c# pdf reader text : Copy pages from pdf into new pdf control SDK system azure wpf web page console TaoMeasureTheory18-part698

1.6. Dierentiation theorems
165
Given anyinterval [a;b], we denethetotal variation kFk
TV([a;b])
of F on [a;b] as
kFk
TV([a;b])
:=
sup
ax
0
<:::<x
n
b
Xn
i=1
jF(x
i
 F(x
i+1
)j;
thus the denitionis thesame, but thepoints x
0
;:::;x
n
arerestricted
toliein [a;b]. ThusforinstancekFk
TV(R)
=sup
N!1
kFk
TV([ N;N])
.
Wesaythata function F hasbounded variation on[a;b] ifkFk
BV([a;b])
is nite.
Exercise 1.6.34. If F : R ! R is a monotone function, show that
kFk
TV([a;b])
= jF(b)   F(a)j for any interval [a;b], and that F has
bounded variation on R if and only if it is bounded.
Exercise 1.6.35. For any functions F;G : R ! R, establish the
triangle property kF + Gk
TV(R)
 kFk
TV(R)
+kGk
TV(R)
and the
homogeneityproperty kcFk
TV(R)
=jcjkFk
TV(R)
for any c 2 R. Also
show that kFk
TV
=0 if and only if F is constant.
Exercise 1.6.36. IfF : R ! Risafunction, showthat kFk
TV([a;b])
+
kFk
TV([b;c])
=kFk
TV([a;c])
whenever a  b  c.
Exercise 1.6.37.
(i) Show that every function f : R ! R of
bounded variationisbounded, and thatthelimitslim
x!+1
f(x)
and lim
x! 1
f(x), are well-dened.
(ii) Givea counterexampleofa bounded, continuous, compactly
supported function f that is not of bounded variation.
Exercise 1.6.38. Let f : R ! R be an absolutely integrable func-
tion, andlet F : R ! R betheindeniteintegralF(x) :=
R
[ 1;x]
f(x).
Show that F is ofbounded variation, and thatkFk
TV(R)
=kfk
L1(R)
.
(Hint: the upper bound kFk
TV(R)
kfk
L1(R)
is relatively easy to
establish. To obtain the lower bound, use the density argument.)
Much as an absolutely integrable function can be expressed as
the dierence of its positive and negative parts, a bounded variation
function can beexpressed as the dierenceof two bounded monotone
functions:
Proposition 1.6.34. A function F : R ! R is of bounded variation
if and only if it is the dierence of two bounded monotone functions.
Copy pages from pdf into new pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page pdf online; delete page numbers in pdf
Copy pages from pdf into new pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete blank pages from pdf file
166
1. Measure theory
Proof. It is clear from Exercises 1.6.34, 1.6.35 that the dierence of
two bounded monotone functions is bounded. Now dene the positive
variation F
+
:R ! R of F by the formula
(1.30)
F
+
(x):=
sup
x
0
<:::<x
n
x
Xn
i=1
max(F(x
i+1
) F(x
i
);0):
It is clear from construction that this is a monotone increasing func-
tion, taking valuesbetween 0 and kFk
TV(R)
,andis thus bounded. To
concludetheproposition, itsucesto (bywriting F = F
+
(F
+
F
)
to show that F
+
F is non-decreasing, orin other words to show that
F
+
(b)  F
+
(a) +F(b) F(a):
If F(b)  F(a) is negative then this is clear from the monotone non-
decreasing nature of F
+
,so assume that F(b) F(a)  0. But then
the claim follows because any sequence of real numbers x
0
<::: <
x
n
a can be extended by one or two elements by adding a and b,
thus increasing the sum sup
x
0
<:::<x
n
P
n
i=1
max(F(x
i
 F(x
i+1
);0)
by at least F(b) F(a).
Exercise 1.6.39. Let F : R ! R be of bounded variation. Dene
the positive variation F
+
by (1.30), and the negative variation F
by
F
(x):=
sup
x
0
<:::<x
n
x
Xn
i=1
max( F(x
i+1
)+F(x
i
);0):
Establish the identities
F(x) = F( 1)+F
+
(x) F
(x);
kFk
TV[a;b]
=F
+
(b) F
+
(a)+F
(b)  F
(a);
and
kFk
TV
=F
+
(+1)+F
(+1)
for everyinterval [a;b], whereF( 1):= lim
x! 1
F(x), F+(+1) :=
lim
x!+1
F
+
(x),and F
(+1) := lim
x!+1
F
(x). (Hint: Themain
dicultycomes from the fact that a partition x
0
<::: < x
n
x that
is goodforF
+
need notbegoodfor F
,and vice versa. However, this
can be xed by taking a good partition for F+ and a good partition
for F
and combining them together into a common renement.)
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. PDFDocument pdf = new PDFDocument(@"C:\test1.pdf"); PDFDocument pdf2 = new PDFDocument(@"C:\test2
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; delete pages on pdf file
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
' Copy three pages from test1.pdf and paste into test2.pdf. Dim pdf As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument("C:\test1.pdf") Dim pdf2 As PDFDocument = New PDFDocument
delete pages pdf preview; delete a page from a pdf reader
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
167
From Proposition 1.6.34 and Theorem 1.6.25 weimmediately ob-
tain
Corollary 1.6.35 (BVdierentiation theorem). Every bounded vari-
ation function is dierentiable almost everywhere.
Exercise 1.6.40. Call a function locally of bounded variation if it
is of bounded variation on every compact interval [a;b]. Show that
every function that is locally of bounded variation is dierentiable
almost everywhere.
Exercise 1.6.41 (Lipschitz dierentiation theorem, one-dimensional
case). A function f : R ! R is said to be Lipschitz continuous
if there exists a constant C > 0 such that jf(x)   f(y)j  Cjx  
yj for all x;y 2 R; the smallest C with this property is known as
the Lipschitz constant of f. Show that every Lipschitz continuous
function F is locally of bounded variation, and hence dierentiable
almost everywhere. Furthermore, show that the derivative F
0
,when
it exists, is bounded in magnitude by the Lipschitz constant of F.
Remark 1.6.36. The same result is true in higher dimensions, and
is known astheRadamacher dierentiation theorem, butwe will defer
the proof of this theorem to Section 2.2, when we have the powerful
tool oftheFubini-Tonelli theorem (Corollary 1.7.23)available, that is
particularly useful for deducing higher-dimensional results in analysis
from lower-dimensional ones.
Exercise 1.6.42. A function f : R ! R is said to be convex if one
has f((1 t)x+ty)  (1 t)f(x)+tf(y) for all x < y and 0 < t < 1.
Show that if f is convex, then it is continuous and almost everywhere
dierentiable, and its derivative f
0
is equal almost everywhere to a
monotonenon-decreasing function, and so is itself almost everywhere
dierentiable. (Hint: Drawingthegraphoff, togetherwitha number
of chords and tangent lines, is likely to be very helpful in providing
visual intuition.) Thus we see that in some sense, convex functions
are\almost everywhere twicedierentiable". Similarclaims also hold
for concave functions, of course.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page DLLs for Adding Page into PDF Document in VB.NET Class.
delete blank pages in pdf files; acrobat remove pages from pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Apart from the ability to inserting a new PDF page into existing PDF to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how to
delete a page from a pdf file; delete pdf pages
168
1. Measure theory
1.6.4. The second fundamental theorem of calculus. We are
now nally ready to attack the second fundamental theorem of cal-
culus in the cases where F is not assumed to be continuously dier-
entiable. We begin with the case when F : [a;b] ! R is monotone
non-decreasing. From Theorem 1.6.25 (extending F to the rest of the
real line if needed), this implies that F is dierentiable almost every-
where in [a;b], so F
0
is dened a.e.; from monotonicity we see that F
0
is non-negative whenever it is dened. Also, an easy modication of
Exercise 1.6.1 shows that F
0
is measurable.
One half of the second fundamental theorem is easy:
Proposition 1.6.37 (Upper bound for second fundamental theo-
rem). Let F : [a;b] ! R be monotone non-decreasing (so that, as
discussed above, F
0
is dened almost everywhere, is unsigned, and is
measurable). Then
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx  F(b) F(a):
In particular, F0 is absolutely integrable.
Proof. It is convenient to extend F to all of R by declaring F(x) :=
F(b) for x > b and F(x) := F(a) for x < a, then F is now a bounded
monotone function on R, and F
0
vanishes outside of [a;b]. As F is
almost everywhere dierentiable, the Newton quotients
f
n
(x) :=
F(x+ 1=n) F(x)
1=n
convergepointwisealmost everywhere to F0. Applying Fatou’s lemma
(Corollary1.4.47), we conclude that
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx  liminf
n!1
Z
[a;b]
F(x+ 1=n) F(x)
1=n
dx:
The right-hand side can be rearranged as
liminf
n!1
n(
Z
[a+1=n;b+1=n]
F(y) dy  
Z
[a;b]
F(x) dx)
which can be rearranged further as
liminf
n!1
n(
Z
[b;b+1=n]
F(x) dx 
Z
[a;a+1=n]
F(x) dx):
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
textMgr.AddString(msg, font, pageIndex, cursor, fontColor); // Output the new document. value, The char wil be added into PDF page, 0
cut pages out of pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones by As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf" 'set split SplitOptions(SplitMode.ByPage) ' limit the pages of each
reader extract pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf document
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
169
Since F is equal to F(b) for the rst integral and is at least F(a) for
the second integral, this expression is at most
liminf
n!1
n(F(b)=n F(a)=n) = F(b)  F(a)
and the claim follows.
Exercise 1.6.43. Show that any function of bounded variation has
an (almost everywhere dened) derivative that is absolutely inte-
grable.
In the Lipschitz case, one can do better:
Exercise 1.6.44 (Second fundamental theorem for Lipschitz func-
tions). Let F : [a;b] ! R be Lipschitz continuous. Show that
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx = F(b) F(a). (Hint: Argue as in the proof of Propo-
sition 1.6.37, but use the dominated convergence theorem (Theorem
1.4.49) in place of Fatou’s lemma (Corollary1.4.47).)
Exercise 1.6.45 (Integration by parts formula). Let F;G : [a;b] !
Rbe Lipschitz continuous functions. Show that
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(x)G(x) dx = F(b)G(b) F(a)G(a)
Z
[a;b]
F(x)G
0
(x) dx:
(Hint: rst show that the product of two Lipschitz continuous func-
tions on [a;b] is again Lipschitz continuous.)
Now we return to the monotone case. Inspired by the Lipschitz
case, one may hope to recover equality in Proposition 1.6.37 for such
functions F. However, there is an important obstruction to this,
which is that all the variation of F may be concentrated in a set of
measure zero, and thus undetectable by the Lebesgue integral of F
0
.
This is mostobvious inthecase ofa discontinuous monotonefunction,
such as the (appropriately named) Heaviside function F := 1
[0;+1)
;
it is clear that F
0
vanishes almost everywhere, but F(b)   F(a) is
not equal to
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx if b and a lie on opposite sides of the
discontinuity at 0. In fact, the same problem arises for all jump
functions:
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
You can use specific APIs to copy and get a specific page of PDF file; you can also copy and paste pages from a PDF document into another PDF file.
delete page on pdf document; delete pages from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
and cropping. Save changes to existing PDF file or output a new PDF file. Insert images into PDF form field in VB.NET. An independent
delete pages pdf file; delete pages of pdf preview
170
1. Measure theory
Exercise 1.6.46. Show thatifF isa jumpfunction, then F
0
vanishes
almost everywhere. (Hint: use the density argument, starting from
piecewiseconstant jump functionsand using Proposition 1.6.37 asthe
quantitative estimate.)
One may hope that jump functions - in which all the  uctua-
tion is concentrated in a countable set - are the only obstruction to
the second fundamental theorem of calculus holding for monotone
functions, and that as long as one restricts attention to continuous
monotone functions, that one can recover the second fundamental
theorem. However, this is still not true, because it is possible for
all the  uctuation to now be concentrated, not in a countable collec-
tion of jump discontinuities, but instead in an uncountable set of zero
measure, such as the middle thirds Cantor set (Exercise 1.2.9). This
can be illustrated by the key counterexample of the Cantor function,
also known as the Devil’s staircase function. The construction of this
function is detailed in the exercise below.
Exercise 1.6.47 (Cantorfunction). Denethefunctions F
0
;F
1
;F
2
;::: :
[0;1] ! R recursively as follows:
1. Set F
0
(x) := x for all x 2[0;1].
2. For each n= 1;2;::: in turn, dene
F
n
(x) :=
8
<
:
1
2
F
n 1
(3x)
if x 2 [0;1=3];
1
2
if x 2 (1=3;2=3);
1
2
+
1
2
F
n 1
(3x  2) if x 2 [2=3;1]
(i) Graph F
0
,F
1
,F
2
,and F
3
(preferably on a single graph).
(ii) Show thatforeachn = 0;1;:::, F
n
is acontinuousmonotone
non-decreasing function with F
n
(0) = 0 and F
n
(1) = 1.
(Hint: induct on n.)
(iii) Show that for each n = 0;1;:::, onehas jF
n+1
(x) F
n
(x)j 
2
n
for each x 2 [0;1]. Conclude that the F
n
converge
uniformly to a limit F : [0;1] ! R. This limit is known as
the Cantor function.
(iv) Show that the Cantor function F is continuous and mono-
tone non-decreasing, with F(0) = 0 and F(1) = 1.
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET This part illustrates how to combine three PDF files into a new file in
delete page from pdf preview; cut pages out of pdf file
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
of splitting a PDF file into multiple ones String inputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" 1.pdf"; // set split SplitMode.ByPage); // limit the pages of each
add or remove pages from pdf; add and remove pages from a pdf
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
171
(v) Show that if x 2 [0;1] lies outside the middle thirds Can-
tor set (Exercise 1.2.9), then F is constant in a neighbour-
hood of x, and in particular F
0
(x) = 0. Conclude that
R
[0;1]
F
0
(x) dx = 0 6= 1 = F(1)  F(0), so that the second
fundamental theorem of calculus fails for this function.
(vi) Show that F(
P
1
n=1
a
n
3
n
) =
P
1
n=1
a
n
2
2
n
for any digits
a
1
;a
2
;::: 2f0;2g. Thus the Cantorfunction, insome sense,
converts base three expansions to base two expansions.
(1) Let I = [
P
n
i=1
a
i
3i
;
P
n
i=1
a
i
3i
+
1
3n
]beone ofthe intervals used
in the n
th
cover I
n
of C (see Exercise 1.2.9), thus n 0 and
a
1
;:::;a
n
2f0;2g. Show that I is an interval of length 3
n
,
but F(I) is an interval of length 2 n.
(2) Show that F is not dierentiable at any element of the Can-
tor set C.
Remark 1.6.38. This example shows that the classical derivative
F
0
(x) := lim
h!0;h6=0
F(x+h) F(x)
h
of a function has some defects; it
cannot\see" some of thevariation ofa continuous monotonefunction
such as the Cantor function. In x1.13 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I,
this will berectied byintroducing theconcept ofthe weak derivative
of a function, which despite the name, is more able than the strong
derivativetodetectthis typeofsingularvariation behaviour. (Wewill
also encounter in Section 1.7.3 the Lebesgue-Stieltjes integral, which
is another (closely related) way to capture all of the variation of a
monotone function, and which is related to the classical derivative
via the Lebesgue-Radon-Nikodym theorem, see x1.2 of An epsilon of
room, Vol. I.)
In view ofthis counterexample, we seethat we need to add anad-
ditional hypothesis to the continuous monotone non-increasing func-
tion F before we can recover the second fundamental theorem. One
such hypothesisis absolute continuity. To motivatethis denition, let
us recall two existing denitions:
(i) A function F : R ! R is continuous if, for every " > 0
and x
0
2R, there exists a  > 0 such that jF(b)  F(a)j 
" whenever (a;b) is an interval of length at most  that
contains x
0
.
172
1. Measure theory
(ii) A function F : R ! R is uniformly continuous if, for every
" > 0, there exists a  > 0 such that jF(b)   F(a)j  "
whenever (a;b) is an interval of length at most .
Denition 1.6.39. A function F : R ! R is said to be abso-
lutely continuous if, for every " > 0, there exists a  > 0 such that
P
n
j=1
jF(b
j
 F(a
j
)j  " whenever (a
1
;b
1
);:::;(a
n
;b
n
) is a nite
collection of disjoint intervals of total length
P
n
j=1
b
j
a
j
at most .
Wedeneabsolutecontinuityfor afunctionF : [a;b] ! R dened
on an interval [a;b] similarly, with the only dierence being that the
intervals [a
j
;b
j
]are of course now required to lie in the domain [a;b]
of F.
The following exercise places absolute continuity in relation to
other regularity properties:
Exercise 1.6.48.
(i) Show that every absolutely continuous
function is uniformly continuous and therefore continuous.
(ii) Showthateveryabsolutelycontinuousfunctionisofbounded
variation on every compact interval [a;b]. (Hint: rst show
this is true for any suciently small interval.) In particu-
lar (byExercise 1.6.40), absolutely continuous functions are
dierentiable almost everywhere.
(iii) Show that every Lipschitz continuous function is absolutely
continuous.
(iv) Show that the function x 7!
p
x is absolutely continuous,
but not Lipschitz continuous, on the interval [0;1].
(v) Show that the Cantor function from Exercise 1.6.47 is con-
tinuous, monotone, and uniformly continuous, but not ab-
solutely continuous, on [0;1].
(vi) If f : R ! R is absolutely integrable, show that the indef-
inite integral F(x) :=
R
[ 1;x]
f(y) dy is absolutely contin-
uous, and that F is dierentiable almost everywhere with
F
0
(x) = f(x) for almost every x.
(vii) Show that the sum or product of two absolutely continuous
functions on an interval [a;b] remainsabsolutelycontinuous.
What happens if we work on R instead of on [a;b]?
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
173
Exercise 1.6.49.
(i) Show thatabsolutelycontinuousfunctions
map null sets to null sets, i.e. if F : R ! R is absolutely
continuous and E is a null set then F(E):= fF(x) : x 2 Eg
is also a null set.
(ii) Show that the Cantor function does not have this property.
For absolutely continuous functions, we can recover the second
fundamental theorem of calculus:
Theorem 1.6.40 (Second fundamental theorem for absolutely con-
tinuous functions). Let F : [a;b] ! R be absolutely continuous. Then
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx = F(b) F(a).
Proof. Our maintool herewill beCousin’s theorem (Exercise1.6.23).
ByExercise1.6.43, F
0
isabsolutelyintegrable. ByExercise1.5.10,
F
0
is thus uniformly integrable. Now let " > 0. By Exercise 1.5.13,
we can nd  > 0 such that
R
U
jF
0
(x)j dx  "whenever U  [a;b] is a
measurable set of measure at most . (Here we adopt the convention
that F
0
vanishesoutsideof[a;b].) By making  small enough, we may
also assume from absolute continuity that
P
n
j=1
jF(b
j
 F(a
j
)j  "
whenever (a
1
;b
1
);:::;(a
n
;b
n
)is a nitecollection of disjoint intervals
of total length
P
n
j=1
b
j
a
j
at most .
Let E  [a;b] be the set of points x where F is not dierentiable,
together with the endpoints a;b, as well as the points where x is not
aLebesgue point of F0. thus E is a null set. By outer regularity (or
the denition of outer measure) wecan nd an open set U containing
Eof measure m(U) < . In particular,
R
U
jF
0
(x)j dx  ".
Now dene a gauge function  : [a;b] ! (0;+1) as follows.
(i) If x 2 E, we dene (x) > 0 to be small enough that the
open interval (x  (x);x +(x)) lies in U.
(ii) If x 62 E, then F is dierentiable at x and x is a Lebesgue
point of F
0
. We let (x) > 0 be small enough that jF(y) 
F(x) (y x)F
0
(x)j  "jy xj holdswhenever jy xj  (x),
and such that j
1
jIj
R
I
F
0
(y) dy F
0
(x)j  " whenever I is an
interval containing x of length at most (x); such a (x)
exists by the denition of dierentiability, and of Lebesgue
174
1. Measure theory
point. Werewritetheseproperties using big-O notation
17
as
F(y) F(x) = (y x)F0(x)+O("jy xj) and
R
I
F0(y) dy =
jIjF
0
(x)+O("jIj).
Applying Cousin’s theorem, we can nd a partition a = t
0
< t
1
<
::: < t
k
=b with k  1, together with real numbers t
j
2[t
j 1
;t
j
]for
each 1  j  k and t
j
t
j 1
(t
j
).
We can express F(b)  F(a) as a telescoping series
F(b) F(a)=
Xk
j=1
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
):
To estimate thesize of this sum, let us rst consider those j for which
t
j
2E. Then, by construction, the intervals (t
j 1
;t
j
)are disjoint in
U. By construction of , we thus have
X
j:t
j
2E
jF(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)j  "
and thus
X
j:t
j
2E
F(t
j
 F(t
j 1
)= O("):
Next, we consider those j for which t
j
62 E. By construction, for
those j we have
F(t
j
) F(t
j
)= (t
j
t
j
)F
0
(t
j
)+O("jt
j
t
j
j)
and
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)= (t
j
t
j 1
)F
0
(t
j
)+O("jt
j
t
j 1
j)
and thus
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)= (t
j
t
j 1
)F
0
(t
j
)+ O("jt
j
t
j 1
j):
On the other hand, from construction again we have
Z
[t
j 1
;t
j
]
F
0
(y) dy = (t
j
t
j 1
)F
0
(t
j
)+O("jt
j
t
j 1
j)
17
In thisnotation, we use O(X) to denote a quantity Y whose magnitude jYj is
at most CX for some absolute constant C. This notationis convenient for managing
errorterms whenitis notimportantto keep trackofthe exactvalue of constants such
as C, due to such rules as O(X)+O(X) =O(X).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested