c# pdf reader text : Add and delete pages in pdf Library software class asp.net winforms windows ajax TaoMeasureTheory12-part692

1.4. Abstract measure spaces
105
(iii) Establish the triangle inequality kf +gk
L1()
kfk
L1()
+
kgk
L1()
andthehomogeneitypropertykcfk
L1()
=jcjkfk
L1()
for all f;g 2 L
1
(X;B;) and c 2 C.
(iv) Show that if f;g 2 L
1
(X;B;) are such that f(x) = g(x)
for -almost every x 2X, then
R
X
f d=
R
X
gd.
(v) Iff 2 L
1
(X;B;), and (X;B
0
;
0
)is arenementof(X;B;),
then f 2 L
1
(X;B
0
;
0
), and
R
X
f d
0
=
R
X
f d. (Hint: it
is easy to get one inequality. To get the other inequality,
rst work in the case when f is both bounded and has -
nitemeasuresupport (i.e. is both vertically andhorizontally
truncated).)
(vi) Show that if f 2 L
1
(X;B;), then kfk
L1()
=0 if and only
if f is zero -almost everywhere.
(vii) If Y  X is B-measurable and f 2 L
1
(X;B;), then f 
Y
2
L
1
(Y;B 
Y
; 
Y
) and
R
Y
f 
Y
d 
Y
=
R
X
f1
Y
d. As
before, by abuse of notation we write
R
Y
f d for
R
Y
f 
Y
d 
Y
.
1.4.5. The convergence theorems. Let (X;B;) be a measure
space, and let f
1
;f
2
;::: : X ! [0;+1] be a sequence of measurable
functions. Suppose that as n ! 1, f
n
(x) converges pointwise either
everywhere, or -almost everywhere, to a measurable limit f. Abasic
question in the subject is to determine the conditions under which
such pointwise convergence would imply convergence of the integral:
Z
X
f
n
d
?
!
Z
X
fd:
To put it another way: when can we ensure that one can interchange
integrals and limits,
lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d
?
=
Z
X
lim
n!1
f
n
d?
There are certainly some cases in which one can safely do this:
Exercise 1.4.42 (Uniform convergence on a nite measure space).
Suppose that (X;B;) is a nite measure space (so (X) < 1),
and f
n
: X ! [0;+1] (resp. f
n
:X ! C) are a sequence of un-
signed measurable functions (resp. absolutely integrable functions)
Add and delete pages in pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages from pdf file; delete a page from a pdf without acrobat
Add and delete pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat extract pages from pdf; delete pages pdf preview
106
1. Measure theory
that converge uniformly to a limit f. Show that
R
X
f
n
d converges
to
R
X
fd.
However, there are also cases in which one cannot interchange
limits and integrals, even when the f
n
are unsigned. We give the
three classic examples, all of \moving bump" type, though the way
in which the bump moves varies from example to example:
Example 1.4.40 (Escape to horizontal innity). Let X be the real
line with Lebesgue measure, and let f
n
:= 1
[n;n+1]
. Then f
n
con-
verges pointwise to f := 0, but
R
R
f
n
(x) dx = 1 does not converge
to
R
R
f(x) dx = 0. Somehow, all the mass in the f
n
has escaped by
moving o to innity in a horizontal direction, leaving none behind
for the pointwise limit f.
Example 1.4.41 (Escape to width innity). Let X be the real line
with Lebesguemeasure, and let f
n
:=
1
n
1
[0;n]
. Then f
n
now converges
uniformly f := 0, but
R
R
f
n
(x) dx = 1 still does not converge to
R
R
f(x) dx = 0. Exercise 1.4.42 would prevent this from happening
if all the f
n
were supported in a single set of nite measure, but the
increasingly wide nature of the support of the f
n
prevents this from
happening.
Example 1.4.42 (Escape to vertical innity). Let X be the unit
interval [0;1] with Lebesgue measure (restricted from R), and let
f
n
:= n1
[
1
n
;
2
n
]
. Now, we have nite measure, and f
n
converges point-
wise to f, but no uniform convergence. And again,
R
[0;1]
f
n
(x) dx = 1
is not converging to
R
[0;1]
f(x) dx = 0. This time, the mass has es-
caped vertically, through the increasingly large values of f
n
.
Remark 1.4.43. From the perspective of time-frequency analysis
(or perhaps more accurately, space-frequency analysis), these three
escapes are analogous (though not quiteidentical) to escapeto spatial
innity, escape to zero frequency, and escape to innite frequency
respectively, thus describing the three dierent ways in which phase
space fails to be compact (if one excises the zero frequency as being
singular).
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF Image Extract; C# Write: Insert text into PDF; C# Write: Add Image
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete pages on pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
processing control SDK, you can create & add new PDF rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages from a pdf file; pdf delete page
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
107
However, once one shuts down these avenues ofescape to innity,
it turns out that one can recover convergence of the integral. There
are two major ways to accomplish this. One is to enforce monotonic-
ity, which prevents each f
n
from abandoning the location where the
mass of the preceding f
1
;:::;f
n 1
was concentrated and which thus
shuts down the above threeescape scenarios. Moreprecisely, we have
the monotone convergence theorem:
Theorem 1.4.44 (Monotone convergence theorem). Let (X;B;) be
a measure space, and let 0  f
1
 f
2
 ::: be a monotone non-
decreasing sequence of unsigned measurable functions on X. Then we
have
lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d =
Z
X
lim
n!1
f
n
d:
Note thatinthespecial casewheneachf
n
isan indicator function
f
n
=1
E
n
,this theorem collapses to the upwards monotone conver-
gence property (Exercise 1.4.23(ii)). Conversely, the upwards mono-
tone convergence property will play a key role in the proof of this
theorem.
Proof. Write f := lim
n!1
f
n
= sup
n
f
n
, then f : X ! [0;+1]
is measurable. Since the f
n
are non-decreasing to f, we see from
monotonicity that
R
X
f
n
d are non-decreasing and bounded above
by
R
X
fd, which gives the bound
lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d 
Z
X
fd:
It remains to establish the reverse inequality
Z
X
fd  lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d:
By denition, it suces to show that
Z
X
gd  lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d:
whenever g is a simple function that is bounded pointwise by f. By
vertical truncation we may assume without loss of generality that g
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Image to PDF Page in C#.NET. How to Insert & Add Image, Picture or Logo on PDF Page Using C#.NET. Add Image to PDF Page Using C#.NET.
delete pages in pdf; delete pages of pdf online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = True ' Add password to PDF file. These two demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
delete page from pdf document; copy page from pdf
108
1. Measure theory
also is nite everywhere, then we can write
g=
Xk
i=1
c
i
1
A
i
for some 0  c
i
<1 and some disjoint B-measurablesets A
1
;:::;A
k
,
thus
Z
X
gd =
Xk
i=1
c
i
(A
i
):
Let 0 < " < 1 be arbitrary. Then we have
f(x) = sup
n
f
n
(x) > (1  ")c
i
for all x 2A
i
.Thus, if we dene the sets
A
i;n
:= fx 2A
i
:f
n
(x) > (1  ")c
i
g
then the A
i;n
increase to A
i
and are measurable. By upwards mono-
tonicity of measure, we conclude that
lim
n!1
(A
i;n
)= (A
i
):
On the other hand, observe the pointwise bound
f
n
Xk
i=1
(1  ")c
i
1
A
i;n
for any n; integrating this, we obtain
Z
X
f
n
d  (1  ")
Xk
i=1
c
i
(A
i;n
):
Taking limits as n ! 1, we obtain
lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d (1 ")
Xk
i=1
c
i
(A
i
);
sending " ! 0 we then obtain the claim.
Remark 1.4.45. It is easy to see that the result still holds if the
monotonicity f
n
 f
n+1
only holds almost everywhere rather than
everywhere.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
add and delete pages in pdf; delete pages pdf online
C# PDF Sticky Note Library: add, delete, update PDF note in C#.net
C#.NET PDF SDK - Add Sticky Note to PDF Page in C#.NET. Able to add notes to PDF using C# source code in Visual Studio .NET framework.
delete page on pdf; delete page in pdf
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
109
This has a number of important corollaries. Firstly, we can gen-
eralise (part of) Tonelli’s theorem for exchanging sums (see Theorem
0.0.2):
Corollary 1.4.46 (Tonelli’s theorem for sums and integrals). Let
(X;B;) be a measure space, and let f
1
;f
2
;::: : X ! [0;+1] be a
sequence of unsigned measurable functions. Then one has
Z
X
X1
n=1
f
n
d =
X1
n=1
Z
X
f
n
d:
Proof. Apply the monotone convergence theorem (Theorem 1.4.44)
to the partial sums F
N
:=
P
N
n=1
f
n
.
Exercise 1.4.43. Giveanexampleto showthatthiscorollarycan fail
if the f
n
areassumed to be absolutely integrablerather than unsigned
measurable, even if the sum
P
1
n=1
f
n
(x) is absolutely convergent for
each x. (Hint: think about the three escapes to innity.)
Exercise 1.4.44 (Borel-Cantelli lemma). Let (X;B;) be a measure
space, and let E
1
;E
2
;E
3
;::: be a sequence of B-measurable sets such
that
P
1
n=1
(E
n
)< 1. Show that almost every x 2 X is contained
in at most nitely many of the E
n
(i.e. fn2 N : x 2 E
n
gis nite for
almost every x 2 X). (Hint: ApplyTonelli’stheorem to theindicator
functions 1
E
n
.)
Exercise 1.4.45.
(i) Give an alternate proof of the Borel-Cantelli lemma (Exer-
cise1.4.44) that does notgo through anyof the convergence
theorems, but instead exploits the more basic properties of
measure from Exercise 1.4.23.
(ii) Give a counterexample that shows that the Borel-Cantelli
lemma can fail if the condition
P
1
n=1
(E
n
)< 1 is relaxed
to lim
n!1
(E
n
)= 0.
Secondly, when one does not have monotonicity, one can at least
obtain an important inequality, known as Fatou’s lemma:
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
with this sample VB.NET code to add an image to textMgr.SelectChar(page, cursor) ' Delete a selected As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save
delete page from pdf reader; delete page from pdf preview
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
passwordSetting.IsAssemble = true; // Add password to PDF file. These C# demos will help you to delete password for an encrypted PDF file.
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete blank page in pdf online
110
1. Measure theory
Corollary1.4.47 (Fatou’s lemma). Let (X;B;) be a measurespace,
and let f
1
;f
2
;::: : X ! [0;+1] be a sequence of unsigned measurable
functions. Then
Z
X
liminf
n!1
f
n
d  liminf
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d:
Proof. Write F
N
:= inf
nN
f
n
for each N. Then the F
N
are mea-
surable and non-decreasing, and hence by the monotone convergence
theorem (Theorem 1.4.44)
Z
X
sup
N>0
F
N
d = sup
N>0
Z
X
F
N
d:
By denition of lim inf, we have sup
N>0
F
N
= liminf
n!1
f
n
. By
monotonicity, we have
R
X
F
N
d 
R
X
f
n
d for all n N, and thus
Z
X
F
N
d  inf
nN
Z
X
f
n
d:
Hence we have
Z
X
liminf
n!1
f
n
d  sup
N>0
inf
nN
Z
X
f
n
d:
The claim then follows by another appeal to the denition of the lim
inferior.
Remark 1.4.48. Informally, Fatou’s lemma tells us that when tak-
ing the pointwise limit of unsigned functions f
n
,that mass
R
X
f
n
d
can be destroyed in thelimit (as was the casein thethree key moving
bump examples), but it cannot be created in the limit. Of course the
unsigned hypothesis is necessary here (consider for instance multiply-
ing any of the moving bump examples by  1). While this lemma
was stated only for pointwise limits, the same general principle (that
mass can be destroyed, but not created, by the process of taking lim-
its) tends to hold for other \weak" notions of convergence. See x1.9
of An epsilon of room, Vol. I for some examples of this.
Finally, wegivetheothermajorwayto shutdown lossofmass via
escapeto innity, whichis to dominate all of thefunctionsinvolved by
an absolutely convergent one. This result is known as the dominated
convergence theorem:
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
111
Theorem 1.4.49 (Dominated convergence theorem). Let (X;B;)
be a measure space, and let f
1
;f
2
;::: : X ! C be a sequence of
measurable functions that converge pointwise -almost everywhere to
ameasurable limit f : X ! C. Suppose that there is an unsigned
absolutely integrable function G : X ! [0;+1] such that jf
n
j are
pointwise -almost everywhere bounded by G for each n. Then we
have
lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d =
Z
X
fd:
From themoving bump examples we see that this statement fails
if there is no absolutelyintegrabledominating function G. Thereader
is encouraged to see why, in each of the moving bump examples,
no such dominating function exists, without appealing to the above
theorem. Note also that when each of the f
n
is an indicator function
f
n
=1
E
n
,the dominated convergence theorem collapses to Exercise
1.4.24.
Proof. By modifying f
n
;f on a null set, we may assume withoutloss
of generality that the f
n
converge to f pointwise everywhere rather
than -almost everywhere, and similarly we can assume that jf
n
are
bounded byGpointwiseeverywhereratherthan -almosteverywhere.
By taking real and imaginary parts we may assume without loss
of generality that f
n
;f are real, thus  G  f
n
G pointwise. Of
course, this implies that  G  f  G pointwise also.
If weapplyFatou’s lemma (Corollary1.4.47)to theunsigned func-
tions f
n
+G, we see that
Z
X
f+G d  liminf
n!1
Z
X
f
n
+G d;
which on subtracting the nite quantity
R
X
Gd gives
Z
X
fd  liminf
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d:
Similarly, if we apply that lemma to the unsigned functions G  f
n
,
we obtain
Z
X
 f d  liminf
n!1
Z
X
G f
n
d;
112
1. Measure theory
negating this inequality and then cancelling
R
X
Gd again we con-
clude that
limsup
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d
Z
X
fd:
The claim then follows by combining these inequalities.
Remark 1.4.50. We deduced the dominated convergence theorem
from Fatou’s lemma, and Fatou’s lemma from the monotone conver-
gencetheorem. However, one can obtain these theorems in a dierent
order, depending on one’s taste, as they are so closely related. For
instance, in [StSk2005], the logic is somewhat dierent; one rst
obtains the slightly simpler bounded convergence theorem, which is
the dominated convergence theorem under the assumption that the
functions are uniformly bounded and all supported on a single set of
nite measure, and then uses that to deduceFatou’s lemma, which in
turn is used to deduce the monotone convergence theorem; and then
the horizontal and vertical truncation properties are used to extend
the bounded convergencetheoremto thedominated convergence the-
orem. It is instructive to view a couple dierent derivations of these
key theorems to get more of an intuitive understanding as to how
they work.
Exercise 1.4.46. Under the hypotheses of the dominated conver-
gence theorem (Theorem 1.4.49), establish also that kf
n
fk
L1
!0
as n ! 1.
Exercise 1.4.47 (Almost dominated convergence). Let (X;B;) be
ameasure space, and let f
1
;f
2
;::: : X ! C be a sequence of mea-
surable functions that converge pointwise -almost everywhere to a
measurable limit f : X ! C. Suppose that there is an unsigned
absolutely integrable functions G;g
1
;g
2
;::: : X ! [0;+1] such that
the jf
n
jare pointwise -almost everywhere bounded by G+ g
n
,and
that
R
X
g
n
d ! 0 as n ! 1. Show that
lim
n!1
Z
X
f
n
d =
Z
X
fd:
Exercise 1.4.48 (Defect version ofFatou’s lemma). Let (X;B;) be
ameasure space, and let f
1
;f
2
;::: : X ! [0;+1] be a sequence of
1.4. Abstract measure spaces
113
unsigned absolutely integrable functions that converges pointwise to
an absolutely integrable limit f. Show that
Z
X
f
n
d 
Z
X
f d kf   f
n
k
L1()
!0
as n ! 1. (Hint: Apply the dominated convergence theorem (The-
orem 1.4.49) to min(f
n
;f).) Informally, this tells us that the gap
between the left and right hand sides of Fatou’s lemma can be mea-
sured by the quantity kf   f
n
k
L1()
.
Exercise 1.4.49. Let (X;B;) be a measure space, and let g : X !
[0;+1] be measurable. Show that the function 
g
: B ! [0;+1]
dened by the formula
g
(E) :=
Z
X
1
E
gd=
Z
E
gd
is a measure. (Such measures are studied in greater detail in x1.2 of
An epsilon of room, Vol. I.)
The monotone convergence theorem is, in some sense, a dening
propertyof the unsigned integral, as the following exerciseillustrates.
Exercise 1.4.50 (Characterisation of the unsigned integral). Let
(X;B) be a measurable space. I : f 7! I(f) be a map from the
space U(X;B) of unsigned measurable functions f : X ! [0;+1] to
[0;+1] that obeys the following axioms:
(i) (Homogeneity) For every f 2 U(X;B) and c 2 [0;+1], one
has I(cf) = cI(f).
(ii) (Finite additivity) For every f;g 2 U(X;B), one has I(f +
g) = I(f)+I(g).
(iii) (Monotone convergence) If 0  f
1
 f
2
 ::: are a non-
decreasing sequence of unsigned measurable functions, then
I(lim
n!1
f
n
)= lim
n!1
I(f
n
).
Then there exists a unique measure  on (X;B) such that I(f) =
R
X
f d for all f 2 U(X;B). Furthermore,  is given by the formula
(E) := I(1
E
)for all B-measurable sets E.
114
1. Measure theory
Exercise 1.4.51. Let (X;B;)beanitemeasurespace(i.e. (X) <
1), and let f : X ! R be a bounded function. Suppose that  is
complete (see Denition 1.4.31). Suppose that the upper integral
Z
X
f d:=
inf
gf;g
simple
Z
X
gd
and lower integral
Z
X
f d :=
sup
hf;h
simple
Z
X
hd
agree. Show that f is measurable. (This is a converse to Exercise
1.3.11.)
We will continue to see the monotone convergence theorem, Fa-
tou’s lemma, and the dominated convergence theorem make an ap-
pearance throughout the rest of this text (and in An epsilon of room,
Vol. I).
1.5. Modes of convergence
If one has a sequence x
1
;x
2
;x
3
;::: 2 R of real numbers x
n
, it is
unambiguous what it means for that sequence to converge to a limit
x2 R: it means that for every " > 0, there exists an N such that
jx
n
xj  " for all n> N. Similarly for a sequence z
1
;z
2
;z
3
;::: 2C
of complex numbers z
n
converging to a limit z 2C.
Moregenerally, ifonehasa sequencev
1
;v
2
;v
3
;::: ofd-dimensional
vectors v
n
in a real vector space R
d
or complex vector space C
d
,it
is also unambiguous what it means for that sequence to converge
to a limit v 2 Rd or v 2 Cd; it means that for every " > 0,
there exists an N such that kv
n
vk  " for all n  N. Here,
the norm kvk of a vector v = (v
(1)
;:::;v
(d)
) can be chosen to be
the Euclidean norm kvk
2
:= (
P
d
j=1
(v
(j)
)
2
)
1=2
, the supremum norm
kvk
1
:= sup
1jd
jv
(j)
j, or any other number of norms, but for the
purposes of convergence, these norms are all equivalent; a sequence
of vectors converges in the Euclidean norm if and only if it converges
in the supremum norm, and similarly for any other two norms on the
nite-dimensional space R
d
or C
d
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested