c# pdf reader text : Delete blank pages in pdf files application control tool html web page .net online SzeliskiBook_20100903_draft9-part669

2.2 Photometric image formation
69
z
i
=102  mm
f= 100  mm
W=35mm
z
o
=5  m
f.o.v.
c
Δ
z
i
P
d
Figure 2.19 Athinlens of focal length f focuses thelightfrom a planea distancez
o
infront
of the lens at a distance z
i
behind the lens, where
1
z
o
+
1
z
i
=
1
f
. If the focal plane (vertical
gray line next to c) is moved forward, the images are no longer in focus and the circle of
confusion c (small thick line segments) depends on the distance of the image plane motion
z
i
relative to the lens aperture diameter d. The field of view (f.o.v.) depends on the ratio
betweenthe sensor width W and the focal length f (or, more precisely, the focusingdistance
z
i
,which is usually quite close to f).
ration, we need to develop a more sophisticated model, which is where the study of optics
comes in (M¨oller1988;Hecht2001;Ray2002).
Figure2.19 shows a diagram of the most basic lens model, i.e., the thin lens composed
of a single piece of glass with very low, equal curvature on both sides. According to the
lens law (whichcan be derived usingsimple geometric arguments onlightrayrefraction), the
relationship between the distance to an object z
o
and the distance behind the lens at which a
focused image is formed z
i
can be expressed as
1
z
o
+
1
z
i
=
1
f
;
(2.96)
wheref is called the focal length of the lens. If we let z
o
!1, i.e., we adjust the lens (move
the image plane) so that objects at infinity are in focus, we get z
i
=f, which is why we can
think of a lens of focal length f as being equivalent (to a first approximation) to a pinhole a
distance f from the focal plane (Figure2.10), whose field of view is given by (2.60).
If the focal plane is moved away from its proper in-focus setting of z
i
(e.g., by twisting
the focus ring on the lens), objects at z
o
are no longer in focus, as shown bythe gray plane in
Figure2.19. Theamount of mis-focusis measuredbythecircle of confusionc(shown asshort
thick blue line segments on the gray plane).7 The equation for the circle of confusion can be
derived using similar triangles; it depends on the distance of travel in the focal plane z
i
relative to the original focus distance z
i
and the diameter of the aperture d (see Exercise2.4).
7
Iftheapertureisnotcompletely circular,e.g., ifit iscaused by ahexagonal diaphragm,it issometimespossible
to seethis effect in the actual blur function (Levin,Fergus,Durandetal.2007;Joshi,Szeliski,andKriegman2008)
or in the“glints” thatareseen when shootinginto thesun.
Delete blank pages in pdf files - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf reader; delete pages of pdf
Delete blank pages in pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
70
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
(a)
(b)
Figure 2.20 Regular and zoom lens depthof field indicators.
The allowable depth variation in the scene that limits the circle of confusion to an accept-
able number is commonlycalledthe depth offield and is afunction of boththe focus distance
andthe aperture, as showndiagrammaticallybymany lens markings (Figure2.20). Since this
depth of field depends on the aperture diameter d, we also have to know how this varies with
the commonly displayed f-number, which is usually denoted as f=# or N and is defined as
f=# = N =
f
d
;
(2.97)
where the focal length f and the aperture diameter d are measured in the same unit (say,
millimeters).
The usual way to write the f-number is to replace the # in f=# with the actual number,
i.e., f=1:4;f=2;f=2:8;:::;f=22. (Alternatively, we can say N = 1:4, etc.) An easy way to
interpret these numbers is tonotice that dividing the focallength by the f-number gives us the
diameter d, sothese are just formulas for the aperture diameter.
8
Notice that the usual progression for f-numbers is infull stops, which are multiples of
p
2,
since this corresponds to doubling the area of the entrance pupil eachtime a smaller f-number
is selected. (This doubling is alsocalled changing the exposure by one exposure value or EV.
It has the same effect on the amount of light reaching the sensor as doubling the exposure
duration, e.g., from1=
125
to1=
250
,see Exercise2.5.)
Now that you know how to convert between f-numbers and aperture diameters, you can
construct your own plots for the depth of field as a function of focal length f, circle of
confusionc, and focus distance z
o
,as explained in Exercise2.4 and see howwellthese match
what you observe on actual lenses, such as those shown in Figure2.20.
Of course, real lenses are not infinitely thin and therefore suffer from geometric aber-
rations, unless compound elements are used to correct for them. The classic five Seidel
aberrations, which arise when using third-order optics, include spherical aberration, coma,
astigmatism, curvature of field, and distortion (M¨oller1988;Hecht2001;Ray2002).
8
Thisalso explains why,with zoom lenses,the f-numbervaries with the current zoom (focallength)setting.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages from a pdf reader
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create PDF from Open Office files. Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc
delete page on pdf reader; delete pages pdf online
2.2 Photometric image formation
71
z
i
=103mm
f’= 101mm
z
o
=5m
P
d
c
Figure 2.21 In a lens subject to chromatic aberration, light at different wavelengths (e.g.,
the redandblur arrows) is focused with adifferent focallength f
0
andhence a differentdepth
z
0
i
,resulting in both a geometric (in-plane) displacement and a loss of focus.
Chromatic aberration
Because the index of refraction for glass varies slightly as a function of wavelength, sim-
ple lenses suffer from chromatic aberration, which is the tendency for light of different
colors to focus at slightly different distances (and hence also with slightly different mag-
nification factors), as shown in Figure2.21. The wavelength-dependent magnification fac-
tor, i.e., the transverse chromatic aberration, can be modeled as a per-color radial distortion
(Section2.1.6) and, hence, calibrated using the techniques described in Section6.3.5. The
wavelength-dependent blur caused by longitudinal chromatic aberration can be calibrated
using techniques described in Section10.1.4. Unfortunately, the blur inducedby longitudinal
aberration can be harder to undo, as higher frequencies can getstrongly attenuated and hence
hard to recover.
In order to reduce chromatic and other kinds of aberrations, most photographic lenses
today are compound lenses made of different glass elements (with different coatings). Such
lenses can no longer be modeled as having a single nodal point P through which all of the
rays must pass (when approximating the lens with a pinhole model). Instead, these lenses
have both a front nodal point, through which the rays enter the lens, and a rear nodal point,
throughwhich they leave on their way tothe sensor. Inpractice, only the location of the front
nodal point is of interest when performing careful camera calibration, e.g., when determining
the point around which to rotate to capture a parallax-free panorama (see Section9.1.3).
Not all lenses, however, can be modeledas havinga single nodalpoint. In particular, very
wide-angle lenses such as fisheye lenses (Section2.1.6) and certain catadioptric imaging
systems consisting of lenses andcurvedmirrors (BakerandNayar1999) donothave a single
point through which all of the acquired light rays pass. In such cases, it is preferable to
explicitly construct a mapping function (look-up table) between pixel coordinates and 3D
rays in space (Gremban,Thorpe,andKanade1988;Champleboux,Lavall´ee,Sautotetal.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
add and delete pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online
delete page in pdf preview; delete pages in pdf online
72
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
z
i
=102mm
f= 100mm
z
o
=5m
δ
i
d
δ
o
α
α
α
P
J
I
O
Q
ro
Figure 2.22 The amount of light hitting a pixel of surface area i depends on the square of
the ratio of the aperture diameter d to the focal length f, as well as the fourth power of the
off-axis angle  cosine, cos
4
.
1992; Grossberg and Nayar 2001; Sturm and Ramalingam 2004; Tardif, Sturm, Trudeau et
al. 2009),asmentionedinSection2.1.6.
Vignetting
Another property of real-world lenses is vignetting, which is the tendency for the brightness
of the image to fall off towards the edge of the image.
Two kinds of phenomena usually contribute to this effect (Ray2002). The first is called
natural vignetting and is due to the foreshortening in the object surface, projected pixel, and
lens aperture, as shown in Figure2.22. Consider the light leaving the object surface patch
of size o located at an off-axis angle . Because this patch is foreshortened with respect
to the camera lens, the amount of light reaching the lens is reduced by a factor cos . The
amount of light reaching the lens is also subject to the usual 1=r
2
fall-off; in this case, the
distance r
o
= z
o
=cos . The actual area of the aperture through which the light passes
is foreshortened by an additional factor cos , i.e., the aperture as seen from point O is an
ellipse of dimensions ddcos. Puttingall of these factors together, we see that the amount
of light leaving O and passingthrough the aperture on its way to the image pixel located at I
is proportional to
o cos 
r2
o
d
2
2
cos = o
4
d
2
z2
o
cos
4
:
(2.98)
Since triangles OPQ and IPJ are similar, the projected areas of of the object surface o
and image pixel i are inthe same (squared) ratio as z
o
:z
i
,
o
i
=
z2
o
z
2
i
:
(2.99)
Putting these together, we obtain the final relationship between the amount of light reaching
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page NET, how to reorganize Word document pages and how
acrobat export pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page to reorganize PowerPoint document pages and how
delete pages from a pdf online; delete pages in pdf
2.3 The digital camera
73
pixel i and the aperture diameter d, the focusing distance z
i
f, and the off-axis angle ,
o
4
d
2
z2
o
cos
4
= i
4
d
2
z
2
i
cos
4
 i
4
d
f
2
cos
4
;
(2.100)
which is called the fundamental radiometric relation between the scene radiance L and the
light (irradiance) E reaching the pixel sensor,
E= L
4
d
f
2
cos
4
;
(2.101)
(Horn1986;Nalwa1993;Hecht2001;Ray2002). Noticein this equation how the amount of
light depends on the pixel surface area (which is why the smaller sensors in point-and-shoot
cameras are somuch noisier than digital single lens reflex (SLR) cameras), the inverse square
of the f-stop N = f=d (2.97), and the fourth power of the cos
4
off-axis fall-off, which is
the natural vignetting term.
Theother major kind of vignetting, calledmechanicalvignetting, is causedbytheinternal
occlusion of rays near the periphery of lens elements in a compound lens, and cannot easily
be described mathematically without performing a full ray-tracing of the actual lens design.
9
However, unlike natural vignetting, mechanical vignetting can be decreased by reducing the
camera aperture (increasing the f-number). It can also be calibrated (along with natural vi-
gnetting) using special devices such as integrating spheres, uniformly illuminated targets, or
camera rotation, as discussed in Section10.1.3.
2.3 The digital camera
After starting from oneor more light sources, reflecting off one or more surfaces in the world,
and passing through the camera’s optics (lenses), light finally reaches the imaging sensor.
How are the photons arriving at this sensor converted into the digital (R, G, B) values that
we observe when we look at a digital image? In this section, we develop a simple model
that accounts for the most important effects such as exposure (gain and shutter speed), non-
linear mappings, sampling and aliasing, and noise. Figure2.23, which is based on camera
models developedbyHealeyandKondepudy(1994);Tsin,Ramesh,andKanade(2001);Liu,
Szeliski, Kang et al.(2008),showsasimpleversionoftheprocessingstagesthatoccurin
modern digital cameras. Chakrabarti,Scharstein,andZickler(2009) developed a sophisti-
cated 24-parameter modelthat is an even better match tothe processing performed in today’s
cameras.
Therearesomeempiricalmodelsthatworkwellinpractice(KangandWeiss2000;Zheng,Lin,andKang
2006).
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pages from pdf
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Dim outputFile As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument
delete page from pdf preview; delete page on pdf file
74
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
Figure 2.23 Image sensing pipeline, showing the various sources of noise as well as typical
digital post-processing steps.
Light falling on an imaging sensor is usually picked up by an active sensing area, inte-
gratedfor the duration of the exposure (usually expressed as the shutter speed ina fraction of
asecond, e.g.,
1
125
,
1
60
,
1
30
), andthenpassed to a set of sense amplifiers . The twomain kinds
of sensor used in digital still and video cameras today are charge-coupled device (CCD) and
complementary metal oxide on silicon (CMOS).
In a CCD, photons are accumulated in each active well during the exposure time. Then,
ina transfer phase, the charges are transferred from well to well in a kindof “bucketbrigade”
until they are deposited at the sense amplifiers, which amplify the signal and pass it to
an analog-to-digital converter (ADC).
10
Older CCD sensors were prone to blooming, when
charges from one over-exposed pixel spilled into adjacent ones, but most newer CCDs have
anti-blooming technology (“troughs” into which the excess charge can spill).
In CMOS, the photons hitting the sensor directly affect the conductivity (or gain) of a
photodetector, which can be selectively gated to control exposure duration, and locally am-
plified before being read out using a multiplexing scheme. Traditionally, CCD sensors
outperformed CMOS in quality sensitive applications, such as digital SLRs, while CMOS
was better for low-power applications, but today CMOS is used in most digital cameras.
Themain factors affectingtheperformance of a digitalimage sensor aretheshutter speed,
samplingpitch, fillfactor, chipsize, analoggain, sensor noise, and the resolution(and quality)
10
In digitalstill cameras,a complete frameis captured and then read out sequentially at once. However,ifvideo
is being captured, a rolling shutter, which exposes and transfers each line separately, is often used. In oldervideo
cameras,the even fields (lines) were scanned first, followed by the odd fields, in aprocessthat is called interlacing.
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
delete pages from a pdf; delete pdf pages online
2.3 The digital camera
75
of the analog-to-digitalconverter. Many of the actual values for these parameters canbe read
from the EXIF tags embedded with digital images. while others can be obtained from the
camera manufacturers’ specification sheets or from camera review or calibration Web sites.
11
Shutter speed. Theshutterspeed(exposuretime)directlycontrolstheamountoflight
reaching the sensor and, hence, determines if images are under- or over-exposed. (For bright
scenes, where alarge aperture or slowshutter speed are desiredto get a shallow depthof field
or motion blur, neutral density filters are sometimes used by photographers.) For dynamic
scenes, the shutter speed also determines the amount of motion blur in the resulting picture.
Usually, a higher shutter speed (less motion blur) makes subsequent analysis easier (see Sec-
tion10.3 for techniques to remove such blur). However, when video is being captured for
display, some motionblur may be desirable to avoid stroboscopic effects.
Sampling pitch. Thesamplingpitchisthephysicalspacingbetweenadjacentsensorcells
onthe imagingchip. Asensor with asmaller samplingpitchhasa higher sampling density and
hence provides a higher resolution (in terms of pixels) for a given active chip area. However,
asmaller pitchalso means thateach sensor has a smaller area and cannotaccumulate as many
photons; this makes it not as light sensitive and more prone to noise.
Fill factor. Thefillfactoristheactivesensingareasizeasafractionofthetheoretically
available sensing area (the product of the horizontal and vertical sampling pitches). Higher
fill factors are usually preferable, as they result in more light capture and less aliasing (see
Section2.3.1). However, this must be balanced with the need to place additional electronics
between the active sense areas. The fill factor of a camera can be determined empirically
using a photometric camera calibration process (see Section10.1.4).
Chip size. Videoandpoint-and-shootcamerashavetraditionallyusedsmallchipareas(
1
4
-
inch to
1
2
-inchsensors
12
), while digital SLR cameras tryto come closer to the traditionalsize
of a 35mm film frame.
13
When overall device size is not important, having a larger chip
size is preferable, since each sensor cell can be more photo-sensitive. (For compact cameras,
asmaller chip means that all of the optics can be shrunk down proportionately.) However,
11 http://www.clarkvision.com/imagedetail/digital.sensor.performance.summary/.
12
These numbers refer to the “tube diameter” of the old vidicon tubes used in video cameras (http://www.
dpreview.com/learn/?/Glossary/Camera
System/sensor
sizes
01.htm).The1/2.5”sensorontheCanonSD800cam-
era actually measures 5.76mm  4.29mm, i.e.,a sixth of the size (on side)ofa35mm full-frame(36mm 24mm)
DSLR sensor.
13
When aDSLR chip does not fill the 35mm full frame, it results in a multiplier effect on thelens focal length.
Forexample,achip that isonly 0:6thedimension ofa 35mmframe will makea50mm lens imagethesameangular
extentas a50=0:6 = 50 1:6=80mm lens,as demonstrated in (2.60).
76
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
larger chips are more expensive to produce, not only because fewer chips can be packed into
each wafer, but also because the probability of a chip defect goes up linearly with the chip
area.
Analog gain. Beforeanalog-to-digitalconversion,thesensedsignalisusuallyboostedby
asense amplifier. In video cameras, the gain on these amplifiers was traditionally controlled
by automatic gain control (AGC) logic, which would adjust these values to obtain a good
overall exposure. In newer digital still cameras, the user now has some additional control
over this gain through the ISO setting, which is typically expressed in ISO standard units
such as 100, 200, or 400. Since the automated exposure control in most cameras also adjusts
the aperture and shutter speed, setting the ISOmanuallyremoves one degree of freedom from
the camera’s control, justas manually specifyingaperture and shutter speed does. In theory, a
higher gain allows the camera to perform better under low light conditions (less motion blur
due to long exposure times when the aperture is already maxed out). In practice, however,
higher ISO settings usually amplify the sensor noise.
Sensor noise. Throughoutthewholesensingprocess,noiseisaddedfromvarioussources,
which may include fixed pattern noise, dark current noise, shot noise, amplifier noise and
quantization noise (HealeyandKondepudy1994;Tsin,Ramesh,andKanade2001). The
final amount of noise present in a sampled image depends on all of these quantities, as well
as the incoming light (controlled by the scene radiance and aperture), the exposure time, and
the sensor gain. Also, for lowlight conditions where the noise is due to low photon counts, a
Poisson model of noise may be more appropriate than a Gaussian model.
As discussed in more detail in Section10.1.1,Liu,Szeliski,Kangetal.(2008) use this
model, along with an empirical database of camera response functions (CRFs) obtained by
Grossberg and Nayar(2004),toestimatethenoiselevelfunction(NLF)foragivenimage,
which predicts the overall noise variance at a given pixel as a function of its brightness (a
separate NLF is estimated for each color channel). An alternative approach, when you have
access to the camera before taking pictures, is to pre-calibrate the NLF by taking repeated
shots of a scene containing a variety of colors and luminances, such as the Macbeth Color
Chart shown in Figure10.3b (McCamy, Marcus, andDavidson1976). (When estimating
the variance, be sure to throw away or downweight pixels with large gradients, as small
shifts betweenexposures willaffectthe sensed values at such pixels.) Unfortunately, the pre-
calibration process may have to be repeated for different exposure times and gain settings
because of the complex interactions occurring within the sensing system.
In practice, most computer vision algorithms, such as image denoising, edge detection,
andstereomatching, allbenefitfrom atleasta rudimentaryestimateof thenoiselevel. Barring
the ability topre-calibrate the cameraor to take repeatedshots of the same scene, the simplest
2.3 The digital camera
77
approach is to look for regions of near-constant value and to estimate the noise variance in
such regions (Liu,Szeliski,Kangetal.2008).
ADC resolution. Thefinalstepintheanalogprocessingchainoccurringwithinanimaging
sensor is the analog to digital conversion (ADC). While a variety of techniques can be used
to implement this process, the two quantities of interest are the resolution of this process
(how many bits it yields) and its noise level (how many of these bits are useful in practice).
For most cameras, the number of bits quoted (eight bits for compressed JPEG images and a
nominal 16 bits for the RAW formats provided by some DSLRs) exceeds the actual number
of usable bits. The best way to tell is to simply calibrate the noise of a given sensor, e.g.,
by taking repeated shots of the same scene and plotting the estimated noise as a function of
brightness (Exercise2.6).
Digital post-processing. Oncetheirradiancevaluesarrivingatthesensorhavebeencon-
verted to digital bits, most cameras perform a variety of digital signal processing (DSP)
operations to enhance the image before compressing and storing the pixel values. These in-
cludecolor filter array(CFA) demosaicing, whitepointsetting, and mappingof the luminance
values through a gamma function to increase the perceived dynamic range of the signal. We
cover these topics in Section2.3.2but, before we do, we returnto the topic of aliasing, which
was mentioned in connection with sensor array fill factors.
2.3.1 Sampling and aliasing
What happens when a field of light impinging on the image sensor falls onto the active sense
areas in the imaging chip? The photons arriving at each active cell are integrated and then
digitized. However, if the fill factor on the chip is small and the signal is not otherwise
band-limited, visually unpleasing aliasing can occur.
To explore the phenomenon of aliasing, let us first look at a one-dimensional signal (Fig-
ure2.24), in which we have two sine waves, one at a frequency of f = 3=
4
and the other at
f = 5=
4
. If we sample these two signals at a frequency of f = 2, we see that they produce
the same samples (shown in black), and so we say that they are aliased.
14
Why is this a bad
effect? In essence, we can no longer reconstruct the original signal, since we do not know
which of the two original frequencies was present.
In fact, Shannon’s Sampling Theorem shows that the minimum sampling (Oppenheim
and Schafer 1996; Oppenheim, Schafer, and Buck 1999)raterequiredtoreconstructasignal
14
An alias isan alternatenameforsomeone,so the sampled signal corresponds to two differentaliases.
78
Computer Vision: Algorithms and Applications (September 3, 2010 draft)
*
f= 3/4
f= 5/4
=
Figure 2.24 Aliasing of a one-dimensional signal: The blue sine wave at f = 3=4 and the
red sine wave at f = 5=4 have the same digital samples, when sampled at f = 2. Even after
convolution with a 100% fill factor box filter, the two signals, while no longer of the same
magnitude, are still aliased in the sense that the sampled red signal looks like an inverted
lower magnitude version of the blue signal. (The image on the right is scaled up for better
visibility. The actual sine magnitudes are 30% and  18% of their original values.)
from its instantaneous samples must be at least twice the highest frequency,
15
f
s
2f
max
:
(2.102)
The maximum frequency in a signal is known as the Nyquist frequency and the inverse of the
minimum sampling frequency r
s
=1=f
s
is known as the Nyquist rate.
However, you may ask, since an imaging chip actually averages the light field over a
finite area, are the results on point sampling still applicable? Averaging over the sensor area
does tend to attenuate some of the higher frequencies. However, even if the fill factor is
100%, as in the right image of Figure2.24, frequencies above the Nyquist limit (half the
sampling frequency) still produce an aliased signal, although with a smaller magnitude than
the corresponding band-limited signals.
Amore convincing argument as to why aliasing is bad can be seen by downsampling
asignal using a poor quality filter such as a box (square) filter. Figure2.25 shows a high-
frequency chirp image (so called because the frequencies increase over time), along with the
results of sampling itwith a 25% fill-factor area sensor, a 100% fill-factor sensor, and a high-
quality 9-tap filter. Additional examples of downsampling (decimation) filters can be found
in Section3.5.2 and Figure3.30.
The best way to predict the amount of aliasing that an imaging system (or even an image
processing algorithm) will produce is to estimate the point spread function (PSF), which
represents the response of a particular pixel sensor to an ideal point light source. The PSF
is a combination (convolution) of the blur induced by the optical system (lens) and the finite
integration area of a chip sensor.16
15 Theactualtheoremstatesthatf
s
mustbeatleasttwicethe signal bandwidth but,sincewearenotdealing with
modulated signals such asradio waves during image capture,the maximum frequency suffices.
16 Imagingchipsusuallyinterposeanopticalanti-aliasingfilterjustbeforetheimagingchiptoreduceorcontrol
the amountof aliasing.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested