c# pdf reader text : Delete pdf pages acrobat control application system web page azure windows console TaoMeasureTheory21-part702

1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
195
Y
(x;y) := y. OnecancertainlytakeCartesian productsX
1
:::X
d
of more than two sets, or even takean inniteproduct
Q
2A
X
,but
for simplicity we will only discuss the theory for products of two sets
for now.
Now suppose that (X;B
X
) and (Y;B
Y
) are measurable spaces.
Thenwecanstill form theCartesian productXY andtheprojection
maps 
X
:X  Y ! X and 
Y
:X Y ! Y . But now we can also
form the pullback -algebras
X
(B
X
):= f
1
X
(E): E 2 B
X
g= fE Y : E 2 B
X
g
and
Y
(B
Y
):= f
1
Y
(E) : E 2B
Y
g= fX  F : F 2 B
Y
g:
We then dene the product -algebra B
X
B
Y
to be the -algebra
generated by the union of these two -algebras:
B
X
B
Y
:= h
X
(B
X
)[
Y
(B
Y
)i:
This denition has several equivalent formulations:
Exercise 1.7.18. Let (X;B
X
)and (Y;B
Y
)be measurable spaces.
(i) Show that B
X
B
Y
is the -algebra generated by the sets
EF with E 2 B
X
,Y 2 B
Y
. In other words, B
X
B
Y
is
the coarsest -algebra on X Y with the property that the
product of a B
X
-measurable set and a B
Y
-measurable set is
always B
X
B
Y
measurable.
(ii) Show that B
X
B
Y
is the coarsest -algebra on X  Y
that makes the projection maps 
X
;
Y
both measurable
morphisms (see Remark 1.4.33).
(iii) If E 2 B
X
B
Y
,show that the sets E
x
:= fy 2Y : (x;y)2
Eg lie in B
Y
for every x 2 X, and similarly that the sets
E
y
:= fx 2 X : (x;y)2 Eg lie in B
X
for every y 2 Y.
(iv) If f : X  Y ! [0;+1] is measurable (with respect to
B
X
B
Y
), show that the function f
x
:y 7! f(x;y) is B
Y
-
measurable for every x 2X, and similarly that thefunction
f
y
:x 7! f(x;y) is B
X
-measurable for every y 2Y .
(v) If E 2 B
X
B
Y
, show that the slices E
x
:= fy 2 Y :
(x;y)2 Eg lie in a countably generated -algebra. In other
Delete pdf pages acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page on pdf document; cut pages out of pdf online
Delete pdf pages acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf file; delete pages from pdf
196
1. Measure theory
words, show that there exists an at most countable collec-
tion A = A
E
of sets (which can depend on E) such that
fE
x
:x 2 Xg  hAi. Conclude in particular that the num-
ber of distinct slices E
x
is at most c, the cardinality of the
continuum. (The last part of this exercise is only suitable
for students who are comfortable with cardinal arithmetic.)
Exercise 1.7.19.
(i) Show that the product of two trivial -algebras (on two
dierent spaces X;Y ) is again trivial.
(ii) Show that the product of two atomic -algebras is again
atomic.
(iii) Show thattheproductoftwo nite -algebras is again nite.
(iv) Show that the product of two Borel -algebras (on two Eu-
clidean spaces R
d
;R
d
0
with d;d
0
 1) is again the Borel
-algebra (on R
d
R
d
0
R
d+d
0
).
(v) Show that the product of two Lebesgue -algebras (on two
Euclidean spaces R
d
;R
d
0
withd;d
0
1) is not theLebesgue
-algebra. (Hint: argue by contradiction and use Exercise
1.7.18(iii).)
(vi) However, show that the Lebesgue -algebra on R
d+d
0
is
the completion (see Exercise 1.4.26) of the product of the
Lebesgue -algebras of Rd and Rd
0
with respect to d+d0-
dimensional Lebesgue measure.
(vii) This part of the exercise is only for students who are com-
fortable with cardinal arithmetic. Give an example to show
that theproductoftwo discrete-algebrasis notnecessarily
discrete.
(viii) On the other hand, show that the product of two discrete
-algebras 2X;2Y isagain a discrete -algebra if atleastone
of the domains X;Y is at most countably innite.
Nowsupposewehavetwo measurespaces(X;B
X
;
X
)and(Y;B
Y
;
Y
).
Given that wecan multiply together thesets X and Y to form a prod-
uct set X Y, and can multiply the -algebras B
X
and B
Y
together
to form a product -algebra B
X
B
Y
,it is natural to expect that we
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print.
delete pages from pdf file online; delete pages pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete page on pdf file; delete pdf page acrobat
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
197
can multiply the two measures 
X
:B
X
![0;+1] and 
Y
:B
Y
!
[0;+1] to form a product measure
X

Y
:B
X
B
Y
![0;+1]. In
view of the\base times height formula" thatone learns in elementary
school, one expects to have
(1.36)
X

Y
(E  F) = 
X
(E)
Y
(F)
whenever E 2 B
X
and F 2 B
Y
.
To construct this measure, it is convenient to make the assump-
tion that both spaces are -nite:
Denition 1.7.10 (-nite). A measurespace (X;B;) is -nite if
Xcan be expressed as the countable union of sets of nite measure.
Thus, for instance, R
d
with Lebesgue measure is -nite, as R
d
can be expressed as the union of (for instance) the balls B(0;n) for
n= 1;2;3;:::, each of which has nite measure. On the other hand,
R
d
with counting measure is not -nite (why?). But most measure
spaces that oneactually encounters in analysis (including, clearly, all
probability spaces) are -nite. It is possible to partially extend the
theory of product spaces to the non--nite setting, but there are a
number of very delicate technical issues that arise and so we will not
discuss them here.
As long as we restrict attention to the -nite case, product mea-
sure always exists and is unique:
Proposition 1.7.11 (Existenceand uniquenessof productmeasure).
Let (X;B
X
;
X
) and (Y;B
Y
;
Y
) be -nite measure spaces. Then
there exists a unique measure 
X

Y
on B
X
B
Y
that obeys 
X
Y
(E F) = 
X
(E)
Y
(F) whenever E 2 B
X
and F 2 B
Y
.
Proof. We rst show existence. Inspired by the fact that Lebesgue
measureistheHahn-Kolmogorovcompletionofelementary(pre-)measure,
we shall rst construct an \elementary product pre-measure" that we
will then apply Theorem 1.7.8 to.
Let B
0
be the collection of all nite unions
S:= (E
1
F
1
)[:::[(E
k
F
k
)
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete page from pdf; delete pages in pdf online
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
cut pages out of pdf file; delete page pdf file
198
1. Measure theory
of Cartesian products of B
X
-measurable sets E
1
;:::;E
k
and B
Y
-
measurable sets F
1
;:::;F
k
. (One can think of such sets as being
somewhat analogous to elementary sets in Euclidean space, although
the analogy is not perfectly exact.) It is not dicult to verify that
this is a Boolean algebra (though it is not, in general, a -algebra).
Also, any set in B
0
can be easily decomposed into a disjoint union
of product sets E
1
F
1
;:::;E
k
F
k
of B
X
-measurable sets and B
Y
-
measurable sets (cf. Exercise 1.1.2). We then dene the quantity
0
(S) associated such a disjoint union S by the formula
0
(S) :=
Xk
j=1
X
(E
j
)
Y
(F
j
)
whenever S is the disjoint union of products E
1
F
1
;:::;E
k
F
k
of B
X
-measurable sets and B
Y
-measurable sets. One can show that
this denition does not depend on exactly how S is decomposed, and
gives a nitely additive measure 
0
:B
0
![0;+1] (cf. Exercise 1.1.2
and Exercise 1.4.33).
Now we show that 
0
is a pre-measure. It suces to show that
if S 2B
0
is the countable disjoint union of sets S
1
;S
2
;::: 2 B
0
,then
0
(S) =
P
1
n=1
(S
n
).
Splitting S up into disjoint product sets, and restricting the S
n
to each of these product sets in turn, we may assume without loss
of generality (using the nite additivity of 
0
)that S = E  F for
some E 2 B
X
and F 2 B
Y
. In a similar spirit, by breaking each S
n
up into component product sets and using nite additivity again, we
may assume without loss of generality that each S
n
takes the form
S
n
=E
n
F
n
for some E
n
2B
X
and F
n
2B
Y
. By denition of 
0
,
our objective is now to show that
X
(E)
Y
(F) =
X1
n=1
X
(E
n
)
Y
(F
n
):
To do this, rst observe fromconstruction that we havethe pointwise
identity
1
E
(x)1
F
(y) =
X1
n=1
1
E
n
(x)1
F
n
(y)
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete a page from a pdf; best pdf editor delete pages
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
delete page in pdf online; delete pages of pdf preview
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
199
for all x 2 X and y 2 Y. We x x 2 X, and integrate this identity in
y(noting that both sides are measurable and unsigned) to conclude
that
Z
Y
1
E
(x)1
F
(y) d
Y
(y) =
Z
Y
X1
n=1
1
E
n
(x)1
F
n
(y) d
Y
(y):
The left-hand side simplies to 1
E
(x)
Y
(F). To compute the right-
handside, weusethemonotoneconvergencetheorem(Theorem1.4.44)
to interchange the summation and integration, and soon see that the
right-hand side is
P
1
n=1
1
E
n
(x)
Y
(F
n
), thus
1
E
(x)
Y
(F) =
X1
n=1
1
E
n
(x)
Y
(F
n
)
for all x. Both sides are measurable and unsigned in x, so we may
integrate in X and conclude that
Z
X
1
E
(x)
Y
(F) d
X
=
Z
X
X1
n=1
1
E
n
(x)
Y
(F
n
)d
X
(x):
Theleft-handside hereis 
X
(E)
Y
(F). Using monotoneconvergence
as before, theright-hand side simplies to
P
1
n=1
X
(E
n
)
Y
(F
n
), and
the claim follows.
Now that we have established that 
0
is a pre-measure, we may
apply Theorem 1.7.8 to extend this measure to a countably additive
measure
X

Y
on a -algebracontaining B
0
.ByExercise 1.7.18(2),
X

Y
isa countablyadditivemeasureon B
X
B
Y
,andasitextends
0
,it willobey(1.36). Finally, toshow uniqueness, observefromnite
additivity that any measure 
X

Y
on B
X
B
Y
that obeys (1.36)
must extend 
0
,and so uniqueness follows from Exercise 1.7.7.
Remark 1.7.12. When X, Y are not both -nite, then one can
still construct at least one product measure, but it will, in general,
not be unique. This makes the theory much more subtle, and we will
not discuss it in these notes.
Example 1.7.13. From Exercise 1.2.22, we see that the product
m
d
m
d
0
of the Lebesgue measures m
d
;m
d
0
on (R
d
;L[R
d
]) and
(Rd;L[Rd
0
]) respectively will agreewith Lebesgue measure md+d
0
on
the product space L[R
d
] L[R
d
0
], which as noted in Exercise 1.7.19
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
delete blank pages in pdf files; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete pages on pdf online; delete page in pdf
200
1. Measure theory
is a subalgebra of L[R
d+d
0
]. After taking the completion
md md
0
of
this product measure, one obtains the full Lebesgue measure md+d
0
.
Exercise 1.7.20. Let (X;B
X
), (Y;B
Y
)be measurable spaces.
(i) Show that the product of two Dirac measures on (X;B
X
),
(Y;B
Y
)is a Dirac measure on (X Y;B
X
B
Y
).
(ii) If X;Y are at most countable, show that the product of the
two counting measures on (X;B
X
), (Y;B
Y
)is the counting
measure on (X  Y;B
X
B
Y
).
Exercise 1.7.21 (Associativityofproduct). Let(X;B
X
;
X
), (Y;B
Y
;
Y
),
(Z;B
Z
;
Z
)be -nite sets. We may identify the Cartesian products
(X Y ) Z and X  (Y Z) with each other in the obvious man-
ner. If we do so, show that (B
X
B
Y
) B
Z
=B
X
(B
Y
B
Z
)and
(
X

Y
)
Z
=
X
(
Y

Z
).
Now we integrate using this product measure. We will need the
following technical lemma. Dene a monotone class in X is a collec-
tion B of subsets of X with the following two closure properties:
(i) If E
1
E
2
::: are a countableincreasing sequence of sets
in B, then
S
1
n=1
E
n
2B.
(ii) If E
1
E
2
::: area countable decreasing sequence of sets
in B, then
T
1
n=1
E
n
2B.
Lemma 1.7.14 (Monotoneclass lemma). Let A be a Boolean algebra
on X. Then hAi is the smallest monotone class that contains A.
Proof. Let B be the intersection of all the monotone classes that
contain A. Since hAi is clearly one such class, B is a subset of hAi.
Our task is then to show that B contains hAi.
It is also clear that B is a monotone class that contains A. By
replacing all the elements of B with their complements, we see that
Bis necessarily closed under complements.
For any E 2 A, consider the set C
E
of all sets F 2 B such that
FnE, EnF, F \E, and Xn(E [ F) all lie in B. It is clear that C
E
contains A; since B is a monotone class, we see that C
E
is also. By
denition of B, we conclude that C
E
=B for all E 2 A.
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
201
Next, let D be the set of all E 2 B such that FnE, EnF, F \E,
andXn(E[F)all lieinB forallF 2 B. Bythepreviousdiscussion, we
see that D contains A. One also easily veries that D is a monotone
class. By denition of B, we conclude that D = B. Since B is also
closed under complements, this implies that B is closed with respect
to nite unions. Since this class also contains A, which contains
;, we conclude that B is a Boolean algebra. Since B is also closed
underincreasing countable unions, weconcludethat it isclosed under
arbitrary countable unions, and is thus a -algebra. As it contains
A, it must also contain hAi.
Theorem 1.7.15 (Tonelli’stheorem, incompleteversion). Let (X;B
X
;
X
)
and (Y;B
Y
;
Y
) be -nite measure spaces, and let f : X  Y !
[0;+1] be measurable with respect to B
X
B
Y
. Then:
(i) The functions x 7!
R
Y
f(x;y)d
Y
(y) and y 7!
R
X
f(x;y) d
X
(x)
(which are well-dened, thanks to Exercise 1.7.18) are mea-
surable with respect to B
X
and B
Y
respectively.
(ii) We have
Z
XY
f(x;y) d
X

Y
(x;y)
=
Z
X
(
Z
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x)
=
Z
Y
(
Z
X
f(x;y) d
X
(x)) d
Y
(y):
Proof. By writing the -nite space X as an increasing union X =
S
1
n=1
X
n
of nite measure sets, we see from several applications of
the monotone convergence theorem (Theorem 1.4.44) that it suces
to prove the claims with X replaced by X
n
. Thus we may assume
without loss of generality that X has nite measure. Similarly we
may assume Y has nite measure. Note from (1.36) that this implies
that X Y has nite measure also.
Every unsigned measurable function is the increasing limit of un-
signed simple functions. By several applications of the monotone
convergence theorem (Theorem 1.4.44), we thus see that it suces to
202
1. Measure theory
verify theclaim when f is a simple function. By linearity, it then suf-
ces to verify the claim when f is an indicator function, thus f = 1
S
for some S 2 B
X
B
Y
.
Let C be the set of all S 2 B
X
B
Y
for which the claims hold.
From the repeated applications of themonotoneconvergence theorem
(Theorem 1.4.44) and the downward monotone convergence theorem
(which is available in this nite measure setting) we see that C is a
monotone class.
By direct computation (using (1.36)), we see that C contains as
an element any product S = E  F with E 2 B
X
and F 2 B
Y
. By
nite additivity, we concludethat C also contains as an element anya
disjoint niteunion S = E
1
F
1
[:::[E
k
F
k
ofsuchproducts. This
implies that C also contains the Boolean algebra B
0
in the proof of
Proposition 1.7.11, assuch setscanalwaysbeexpressedasthedisjoint
nite union of Cartesian products of measurable sets. Applying the
monotoneclass lemma, we conclude that C contains hB
0
i= B
X
B
Y
,
and the claim follows.
Remark 1.7.16. Note that Tonelli’s theorem for sums (Theorem
0.0.2) is a special case of the above result when 
X
;
Y
are counting
measure. In a similar spirit, Corollary 1.4.46 is the special case when
just one of 
X
;
Y
is counting measure.
Corollary 1.7.17. Let (X;B
X
;
X
)and (Y;B
Y
;
Y
)be -nite mea-
sure spaces, and let E 2B
X
B
Y
be a null set with respect to 
X

Y
.
Then for 
X
-almost every x 2X, the set E
x
:= fy 2 Y : (x;y) 2 Eg
is a 
Y
-null set; and similarly, for 
Y
-almost every y 2 Y , the set
E
y
:= fx 2 X : (x;y) 2 Eg is a 
X
-null set.
Proof. Applying the Tonelli theorem to the indicator function 1
E
,
we conclude that
0=
Z
X
(
Z
Y
1
E
(x;y)d
Y
(y))d
X
(x) =
Z
Y
(
Z
X
1
E
(x;y)d
X
(x))d
Y
(y)
and thus
0=
Z
X
Y
(E
x
)d
X
(x) =
Z
Y
X
(E
y
)d
Y
(y);
and the claim follows.
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
203
With this corollary, we can extend Tonelli’s theorem to the com-
pletion (XY;
B
X
B
Y
;
X

Y
)of theproductspace (XY;B
X
B
Y
;
X

Y
), as constructed in Exercise 1.4.26. But we can easily
extend the Tonelli theorem to this context:
Theorem 1.7.18 (Tonelli’stheorem, completeversion). Let (X;B
X
;
X
)
and (Y;B
Y
;
Y
)be complete -nite measure spaces, and let f : X 
Y ! [0;+1] be measurable with respect to
B
X
B
Y
. Then:
(i) For 
X
-almost every x 2 X, the function y 7! f(x;y) is
B
Y
-measurable, and in particular
R
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y) exists.
Furthermore, the (
X
-almost everywhere dened) map x 7!
R
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
is B
X
-measurable.
(ii) For 
Y
-almost every y 2 Y , the function x 7! f(x;y) is
B
X
-measurable, and in particular
R
X
f(x;y) d
X
(x) exists.
Furthermore, the (
Y
-almost everywhere dened) map y 7!
R
X
f(x;y) d
X
is B
Y
-measurable.
(iii) We have
Z
XY
f(x;y) d
X

Y
(x;y) =
Z
X
(
Z
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x)
=
Z
X
(
Z
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x):
(1.37)
Proof. From Exercise 1.4.28, every measurable set in
B
X
B
Y
is
equal to a measurable set in B
X
B
Y
outside of a 
X

Y
-null set.
This implies that the
B
X
B
Y
-measurable function f agrees with a
B
X
B
Y
-measurable function
~
foutside of a 
X

Y
-null set E (as
can be seen by expressing f as the limit of simple functions). From
Corollary 1.7.17, we see that for 
X
-almost every x 2 X, the function
y7! f(x;y) agrees with y 7!
~
f(x;y) outside of a 
Y
-null set (and is
in particular measurable, as (Y;B
Y
;
Y
) is complete); and similarly
for 
Y
-almost every y 2 Y , the function x 7! f(x;y) agrees with
x7!
~
f(x;y) outside of a 
X
-null set and is measurable, and the claim
follows.
Specialising to the case when f is an indicator function f = 1
E
,
we conclude
204
1. Measure theory
Corollary 1.7.19 (Tonelli’s theorem for sets). Let (X;B
X
;
X
)and
(Y;B
Y
;
Y
)be complete-nite measure spaces, and let E 2
B
X
B
Y
.
Then:
(i) For 
X
-almost every x 2X, the set E
x
:= fy 2Y : (x;y)2
Eg lies in B
Y
,and the (
X
-almost everywhere dened) map
x7! 
Y
(E
x
)is B
X
-measurable.
(ii) For 
Y
-almost every y 2Y , the set E
y
:= fx 2 X : (x;y)2
Eg lies in B
X
,and the (
Y
-almost everywhere dened) map
y7! 
X
(Ey) is B
Y
-measurable.
(iii) We have
(1.38)
X

Y
(E) =
Z
X
Y
(E
x
)d
X
(x)
=
Z
X
X
(E
y
)d
X
(x):
Exercise 1.7.22. The purpose of this exercise isto demonstrate that
Tonelli’s theorem can fail if the -nite hypothesis is removed, and
also that product measure need not be unique. Let X is the unit
interval [0;1] with Lebesgue measure m (and the Lebesgue -algebra
L([0;1])) and Y is the unit interval [0;1] with counting measure (and
the discrete -algebra 2[0;1]) #. Letf := 1
E
betheindicator function
of the diagonal E := f(x;x) : x 2 [0;1]g.
(i) Show that f is measurable in the product -algebra.
(ii) Show that
R
X
(
R
Y
f(x;y) d#(y))dm(x) = 1.
(iii) Show that
R
Y
(
R
X
f(x;y) dm(x))d#(y) = 0.
(iv) Show that there is more than one measure  on L([0;1])
2
[0;1]
with the property that (E  F) = m(E)#(F) for all
E 2 L([0;1]) and F 2 2
[0;1]
. (Hint: use the two dierent
ways to perform a double integral to create two dierent
measures.)
Remark 1.7.20. If f isnot assumed to bemeasurablein the product
space(oritscompletion), thenofcoursetheexpression
R
XY
f(x;y)d
X

Y
(x;y)
does not make sense. Furthermore, in this case the remaining two ex-
pressions in (1.37) may become dierent as well (in some models of
set theory, at least), even when X and Y are nite measure. For
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested