1.4. Abstract measure spaces
85
1.4.2. -algebras and measurable spaces. In order to obtain a
measure and integration theory that can cope well with limits, the
nite union axiom of a Boolean algebra is insucient, and must be
improved to a countable union axiom:
Denition 1.4.12 (Sigma algebras). Let X be a set. A -algebra
on X is a collection B of X which obeys the following properties:
(i) (Empty set) ; 2 B.
(ii) (Complement) If E 2 B, then the complement E
c
:= XnE
also lies in B.
(iii) (Countable unions) If E
1
;E
2
;::: 2 B, then
S
1
n=1
E
n
2B.
We refer to the pair (X;B) of a set X together with a -algebra on
that set as a measurable space.
Remark 1.4.13. The prex  usually denotes \countable union".
Other instances of this prex includea -compact topological space (a
countable union of compact sets), a -nite measure space (a count-
able union of sets of nite measure), or F
set (a countable union of
closed sets) for other instances of this prex.
From de Morgan’s law (which is just as valid for innite unions
and intersections as it is for nite ones), we see that -algebras are
closed under countable intersections as well as countable unions.
By padding a nite union into a countable union by using the
empty set, we see that every -algebra is automatically a Boolean al-
gebra. Thus, weautomatically inherit thenotion of being measurable
with respect to a -algebra, or of one -algebra being coarser or ner
than another.
Exercise 1.4.10. Show that all atomic algebras are -algebras. In
particular, the discrete algebra and trivial algebra are -algebras, as
are the nite algebras and the dyadic algebras on Euclidean spaces.
Exercise 1.4.11. Show that the Lebesgue and null algebras are -
algebras, but the elementary and Jordan algebras are not.
Exercise 1.4.12. Show that any restriction B 
Y
of a -algebra B to
asubspace Y of X (as dened in Exercise 1.4.2) is again a -algebra
on the subspace Y.
Delete pages from a pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete blank pages in pdf files
Delete pages from a pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and delete pages in pdf online; delete a page from a pdf
86
1. Measure theory
There is an exact analogue of Exercise 1.4.6:
Exercise 1.4.13 (Intersection of -algebras). Show that the inter-
section
V
2I
B
:=
T
2I
B
of an arbitrary (and possibly innite or
uncountable) number of -algebras B
is again a -algebra, and is
the nest -algebra that is coarser than all of the B
.
Similarly, we have a notion of generation:
Denition 1.4.14 (Generation of -algebras). Let F be any family
of sets in X. Wedene hFito betheintersection of all the-algebras
that contain F, which is again a -algebra by Exercise 1.4.13. Equiv-
alently, hFi is the coarsest -algebra that contains F. We say that
hFi is the -algebra generated by F.
Since every -algebra is a Boolean algebra, we have the trivial
inclusion
hFi
bool
hFi:
However, equality need not hold; it only holds if and only if hFi
bool
is a -algebra. For instance, if F is the collection of all boxes in
R
d
,then hFi
bool
is the elementary algebra (Exercise 1.4.7), but hFi
cannot equal this algebra, as it is not a -algebra.
Remark 1.4.15. From the denitions, it is clear that we have the
following principle, somewhat analogous to the principle of math-
ematical induction: if F is a family of sets in X, and P(E) is a
property of sets E  X which obeys the following axioms:
(i) P(;) is true.
(ii) P(E) is true for all E 2 F.
(iii) If P(E) is true for some E  X, then P(XnE) is true also.
(iv) If E
1
;E
2
;:::  X aresuch that P(E
n
)is truefor all n, then
P(
S
1
n=1
E
n
)is true also.
Then one can conclude that P(E) is true for all E 2 hFi. Indeed,
the set of all E for which P(E) holds is a -algebra that contains F,
whencetheclaim. This principleis particularlyuseful for establishing
properties of Borel measurable sets (see below).
We now turn to an important example of a -algebra:
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete page in pdf preview; delete pages pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page numbers in pdf; delete pages from pdf
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
87
Denition 1.4.16 (Borel -algebra). Let X be a metric space, or
more generally a topological space. The Borel -algebra B[X] of X
is dened to be the -algebra generated by the open subsets of X.
Elements of B[X] will be called Borel measurable.
Thus, for instance, the Borel -algebra contains the open sets,
the closed sets (which are complements of open sets), the countable
unions of closed sets (known as F
sets), the countable intersections
of open sets (known as G
sets), the countable intersections of F
sets, and so forth.
In R
d
,everyopen set is Lebesguemeasurable, and so we see that
the Borel -algebra is coarser than the Lebesgue -algebra. We will
shortly see, though, that the two -algebras are not equal.
We dened the Borel -algebra to be generated by the open sets.
However, they are also generated by several other sets:
Exercise 1.4.14. Show thattheBorel-algebra B[R
d
]ofaEuclidean
set is generated by any of the following collections of sets:
(i) The open subsets of R
d
.
(ii) The closed subsets of R
d
.
(iii) The compact subsets of R
d
.
(iv) The open balls of R
d
.
(v) The boxes in R
d
.
(vi) The elementary sets in R
d
.
(Hint: To show that two families F;F
0
of sets generate the same
-algebra, it suces to show that every -algebra that contains F,
contains F0 also, and conversely.)
There is an analogue of Exercise 1.4.9, which illustrates the ex-
tent to which a generated -algebra is \larger" than the analogous
generated Boolean algebra:
Exercise 1.4.15 (Recursive description of a generated -algebra).
(This exercise requires familiarity with the theory of ordinals, which
is reviewed in x2.4 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I. Recall that we
are assuming the axiom of choice throughout this text.) Let F be
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET
delete pages from pdf in preview; delete pdf page acrobat
88
1. Measure theory
acollection of sets in a set X, and let !
1
be the rst uncountable
ordinal. Dene the sets F
for every countable ordinal  2 !
1
via
transnite induction as follows:
(i) F
:= F.
(ii) For each countable successor ordinal  =  + 1, we dene
F
to be the collection of all sets that either the union of
an at most countable number of sets in F
n 1
(including the
empty union ;), or the complement of such a union.
(iii) For each countable limit ordinal  = sup
<
, we dene
F
:=
S
<
F
.
Show that hFi=
S
2!
1
F
.
Remark 1.4.17. The rst uncountable ordinal !
1
will make several
further cameo appearances here and in An epsilon of room, Vol. I,
for instancebygenerating counterexamples to various plausiblestate-
ments in point-set topology. In the case when F is the collection of
open sets in a topological space, so that hFi, then the sets F
are
essentially the Borel hierarchy (which starts at the open and closed
sets, then moves on to the F
and G
sets, and so forth); these play
an important role in descriptive set theory.
Exercise 1.4.16. (This exercise requires familiarity with the theory
of cardinals.) Let F beaninnitefamily of subsets of X ofcardinality
(thus  is an innite cardinal). Show that hFi has cardinality at
most 
@
0
. (Hint: use Exercise 1.4.15.) In particular, show that the
Borel -algebra B[R
d
]has cardinality at most c := 2
@
0
.
ConcludethatthereexistJordanmeasurable(and henceLebesgue
measurable) subsets of R
d
which are not Borel measurable. (Hint:
How many subsets of theCantor set arethere?) Use this to placethe
Borel -algebra on the diagram that you drew for Exercise 1.4.8.
Remark 1.4.18. Despite this demonstration that not all Lebesgue
measurable subsets are Borel measurable, it is remarkably dicult
(though not impossible) to exhibit a specic set that is not Borel
measurable. Indeed, a large majority of the explicitly constructible
sets that oneactually encountersin practicetend to be Borel measur-
able, and onecan view the propertyof Borel measurability intuitively
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete pages from pdf file online
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
delete pages from a pdf; delete blank page from pdf
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
89
as a kind of \constructibility" property. (Indeed, as a very cruderst
approximation, one can view the Borel measurable sets as those sets
of \countable descriptive complexity"; in contrast, sets of nite de-
scriptive complexity tend to be Jordan measurable (assuming they
are bounded, of course).
Exercise 1.4.17. Let E;F be Borel measurable subsets of Rd
1
;Rd
2
respectively. Show that EF isa Borel measurablesubset of R
d
1
+d
2
.
(Hint: rst establish this in the case when F is a box, by using
Remark 1.4.15. To obtain the general case, apply Remark 1.4.15 yet
again.)
The above exercise has a partial converse:
Exercise 1.4.18. Let E be a Borel measurable subset of R
d
1
+d
2
.
(i) Show that for any x
1
2R
d
1
,the slice fx
2
2R
d
2
:(x
1
;x
2
)2
Eg is a Borel measurable subset of Rd
2
. Similarly, show
that for every x
2
2R
d
2
,the slice fx
1
2R
d
1
:(x
1
;x
2
)2 Eg
is a Borel measurable subset of R
d
1
.
(ii) Give a counterexample to show that this claim is not true
if \Borel" is replaced with \Lebesgue" throughout. (Hint:
the Cartesian product of any set with a point is a null set,
even if the rst set was not measurable.)
Exercise 1.4.19. Show that the Lebesgue -algebra on R
d
is gener-
ated by the union of the Borel -algebra and the null -algebra.
1.4.3. Countably additive measures and measurespaces. Hav-
ing set out the concept of a -algebra a measurable space, we now
endow these structures with a measure.
We begin with the nitely additive theory, although this theory
is too weak for our purposes and will soon be supplanted by the
countably additive theory.
Denition 1.4.19 (Finitely additive measure). Let B be a Boolean
algebra on a space X. An (unsigned) nitely additive measure  on
Bis a map  : B ! [0;+1] that obeys the following axioms:
(i) (Empty set) (;)= 0.
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer. Explanation about transparency. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online. This
delete pages from pdf reader; cut pages out of pdf online
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to convert and export PDF document to
C# view PDF online, C# convert PDF to tiff, C# read PDF, C# convert PDF to text, C# extract PDF pages, C# comment annotate PDF, C# delete PDF pages, C# convert
add and delete pages from pdf; delete pdf pages acrobat
90
1. Measure theory
(ii) (Finite additivity) Whenever E;F 2 B are disjoint, then
(E [F) = (E) +(F).
Remark 1.4.20. The empty set axiom is needed in order to rule out
the degenerate situation in which every set (including the empty set)
has innite measure.
Example 1.4.21. Lebesgue measure m is a nitely additive measure
on theLebesgue-algebra, and henceon all sub-algebras (such as the
null algebra, the Jordan algebra, or the elementary algebra). In par-
ticular, Jordan measure and elementary measure are nitely additive
(adopting the convention that co-Jordan measurable sets have in-
nite Jordan measure, and co-elementary sets have inniteelementary
measure).
On the other hand, as we saw in previous notes, Lebesgue outer
measure is not nitely additive on the discrete algebra, and Jordan
outer measure is not nitely additive on the Lebesgue algebra.
Example 1.4.22 (Diracmeasure). Let x 2X and B be an arbitrary
Boolean algebra on X. Then the Dirac measure 
x
at x, dened by
setting 
x
(E) := 1
E
(x), is nitely additive.
Example 1.4.23 (Zero measure). The zero measure 0 : E 7! 0 is a
nitely additive measure on any Boolean algebra.
Example1.4.24 (Linearcombinationsofmeasures). IfB isa Boolean
algebra onX, and ; : B ! [0;+1] are nitelyadditivemeasureson
B, then + : E 7! (E)+(E)is also a nitelyadditivemeasure, as
is c : E 7! c(E) for any c 2 [0;+1]. Thus, for instance, thesum
of Lebesgue measure and a Dirac measure is also a nitely additive
measure on the Lebesgue algebra (or on any of its sub-algebras).
Example1.4.25 (Restrictionofa measure). IfB isaBooleanalgebra
on X,  : B ! [0;+1] is a nitely additive measure, and Y is a B-
measurable subset of X, then the restriction  
Y
:B 
Y
![0;+1] of
Bto Y , dened by setting  
Y
(E) := (E) whenever E 2B 
Y
(i.e.
if E 2 B and E  Y ), is also a nitely additive measure.
Example 1.4.26 (Counting measure). If B is a Boolean algebra on
X, then the function #: B ! [0;+1] dened by setting #(E) to be
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
91
the cardinality of E if E is nite, and #(E) := +1 if E is innite, is
anitely additive measure, known as counting measure.
As with our denition of Boolean algebras and -algebras, we
adopted a \minimalist" denition so that the axioms are easy to ver-
ify. But they imply several further useful properties:
Exercise 1.4.20. Let  : B ! [0;+1] be a nitelyadditive measure
on a Boolean -algebra B. Establish the following facts:
(i) (Monotonicity) If E;F are B-measurable and E  F, then
(E)  (F).
(ii) (Finite additivity) If k is a natural number, and E
1
;:::;E
k
are B-measurable and disjoint, then (E
1
[::: [ E
k
) =
(E
1
)+::: +(E
k
).
(iii) (Finitesubadditivity)Ifkisa natural number,andE
1
;:::;E
k
are B-measurable, then (E
1
[::: [ E
k
)  (E
1
)+ ::: +
(E
k
).
(iv) (Inclusion-exclusion for two sets) If E;F are B-measurable,
then (E [F)+(E \F) = (E)+(F).
(Caution: rememberthat thecancellationlaw a+c = b+c =) a = b
does not hold in [0;+1] if c is innite, and so the use of cancellation
(or subtraction) should be avoided if possible.)
One can characterise measures completely for any nite algebra:
Exercise 1.4.21. Let B be a nite Boolean algebra, generated by
anite family A
1
;:::;A
k
of non-empty atoms. Show that for every
nitely additive measure on B there exists c
1
;:::;c
k
2[0;+1] such
that
(E) =
X
1jk:A
j
E
c
j
:
Equivalently, if x
j
is a point in A
j
for each 1  j  k, then
=
Xk
j=1
c
j
x
j
:
Furthermore, show that the c
1
;:::;c
k
are uniquely determined by .
92
1. Measure theory
This is about the limitof what onecan say about nitelyadditive
measuresatthislevel ofgenerality. Wenow specialisetothecountably
additive measures on -algebras.
Denition 1.4.27 (Countably additive measure). Let (X;B) be a
measurable space. An (unsigned) countably additive measure  on
B, or measure for short, is a map  : B ! [0;+1] that obeys the
following axioms:
(i) (Empty set) (;)= 0.
(ii) (Countableadditivity)WheneverE
1
;E
2
;::: 2 B areacount-
ablesequenceofdisjointmeasurablesets, then (
S
1
n=1
E
n
)=
P
1
n=1
(E
n
).
Atriplet (X;B;), where (X;B) is a measurable space and  : B !
[0;+1] isa countably additive measure, is known as a measure space.
Note the distinction between a measure space and a measurable
space. The latter has the capability to be equipped with a measure,
but the former is actually equipped with a measure.
Example 1.4.28. Lebesguemeasureisa countably additive measure
on the Lebesgue -algebra, and hence on every sub--algebra (such
as the Borel -algebra).
Example1.4.29. TheDiracmeasures fromExercise1.4.22 arecount-
ably additive, as is counting measure.
Example 1.4.30. Any restriction of a countably additive measure
to a measurable subspace is again countably additive.
Exercise 1.4.22 (Countable combinations of measures). Let (X;B)
be a measurable space.
(i) If  is a countably additive measure on B, and c 2 [0;+1],
then c is also countably additive.
(ii) If 
1
;
2
;::: are a sequence of countably additive measures
on B, then the sum
P
1
n=1
n
:E 7!
P
1
n=1
n
(E) is also a
countably additive measure.
Note that countable additivity measures are necessarily nitely
additive (by padding out a nite union into a countable union using
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
93
the empty set), and so countably additive measures inherit all the
properties of nitely additive properties, such as monotonicity and
nite subadditivity. But one also has additional properties:
Exercise 1.4.23. Let (X;B;) be a measure space.
(i) (Countable subadditivity) If E
1
;E
2
;::: are B-measurable,
then (
S
1
n=1
E
n
)
P
1
n=1
(E
n
).
(ii) (Upwards monotone convergence) If E
1
E
2
::: are B-
measurable, then
(
1[
n=1
E
n
)= lim
n!1
(E
n
)= sup
n
(E
n
):
(iii) (Downwards monotone convergence) If E
1
E
2
 ::: are
B-measurable, and (E
n
)< 1 for at least one n, then
(
1\
n=1
E
n
)= lim
n!1
(E
n
)= inf
n
(E
n
):
Show that the downward monotone convergence claim can fail if the
hypothesis that (E
n
) < 1 for at least one n is dropped. (Hint:
mimic the solution to Exercise 1.2.11.)
Exercise 1.4.24 (Dominated convergence for sets). Let (X;B;)
be a measure space. Let E
1
;E
2
;::: be a sequence of B-measurable
sets that converge to another set E, in the sense that 1
E
n
converges
pointwise to 1
E
.
(i) Show that E is also B-measurable.
(ii) If there exists a B-measurable set F of nite measure (i.e.
(F) < 1)thatcontains all oftheE
n
,showthatlim
n!1
(E
n
)=
(E). (Hint: Apply downward monotonicity to the sets
S
n>N
(E
n
E).)
(iii) Show that the previous part of this exercise can fail if the
hypothesis that all the E
n
are contained in a set of nite
measure is omitted.
Exercise 1.4.25. LetX beanatmostcountablesetwiththediscrete
-algebra. Show that every measure  on this measurable space can
94
1. Measure theory
be uniquely represented in the form
=
X
x2X
c
x
x
for some c
x
2[0;+1], thus
(E) =
X
x2E
c
x
for all E  X. (This claim fails in the uncountable case, although
showing this is slightly tricky.)
Auseful technical property, enjoyed by some measure spaces, is
that of completeness:
Denition 1.4.31 (Completeness). A null set of a measure space
(X;B;) is dened to be a B-measurable set of measure zero. A sub-
null set is any subset of a null set. A measure space is said to be
complete if every sub-null set is a null set.
Thus, for instance, the Lebesgue measure space (R
d
;L[R
d
];m) is
complete, but the Borel measure space (Rd;B[Rd];m) is not (as can
be seen from the solution to Exercise 1.4.16).
Completion is a convenient property to have in some cases, par-
ticularly when dealing with properties that hold almost everywhere.
Fortunately, it is fairly easy to modify any measure space to be com-
plete:
Exercise 1.4.26 (Completion). Let (X;B;) be a measure space.
Show that there exists a unique renement (X;
B;
), known as the
completion of (X;B;), which is the coarsest renement of (X;B;)
thatis complete. Furthermore, show that
Bconsistsprecisely of those
sets that dier from a B-measurable set by a B-subnull set.
Exercise 1.4.27. Show thattheLebesguemeasurespace(R
d
;L[R
d
];m)
is the completion of the Borel measure space (R
d
;B[R
d
];m).
Exercise 1.4.28 (Approximationbyan algebra). LetA bea Boolean
algebra on X, and let  be a measure on hAi.
(i) If (X) < 1, show that for every E 2 hAi and " > 0 there
exists F 2A such that (EF) < ".
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested