c# pdf reader text : Delete pages pdf files SDK application API .net html web page sharepoint TaoMeasureTheory22-part703

1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
205
instance, let us assume the continuum hypothesis, which implies that
the unit interval [0;1] can be placed in one-to-one correspondence
with the rst uncountable ordinal !
1
. Let  be the ordering of [0;1]
that is associated to this ordinal, let E := f(x;y) 2 [0;1]
2
:x  yg,
and let f := 1
E
.Then, for any y 2 [0;1], there areat most countably
many x such that x  y, and so
R
[0;1]
f(x;y) dx exists and is equal
to zero for every y. On the other hand, for every x 2 [0;1], one has
x y for all but countably many y 2 [0;1], and so
R
[0;1]
f(x;y) dy ex-
ists and is equal to one for every y, and so the last two expressions in
(1.37)exist but are unequal. (In particular, Tonelli’s theorem implies
that E cannot be a Lebesgue measurable subset of [0;1]
2
.) Thus we
see that measurability in the product space is an important hypoth-
esis. (There do however exist models of set theory (with the axiom
of choice) in which such counterexamples cannot be constructed, at
least in the case when X and Y are the unit interval with Lebesgue
measure.)
Tonelli’s theorem is for the unsigned integral, but it leads to an
important analogue for the absolutely integral, known as Fubini’s
theorem:
Theorem 1.7.21 (Fubini’stheorem). Let (X;B
X
;
X
)and (Y;B
Y
;
Y
)
be complete -nite measure spaces, and let f : X Y ! C be abso-
lutely integrable with respect to
B
X
B
Y
. Then:
(i) For 
X
-almost every x 2 X, the function y 7! f(x;y) is
absolutely integrable with respect to 
Y
, and in particular
R
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y) exists. Furthermore, the (
X
-almost ev-
erywhere dened) map x 7!
R
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y) is absolutely
integrable with respect to 
X
.
(ii) For 
Y
-almost every y 2 Y , the function x 7! f(x;y) is
absolutely integrable with respect to 
X
, and in particular
R
X
f(x;y) d
X
(x) exists. Furthermore, the (
Y
-almost ev-
erywhere dened) map y 7!
R
X
f(x;y) d
X
(x) is absolutely
integrable with respect to 
Y
.
Delete pages pdf files - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat extract pages from pdf; copy page from pdf
Delete pages pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete page from pdf file
206
1. Measure theory
(iii) We have
Z
XY
f(x;y) d
X

Y
(x;y) =
Z
X
(
Z
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x)
=
Z
X
(
Z
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x):
Proof. By taking real and imaginary parts we may assume that f
is real; by taking positive and negative parts we may assume that
f is unsigned. But then the claim follows from Tonelli’s theorem;
note from (1.37) that
R
X
(
R
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x) is nite, and so
R
Y
f(x;y) d
Y
(y) < 1 for 
X
-almost every x 2 X, and similarly
R
X
f(x;y) d
X
(x) < 1 for 
Y
-almost every y 2 Y .
Exercise 1.7.23. Givean exampleof a Borel measurablefunction f :
[0;1]
2
!R such that the integrals
R
[0;1]
f(x;y)dy and
R
[0;1]
f(x;y) dx
exist and are absolutely integrable for all x 2 [0;1] and y 2 [0;1] re-
spectively, and that
R
[0;1]
(
R
[0;1]
f(x;y) dy)dxand
R
[0;1]
(
R
[0;1]
f(x;y)dy)dx
exist and are absolutely integrable, but such that
Z
[0;1]
(
Z
[0;1]
f(x;y) dy) dx 6=
Z
[0;1]
(
Z
[0;1]
f(x;y) dy) dx:
areunequal. (Hint: adaptthe example from Remark 0.0.3.) Thus we
see that Fubini’s theorem fails when one drops the hypothesis that f
is absolutely integrable with respect to the product space.
Remark 1.7.22. Despite the failure of Tonelli’s theorem in the -
nite setting, it is possible to (carefully) extend Fubini’s theorem
to the non--nite setting, as the absolute integrability hypotheses,
when combined with Markov’s inequality (Exercise 1.4.36(vi)), can
provide a substitute for the -nite property. However, we will not
do so here, and indeed I would recommend proceeding with extreme
caution when performing any sort of interchange of integrals or in-
voking of product measure when one is not in the -nite setting.
Informally, Fubini’s theoremallows one to always interchangethe
orderof two integrals, aslong astheintegrandis absolutely integrable
in the product space (or its completion). In particular, specialising
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Page Process. File: Merge, Append PDF Files. File: Split PDF Document. File: Compress PDF. Page: Create Thumbnails. Page: Insert PDF Pages. Page: Delete Existing
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; add and remove pages from a pdf
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to reorganize PDF document pages and how
delete pages of pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf
1.7. Outer measure, pre-measure, product measure
207
to Lebesgue measure, we have
Z
Rd+d
0
f(x;y) d(x;y) =
Z
Rd
(
Z
Rd
0
f(x;y)dy)dx =
Z
Rd
0
(
Z
Rd
f(x;y)dx)dy
whenever f : R
d+d
0
!C is absolutely integrable. In view of this, we
often write dxdy (or dydx) for d(x;y).
By combining Fubini’s theorem with Tonelli’s theorem, we can
recast the absolute integrability hypothesis:
Corollary 1.7.23 (Fubini-Tonelli theorem). Let (X;B
X
;
X
) and
(Y;B
Y
;
Y
)be complete -nite measure spaces, and let f : XY !
Cbe measurable with respect to
B
X
B
Y
. If
Z
X
(
Z
Y
jf(x;y)j d
Y
(y)) d
X
(x)< 1
(note the left-hand side always exists, by Tonelli’s theorem) then f is
absolutely integrable with respect to
B
X
B
Y
,and in particular the
conclusions of Fubini’s theoremhold. Similarly ifwe use
R
Y
(
R
X
jf(x;y)j d
X
(x))d
Y
(y)
instead of
R
X
(
R
Y
jf(x;y)j d
Y
)d
X
.
The Fubini-Tonelli theorem is an indispensable tool for comput-
ing integrals. We give some basic examples below:
Exercise 1.7.24 (Area interpretation ofintegral). Let (X;B;) be a
-nitemeasurespace, and letR beequipped withLebesgue measure
mand the Borel -algebra B[R]. Show that if f : X ! [0;+1] is
measurable if and only if the set f(x;t) 2 X  R : 0  t  f(x)g is
measurable in B B[R], in which case we have
(m)(f(x;t) 2 X R : 0  t  f(x)g) =
Z
X
f(x) d(x):
Similarly if we replace f(x;t) 2 X  R : 0  t  f(x)g by f(x;t) 2
XR : 0  t < f(x)g.
Exercise 1.7.25 (Distribution formula). Let (X;B;) be a -nite
measure space, and let f : X ! [0;+1] be measurable. Show that
Z
X
f(x) d(x) =
Z
[0;+1]
(fx 2X : f(x)  g) d:
C#: How to Delete Cached Files from Your Web Viewer
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C#
delete page from pdf preview; delete a page in a pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Merge two or several separate PDF files together and into one PDF document in VB.NET. Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file.
delete page in pdf reader; add and delete pages from pdf
208
1. Measure theory
(Notethat theintegrand on the right-hand side is monotoneand thus
Lebesgue measurable.) Similarly if we replace fx 2X : f(x)  g by
fx 2X : f(x) > g.
Exercise 1.7.26 (Approximations to the identity). Let P : R
d
!
R
+
be a good kernel (see Exercise 1.6.27), and let P
t
(x) :=
1
td
P(
x
t
)
be the associated rescaled functions. Show that if f : R
d
! C is
absolutely integrable, that f P
t
converges in L1 norm to f as t ! 0.
(Hint: use the density argument. You will need an upper bound on
kf  P
t
k
L1(Rd)
which can be obtained using Tonelli’s theorem.)
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages. If needed, developers can also combine generated split PDF document files with other PDF
delete page from pdf online; delete blank page in pdf
C# PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in C#.net
How to Use C#.NET Demo Code to Convert PDF Document to HTML5 Files in C#.NET Class. Add necessary references: RasterEdge.Imaging.Basic.dll.
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; add or remove pages from pdf
Chapter 2
Related articles
209
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
split target multi-page PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
cut pages out of pdf online; delete pages from pdf document
VB.NET PDF Convert to HTML SDK: Convert PDF to html files in vb.
' Convert PDF file to HTML5 files DocumentConverter.ConvertToHtml5("..\1.pdf", "..output\", RelativeType.SVG). Copyright © <2000-2016> by <RasterEdge.com>.
copy pages from pdf to word; delete pages of pdf preview
210
2. Related articles
2.1. Problem solving strategies
Thepurposeofthissection isto list (in no particular order) a number
of common problem solving strategies forattacking real analysisexer-
cises such as that presented in this text. Some of these strategies are
specic to real analysis type problems, but others are quite general
and would be applicable to other mathematical exercises.
2.1.1. Split up equalities into inequalities. If one has to show
that two numerical quantities X and Y are equal, try proving that
X Y and Y  X separately. Often one of these will be very easy,
and the other one harder; but the easy direction may still provide
someclueas to what needs to bedoneto establish the otherdirection.
Exercise 1.1.6(iii) is a typical problem in which this strategy can be
applied.
In a similar spirit, to show that two sets E and F are equal, try
proving that E  F and F  E. See for instancethe proof of Lemma
1.2.11 for a simple example of this.
2.1.2. Give yourself an epsilon of room. If one has to show
that X  Y, try proving that X  Y + " for any " > 0. (This
trick combines well with x2.1.1.) See for instance Lemma 1.2.5 for an
example of this.
In a similar spirit:
 ifoneneeds to show thata quantity X vanishes, tryshowing
that jXj  " for every " > 0. (Exercise 1.2.19 is a simple
application of this strategy.)
 if one wishes to show that two functions f;g agree almost
everywhere, try showing rst that jf(x)  g(x)j  " holds
for almost every x, or even just outside of a set of measure
at most ", for any given " > 0. (See for instance the proof
of Lemma 1.5.7 for an example of this.)
 if one wants to show that a sequence x
n
of real numbers
converges to zero, try showing that limsup
n!1
jx
n
j  "
for every " > 0. (The proof of the Lebesgue dierentiation
theorem, Theorem 1.6.12, is in this spirit.)
2.1. Problem solving strategies
211
Don’t be too focused on getting all your error terms adding up to
exactly " - usually, as long as the nal error bound consists of terms
that can all be made as small as one wishes by choosing parameters
in a suitable way, that is enough. For instance, an error term such
as 10" is certainly OK, or even more complicated expressions such as
10"= +4 if one has the ability to choose  as small as one wishes,
and then after  is chosen, one can then also set " as small as one
wishes (in a manner that can depend on ).
One caveat: for nite x, and any " > 0, it is true that x +" > x
and x  "< x, but this statement is not true when x is equal to +1
(or 1). So remember to exercisesomecarewith the epsilon ofroom
trick when some quantities are innite.
See also x2.7 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I.
2.1.3. Decompose (or approximate) a rough or general ob-
ject into (or by) a smoother or simpler one. If one has to
prove something about an unbounded (or innite measure) set, con-
sider proving it for bounded (or nite measure) sets rst if this looks
easier.
In a similar spirit:
 If one has to prove something about a measurable set, try
provingitforopen, closed, compact, bounded, orelementary
sets rst.
 If one has to prove something about a measurable function,
try proving it for functions that are continuous, bounded,
compactly supported, simple, absolutely integrable, etc..
 If one has to prove something about an innite sum or se-
quence, try proving it rst for nite truncations of that sum
or sequence (but try to get all the bounds independent of
the number of terms in that truncation, so that you can still
pass to the limit!).
 If one has to prove something about a complex-valued func-
tion, try it for real-valued functions rst.
 If one has to prove something about a real-valued function,
try it for unsigned functions rst.
212
2. Related articles
 If one has to prove something about a simple function, try
it for indicator functions rst.
In order to pass back to the general case from these special cases,
onewill have to somehow decompose the general objectinto a combi-
nation of special ones, or approximate general objects by special ones
(or as a limit of a sequence of special objects). In the latter case,
one may need an epsilon of room (x2.1.2), and some sort of limiting
analysis may be needed to deal with the errors in the approximation
(it is not always enough to just \pass to the limit", as one has to
justify that the desirable properties of the approximating object are
preserved in the limit). Littlewood’s principles (Section 1.3.5) and
their variants are often useful for thus purpose.
Note: oneshouldnot do this blindly, asonemightthen beloading
on a bunch of distracting but ultimately useless hypotheses that end
up being a lot less help than one might hope. But they should be
kept in mind as something to try if one starts having thoughts such
as \Gee, it would be nice at this point if I could assume that f is
continuous / real-valued / simple / unsigned / etc.".
In the more quantitative areas of analysis and PDE, one sees
acommon variant of the above technique, namely the method of a
priori estimates. Here, one needs to prove an estimate or inequality
for all functions in a large, rough class (e.g. all rough solutions to
a PDE). One can often then rst prove this inequality in a much
smaller (but still \dense") class of \nice" functions, so that there is
little diculty justifying the various manipulations (e.g. exchanging
integrals, sums, or limits, or integrating by parts) that one wishes
to perform. Once one obtains these a priori estimates, one can then
often take some sort of limiting argument to recover the general case.
2.1.4. If one needs to  ip an upper bound to a lower bound
or vice versa, look for a way to take re ections or comple-
ments. Sometimes one needs a lower bound for some quantity, but
only has techniques that give upper bounds. In some cases, though,
one can \re ect" an upper bound into a lower bound (or vice versa)
by replacing a set E contained in some space X with its complement
XnE, or a function f with its negation  f (or perhaps subtracting f
2.1. Problem solving strategies
213
from some dominating function F to obtain F  f). This trick works
best when the objects being re ected are contained in some sort of
\bounded", \nite measure", or \absolutely integrable" container, so
that one avoids having the dangerous situation of having to subtract
innite quantities from each other.
Atypical example of this is when one deduces downward mono-
tone convergencefor sets from upward monotone convergence for sets
(Exercise 1.2.11).
2.1.5. Uncountable unions can sometimes be replaced by
countableorniteunions. Uncountableunionsarenotwell-behaved
in measure theory; for instance, an uncountable union of null sets
need not be a null set (or even a measurable set). (On the other
hand, the uncountable union of open sets remains open; this can of-
ten be important to know.) However, in many cases one can replace
an uncountable union by a countable one. For instance, if one needs
to prove a statement for all " > 0, then there are an uncountable
number of "’s one needs to check, which may threaten measurability;
but in many cases itis enough to only workwith a countablesequence
of "s, such as the numbers 1=m for m = 1;2;3;:::. (Exercise 1.6.30
relies heavily on this trick.)
In a similar spirit, given a real parameter , this parameter ini-
tially ranges over uncountably many values, but in some cases one
can get away with only working with a countable set of such values,
such as the rationals. In a similar spirit, rather than work with all
boxes (of which there are uncountably many), one might work with
the dyadic boxes (of which there are only countably many; also, they
obey nicer nesting properties than general boxes and so are often
desirable to work with in any event).
If you are working on a compact set, then one can often replace
even uncountable unions with nite ones, so long as one is working
with open sets. (The proof of Theorem 1.6.20 is a good example of
this strategy.) When this option is available, it is often worth spend-
ing an epsilon of measure (or whatever other resource is available to
spend) to make one’s sets open, just so that one can take advantage
of compactness.
214
2. Related articles
2.1.6. If it is dicult to work globally, work locally instead.
Adomain such as Euclidean space Rd has innite measure, and this
creates a number of technical diculties when trying to do measure
theory directly on such spaces. Sometimes it is best to work more
locally, for instance working on a large ball B(0;R) or even a small
ball such as B(x;") rst, and then guring out how to patch things
together later. Compactness (or the closely related property of total
boundedness) isoften useful for patching together small balls to cover
alarge ball. Patching together large balls into the whole space tends
to work well when the properties one are trying to establish are local
in nature (such as continuity, or pointwise convergence) or behave
well with respect to countable unions. For instance, to prove that
a sequence of functions f
n
converges pointwise almost everywhere
to f on R
d
, it suces to verify this pointwise almost everywhere
convergence on the ball B(0;R) for every R > 0 (which one can take
to be an integer to get countability, see x2.1.5). The application of
vertical truncation (as done, for instance, in the proof of Corollary
1.3.14) is an instance of this idea.
2.1.7. Bewilling to throwawayanexceptional set. The\Lebesgue
philosophy" to measure theory is that null sets areoften \irrelevant",
and so one should be very willing to cut out a set of measure zero
on which bad things are happening (e.g. a function is undened or
innite, a sequence of functions is not converging, etc.). One should
also be only slightly less willing to throw away sets of positive but
small measure, e.g. sets of measure at most ". If such sets can be
madearbitrarilysmall in measure, this is often almostas good as just
throwing away a null set.
Many things in measure theory improve after throwing away a
small set. The most notable examples of this are Egorov’s theorem
(Theorem 1.3.26) and Lusin’s theorem (Theorem 1.3.28); see also
Exercise 1.3.25 for some other examples of this idea.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested