c# pdf reader text : Delete page on pdf file control Library utility azure .net web page visual studio TaoMeasureTheory14-part694

1.5. Modes of convergence
125
It is instructive to see how this subsequence is extracted in the
case of the typewriter sequence. In general, one can view the oper-
ation of passing to a subsequence as being able to eliminate \type-
writer" situations in which the tail support is much larger than the
width.
Exercise 1.5.7. Let (X;B;) be a measure space, let f
n
:X ! C
be a sequence of measurable functions converging pointwise almost
everywhere as n ! 1 to a measurable limit f : X ! C, and for each
n, let f
n;m
:X ! Cbea sequenceofmeasurablefunctionsconverging
pointwise almost everywhere as m ! 1 (keeping n xed) to f
n
.
(i) If(X)isnite, show thatthereexists asequencem
1
;m
2
;:::
such that f
n;m
n
converges pointwise almost everywhere to
f.
(ii) Show the same claim is true if, instead of assuming that
(X) is nite, we merely assume that X is -nite, i.e. it is
the countable union of sets of nite measure.
(The claim can fail if X is not -nite. A counterexample is if X =
N
N
withcountingmeasure, f
n
and f areidenticallyzeroforalln 2 N,
and f
n;m
is the indicator function thespace of all sequences (a
i
)
i2N
2
N
N
with a
n
m.)
Exercise 1.5.8. Let f
n
:X ! C be a sequence of measurable func-
tions, and let f : X ! C be another measurable function. Show that
the following are equivalent:
(i) f
n
converges in measure to f.
(ii) Every subsequence f
n
j
of the f
n
has a further subsequence
f
n
j
i
that converges almost uniformly to f.
1.5.5. Domination and uniform integrability. Now we turn to
the reverse question, of whether almost uniform convergence, point-
wise almost everywhere convergence, or convergence in measure can
imply L
1
convergence. The escape to vertical and width innity ex-
amples shows thatwithout anyfurther hypotheses, the answer to this
question is no. However, one can do better if one places some dom-
ination hypotheses on the f
n
that shut down both of these escape
routes.
Delete page on pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages pdf document; add remove pages from pdf
Delete page on pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from pdf document; delete pages from a pdf in preview
126
1. Measure theory
We say that a sequence f
n
:X ! C is dominated if there exists
an absolutely integrable function g : X ! C such that jf
n
(x)j  g(x)
for all nand almost every x. For instance, if X has nitemeasure and
thef
n
areuniformlybounded, thenthey are dominated. Observethat
the sequences in the vertical and width escape to innity examples
are not dominated (why?).
The dominated convergence theorem (Theorem 1.4.49) then as-
serts that if f
n
converges to f pointwise almost everywhere, then it
necessarily converges to f in L
1
norm (and hence also in measure).
Here is a variant:
Exercise 1.5.9. Suppose that f
n
:X ! C are a dominated sequence
of measurable functions, and let f : X ! C be another measurable
function. Show that f
n
converges in L
1
norm to f if and only if
f
n
converges in measure to f. (Hint: one way to establish the \if"
direction is rst show that every subsequence of the f
n
has a further
subsequence that converges in L
1
to f, using Exercise 1.5.6 and the
dominated convergencetheorem (Theorem 1.4.49). Alternatively, use
monotone convergence to nd a set E of nite measure such that
R
XnE
gd, and hence
R
XnE
f
n
d and
R
XnE
fd, are small.)
There is a more general notion than domination, known as uni-
form integrability, which servesasa substitutefordominationinmany
(but not all) contexts.
Denition 1.5.11 (Uniform integrability). A sequence f
n
:X ! C
of absolutely integrable functions is said to be uniformly integrable if
the following three statements hold:
(i) (Uniform bound on L
1
norm) One has sup
n
kf
n
k
L1()
=
sup
n
R
X
jf
n
jd < +1.
(ii) (No escapeto verticalinnity)Onehassup
n
R
jf
n
jM
jf
n
jd!
0as M ! +1.
(iii) (No escape to width innity) One hassup
n
R
jf
n
j
jf
n
jd !
0as  ! 0.
Remark 1.5.12. It is instructive to understand uniform integrabil-
ity in the step function case f
n
=A
n
1
E
n
.The uniform bound on the
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
cut pages from pdf reader; delete pages from a pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
delete page pdf; best pdf editor delete pages
1.5. Modes of convergence
127
L
1
norm then asserts that A
n
(E
n
)stays bounded. The lack of es-
cape to vertical innity means that along any subsequence for which
A
n
!1, A
n
(E
n
)must go to zero. Similarly, the lack of escape to
width innity means that along any subsequence for which A
n
!0,
A
n
(E
n
)must go to zero.
Exercise 1.5.10.
(i) Show thatif f isan absolutely integrable
function, then the constant sequence f
n
= f is uniformly
integrable. (Hint: use the monotone convergence theorem.)
(ii) Show that every dominated sequence of measurable func-
tions is uniformly integrable.
(iii) Give an example of a sequence that is uniformly integrable
but not dominated.
In the case of a nite measure space, there is no escape to width
innity, and the criterion for uniform integrability simplies to just
that of excluding vertical innity:
Exercise 1.5.11. Suppose that X has nite measure, and let f
n
:
X ! C be a sequence of measurable functions. Show that f
n
is
uniformly integrable if and only if sup
n
R
jf
n
jM
jf
n
jd ! 0 as M !
+1.
Exercise 1.5.12 (Uniform Lp bound on nite measure implies uni-
form integrability). Suppose that X have nite measure, let 1 < p <
1, an d suppose that f
n
:X ! C is a sequence of measurable func-
tions such that sup
n
R
X
jf
n
j
p
d < 1. Show that the sequence f
n
is
uniformly integrable.
Exercise 1.5.13. Letf
n
:X ! C bea uniformlyintegrablesequence
of functions. Show that for every " > 0 there exists a  > 0 such that
Z
E
jf
n
jd "
whenever n  1 and E is a measurable set with (E)  .
Exercise 1.5.14. This exercise is a partial converse to Exercise
1.5.13. Let X be a probability space, and let f
n
: X ! C be a
sequence of absolutely integrable functions with sup
n
kf
n
k
L1
< 1.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pages pdf files; delete pdf page acrobat
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
128
1. Measure theory
Suppose that for every " > 0 there exists a  > 0 such that
Z
E
jf
n
jd "
whenever n 1 and E is a measurable set with (E) . Show that
the sequence f
n
is uniformly integrable.
The dominated convergence theorem (Theorem 1.4.49) does not
have an analogue in the uniformly integrable setting:
Exercise 1.5.15. Give an example of a sequence f
n
of uniformly
integrable functions that converge pointwise almost everywhere to
zero, but do not converge almost uniformly, in measure, or in L1
norm.
However, one does have an analogue of Exercise 1.5.9:
Theorem 1.5.13 (Uniformly integrable convergence in measure).
Let f
n
:X ! C be a uniformly integrable sequence of functions, and
let f : X ! C be another function. Then f
n
converges in L
1
norm
to f if and only if f
n
converges to f in measure.
Proof. The\only if" partfollows fromExercise1.5.2, so we establish
the \if" part.
By uniform integrability, there exists a nite A> 0 such that
Z
X
jf
n
jd  A
for all n. By Exercise 1.5.6, there is a subsequence of the f
n
that
convergespointwise almosteverywhereto f. Applying Fatou’s lemma
(Corollary1.4.47), we conclude that
Z
X
jfj d  A;
thus f is absolutely integrable.
Now let" > 0 be arbitrary. By uniform integrability, onecan nd
> 0 such that
(1.15)
Z
jf
n
j
jf
n
jd  "
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete page pdf file reader; delete page pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete pages from a pdf; delete page on pdf
1.5. Modes of convergence
129
for all n. By monotoneconvergence, and decreasing  if necessary, we
may say the same for f, thus
(1.16)
Z
jfj
jfj d ":
Let 0 <  < =2 be another small quantity (that can depend on
A;";) that we will choose a bit later. From (1.15), (1.16) and the
hypothesis  < =2 we have
Z
jf
n
fj<;jfj=2
jf
n
jd "
and
Z
jf
n
fj<;jfj=2
jfj d  "
and hence by the triangle inequality
(1.17)
Z
jf
n
fj<;jfj=2
jf  f
n
jd 2":
Finally, from Markov’s inequality (Exercise 1.4.36(vi)) we have
(fx : jf(x)j > =2g) 
A
=2
and thus
Z
jf
n
fj<;jfj>=2
jf  f
n
jd  " 
A
=2
:
In particular, by shrinking  further if necessary we see that
Z
jf
n
fj<;jfj>=2
jf  f
n
jd  "
and hence by (1.17)
(1.18)
Z
jf
n
fj<
jf  f
n
jd 3"
for all n.
Meanwhile, since f
n
converges in measure to f, we know that
there exists an N (depending on ) such that
(jf
n
(x)  f(x)j  ) 
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete blank page from pdf; delete pages from pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pdf pages in reader
130
1. Measure theory
for all n  N. Applying Exercise 1.5.13, we conclude (making 
smaller if necessary) that
Z
jf
n
fj
jf
n
jd  "
and
Z
jf
n
fj
jfj d  "
and hence by the triangle inequality
Z
jf
n
fj
jf  f
n
jd 2"
for all n N. Combining this with (1.18) we conclude that
kf
n
fk
L1()
=
Z
X
jf   f
n
jd  5"
for all n N, and so f
n
converges to f in L1 norm as desired.
Finally, werecall two resultsfrom the previous notes for unsigned
functions.
Exercise 1.5.16 (Monotone convergence theorem). Suppose that
f
n
: X ! [0;+1) are measurable, monotone non-decreasing in n
and are such that sup
n
R
X
f
n
d< 1. Show that f
n
converges in L
1
norm to sup
n
f
n
.(Note that sup
n
f
n
can be innite on a null set, but
the denition of L
1
convergencecanbe easilymodiedto accomodate
this.)
Exercise 1.5.17 (Defect version of Fatou’s lemma). Suppose that
f
n
:X ! [0;+1) are measurable, are such that sup
n
R
X
f
n
d< 1,
and converge pointwise almost everywhere to some measurable limit
f : X ! [0;+1). Show that f
n
converges in L
1
norm to f if and
only if
R
X
f
n
d converges to
R
X
fd. Informally, we see that in the
unsigned, bounded mass case, pointwiseconvergence implies L
1
norm
convergence if and only if there is no loss of mass.
Exercise 1.5.18. Suppose that f
n
: X ! C are a dominated se-
quence of measurable functions, and let f : X ! C be another
measurable function. Show that f
n
converges pointwise almost ev-
erywhere to f if and only if f
n
converges in almost uniformly to f.
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
131
Exercise 1.5.19. Let X be a probability space (see Section 2.3).
Given any real-valued measurable function f : X ! R, we dene the
cumulative distribution function F : R ! [0;1] off to bethe function
F() := (fx 2 X : f(x)  g). Given another sequence f
n
:X !
Rof real-valued measurable functions, we say that f
n
converges in
distribution to f if the cumulative distribution function F
n
() of f
n
converges pointwise to the cumulative distribution function F() of
fat all  2 R for which F is continuous.
(i) Show that if f
n
converges to f in anyof theseven sensesdis-
cussed above (uniformly, essentially uniformly, almost uni-
formly pointwise, pointwise almost everywhere, in L
1
,or in
measure), then it converges in distribution to f.
(ii) Give an example in which f
n
converges to f in distribution,
but not in any of the above seven senses.
(iii) Show that convergence in distribution is not linear, in the
sense that if f
n
converges to f in distribution, and g
n
con-
verges to g, then f
n
+g
n
need not converge to f + g.
(iv) Show that a sequence f
n
can converge in distribution to two
dierent limits f;g, which are not equal almost everywhere.
Convergence in distribution (not to be confused with convergence in
the sense of distributions, which is studied in S 1.13 of An epsilon of
room, Vol. I is commonly used in probability; but, as the above ex-
ercise demonstrates, it is quite a weak notion of convergence, lacking
many of the properties of the modes of convergence discussed here.
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
Let[a;b] bea compact interval of positive length (thus 1 < a< b <
+1). Recall that a function F : [a;b] ! R is said to be dierentiable
at a point x 2 [a;b] if the limit
(1.19)
F
0
(x) :=
lim
y!x;y2[a;b]nfxg
F(y)  F(x)
 x
exists. In that case, we call F0(x) the strong derivative, classical de-
rivative, or just derivative for short, of F at x. We say that F is
132
1. Measure theory
everywhere dierentiable, or dierentiable for short, if it is dieren-
tiable at all points x 2 [a;b], and dierentiable almost everywhere ifit
is dierentiable at almost every point x 2 [a;b]. If F is dierentiable
everywhere and its derivative F
0
is continuous, then we say that F is
continuously dierentiable.
Remark 1.6.1. In x1.13 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I, the notion of
aweak derivative or distributional derivative is introduced. This type
of derivative can be applied to a much rougher class of functions and
is in many ways more suitable than the classical derivative for doing
\Lebesgue" type analysis (i.e. analysis centred around the Lebesgue
integral, and in particular allowing functions to be uncontrolled, in-
nite, or even undened on sets of measure zero). However, for now
we will stick with the classical approach to dierentiation.
Exercise 1.6.1. If F : [a;b] ! R is everywhere dierentiable, show
that F is continuous and F
0
is measurable. If F is almost everywhere
dierentiable, show that the (almost everywhere dened) function F
0
is measurable (i.e. it is equal to an everywhere dened measurable
function on [a;b] outside ofa null set), but givean example to demon-
strate that F need not be continuous.
Exercise 1.6.2. Give an example of a function F : [a;b] ! R
whichiseverywheredierentiable, butnotcontinuouslydierentiable.
(Hint: choose an F that vanishes quickly at some point, say at the
origin 0, but which also oscillates rapidly near that point.)
In single-variable calculus, the operations of integration and dif-
ferentiation are connected by a number of basic theorems, starting
with Rolle’s theorem.
Theorem 1.6.2 (Rolle’s theorem). Let [a;b] be a compact interval of
positive length, and let F : [a;b] ! R be a dierentiable function such
that F(a) = F(b). Then there exists x 2 (a;b) such that F
0
(x) = 0.
Proof. By subtracting a constant from F (which does not aect dif-
ferentiability orthederivative) we mayassumethat F(a) = F(b) = 0.
If F is identically zero then the claim is trivial, so assume that F is
non-zero somewhere. By replacing F with  F if necessary, we may
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
133
assume that F is positive somewhere, thus sup
x2[a;b]
F(x) > 0. On
the other hand, as F is continuous and [a;b] is compact, F must at-
tain its maximum somewhere, thus there exists x 2 [a;b] such that
F(x)  F(y) for all y 2 [a;b]. Then F(x) must be positive and so x
cannot equal either a or b, and thus must lie in the interior. From the
right limit of (1.19) we see that F0(x)  0, while from the left limit
we have F
0
(x)  0. Thus F
0
(x) = 0 and the claim follows.
Remark 1.6.3. Observe that the same proof also works if F is only
dierentiable in the interior (a;b) of the interval [a;b], so long as it is
continuous all the way up to the boundary of [a;b].
Exercise 1.6.3. Give an example to show that Rolle’s theorem can
fail if f is merely assumed to be almost everywhere dierentiable,
even if one adds the additional hypothesis that f is continuous. This
example illustrates that everywhere dierentiability is a signicantly
stronger property than almost everywhere dierentiability. We will
see further evidence of this fact later in these notes; there are many
theorems that assert in their conclusion that a function is almost ev-
erywhere dierentiable, but few that manage to conclude everywhere
dierentiability.
Remark 1.6.4. It is important to note that Rolle’s theorem only
works in the real scalar case when F is real-valued, as it relies heavily
on the least upper bound propertyfor thedomain R. If, for instance,
we consider complex-valued scalar functions F : [a;b] ! C, then the
theorem can fail; for instance, the function F : [0;1] ! C dened by
F(x) := e
2ix
1 vanishesat both endpoints and isdierentiable, but
its derivative F
0
(x) = 2ie
2ix
is never zero. (Rolle’s theorem does
imply that the real and imaginary parts of the derivative F
0
both
vanish somewhere, but the problem is that they don’t simultaneously
vanish at the same point.) Similar remarks to functions taking values
in a nite-dimensional vector space, such as R
n
.
One can easily amplify Rolle’s theorem to the mean value theo-
rem:
Corollary 1.6.5 (Mean value theorem). Let [a;b] be a compact in-
terval of positive length, and let F : [a;b] ! R be a dierentiable
function. Then there exists x 2(a;b) such that F0(x) =
F(b) F(a)
b a
.
134
1. Measure theory
Proof. ApplyRolle’s theoremto thefunction x 7! F(x) 
F(b) F(a)
b a
(x 
a).
Remark 1.6.6. As Rolle’s theorem is only applicable to real scalar-
valued functions, the more general mean value theorem is also only
applicable to such functions.
Exercise 1.6.4 (Uniqueness of antiderivatives up to constants). Let
[a;b] be a compact interval of positive length, and let F : [a;b] ! R
and G : [a;b] ! R be dierentiable functions. Show that F0(x) =
G
0
(x) for every x 2 [a;b] if and only if F(x) = G(x) + C for some
constant C 2 R and all x 2 [a;b].
We can use the mean value theorem to deduce one of the funda-
mental theorems of calculus:
Theorem 1.6.7 (Second fundamental theorem of calculus). Let F :
[a;b] ! R be a dierentiable function, such that F
0
is Riemann in-
tegrable. Then the Riemann integral
R
b
a
F
0
(x) dx of F
0
is equal to
F(b) F(a). In particular, we have
R
b
a
F
0
(x) dx = F(b) F(a) when-
ever F is continuously dierentiable.
Proof. Let " > 0. By the denition of Riemann integrability, there
exists a nite partition a = t
0
<t
1
<::: < t
k
=b such that
j
Xk
j=1
F
0
(t
j
)(t
j
t
j 1
Z
b
a
F
0
(x)j  "
for every choice of t
j
2[t
j 1
;t
j
].
Fix this partition. From the mean value theorem, for each 1 
j k one can nd t
j
2[t
j 1
;t
j
]such that
F
0
(t
j
)(t
j
t
j 1
)= F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)
and thus by telescoping series
j(F(b) F(a)) 
Z
b
a
F
0
(x)j  ":
Since " > 0 was arbitrary, the claim follows.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested