c# pdf reader text : Delete pages from pdf reader SDK software service wpf winforms web page dnn TaoMeasureTheory11-part691

1.4. Abstract measure spaces
95
(ii) More generally, if X =
S
1
n=1
A
n
for some A
1
;A
2
;::: 2 A
with (A
n
)< 1 for all n, E 2 hAi has nite measure, and
"> 0, show that there exists F 2A such that (EF) < ".
1.4.4. Measurable functions, and integration on a measure
space. Now we are ready to dene integration on measure spaces.
We rst need the notion of a measurable function, which is analogous
to that of a continuous function in topology. Recall that a function
f: X ! Y between two topological spaces X;Y is continuous if the
inverse image f
1
(U) of any open set is open. In a similar spirit, we
have
Denition 1.4.32. Let (X;B) be a measurable space, and let f :
X ! [0;+1] or f : X ! C be an unsigned or complex-valued
function. We say that f is measurable if f 1(U) is B-measurable for
every open subset U of [0;+1] or C.
From Lemma 1.3.9, we see that this generalises the notion of a
Lebesgue measurable function.
Exercise 1.4.29. Let (X;B) be a measurable space.
(i) Show that a function f : X ! [0;+1] is measurable if and
only if the level sets fx 2 X : f(x)> g are B-measurable.
(ii) Show that an indicator function 1
E
of a set E  X is mea-
surable if and only if E itself is B-measurable.
(iii) Show that a function f : X ! [0;+1] or f : X ! C is
measurable if and only if f
1
(E) is B-measurable for every
Borel-measurable subset E of [0;+1] or C.
(iv) Show that a function f : X ! C is measurable if and only
if its real and imaginary parts are measurable.
(v) Show that a function f : X ! R is measurable if and only
if the magnitudes f
+
:= max(f;0), f
:= max( f;0) of its
positive and negative parts are measurable.
(vi) If f
n
:X ! [0;+1] are a sequence of measurable functions
that converge pointwise to a limit f : X ! [0;+1], then
show that f is also measurable. Obtain the same claim if
[0;+1] is replaced by C.
Delete pages from pdf reader - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages out of pdf file; delete page pdf file reader
Delete pages from pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete page pdf online
96
1. Measure theory
(vii) Iff : X ! [0;+1] is measurableand : [0;+1] ! [0;+1]
is continuous, show that  f is measurable. Obtain the
same claim if [0;+1] is replaced by C.
(viii) Show that the sum or product of two measurable functions
in [0;+1] or C is still measurable.
Remark 1.4.33. One can also view measurable functions in a more
category theoretic fashion. Dene measurable morphism or measur-
able map f from one measurable space (X;B) to another (Y;C) to
be a function f : X ! Y with the property that f
1
(E) is B-
measurablefor everyC-measurablesetE. Thena measurablefunction
f : X ! [0;+1] or f : X ! C is the same thing as a measurable
morphism from X to [0;+1] or C, where the latter is equipped with
the Borel -algebra. Also, one -algebra B on a space X is coarser
than another B
0
precisely when the identity map id
X
:X ! X is
ameasurable morphism from (X;B
0
) to (X;B). The main purpose
of adopting this viewpoint is that it is obvious that the composi-
tion of measurable morphisms is again a measurable morphism. This
is important in those elds of mathematics, such as ergodic theory
(discussed in [Ta2009]), in which one frequently wishes to compose
measurable transformations (and in particular, to compose a trans-
formation T : (X;B) ! (X;B) with itself repeatedly); but it will not
play a major role in this text.
Measurable functions are particularly easy to describe on atomic
spaces:
Exercise 1.4.30. Let (X;B) be a measurable space that is atomic,
thus B = A((A
)
2I
) for some partition X =
S
2I
A
of X into
disjoint non-empty atoms. Show that a function f : X ! [0;+1] or
f: X ! C is measurable if and only if it is constant on each atom,
or equivalently if one has a representation of the form
f=
X
2I
c
1
A
for someconstants c
in [0;+1] or in Casappropriate. Furthermore,
the c
are uniquely determined by f.
Exercise 1.4.31 (Egorov’s theorem). Let (X;B;) be a nite mea-
sure space (so (X) < 1), and let f
n
: X ! C be a sequence of
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
VB.NET Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF pages; VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc.Word for XImage.OCR for C#; XImage.Barcode Reader for C#
delete pdf pages ipad; cut pages from pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete a page from a pdf file; delete a page from a pdf online
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
97
measurable functions that converge pointwise almost everywhere to a
limit f : X ! C, and let " > 0. Show that there exists a measurable
set E of measure at most " such that f
n
converges uniformly to f
outside of E. Give an example to show that the claim can fail when
the measure  is not nite.
In Section 1.3 we dened rst an simple integral, then an un-
signed integral, and then nally an absolutely convergent integral.
We perform the same three stages here. We begin with the simple
integral, which in the abstract setting becomes integration in thecase
when the -algebra is nite:
Denition 1.4.34 (Simple integral). Let (X;B;) be a measure
space with B nite. By Exercise 1.4.4, X is partitioned into a -
nite number of atoms A
1
;:::;A
n
. If f : X ! [0;+1] is measurable,
then by Exercise 1.4.30 it has a unique representation of the form
f=
Xn
i=1
c
i
1
A
i
for some c
1
;:::;c
n
2 [0;+1]. We then dene the simple integral
Simp
R
X
fd of f by the formula
Simp
Z
X
f d:=
Xn
i=1
c
i
(A
i
):
Note that, thanks to Exercise 1.4.3, the precise decomposition into
atoms does not aect the denition of the simple integral.
Exercise 1.4.32. Propose a denition for the simple integral for ab-
solutely convergent complex-valued functions on a measurable space
with a nite -algebra.
With this denition, it is clear that one has the monotonicity
property
Simp
Z
X
f d Simp
Z
X
gd
whenever f  g are unsigned measurable, as well as the linearity
properties
Simp
Z
X
f+ g d= Simp
Z
X
fd+Simp
Z
X
gd
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete a page from a pdf acrobat; delete pages on pdf file
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
Visual Studio .NET application. Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed. Able to pull text
delete blank pages in pdf; delete page in pdf online
98
1. Measure theory
and
Simp
Z
X
cf d = c Simp
Z
X
f d
for unsigned measurable f;g and c 2 [0;+1]. We also make the
following important technical observation:
Exercise 1.4.33 (Simple integral unaected by renements). Let
(X;B;) be a measure space, and let (X;B
0
;
0
)be a renement of
(X;B;), which means that B
0
contains B and 
0
: B
0
! [0;+1]
agrees with : B ! [0;+1] on B. Suppose that both B;B
0
are nite,
and let f : B ! [0;+1] be measurable. Show that
Simp
Z
X
f d = Simp
Z
X
fd
0
:
This allows one to extend the simpleintegral to simplefunctions:
Denition 1.4.35 (Integral ofsimplefunctions). An (unsigned)sim-
ple function f : X ! [0;+1] on a measurable space (X;B) is a mea-
surable function that takes on nitely many values a
1
;:::;a
k
. Note
that such a function is then automatically measurable with respect
to at least one nite sub--algebra B
0
of B, namely the -algebra B
0
generated by the preimages f
1
(fa
1
g);:::;f
1
(fa
k
g) of a
1
;:::;a
k
.
We then dene the simple integral Simp
R
X
f d by the formula
Simp
Z
X
fd := Simp
Z
X
fd 
B0
;
where  
B0
:B
0
![0;+1] is the restriction of  : B ! [0;+1] to B
0
.
Note that there could be multiple nite -algebras with respect
to which f is measurable, but Exercise 1.4.33 guarantees that all such
extensions will give the same simple integral. Indeed, if f were mea-
surable with respect to two separate nite sub--algebras B
0
and B
00
of B, then it would also be measurable with respect to their common
renement B
0
_B
00
:= hB
0
[B
00
i, which is also nite(by Exercise1.4.8),
and then by Exercise 1.4.33,
R
X
f d 
B0
and
R
X
f d 
B00
are both
equal to
R
X
fd 
B0_B00
,and hence equal to each other.
From this we can deduce the following properties of the simple
integral. As with the Lebesgue theory, we say that a property P(x)
of an element x 2 X of a measure space (X;B;) holds -almost
everywhere if it holds outside of a sub-null set.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
delete pages pdf file; delete blank pages in pdf online
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
Delete text from PDF file in preview without adobe PDF reader component installed in ASP.NET. C#.NET PDF: Delete Text from Consecutive PDF Pages.
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete pdf pages reader
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
99
Exercise 1.4.34 (Basicpropertiesofthesimpleintegral). Let(X;B;)
be a measure space, and let f;g : X ! [0;+1] be simple functions.
(i) (Monotonicity) If f  g pointwise, then Simp
R
X
f d 
Simp
R
X
gd.
(ii) (Compatibility with measure) For every B-measurable set
E, we have Simp
R
X
1
E
d = (E).
(iii) (Homogeneity)Foreveryc 2 [0;+1], onehasSimp
R
X
cf d =
cSimp
R
X
f d.
(iv) (Finite additivity) Simp
R
X
(f + g) d = Simp
R
X
f d +
Simp
R
X
gd.
(v) (Insensitivity to renement) If (X;B
0
;
0
)is a renement of
(X;B;)(asdened in Exercise1.4.33),thenSimp
R
X
fd=
Simp
R
X
f d
0
.
(vi) (Almosteverywhereequivalence)Iff(x) = g(x)for-almost
every x 2 X, then Simp
R
X
fd = Simp
R
X
gd.
(vii) (Finiteness) Simp
R
X
f d < 1 if and only if f is nite
almost everywhere, and is supported on a set of nite mea-
sure.
(viii) (Vanishing) Simp
R
X
fd = 0 if and only if f is zero almost
everywhere.
Exercise 1.4.35 (Inclusion-exclusion principle). Let (X;B;) be a
measure space, and letA
1
;:::;A
n
be B-measurable sets of nitemea-
sure. Show that
[n
i=1
A
i
!
=
X
Jf1;:::;ng:J6=;
( 1)
jJj 1
\
i2J
A
i
!
:
(Hint: ComputeSimp
R
X
(1 
Q
n
i=1
(1 1
A
i
))din twodierent ways.)
Remark 1.4.36. The simpleintegral couldalso bedenedon nitely
additive measure spaces, rather than countablyadditive ones, and all
the above properties would still apply. However, on a nitelyadditive
measurespaceonewould havedicultyextending theintegral beyond
simple functions, as we will now do.
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test2.pdf") Dim pageindexes = New Integer() {1, 2, 4} Dim pages = pdf.DuplicatePage(pageindexes
cut pages from pdf; delete pages of pdf
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
C#.NET PDF Library - Copy and Paste PDF Pages in C#.NET. Easy to C#.NET Sample Code: Copy and Paste PDF Pages Using C#.NET. C# programming
reader extract pages from pdf; delete a page in a pdf file
100
1. Measure theory
Fromthesimpleintegral, wecannow denetheunsignedintegral,
in analogy to how the unsigned Lebesgue integral was constructed in
Section 1.3.3.
Denition 1.4.37. Let (X;B;) be a measure space, and let f :
X ! [0;+1] be measurable. Then we dene the unsigned integral
R
X
f d of f by the formula
(1.14)
Z
X
fd :=
sup
0gf;g
simple
Simp
Z
X
gd:
Clearly, this denition generalises Denition 1.3.13. Indeed, if f :
R
d
![0;+1] isLebesguemeasurable, then
R
Rd
f(x) dx =
R
Rd
fdm.
We record some easy properties of this integral:
Exercise 1.4.36 (Easy properties of the unsigned integral). Let
(X;B;) be a measure space, and let f;g : X ! [0;+1] be mea-
surable.
(i) (Almost everywhere equivalence) If f = g -almost every-
where, then
R
X
fd =
R
X
g d
(ii) (Monotonicity)Iff  g -almosteverywhere, then
R
X
fd 
R
X
g d.
(iii) (Homogeneity) We have
R
X
cf d = c
R
X
f d for every
c2 [0;+1].
(iv) (Superadditivity)Wehave
R
X
(f+g)d 
R
X
fd+
R
X
gd.
(v) (Compatibility with the simple integral) If f is simple, then
R
X
f d= Simp
R
X
fd.
(vi) (Markov’s inequality) For any 0 <  < 1, one has
(fx 2 X : f(x)  g) 
1
Z
X
fd:
In particular, if
R
X
fd < 1, then the sets fx 2X : f(x) 
g have nite measure for each  > 0.
(vii) (Finiteness) If
R
X
fd < 1, then f(x) is nite for -almost
every x.
(viii) (Vanishing) If
R
X
f d = 0, then f(x) is zero for -almost
every x.
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
101
(ix) (Vertical truncation) We have lim
n!1
R
X
min(f;n) d =
R
X
f d.
(x) (Horizontal truncation) If E
1
 E
2
::: is an increasing
sequence of B-measurable sets, then
lim
n!1
Z
X
f1
E
n
d =
Z
X
f1
S
1
n=1
E
n
d:
(xi) (Restriction)IfY isa measurablesubsetofX, then
R
X
f1
Y
d=
R
Y
f
Y
d
Y
,wheref 
Y
:Y ! [0;+1] istherestrictionof
f: X ! [0;+1] to Y, and the restriction 
Y
was dened
in Example 1.4.25. We will often abbreviate
R
Y
f
Y
d 
Y
(by slight abuse of notation) as
R
Y
fd.
As before, one of the key properties of this integral is its additiv-
ity:
Theorem 1.4.38. Let (X;B;) be a measure space, and let f;g :
X! [0;+1] be measurable. Then
Z
X
(f +g) d=
Z
X
f d+
Z
X
gd:
Proof. In view of superadditivity, it suces to establish the subad-
ditivity property
Z
X
(f +g) d
Z
X
fd+
Z
X
g d
We establish this in stages. We rst deal with the case when  is a
nite measure (which means that (X) < 1) and f;g are bounded.
Pick an " > 0, and let f
"
be f rounded down to the nearest integer
multiple of ", and f
"
bef rounded up to thenearest integer multiple.
Clearly, we have the pointwise bounds
f
"
(x)  f(x)  f
"
(x)
and
f
"
(x) f
"
(x)  ":
Since f is bounded, f
"
and f
"
are simple. Similarly dene g
"
;g
"
. We
then have the pointwise bound
f+g  f
"
+g
"
f
"
+g
"
+2";
102
1. Measure theory
hence by Exercise 1.4.36 and the properties of the simple integral,
Z
X
f+g d
Z
X
f
"
+g
"
+2" d
=Simp
Z
X
f
"
+g
"
+2" d
=Simp
Z
X
f
"
d+Simp
Z
X
g
"
d+ 2"(X):
From (1.14) we conclude that
Z
X
f+g d 
Z
X
f d+
Z
X
gd+2"(X):
Letting " ! 0 and using the assumption that (X) is nite, weobtain
the claim.
Now we continue to assume that  is a nite measure, but now
do not assume that f;g are bounded. Then for any natural number
n, we can use the previous case to deduce that
Z
X
min(f;n)+min(g;n) d
Z
X
min(f;n) d+
Z
X
min(g;n) d:
Since min(f +g;n) min(f;n)+min(g;n), we conclude that
Z
X
min(f +g;n) 
Z
X
min(f;n) d+
Z
X
min(g;n) d:
Taking limits as n ! 1 using vertical truncation, we obtain the
claim.
Finally, we no longer assume that  is of nite measure, and also
do not require f;g to be bounded. If either
R
X
f d or
R
X
g d is
innite, then by monotonicity,
R
X
f+g d is innite as well, and the
claim follows; so we may assume that
R
X
fd and
R
X
gd are both
nite. By Markov’s inequality (Exercise 1.4.36(vi)), we concludethat
for each natural number n, the set E
n
:= fx 2 X : f(x) >
1
n
g[fx 2
X: g(x) >
1
n
ghas nite measure. These sets are increasing in n, and
f;g;f+g are supported on
S
1
n=1
E
n
,and so by horizontal truncation
Z
X
(f +g) d = lim
n!1
Z
X
(f +g)1
E
n
d:
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
103
From the previous case, we have
Z
X
(f +g)1
E
n
d 
Z
X
f1
E
n
d+
Z
X
g1
E
n
d:
Letting n ! 1 and using horizontal truncation we obtain the claim.
Exercise 1.4.37 (Linearity in ). Let (X;B;) be a measure space,
and let f : X ![0;+1] be measurable.
(i) Show that
R
X
f d(c)= c 
R
X
fd for every c 2[0;+1].
(ii) If 
1
;
2
;::: are a sequence of measures on B, show that
Z
X
f d
X1
n=1
n
=
X1
n=1
Z
X
fd
n
:
Exercise 1.4.38 (Change of variables formula). Let (X;B;) be a
measure space, and let  : X ! Y be a measurable morphism (as
dened in Remark 1.4.33) from (X;B) to another measurable space
(Y;C). Dene the pushforward 
: C ! [0;+1] of  by  by the
formula 
(E) := (
1
(E)).
(i) Show that 
 is a measure on C, so that (Y;C;
) is a
measure space.
(ii) If f : Y ! [0;+1] is measurable, show that
R
Y
f d
=
R
X
(f  ) d.
(Hint: the quickest proof here is via the monotone convergence the-
orem (Theorem 1.4.44) below, but it is also possible to prove the
exercise without this theorem.)
Exercise 1.4.39. Let T : R
d
!R
d
be an invertible linear transfor-
mation, and let m be Lebesgue measure on R
d
. Show that T
m=
1
jdetTj
m, where the pushforward T
m of m was dened in Exercise
1.4.38.
Exercise 1.4.40 (Sums as integrals). Let X be an arbitrary set
(with thediscrete -algebra), let # be counting measure (seeExercise
1.4.26), and let f : X ! [0;+1] be an arbitrary unsigned function.
104
1. Measure theory
Show that f is measurable with
Z
X
fd# =
X
x2X
f(x):
Once one has the unsigned integral, one can dene theabsolutely
convergent integral exactly as in the Lebesgue case:
Denition 1.4.39 (Absolutely convergent integral). Let (X;B;)
be a measure space. A measurable function f : X ! C is said to be
absolutely integrable if the unsigned integral
kfk
L1(X;B;)
:=
Z
X
jfj d
is nite, and use L
1
(X;B;), L
1
(X), or L
1
() to denote the space
of absolutely integrable functions. If f is real-valued and absolutely
integrable, we dene the integral
R
X
fd by the formula
Z
X
fd :=
Z
X
f
+
d 
Z
X
f
d
where f
+
:= max(f;0), f
:= max( f;0) are the magnitudes of the
positive and negative components of f. If f is complex-valued and
absolutely integrable, we dene the integral
R
X
fd by the formula
Z
X
fd :=
Z
X
Ref d+i
Z
X
Imf d
where the two integrals on the right are interpreted as real-valued in-
tegrals. It is easy to see that the unsigned, real-valued, and complex-
valued integrals dened in this manner are compatible on their com-
mon domains of denition.
Clearly, this denition generalises the Denition 1.3.17.
We record some of the key facts about the absolutely convergent
integral:
Exercise 1.4.41. Let (X;B;) be a measure space.
(i) Show that L
1
(X;B;) is a complex vector space.
(ii) Show that the integration map f 7!
R
X
f d is a complex-
linear map from L
1
(X;B;) to C.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested