c# pdf reader text : Copy pages from pdf to new pdf Library control class asp.net azure winforms ajax TaoMeasureTheory17-part697

1.6. Dierentiation theorems
155
R
+
such that P(x) =
~
P(jxj)), radially non-increasing (so that
~
Pis a
non-increasing function), and has total mass
R
Rd
P(x) dx equal to 1.
The functions P
t
(x) :=
1
td
P(
x
t
) for t > 0 are then said to be a good
family of approximations to the identity.
(i) Show that the heat kernels
16
P
t
(x):=
1
(4t2)d=2
e
jxj
2
=4t
2
and
Poisson kernels P
t
(x) := c
d
t
(t2+jxj2)(d+1)=2
are good families
of approximations to the identity, if the constant c
d
>0 is
chosen correctly (in factone has c
d
= ((d+1)=2)=
(d+1)=2
,
but you are not required to establish this).
(ii) Show that if P is a good kernel, then
c
d
<
X1
n= 1
2
dn
~
P(2
n
) C
d
for some constants 0 < c
d
<C
d
depending only on d. (Hint:
compare P with such \horizontal wedding cake" functions
as
P
1
n= 1
1
2n 1<jxj2n
~
P(2n).)
(iii) Establish the quantitative upper bound
j
Z
Rd
f(y)P
t
(x  y) dyj  C
0
d
sup
r>0
1
jB(x;r)j
Z
B(x;r)
jf(y)j dy
for any absolutely integrable function f and some constant
C
0
d
>0 depending only on d.
(iv) Show that if f : R
d
!C is absolutely integrable and x is a
Lebesgue point of f, then the convolution
f P
t
(x):=
Z
Rd
f(y)P
t
(x y) dy
converges to f(x) as t ! 0. (Hint: split f(y) as the sum
of f(x) and f(y)   f(x).) In particular, f  P
t
converges
pointwise almost everywhere to f.
1.6.3. Almost everywhere dierentiability. As wesee in under-
graduate real analysis, not every continuous function f : R ! R is
dierentiable, with the standard example being the absolute value
function f(x) := jxj, which is continuous not dierentiable at the
16
Notethatwehave modiedtheusualformulationofthe heatkernelbyreplacing
twitht
2
inordertomake itconform tothenotationalconventionsusedinthisexercise.
Copy pages from pdf to new pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
add and delete pages in pdf; delete pages from a pdf reader
Copy pages from pdf to new pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page pdf file; delete pages of pdf reader
156
1. Measure theory
origin x = 0. Of course, this function is still almost everywhere dif-
ferentiable. With a bit more eort, one can construct continuous
functions that are in fact nowhere dierentiable:
Exercise 1.6.28 (Weierstrass function). Let F : R ! R be the
function
F(x) :=
X1
n=1
4
n
sin(8
n
x):
(i) Show that F is well-dened (in the sense that the series is
absolutely convergent) and that F is a bounded continuous
function.
(ii) Show that for every 8-dyadic interval [
j
8n
;
j+1
8n
]with n  1,
onehas jF(
j+1
8n
) F(
j
8n
)j  c4
n
forsome absoluteconstant
c> 0.
(iii) Show that F is not dierentiable at anypoint x 2R. (Hint:
argue by contradiction and use the previous part of this
exercise.) Notethatitisnot enough to formallydierentiate
the series term by term and observe that the resulting series
is divergent - why not?
Thedicultyhere is thata continuous function can still containa
large amount of oscillation, which can lead to breakdown of dieren-
tiability. However, if onecan somehow limit the amount of oscillation
present, then one can often recover a fair bit of dierentiability. For
instance, we have
Theorem 1.6.25 (Monotone dierentiation theorem). Any function
F : R ! R which is monotone (either monotone non-decreasing or
monotone non-increasing) is dierentiable almost everywhere.
Exercise 1.6.29. Show that every monotone function is measurable.
To prove this theorem, we just treat the case when F is mono-
tone non-decreasing, as the non-increasing caseis similar (and can be
deduced from the non-decreasing case by replacing F with  F).
Wealso rst focuson thecasewhen F iscontinuous, asthisallows
us to use the rising sun lemma. To understand the dierentiability of
F, we introduce the four Dini derivatives of F at x:
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\test1.pdf"); PDFDocument pdf2 = new PDFDocument(@"C:\test2
delete pages from a pdf in preview; delete pages from pdf acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. Dim pdf As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument
cut pages from pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf in preview
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
157
(i) Theupperrightderivative
D+F(x) := limsup
h!0+
F(x+h) F(x)
h
;
(ii) Thelowerright derivativeD
+
F(x) := liminf
h!0+
F(x+h) F(x)
h
;
(iii) Theupperleftderivative
D F(x) := limsup
h!0
F(x+h) F(x)
h
;
(iv) Thelowerright derivativeD
F(x):= liminf
h!0
F(x+h) F(x)
h
.
Regardless of whether F is dierentiable or not (or even whether F
is continuous or not), the four Dini derivatives always exist and take
values in the extended real line [ 1;1]. (If F is only dened on an
interval [a;b], rather than on the endpoints, then some of the Dini
derivatives may not exist at the endpoints, but this is a measure zero
set and will not impact our analysis.)
Exercise 1.6.30. If F is monotone, show that the four Dini deriva-
tives ofF aremeasurable. (Hint: themain diculty is to reformulate
the derivatives so that h ranges over a countable set rather than an
uncountable one.)
Afunction F is dierentiable at x preciselywhen the four deriva-
tives are equal and nite:
(1.29)
D+F(x) = D
+
F(x) =
D F(x) = D
F(x) 2( 1;+1):
We also have the trivial inequalities
D
+
F(x) 
D+F(x); D
F(x) 
D F(x):
If F is non-decreasing, all these quantities are non-negative, thus
0 D
+
F(x) 
D+F(x); 0  D
F(x) 
D F(x):
The one-sided Hardy-Littlewood maximal inequality has an ana-
logue in this setting:
Lemma 1.6.26 (One-sided Hardy-Littlewood inequality). Let F :
[a;b] ! R be a continuous monotone non-decreasing function, and
let  > 0. Then we have
m(fx 2 [a;b] :
D+F(x)  g) 
F(b)  F(a)
:
Similarly for the other three Dini derivatives of F.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" Output.pdf" Dim doc1 Dim doc2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument(inputFilePath2 GetPage(2) Dim pages = New PDFPage() {page0
delete pages on pdf; acrobat export pages from pdf
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position Copying and Pasting Pages. You can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages on pdf online
158
1. Measure theory
If F is not assumed to be continuous, then we have the weaker
inequality
m(fx 2[a;b] :
D+F(x)  g)  C
F(b)  F(a)
for some absolute constant C > 0.
Remark 1.6.27. Note that if one naively applies the fundamental
theoremsofcalculus, onecanformally seethattherstpartofLemma
1.6.26 is equivalent to Lemma 1.6.16. We cannot however use this
argument rigorously because we have not established the necessary
fundamental theorems of calculus to do this. Nevertheless, we can
borrow the proof of Lemma 1.6.16 without diculty to usehere, and
this is exactly what we will do.
Proof. Wejustprovethecontinuouscaseand leavethediscontinuous
case as an exercise.
It suces to prove the claim for
D+F; by re ection (replacing
F(x) with  F( x), and [a;b] with [ b; a]), the same argument
works for
D F, and then this trivially implies the same inequalities
for D
+
Fand D
F. By modifying  by an epsilon, and dropping the
endpoints from [a;b] as they have measure zero, it suces to show
that
m(fx 2(a;b) :
D+F(x) > g) 
F(b)  F(a)
Wemayapplytherising sun lemma(Lemma1.6.17)tothecontin-
uous function G(x) := F(x) x. This gives us an at most countable
family of intervals I
n
=(a
n
;b
n
) in (a;b), such that G(b
n
)  G(a
n
)
for each n, and such that G(y)  G(x) whenever a  x  y  b and
xlies outside of all of the I
n
.
Observethatifx 2 (a;b), andG(y)  G(x)forall x  y  b, then
D+F(x)  . Thus we see that the set fx 2 (a;b) :
D+F(x) > g is
contained in the union of the I
n
,and so by countable additivity
m(fx 2 (a;b) :
D+F(x) > g) 
X
n
b
n
a
n
:
But we can rearrange the inequality G(b
n
)  G(a
n
) as b
n
a
n
F(b
n
) F(a
n
)
. From telescoping series and the monotone nature of F
we have
P
n
F(b
n
) F(a
n
) F(b) F(a) (this is easiest to prove by
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Copy this demo code to your C# application to rotate the first page of One is used for rotating all PDF pages to 180 in clockwise and output a new PDF file
delete blank page in pdf; delete pdf pages online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to
copy page from pdf; delete page from pdf document
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
159
rst working with a nite subcollection of the intervals (a
n
;b
n
), and
then taking suprema), and the claim follows.
The discontinuous case is left as an exercise.
Exercise 1.6.31. Prove Lemma 1.6.26 in the discontinuous case.
(Hint: the rising sun lemma is no longer available, but one can use
either the Vitali-type covering lemma (which will give C = 3) or the
Besicovitch lemma (which will give C = 2), by modifying the proof
of Theorem 1.6.20.
Sending  ! 1 in the above lemma (cf. Exercise 1.3.18), and
then sending [a;b] to R, we conclude as a corollary that all the four
Dini derivativesofa continuousmonotonenon-decreasing functionare
nite almost everywhere. So to prove Theorem 1.6.25 for continuous
monotone non-decreasing functions, it suces to show that (1.29)
holds for almost every x. In view of the trivial inequalities, it suces
to show that
D
+
F(x)  D
F(x) and
D
F(x)  D
+
F(x) for almost
every x. We will just show the rst inequality, as the second follows
byreplacing F with its re ection x 7!  F( x). It will suceto show
that for every pair 0 < r < R of real numbers, the set
E= E
r;R
:= fx 2 R :
D
+
F(x) > R > r > D
F(x)g
is a null set, since by letting R;r range over rationals with R > r > 0
and taking countable unions, we would concludethat the set fx 2R :
D
+
F(x) > D
F(x)g is a null set (recall that the Dini derivatives are
all non-negative when F is non-decreasing), and the claim follows.
Clearly E is a measurable set. To prove that it is null, we will
establish the following estimate:
Lemma 1.6.28 (E has density less than one). For any interval [a;b]
and any 0 < r < R, one has m(E
r;R
\[a;b]) 
r
R
jb  aj.
Indeed, this lemma implies that E has no points of density, which
by Exercise 1.6.24 forces E to be a null set.
Proof. We begin by applying the rising sun lemma to the function
G(x) := rx+ F( x) on [ b; a]; the large number of negative signs
present hereisneeded in orderto properlydealwiththelowerleftDini
derivative D
F. This gives an at most countable family of disjoint
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Open a document. PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath); PDFPage page = (PDFPage)pdf.GetPage(0); // Extract all images on one pdf page.
delete pages out of a pdf; delete page from pdf
C# PDF Annotate Library: Draw, edit PDF annotation, markups in C#.
RootPath + "\\" 2.pdf"; String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" Annot_6.pdf"; // open a PDF file PDFDocument doc = new PDFDocument(inputFilePath
delete page from pdf online; cut pages from pdf online
160
1. Measure theory
intervals  I
n
=( b
n
; a
n
)in ( b; a), such that G( a
n
) G( b
n
)
for all n, andsuch thatG( x)  G( y)whenever  x   y   aand
x 2 ( b; a) lies outsideofall of the  I
n
.Observethat if x 2 (a;b),
and G( x)  G( y) for all  x   y   a, then D
F(x)  r.
Thus we see that E
r;R
is contained inside the union of the intervals
I
n
=(a
n
;b
n
). Ontheother hand, from the rstpartof Lemma 1.6.26
we have
m(E
r;R
\(a
n
;b
n
)) 
F(b
n
 F(a
n
)
R
:
But we can rearrange the inequality G( a
n
) G( b
n
) as F(b
n
F(a
n
) r(b
n
a
n
). From countable additivity, one thus has
m(E
r;R
)
r
R
X
n
b
n
a
n
:
Butthe(a
n
;b
n
)are disjoint inside (a;b), so fromcountable additivity
again, we have
P
n
b
n
a
n
b  a, and the claim follows.
Remark 1.6.29. Note if F was not assumed to be continuous, then
one would lose a factor of C here from the second part of Lemma
1.6.26, and one would then be unable to prevent
D+F from being up
to C times as large as D
F. So sometimes, even when all one is seek-
ing is a qualitative result such as dierentiability, it is still important
to keep track of constants. (But this is the exception rather than the
rule: for a large portion of arguments in analysis, the constants are
not terribly important.)
This concludes the proof of Theorem 1.6.25 in the continuous
monotone non-decreasing case. Now we work on removing the conti-
nuity hypothesis (which was needed in order to make the rising sun
lemma work properly). If we naively try to run the density argument
as we did in previous sections, then (for once) the argument does not
workvery well, as the spaceofcontinuous monotonefunctionsare not
suciently dense in the space of all monotone functions in the rele-
vantsense (which, in this case, is in thetotal variation sense, which is
what is needed to invokesuch tools asLemma 1.6.26.). To bridgethis
gap, we have to supplement the continuous monotone functions with
another class of monotone functions, known as the jump functions.
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
161
Denition 1.6.30 (Jump function). A basic jump function J is a
function of the form
J(x) :=
8
<
:
0
when x < x
0
when x = x
0
1
when x > x
0
for some real numbers x
0
2R and 0    1; we call x
0
the point of
discontinuity for J and  the fraction. Observe that such functions
are monotone non-decreasing, but have a discontinuity at one point.
Ajump function is any absolutely convergent combination of basic
jump functions, i.e. a function of the form F =
P
n
c
n
J
n
,where n
ranges overanatmost countableset, each J
n
is a basicjump function,
andthec
n
arepositiverealswith
P
n
c
n
<1. Ifthereareonlynitely
many ninvolved, we say that F is a piecewise constant jump function.
Thus, for instance, if q
1
;q
2
;q
3
;::: is any enumeration of the ra-
tionals, then
P
1
n=1
2
n
1
[q
n
;+1)
is a jump function.
Clearly, all jump functions are monotone non-decreasing. From
the absolute convergence of the c
n
we see that every jump function is
the uniform limit of piecewise constant jump functions, for instance
P
1
n=1
c
n
J
n
is the uniform limit of
P
N
n=1
c
n
J
n
. One consequence of
this is that the points of discontinuity of a jump function
P
1
n=1
c
n
J
n
arepreciselythose of theindividual summands c
n
J
n
,i.e. ofthe points
x
n
where each J
n
jumps.
Thekeyfact is that thesefunctions, together with the continuous
monotone functions, essentially generate all monotone functions, at
least in the bounded case:
Lemma 1.6.31 (Continuous-singular decomposition for monotone
functions). Let F : R ! R be a monotone non-decreasing function.
(i) The only discontinuities ofF arejump discontinuities. More
precisely, if x is a point where F is discontinuous, then the
limits lim
y!x
F(y) and lim
y!x+
F(y) both exist, but are
unequal, with lim
y!x
F(y) < lim
y!x+
F(y).
(ii) There are at most countably many discontinuities of F.
162
1. Measure theory
(iii) If F is bounded, then F can be expressed as the sum of
a continuous monotone non-decreasing function F
c
and a
jump function F
pp
.
Remark 1.6.32. This decomposition is part of the more general
Lebesgue decomposition, discussed in x1.2 of An epsilon of room, Vol.
I.
Proof. Bymonotonicity, thelimits F
(x) := lim
y!x
F(y)andF
+
(x) :=
lim
y!x+
F(y) always exist, with F
(x)  F(x)  F
+
(x) for all x.
This gives (i).
By (i), whenever there is a discontinuity x of F, there is at least
one rational number q
x
strictly between F
(x) and F
+
(x), and from
monotonicity, each rational number can be assigned to at most one
discontinuity. This gives (ii).
Now we prove (iii). Let A be the set of discontinuities of F,
thus A is at most countable. For each x 2 A, we dene the jump
c
x
:= F
+
(x) F
(x) > 0, and the fraction 
x
:=
F(x) F
(x)
F
+
(x) F
(x)
2[0;1].
Thus
F
+
(x) = F
(x)+ c
x
and F(x) = F
(x)+
x
c
x
:
Note that c
x
is the measure of the interval (F
(x);F
+
(x)). By
monotonicity, these intervals are disjoint; by the boundedness of F,
theirunionisbounded. Bycountableadditivity, wethushave
P
x2A
c
x
<
1, and so if we let J
x
be the basic jump function with point of dis-
continuity x and fraction 
x
,then the function
F
pp
:=
X
x2A
c
x
J
x
is a jump function.
As discussed previously, G is discontinuous only at A, and for
each x 2A one easily checks that
(F
pp
)
+
(x) = (F
pp
)
(x)+ c
x
and F
pp
(x) = (F
pp
)
(x)+ 
x
c
x
where(F
pp
)
(x) := lim
y!x
F
pp
(y), and (F
pp
)
+
(x) := lim
y!x+
F
pp
(y).
We thus see that thedierence F
c
:= F  F
pp
is continuous. Theonly
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
163
remaining task is to verify that F
c
is monotone non-decreasing, thus
we need
F
pp
(b) F
pp
(a)  F(b) F(a)
for all a< b. But the left-hand side can berewritten as
P
x2A\[a;b]
c
x
.
As each c
x
is the measure of the interval (F
(x);F
+
(x)), and these
intervals for x 2 A \ [a;b] are disjoint and lie in (F(a);F(b)), the
claim follows from countable additivity.
Exercise 1.6.32. Show that the decomposition of a bounded mono-
tone non-decreasing function F into continuous F
c
and jump compo-
nents F
pp
given by the above lemma is unique.
Exercise 1.6.33. Find a suitable generalisation of the notion of a
jump function that allows one to extend the above decomposition to
unboundedmonotonefunctions, andthenprovethisextension. (Hint:
the notion to shoot for here is that of a \locally jump function".)
Now we can nish the proof of Theorem 1.6.25. As noted pre-
viously, it suces to prove the claim for monotone non-decreasing
functions. As dierentiability is a local condition, we can easily re-
duce to thecase of bounded monotonenon-decreasing functions, since
to test dierentiability of a monotone non-decreasing function F in
any compact interval [a;b] we may replace F by the bounded mono-
tonenon-decreasing functionmax(min(F;F(b));F(a))with no change
in the dierentiability in [a;b] (except perhaps at the endpoints a;b,
but these form a set of measure zero). As we have already proven
the claim for continuous functions, it suces by Lemma 1.6.31 (and
linearity of the derivative) to verify the claim for jump functions.
Now, nally, we are able to use the density argument, using the
piecewise constant jump functions as the dense subclass, and using
the second part of Lemma 1.6.26 for the quantitative estimate; for-
tunately for us, the density argument does not particularly care that
there is a loss of a constant factor in this estimate.
For piecewise constant jump functions, the claim is clear (indeed,
the derivative exists and is zero outside of nitely many discontinu-
ities). Now we run the density argument. Let F be a bounded jump
function, and let" > 0 and > 0bearbitrary. Aseveryjumpfunction
is the uniform limit of piecewiseconstant jump functions, we can nd
164
1. Measure theory
apiecewise constant jump function F
"
such that jF(x)  F
"
(x)j  "
for all x. Indeed, by taking F
"
to be a partial sum of the basic jump
functions that make up F, wecan ensure that F  F
"
is also a mono-
tone non-decreasing function. Applying the second part of Lemma
1.6.26, we have
fx 2R :
D+(F   F
"
)(x)  g 
2C"
for some absolute constant C, and similarly for the other four Dini
derivatives. Thus, outside of a set of measure at most 8C"=, all
of the Dini derivatives of F   F
"
are less than . Since F0
"
is almost
everywhere dierentiable, weconcludethatoutsideofa set of measure
at most 8C"=, all the Dini derivatives of F(x) lie within  of F
0
"
(x),
and in particular are nite and lie within 2 of each other. Sending
"to zero (holding  xed), we conclude that for almost every x, the
Dini derivatives of F are nite and lie within 2 of each other. If
we then send  to zero, we see that for almost every x, the Dini
derivatives of F agree with each other and are nite, and the claim
follows. This concludes the proof of Theorem 1.6.25.
Justastheintegration theoryofunsigned functions canbeusedto
develop the integration theory of the absolutely convergent functions
(see Section 1.3.4), the dierentiation theory of monotone functions
can be used to develop a parallel dierentiation theory for the class
of functions of bounded variation:
Denition 1.6.33 (Bounded variation). Let F : R ! R be a func-
tion. The total variation kFk
TV(R)
(or kFk
TV
for short) of F is
dened to be the supremum
kFk
TV(R)
:=
sup
x
0
<:::<x
n
Xn
i=1
jF(x
i
 F(x
i+1
)j
wherethesupremumrangesoverall niteincreasing sequencesx
0
;:::;x
n
of real numbers with n  0; this is a quantity in [0;+1]. We say
that F has bounded variation (on R) if kFk
TV(R)
is nite. (In this
case, kFk
TV(R)
is often written as kFk
BV(R)
or just kFk
BV
.)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested