c# pdf reader text : Delete a page from a pdf online SDK application service wpf html azure dnn TaoMeasureTheory19-part699

1.6. Dierentiation theorems
175
and thus
F(t
j
 F(t
j 1
)=
Z
[t
j 1
;t
j
]
F
0
(y) dy +O("jt
j
t
j 1
j):
Summing in j, we conclude that
X
j:t
j
62E
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)=
Z
S
F
0
(y) dy +O("(b  a));
where S is the union of all the [t
j 1
;t
j
] with t
j
62 E. By con-
struction, this set is contained in [a;b] and contains [a;b]nU. Since
R
U
jF
0
(x)j dx  ", we conclude that
Z
S
F
0
(y) dy =
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(y) dy +O("):
Putting everything together, we conclude that
F(b)  F(a) =
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(y) dy +O(")+O("jb  aj):
Since " > 0 was arbitrary, the claim follows.
Combining this result with Exercise 1.6.48, we obtain a satisfac-
tory classication of the absolutely continuous functions:
Exercise 1.6.50. Show that a function F : [a;b] ! R is absolutely
continuous if and only if it takes the form F(x) =
R
[a;x]
f(y) dy + C
for some absolutely integrable f : [a;b] ! R and a constant C.
Exercise 1.6.51 (Compatibility of the strong and weak derivatives
in the absolutely continuous case). Let F : [a;b] ! R be an abso-
lutely continuous function, and let  : [a;b] ! R be a continuously
dierentiable function supported in a compact subset of (a;b). Show
that
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx =  
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx.
Inspecting the proof of Theorem 1.6.40, we see that the abso-
lute continuity was used primarily in two ways: rstly, to ensure the
almost everywhere existence, and to control an exceptional null set
E. It turns out that one can achieve the latter control by making a
dierent hypothesis, namely that the function F is everywhere dier-
entiable rather than merely almost everywhere dierentiable. More
precisely, we have
Delete a page from a pdf online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
pdf delete page; delete pages from pdf in preview
Delete a page from a pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete pages in pdf
176
1. Measure theory
Proposition 1.6.41 (Second fundamental theoremofcalculus,again).
Let [a;b] be a compact interval of positive length, let F : [a;b] ! R be
adierentiable function, such that F
0
is absolutely integrable. Then
the Lebesgue integral
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx of F
0
is equal to F(b)  F(a).
Proof. This will be similar to the proof of Theorem 1.6.40, the one
main new twist being that we need several open sets U instead ofjust
one. Let E  [a;b] be the set of points x which are not Lebesgue
points of F
0
,together with the endpoints a;b. This is a null set. Let
"> 0, and then let  > 0 be small enough that
R
U
jF
0
(x)j dx  "
whenever U is measurable with m(U)  . We can also ensure that
 ".
For every natural number m = 1;2;::: we can nd an open set
U
m
containing E of measure m(U
m
) =4
m
. In particular we see
that m(
S
1
m=1
U
m
)  and thus
R
S
1
m=1
U
m
jF
0
(x)j dx  ".
Now dene a gauge function  : [a;b] ! (0;+1) as follows.
(i) If x 2 E, we dene (x) > 0 to be small enough that the
open interval (x   (x);x + (x)) lies in U
m
, where m is
the rst natural number such that jF
0
(x)j  2
m
,and also
small enough that jF(y)  F(x)  (y  x)F
0
(x)j  "jy   xj
holds whenever jy  xj  (x). (Here we crucially use the
everywhere dierentiability to ensure that f0(x) exists and
is nite here.)
(ii) Ifx 62 E, welet(x)> 0 besmall enough thatjF(y) F(x) 
(y  x)F
0
(x)j  "jy  xj holds whenever jy  xj  (x), and
such that j
1
jIj
R
I
F
0
(y) dy   F
0
(x)j  " whenever I is an
interval containing x of length at most (x), exactly as in
the proof of Theorem 1.6.40.
Applying Cousin’s theorem, we can nd a partition a = t
0
< t
1
<
::: < t
k
=b with k  1, together with real numbers t
j
2[t
j 1
;t
j
]for
each 1  j  k and t
j
t
j 1
(t
j
).
As before, we express F(b) F(a) as a telescoping series
F(b) F(a)=
Xk
j=1
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
):
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
delete page from pdf reader; acrobat extract pages from pdf
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
delete pages from pdf online; delete a page in a pdf file
1.6. Dierentiation theorems
177
For the contributions of those j with t
j
62 E, we argue exactly as in
the proof of Theorem 1.6.40 to conclude eventually that
X
j:t
j
62E
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)=
Z
S
F
0
(y) dy +O("(b  a));
where S is the union of all the [t
j 1
;t
j
]with t
j
62 E. Since
Z
[a;b]nS
jF
0
(x)j dx 
Z
S
1
m=1
U
m
jF
0
(x)j dx  "
we thus have
Z
S
F
0
(y) dy =
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(y) dy +O("):
Now we turn to those j with t
j
2E. By construction, we have
F(t
j
 F(t
j 1
)= (t
j
t
j 1
)F
0
(t
j
)+ O("jt
j
t
j 1
j)
r these intervals, and so
X
j:t
j
2E
F(t
j
) F(t
j 1
)= (
X
j:t
j
2E
(t
j
t
j 1
)F
0
(t
j
))+O("(b  a)):
Next, for each j we have F
0
(t
j
) 2
m
and [t
j 1
;t
j
] U
m
for some
natural number m = 1;2;:::, by construction. By countable additiv-
ity, we conclude that
(
X
j:t
j
2E
(t
j
t
j 1
)F
0
(t
j
))
X1
m=1
2
m
m(U
m
)
X1
m=1
2
m
"=4
m
=O("):
Putting all this together, we again have
F(b)  F(a) =
Z
[a;b]
F
0
(y) dy +O(")+O("jb  aj):
Since " > 0 was arbitrary, the claim follows.
Remark 1.6.42. The aboveproposition is yet another illustration of
how the propertyof everywhere dierentiability is signicantly better
than that of almost everywhere dierentiability. In practice, though,
the above proposition is not as useful as one might initially think,
because there are very few methods that establish the everywhere
dierentiability of a function that do not also establish continuous
dierentiability (or at least Riemann integrability of the derivative),
at which point one could just use Theorem 1.6.7 instead.
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Free components and online source codes for .NET framework 2.0+. PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete pdf pages reader; add and delete pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
cut pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf reader
178
1. Measure theory
Exercise 1.6.52. Let F : [ 1;1] ! R be the function dened by
setting F(x) := x2sin(
1
x3
)when x is non-zero, and F(0) := 0. Show
that F is everywhere dierentiable, but the deriative F
0
is not abso-
lutely integrable, and so the second fundamental theorem of calculus
does not apply in this case (at least if we interpret
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx
using the absolutely convergent Lebesgue integral). See however the
next exercise.
Exercise 1.6.53 (Henstock-Kurzweil integral). Let [a;b] be a com-
pact interval of positive length. We say that a function f : [a;b] ! R
is Henstock-Kurzweil integrable with integral L 2R if for every " > 0
there exists a gauge function  : [a;b] ! (0;+1) such that one has
j
Xk
j=1
f(t
j
)(t
j
t
j 1
 Lj  "
whenever k  1 and a = t
0
<t
1
< ::: < t
k
= b and t
1
;:::;t
k
are
such that t
j
2[t
j 1
;t
j
]and jt
j
t
j 1
j (t
j
) for every 1  j  k.
When this occurs, we call L the Henstock-Kurzweil integral of f and
write it as
R
[a;b]
f(x) dx.
(i) Show that if a function is Henstock-Kurzweil integrable,
it has a unique Henstock-Kurzweil integral. (Hint: use
Cousin’s theorem.)
(ii) Show that if a function is Riemann integrable, then it is
Henstock-Kurzweil integrable, and the Henstock-Kurzweil
integral
R
[a;b]
f(x)dx isequalto theRiemannintegral
R
b
a
f(x)dx.
(iii) Show that if a function f : [a;b] ! R is everywhere de-
ned, everywhere nite, and isabsolutely integrable, then it
isHenstock-Kurzweil integrable, andtheHenstock-Kurzweil
integral
R
[a;b]
f(x)dx isequalto theLebesgueintegral
R
[a;b]
f(x)dx.
(Hint: this is a variant of the proof of Theorem 1.6.40 or
Proposition 1.6.41.)
(iv) Show that if F : [a;b] ! R is everywhere dierentiable,
then F
0
is Henstock-Kurzweil integrable, and the Henstock-
Kurzweil integral
R
[a;b]
F
0
(x) dx is equal to F(b)   F(a).
(Hint: this is a variant of the proof of Theorem 1.6.40 or
Proposition 1.6.41.)
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET source code. Support .NET WinForms, ASP
cut pages from pdf online; delete pages from a pdf reader
VB.NET PDF - Convert PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
RasterEdge. PRODUCTS: ONLINE DEMOS: Online HTML5 Document Viewer; Online XDoc.PDF C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages;
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
179
(v) Explain why the above results give an alternate proof of
Exercise 1.6.4 and of Proposition 1.6.41.
Remark 1.6.43. As the above exercise indicates, the Henstock-
Kurzweil integral (also known as the Denjoy integral or Perron in-
tegral) extends the Riemann integral and the absolutely convergent
Lebesgue integral, at least as long as one restricts attention to func-
tions that are dened and are nite everywhere (in contrast to the
Lebesgue integral, which is willing to tolerate functions being innite
or undened so long as thisonly occurs on a null set). It is the notion
of integration that is most naturally associated with the fundamental
theorem of calculus for everywhere dierentiablefunctions, as seen in
part 4 of the above exercise; it can also be used as a unied frame-
work for all the proofs in this section that invoked Cousin’s theorem.
The Henstock-Kurzweil integral can also integrate some (highly os-
cillatory) functions that the Lebesgue integral cannot, such as the
derivative F
0
of the function F appearing in Exercise 1.6.52. This is
analogous to how conditional summation lim
N!1
P
N
n=1
a
n
can sum
conditionally convergent series
P
1
n=1
a
n
, even if they are not abso-
lutely integrable. However, much as conditional summation is not
always well-behaved with respect to rearrangement, the Henstock-
Kurzweil integral does not always react well to changes of variable;
also, due to its reliance on the order structure of the real line R,
it is dicult to extend the Henstock-Kurzweil integral to more gen-
eral spaces, such as the Euclidean space R
d
,or to abstract measure
spaces.
1.7. Outer measures, pre-measures, and product
measures
In this text so far, we have focused primarily on one specic example
of a countably additive measure, namely Lebesgue measure. This
measure was constructed from a more primitive concept of Lebesgue
outer measure, which in turn was constructed from the even more
primitive concept of elementary measure.
It turnsoutthatboth of theseconstructionscanbeabstracted. In
this section, we will give the Caratheodory extension theorem, which
constructs a countably additive measure from any abstract outer
VB.NET PDF - Annotate PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Ability to insert a text note after selected text. Allow users to draw freehand shapes on PDF page. VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer: Annotate PDF Online.
delete page numbers in pdf; add and delete pages in pdf online
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
Delete and remove all image objects contained in a specific to remove a specific image from PDF document page. Free .NET PDF SDK library download and online C#
delete pdf pages android; delete page in pdf preview
180
1. Measure theory
measure; this generalises the construction of Lebesgue measure from
Lebesgue outer measure. One can in turn construct outer measures
from another concept known as a pre-measure, of which elementary
measure is a typical example.
With thesetools, onecan startconstructing manymoremeasures,
such as Lebesgue-Stieltjes measures, product measures, and Hausdor
measures. With a little more eort, one can also establish the Kol-
mogorov extension theorem, which allows one to construct a variety
of measures on innite-dimensional spaces, and is of particular im-
portance in the foundations of probability theory, as it allows one to
set up probability spaces associated to both discrete and continuous
random processes, even if they have innite length.
The most important result about product measure, beyond the
fact that it exists, is that one can use it to evaluate iterated inte-
grals, and to interchange their order, provided that the integrand
is either unsigned or absolutely integrable. This fact is known as
the Fubini-Tonelli theorem, and is an absolutely indispensable tool
for computing integrals, and for deducing higher-dimensional results
from lower-dimensional ones.
In this section we will however omit a very important way to
construct measures, namely the Riesz representation theorem, which
is discussed in x1.10 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I.
1.7.1. Outer measures and the Caratheodory extension the-
orem. We begin with the abstract concept of an outer measure.
Denition 1.7.1 (Abstract outer measure). Let X be a set. An ab-
stract outer measure (or outer measure for short) is a map 
:2
X
!
[0;+1] that assigns an unsigned extended real number 
(E) 2
[0;+1] to every set E  X which obeys the following axioms:
(i) (Empty set) 
(;)= 0.
(ii) (Monotonicity) If E  F, then 
(E)  
(F).
(iii) (Countable subadditivity) If E
1
;E
2
;:::  X is a countable
sequenceofsubsets ofX, then
(
S
1
n=1
E
n
)
P
1
n=1
(E
n
).
Outer measures are also known as exterior measures.
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
181
Thus, for instance, Lebesgue outer measure m
is an outer mea-
sure (see Exercise 1.2.3). On the other hand, Jordan outer measure
m
;(J)
is only nitely subadditive rather than countably subadditive
and thus is not, strictly speaking, an outer measure; for this reason
this concept is often referred to as Jordan outer content rather than
Jordan outer measure.
Note that outer measures are weaker than measures in that they
aremerely countably subadditive, rather than countably additive. On
the other hand, they are able to measure all subsets of X, whereas
measures can only measure a -algebra of measurable sets.
In Denition1.2.2, weusedLebesgueouter measuretogetherwith
the notion of an open set to dene the concept of Lebesgue measur-
ability. This denition is not available in our more abstract setting,
as we do not necessarily have the notion of an open set. An alterna-
tive denition of measurability was put forth in Exercise 1.2.17, but
this still required the notion of a box or an elementary set, which is
still not available in this setting. Nevertheless, we can modify that
denition to give an abstract denition of measurability:
Denition 1.7.2 (Caratheodory measurability). Let 
be an outer
measure on a set X. A set E  X is said to be Caratheodory mea-
surable with respect to 
if one has
(A) = 
(A\E)+
(AnE)
for every set A X.
Exercise 1.7.1 (Null sets are Caratheodory measurable). Suppose
that E is a null set for an outer measure 
(i.e. 
(E) = 0). Show
that E is Caratheodory measurable with respect to 
.
Exercise 1.7.2 (Compatibility with Lebesgue measurability). Show
that a set E  Rd is Caratheodory measurable with respect to
Lebesgue outer measurable if and only if it is Lebesgue measurable.
(Hint: one direction follows from Exercise 1.2.17. For the other di-
rection, rst verify simple cases, such as when E is a box, or when E
or A are bounded.)
The construction of Lebesgue measure can then be abstracted as
follows:
182
1. Measure theory
Theorem 1.7.3 (Caratheodory extension theorem). Let 
:2
X
!
[0;+1] be an outer measure on a set X, let B be the collection of all
subsets of X that are Caratheodory measurable with respect to 
,and
let  : B ! [0;+1] be the restriction of 
to B (thus (E) := 
(E)
whenever E 2B). Then B is a -algebra, and  is a measure.
Proof. We begin with the -algebra property. It is easy to see that
the empty set lies in B, and that the complement of a set in B lies
in B also. Next, we verify that B is closed under nite unions (which
will make B a Boolean algebra). Let E;F 2 B, and let A  X be
arbitrary. By denition, it suces to show that
(1.31)
(A) = 
(A\(E [F))+
(An(E [F)):
To simplify the notation, we partition A into the four disjoint sets
A
00
:= An(E [F);
A
10
:= (AnF)\E;
A
01
:= (AnE) \F;
A
11
:= A\E \F
(the reader may wish to draw a Venn diagram hereto understand the
nature of these sets). Thus (1.31) becomes
(1.32) 
(A
00
[A
01
[A
10
[A
11
)= 
(A
01
[A
10
[A
11
)+
(A
00
):
On the other hand, from the Caratheodory measurability of E, one
has
(A
00
[A
01
[A
10
[A
11
)= 
(A
00
[A
01
)+ 
(A
10
[A
11
)
and
(A
01
[A
10
[A
11
)= 
(A
01
)+ 
(A
10
[A
11
)
while from the Caratheodory measurability of F one has
(A
00
[A
01
)= 
(A
00
)+
(A
01
);
putting these identities together we obtain (1.32). (Note that no
subtraction is employed here, and so the arguments still work when
some sets have innite outer measure.)
Now we verify that B is a -algebra. As it is already a Boolean
algebra, it suces (see Exercise1.7.3 below)to verifythat B is closed
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
183
with respect to countable disjoint unions. Thus, let E
1
;E
2
;::: be
adisjoint sequence of Caratheodory-measurable sets, and let A be
arbitrary. We wish to show that
(A) = 
(A\
1[
n=1
E
n
)+
(An
1[
n=1
E
n
):
In view of subadditivity, it suces to show that
(A)  
(A\
1[
n=1
E
n
)+
(An
1[
n=1
E
n
):
For any N  1,
S
N
n=1
E
n
is Caratheodory measurable (as B is a
Boolean algebra), and so
(A)  
(A\
[N
n=1
E
n
)+
(An
[N
n=1
E
n
):
By monotonicity, 
(An
S
N
n=1
E
n
) 
(An
S
1
n=1
E
n
). Taking limits
as N ! 1, it thus suces to show that
(A\
1[
n=1
E
n
) lim
N!1
(A\
[N
n=1
E
n
):
But by the Caratheodory measurability of
S
N
n=1
E
n
,we have
(A\
N[+1
n=1
E
n
)= 
(A\
[N
n=1
E
n
)+ 
(A\E
N+1
n
[N
n=1
E
n
)
for any N  0, and thus on iteration
lim
N!1
(A\
[N
n=1
E
n
)=
X1
N=0
(A\E
N+1
n
N[
n=1
E
n
)
On the other hand, from countable subadditivity one has
(A\
1[
n=1
E
n
)
X1
N=0
(A\E
N+1
n
[N
n=1
E
n
)
and the claim follows.
Finally, we show that  is a measure. It is clear that (;) = 0,
so it suces to establish countable additivity, thus we need to show
184
1. Measure theory
that
(
1[
n=1
E
n
)=
X1
n=1
(E
n
)
whenever E
1
;E
2
;::: are Caratheodory-measurable and disjoint. By
subadditivity it suces to show that
(
[1
n=1
E
n
)
X1
n=1
(E
n
):
By monotonicity it suces to show that
(
[N
n=1
E
n
)=
XN
n=1
(E
n
)
for anyniteN. ButfromtheCaratheodorymeasurabilityof
S
N
n=1
E
n
one has
(
N[+1
n=1
E
n
)= 
(
[N
n=1
E
n
)+
(E
N+1
)
for any N  0, and the claim follows from induction.
Exercise 1.7.3. Let B be a Boolean algebra on a set X. Show that
Bis a -algebra if and only if it is closed under countable disjoint
unions, which means that
S
1
n=1
E
n
2B whenever E
1
;E
2
;E
3
;::: 2B
are a countable sequence of disjoint sets in B.
Remark 1.7.4. Note that the above theorem, combined with Exer-
cise1.7.2 gives a slightlyalternatewayto constructLebesgue measure
from Lebesgue outer measure than the construction given in Section
1.2. This is arguably a more ecient way to proceed, but is also less
geometrically intuitive than the approach taken in Section 1.2.
Remark 1.7.5. From Exercise 1.7.1 we see that the measure  con-
structed by the Caratheodory extension theorem is automatically
complete (see Denition 1.4.31).
Remark 1.7.6. In x1.15 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I, an impor-
tant example of a measure constructed by Caratheodory’s theorem is
given, namely the d-dimensional Hausdor measure H
d
on R
n
that
is good for measuring the size of d-dimensional subsets of R
n
.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested