c# pdf reader text : Delete pages from a pdf file Library software class asp.net winforms html ajax TaoMeasureTheory16-part696

1.6. Dierentiation theorems
145
b
n
z  b, we see that y cannot exceed b
n
,and thus lies in A, but
this contradicts the fact that t
is the supremum of A.
Thecase when a
n
=a is similar and is left to thereader; theonly
dierence is that we can no longer assert that F(y)  F(a
n
)for all
a
n
y  b, and so do not have the upper bound F(b
n
) F(a
n
). 
Now we can prove the one-sided Hardy-Littlewood maximal in-
equality. By upwards monotonicity, it will suce to show that
m(fx 2[a;b] :
sup
h>0;[x;x+h][a;b]
1
h
Z
[x;x+h]
jf(t)j dt  g) 
1
Z
R
jf(t)jdt
for any compact interval [a;b]. By modifying  by an epsilon, we may
replace the non-strict inequality here with strict inequality:
(1.25)
m(fx 2 [a;b] :
sup
h>0;[x;x+h][a;b]
1
h
Z
[x;x+h]
jf(t)j dt > g) 
1
Z
R
jf(t)jdt
Fix [a;b]. We apply the rising sun lemma to the function F :
[a;b] ! R dened as
F(x) :=
Z
[a;x]
jf(t)j dt  (x  a):
By Lemma 1.6.5, F is continuous, and so we can nd an at most
countablesequenceofintervals I
n
=(a
n
;b
n
)with the properties given
by the rising sun lemma. From the second property of that lemma,
we observe that
fx 2 [a;b] :
sup
h>0;[x;x+h][a;b]
1
h
Z
[x;x+h]
jf(t)j dt > g 
[
n
I
n
;
since the property
1
h
R
[x;x+h]
jf(t)j dt >  can be rearranged as F(x+
h) > F(x). By countable additivity, we may thus upper bound the
left-hand side of (1.25) by
P
n
(b
n
a
n
). On the other hand, since
F(b
n
 F(a
n
) 0, we have
Z
I
n
jf(t)j dt  (b
n
a
n
)
and thus
X
n
(b
n
a
n
)
1
X
n
Z
I
n
jf(t)j dt:
Delete pages from a pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pdf pages in preview
Delete pages from a pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page in pdf document; copy pages from pdf to word
146
1. Measure theory
As the I
n
are disjoint intervals in I, we may apply monotone conver-
gence and monotonicity to conclude that
X
n
Z
I
n
jf(t)j dt 
Z
[a;b]
jf(t)j dt;
and the claim follows.
Exercise 1.6.11 (Two-sided Hardy-Littlewood maximal inequality).
Let f : R ! C be an absolutely integrable function, and let  > 0.
Show that
m(fx 2 R : sup
x2I
1
jIj
Z
I
jf(t)j dt  g) 
2
Z
R
jf(t)j dt;
wherethesupremum ranges over all intervals I of positivelength that
contain x.
Exercise 1.6.12 (Rising sun inequality). Let f : R ! R be an
absolutely integrable function, and let f
:R ! R be the one-sided
signed Hardy-Littlewood maximal function
f
(x) := sup
h>0
1
h
Z
[x;x+h]
f(t) dt:
Establish the rising sun inequality
m(ff
(x)> g) 
Z
x:f(x)>
f(x) dx
for all real  (note here that we permit  to be zero or negative), and
show that this inequality implies Lemma 1.6.16. (Hint: First do the
= 0 case, byinvoking the rising sun lemma.) See[Ta2009, x2.9] for
some further discussion of inequalities of this type, and applications
to ergodic theory (and in particular the maximal ergodic theorem).
Exercise 1.6.13. Show that the left and right-hand sides in Lemma
1.6.16 are in fact equal. (Hint: one may rst wish to try this in the
case when f has compact support, in which case one can apply the
rising sun lemma to a sucientlylargeinterval containingthesupport
of f.)
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Deleting Pages. You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete. Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. Sorting Pages.
delete a page from a pdf without acrobat; delete pages pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete page in pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf online
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
147
1.6.2. The Lebesgue dierentiation theorem in higher di-
mensions. Now we extend the Lebesgue dierentiation theorem to
higher dimensions. Theorem 1.6.11 does not have an obvious high-
dimensional analogue, but Theorem 1.6.12 does:
Theorem 1.6.19 (Lebesgue dierentiation theorem in general di-
mension). Let f : Rd ! C be an absolutely integrable function. Then
for almost every x 2R
d
,one has
(1.26)
lim
r!0
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
jf(y)  f(x)j dy = 0
and
lim
r!0
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
f(y) dy = f(x);
where B(x;r) := fy 2 R
d
:jx   yj < rg is the open ball of radius r
centred at x.
From the triangle inequality we see that
j
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
f(y) dy  f(x)j = j
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
f(y) f(x) dyj
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
jf(y) f(x)j dy;
so we see that the rst conclusion of Theorem 1.6.19 implies the
second. A point x for which (1.26) holds is called a Lebesgue point of
f; thus, for an absolutely integrable function f, almost every point in
R
d
will be a Lebesgue point for R
d
.
Exercise 1.6.14. Call a function f : R
d
!C locally integrable if,
for every x 2 R
d
,there exists an open neighbourhood of x on which
fis absolutely integrable.
(i) Showthatf is locallyintegrableifandonlyif
R
B(0;r)
jf(x)j dx <
1for all r > 0.
(ii) ShowthatTheorem1.6.19impliesa generalisationofitselfin
whichthecondition ofabsoluteintegrabilityoff isweakened
to local integrability.
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
note, PDF file will be divided from the previous page of your defined page number which starts from 0. For example, your original PDF file contains 4 pages.
delete pdf pages android; delete blank pages in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Moreover, you may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a PDFDocument object at user-defined position.
delete page from pdf file online; delete blank page in pdf online
148
1. Measure theory
Exercise 1.6.15. For each h > 0, let E
h
be a subset of B(0;h) with
the property that m(E
h
) cm(B(0;h)) for some c > 0 independent
of h. Show that if f : R
d
! C is locally integrable, and x is a
Lebesgue point of f, then
lim
h!0
1
m(E
h
)
Z
x+E
h
f(y) dy = f(x):
Conclude that Theorem 1.6.19 implies Theorem 1.6.12.
To prove Theorem 1.6.19, we use the density argument. The
dense subclass case is easy:
Exercise 1.6.16. Show that Theorem 1.6.19 holds whenever f is
continuous.
The quantitative estimate needed is the following:
Theorem 1.6.20 (Hardy-Littlewood maximal inequality). Let f :
R
d
!C be an absolutely integrable function, and let  > 0. Then
m(fx 2R
d
:sup
r>0
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
jf(y)j dy  g) 
C
d
Z
R
jf(t)j dt
for some constant C
d
>0 depending only on d.
Remark 1.6.21. The expression sup
r>0
1
m(B(x;r))
R
B(x;r)
jf(y)j dy 
g is known as the Hardy-Littlewood maximal function of f, and is
often denoted Mf(x). It is an important function in the eld of
(real-variable) harmonic analysis.
Exercise 1.6.17. Use the density argument to show that Theorem
1.6.20 implies Theorem 1.6.19.
In the one-dimensional case, this estimate was established via
the rising sun lemma. Unfortunately, that lemma relied heavily on
the ordered nature of R, and does not have an obvious analogue in
higher dimensions. Instead, wewill usethefollowing covering lemma.
Given an open ball B = B(x;r) in R
d
and a real number c > 0, we
write cB := B(x;cr) for the ball with the same centre as B, but c
times the radius. (Note that this is slightly dierent from the set
c B := fcy : y 2 Bg - why?) Note that jcBj = cdjBj for any open
ball B  R
d
and any c > 0.
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
delete pages in pdf online; delete pages from pdf file online
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Compress large-size PDF document of 1000+ pages to smaller one in a Delete unimportant contents: C# Demo Code to Optimize An Exist PDF File in Visual C#.NET
cut pages from pdf; delete page on pdf reader
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
149
Lemma 1.6.22 (Vitali-type covering lemma). Let B
1
;:::;B
n
be a
nite collection of open balls in Rd (not necessarily disjoint). Then
there exists a subcollection B
0
1
;:::;B
0
m
of disjoint balls in this collec-
tion, such that
(1.27)
[n
i=1
B
i
[m
j=1
3B
0
j
:
In particular, by nite subadditivity,
m(
[n
i=1
B
i
) 3
d
Xm
j=1
m(B
0
j
):
Proof. We use a greedy algorithm argument, selecting the balls B
0
i
to be as largeas possiblewhileremaining disjoint. Moreprecisely, we
run the following algorithm:
Step 0. Initialisem = 0 (so that, initially, therearenoballsB0
1
;:::;B0
m
in the desired collection).
Step 1. Considerall the balls B
j
that do notalreadyintersect oneof
the B
0
1
;:::;B
0
m
(so, initially, all of the balls B
1
;:::;B
n
will
beconsidered). Ifthere are no suchballs, STOP. Otherwise,
go on to Step 2.
Step 2. Locate the largest ball B
j
that does not already intersect
one of the B
0
1
;:::;B
0
m
. (If there are multiple largest balls
with exactly the sameradius, breakthetiearbitrarily.) Add
this ball to thecollection B0
1
;:::;B0
m
bysetting B0
m+1
:= B
j
and then incrementing m to m+ 1. Then return to Step 1.
Notethat at each iteration of this algorithm, the number of available
balls amongst the B
1
;:::;B
n
drops by at least one (since each ball
selected certainly intersects itself and so cannot be selected again).
So this algorithm terminates in nite time. It is also clear from con-
struction that the B
0
1
;:::;B
0
m
are a subcollection of the B
1
;:::;B
n
consisting of disjoint balls. So the only task remaining is to verify
that (1.27) holds at the completion of the algorithm, i.e. to show
that each ball B
i
in the original collection is covered by the triples
3B
0
j
of the subcollection.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Split PDF File by Number of Pages Demo Code in VB.NET. This is an VB.NET example of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by number of pages.
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete pages from a pdf online
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET
cut pages from pdf reader; cut pages from pdf file
150
1. Measure theory
For this, we argue as follows. Take any ball B
i
in the original
collection. Because the algorithm only halts when there are no more
balls that aredisjoint fromthe B
0
1
;:::;B
0
m
,the ball B
i
must intersect
at least one of the balls B
0
j
in the subcollection. Let B
0
j
be the rst
ball with this property, thus B
i
is disjoint from B
0
1
;:::;B
0
j 1
, but
intersects B0
j
. Because B0
j
was chosen to be largest amongst all balls
that did not intersect B
0
1
;:::;B
0
j 1
,weconcludethat theradius of B
i
cannot exceed that of B
0
j
. From the triangle inequality, this implies
that B
i
3B
0
j
,and the claim follows.
Exercise 1.6.18. Technically speaking, the above algorithmic ar-
gument was not phrased in the standard language of formal mathe-
matical deduction, because in that language, any mathematical ob-
ject (such as the natural number m) can only be dened once, and
not redened multiple times as is done in most algorithms. Rewrite
the above argument in a way that avoids redening any variable.
(Hint: introduce a \time" variable t, and recursively construct fam-
ilies B
0
1;t
;:::;B
0
m
t
;t
of balls that represent the outcome of the above
algorithm after t iterations (or t
iterations, if the algorithm halted
at some previous time t
<t). For this particular algorithm, there
are also more ad hoc approaches that exploit the relatively simple
nature of the algorithm to allow for a less notationally complicated
construction.) More generally, it is possible to use this time parame-
ter trick to convert anyconstructioninvolving a provably terminating
algorithm into a construction that does not redene any variable. (It
is however dangerous to work with any algorithm that has an innite
run time, unless one has a suitably strong convergence result for the
algorithm that allows one to take limits, either in the classical sense
or in themore general sense ofjumping to limit ordinals; in thelatter
case, one needs to use transnite induction in order to ensure that
the use of such algorithms is rigorous; see x2.4 of An epsilon of room,
Vol. I.)
Remark1.6.23. Theactual Vitali covering lemma[Vi1908] is slightly
dierent to this one, but we will not need it here. Actually there is
afamily of related covering lemmas which are useful for a variety of
tasks in harmonic analysis, see for instance [deG1981] for further
discussion.
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
151
Now we can prove the Hardy-Littlewood inequality, which wewill
do with the constant C
d
:= 3d. It suces to verify the claim with
strict inequality,
m(fx 2 R
d
:sup
r>0
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
jf(y)j dy > g) 
C
d
Z
R
jf(t)j dt
as the non-strict case then follows by perturbing  slightly and then
taking limits.
Fix f and . By inner regularity, it suces to show that
m(K) 
3
d
Z
R
jf(t)j dt
whenever K is acompactsetthatiscontainedinfx 2 Rd : sup
r>0
1
m(B(x;r))
R
B(x;r)
jf(y)jdy >
g.
Byconstruction, for everyx 2K, thereexistsanopen ball B(x;r)
such that
(1.28)
1
m(B(x;r))
Z
B(x;r)
jf(y)j dy > :
By compactness of K, we can cover K by a nite number B
1
;:::;B
n
of such balls. Applying the Vitali-type covering lemma, we can nd
asubcollection B0
1
;:::;B0
m
of disjoint balls such that
m(
[n
i=1
B
i
) 3
d
Xm
j=1
m(B
0
j
):
By (1.28), on each ball B0
j
we have
m(B
0
j
)<
1
Z
B
0
j
jf(y)j dy;
summing in j and using the disjointness of the B
0
j
we conclude that
m(
[n
i=1
B
i
)
3
d
Z
Rd
jf(y)j dy:
Since the B
1
;:::;B
n
cover K, we obtain Theorem 1.6.20 as desired.
Exercise 1.6.19. Improve the constant 3d in the Hardy-Littlewood
maximal inequality to 2
d
. (Hint: observe that with the construction
used to prove the Vitali covering lemma, the centres of the balls B
i
are contained in
S
m
j=1
2B
0
j
and not just in
S
m
j=1
3B
0
j
. To exploit this
152
1. Measure theory
observation one may need to rst create an epsilon of room, as the
centers are not by themselves sucient to cover the required set.)
Remark 1.6.24. The optimal value of C
d
is not known in general,
although a fairly recent result of Melas[Me2003] gives the surprising
conclusion that the optimal value of C
1
is C
1
=
11+
p
61
12
=1:56:::. It
is known that C
d
grows at most linearly in d, thanks to a result of
Stein and Stromberg[StSt1983], but it is not known if C
d
isbounded
in d or grows as d! 1.
Exercise 1.6.20 (Dyadic maximal inequality). If f : R
d
!C is an
absolutely integrable function, establish the dyadic Hardy-Littlewood
maximal inequality
m(fx 2 R
d
:sup
x2Q
1
jQj
Z
Q
jf(y)j dy  g) 
1
Z
R
jf(t)j dt
where the supremum ranges over all dyadic cubes Q that contain x.
(Hint: the nesting property of dyadic cubes will be useful when it
comes to the covering lemma stage of the argument, much as it was
in Exercise 1.1.14.)
Exercise 1.6.21 (Besicovich covering lemma in one dimension). Let
I
1
;:::;I
n
be a nite family of open intervals in R (not necessarily
disjoint). Show that there exist a subfamily I
0
1
;:::;I
0
m
of intervals
such that
(i)
S
n
i=1
I
n
=
S
m
j=1
I
0
m
;and
(ii) Each point x 2R is contained in at most two of the I
0
m
.
(Hint: First rene the family of intervals so that no interval I
i
is
contained in the union of the the other intervals. At that point, show
that it is no longer possible for a point to be contained in three of
the intervals.) There is a variant of this lemma that holds in higher
dimensions, known as the Besicovitch covering lemma.
Exercise 1.6.22. Let bea Borel measure(i.e. a countably additive
measure on the Borel -algebra) on R, such that 0 < (I) < 1 for
every interval I of positive length. Assume that  is inner regular, in
the sense that (E) = sup
KE;
compact
(K) for every Borel mea-
surable set E. (As it turns out, from the theory of Radon measures,
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
153
all locally nite Borel measures have this property, but we will not
prove this here; see x1.10 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I.) Establish
the Hardy-Littlewood maximal inequality
(fx 2R : sup
x2I
1
(I)
Z
I
jf(y)j d(y) g) 
2
Z
R
jf(y)j d(y)
for anyabsolutelyintegrablefunction f 2L
1
(),wherethesupremum
ranges over all open intervals I that contain x. Note that this essen-
tially generalises Exercise 1.6.11, in which  is replaced by Lebesgue
measure. (Hint: Repeat the proof of the usual Hardy-Littlewood
maximal inequality, but use the Besicovich covering lemma in place
of theVitali-typecovering lemma. Whydo we needtheformer lemma
here instead of the latter?)
Exercise 1.6.23 (Cousin’s theorem). Prove Cousin’s theorem: given
any function  : [a;b] ! (0;+1) on a compact interval [a;b] of posi-
tive length, there exists a partition a = t
0
<t
1
<::: < t
k
=b with
k 1, together with real numbers t
j
2[t
j 1
;t
j
]for each 1  j  k
and t
j
t
j 1
 (t
j
). (Hint: use the Heine-Borel theorem, which
asserts that any open cover of [a;b] has a nite subcover, followed by
the Besicovitch covering lemma.) This theorem is useful in a variety
of applicationsrelated to the secondfundamental theoremofcalculus,
as we shall see below. The positive function  is known as a gauge
function.
Now weturn to consequences of theLebesgue dierentiation the-
orem. Given a Lebesgue measurable set E  R
d
,call a point x 2 R
d
apoint of density for E if
m(E\B(x;r))
m(B(x;r))
!1 as r ! 0. Thus, for in-
stance, if E = [ 1;1]nf0g, then every point in ( 1;1) (including the
boundary point 0) is a point of density for E, but the endpoints  1;1
(as well as the exterior of E) are not points of density. One can think
of a point of density as being an \almost interior" point of E; it is
not necessarily the case that one can t an small ball B(x;r) centred
at x inside of E, but one can t most of that small ball inside E.
Exercise 1.6.24. If E  R
d
is Lebesgue measurable, show that
almost every point in E is a point of density for E, and almost every
point in the complement of E is not a point of density for E.
154
1. Measure theory
Exercise 1.6.25. Let E  R
d
be a measurable set of positive mea-
sure, and let "> 0.
(i) Using Exercise 1.6.15 and Exercise 1.6.24, show that there
exists a cubeQ  R
d
of positivesidelength such that m(E\
Q) > (1  ")m(Q).
(ii) Give an alternate proof of the above claim that avoids the
Lebesgue dierentiation theorem. (Hint: reduce to thecase
when E is bounded, then approximate E by an almost dis-
joint union of cubes.)
(iii) Use the above result to give an alternate proof of the Stein-
haus theorem (Exercise 1.6.8).
Ofcourse, onecanreplacecubesherebyother comparableshapes,
such as balls. (Indeed, a good principle to adopt in analysis is that
cubes and balls are \equivalent up to constants", in that a cube of
some sidelength can be contained in a ball of comparable radius, and
vice versa. This type of mental equivalence is analogous to, though
not identical with, the famous dictum that a topologist cannot dis-
tinguish a doughnut from a coee cup.)
Exercise 1.6.26.
(i) Give an example of a compact set K 
Rof positive measure such that m(K \I) < jIj for every
interval I of positive length. (Hint: rst construct an open
dense subset of [0;1] of measure strictly less than 1.)
(ii) Give an example of a measurable set E  R such that
0< m(E \ I) < jIj for every interval I of positive length.
(Hint: rst workin a bounded interval, such as ( 1;2). The
complement of theset K in the rst example is the union of
at most countably many open intervals, thanks to Exercise
1.6.10. Now ll in these open intervals and iterate.)
Exercise 1.6.27 (Approximations to the identity). Dene a good
kernel
15
to be a measurable function P : R
d
! R
+
which is non-
negative, radial (which means that there is a function
~
P: [0;+1) !
15
Dierent texts have slightly dierent notions of what a good kernel is; the
\right"classofkernelstoconsiderdependstosome extentonwhattypeofconvergence
results one is interested in(e.g. almost everywhere convergence,convergence in L
1
or
L
1
norm, etc.), andonwhat hypotheses one wishes to place on the original function
f.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested