Klinker1993) and more recently has inspired
local two-color models for applications such Bayer pattern demosaicing (Bennett,Uytten-
daele, Zitnick et al. 2006).
Global illumination (ray tracing and radiosity)
The simple shading model presented thus far assumes that light rays leave the light sources,
bounce off surfaces visible to the camera, thereby changing in intensity or color, and arrive
at the camera. In reality, light sources can be shadowed by occluders and rays can bounce
multiple times around a scene while making their trip from a light source to the camera.
Two methods have traditionally been used to model such effects. If the scene is mostly
specular (the classic example being scenes made of glass objects and mirrored or highly pol-
ished balls), the preferred approach is ray tracing or path tracing (Glassner1995;Akenine-
M¨oller and Haines2002;Shirley2005),whichfollowsindividualraysfromthecameraacross
multiple bounces towards the light sources (or vice versa). If the scene is composed mostly
of uniform albedo simple geometry illuminators and surfaces, radiosity (global illumination)
techniques are preferred (CohenandWallace1993;SillionandPuech1994;Glassner1995).
68
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Combinations of the two techniques have also been developed (Wallace,Cohen,andGreen-
berg 1987),aswellasmoregenerallighttransporttechniquesforsimulatingeffectssuchas
the caustics cast by rippling water.
The basic ray tracing algorithm associates a light ray with each pixel in the camera im-
age and finds its intersection with the nearest surface. A primary contribution can then be
computed using the simple shading equations presented previously (e.g., Equation (2.93))
for all light sources that are visible for that surface element. (An alternative technique for
computing which surfaces are illuminated by a light source is to compute a shadow map,
or shadow buffer, i.e., a rendering of the scene from the light source’s perspective, and then
compare the depth of pixels being rendered with the map (Williams1983;Akenine-M¨oller
and Haines 2002).)Additionalsecondaryrayscanthenbecastalongthespeculardirection
towards other objects in the scene, keeping track of any attenuation or color change that the
specular reflection induces.
Radiosityworksbyassociatinglightness values withrectangular surfaceareas inthe scene
(including area light sources). The amount of light interchanged between any two (mutually
visible) areas in the scene can be captured as a form factor, which depends on their relative
orientationandsurfacereflectanceproperties, aswellas the 1=r
2
fall-off as light isdistributed
over a larger effective sphere the further away it is (CohenandWallace1993;Sillionand
Puech 1994; Glassner 1995). Alargelinearsystemcanthenbesetuptosolveforthefinal
lightness of each area patch, using the light sources as the forcing function (right hand side).
Once the system has been solved, the scene can be rendered from any desired point of view.
Under certain circumstances, it is possible to recover the global illumination in a scene from
photographs using computer vision techniques (Yu,Debevec,Maliketal.1999).
The basic radiosity algorithm does not take into account certain near field effects, such
as the darkening inside corners and scratches, or the limited ambient illumination caused
by partial shadowing from other surfaces. Such effects have been exploited in a number of
computer vision algorithms (Nayar,Ikeuchi,andKanade1991;LangerandZucker1994).
While all of these global illumination effects can have a strong effect on the appearance
of a scene, and hence its 3D interpretation, they are not covered in more detail in this book.
(But see Section12.7.1 for a discussion of recovering BRDFs from real scenes and objects.)
2.2.3 Optics
Once the light from a scene reaches the camera, it must still pass through the lens before
reaching the sensor (analog film or digital silicon). For many applications, it suffices to
treat the lens as an ideal pinhole that simply projects all rays through a common center of
projection (Figures2.8 and2.9).
However, if we want to deal with issues such as focus, exposure, vignetting, and aber-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested