c# pdf reader text : Cut pages from pdf preview Library application class asp.net html .net ajax TaoMeasureTheory3-part707

1.1. Prologue: The problem of measure
15
Exercise 1.1.20 (Piecewise constant functions). Let [a;b] be an in-
terval. A piecewise constant function f : [a;b] ! R is a function
for which there exists a partition of [a;b] into nitely many intervals
I
1
;:::;I
n
,suchthatf is equal to a constant c
i
on eachof theintervals
I
i
. If f is piecewise constant, show that the expression
Xn
i=1
c
i
jI
i
j
is independent of the choice of partition used to demonstrate the
piecewise constant nature of f. We will denote this quantity by
p.c.
R
b
a
f(x) dx, and refer to it as the piecewise constant integral of f
on [a;b].
Exercise 1.1.21 (Basicpropertiesofthepiecewiseconstant integral).
Let [a;b] be an interval, and let f;g : [a;b] ! R bepiecewise constant
functions. Establish the following statements:
(1) (Linearity) For any real number c, cf and f + g are piece-
wise constant, with p.c.
R
b
a
cf(x) dx = cp.c.
R
b
a
f(x) dx and
p.c.
R
b
a
f(x)+g(x) dx = p.c.
R
b
a
f(x) dx +p.c.
R
b
a
g(x) dx.
(2) (Monotonicity) If f  g pointwise (i.e. f(x)  g(x) for all
x2 [a;b]) then p.c.
R
b
a
f(x) dx  p.c.
R
b
a
g(x) dx.
(3) (Indicator)If E isan elementary subset of [a;b], then the in-
dicator function 1
E
:[a;b] ! R (dened bysetting 1
E
(x) :=
1when x 2 E and 1
E
(x) := 0 otherwise) is piecewise con-
stant, and p.c.
R
b
a
1
E
(x) dx = m(E).
Denition 1.1.6 (Darboux integral). Let [a;b] be an interval, and
f : [a;b] ! R be a bounded function. The lower Darboux integral
R
b
a
f(x) dx of f on [a;b] is dened as
Z
b
a
f(x) dx :=
sup
gf;
piecewise constant
p.c.
Z
b
a
g(x) dx;
whereg ranges overall piecewiseconstantfunctionsthatarepointwise
bounded aboveby f. (The hypothesis that f is bounded ensures that
the supremumisover a non-emptyset.) Similarly, wedenethe upper
Cut pages from pdf preview - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf online; delete a page from a pdf online
Cut pages from pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page pdf file; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
16
1. Measure theory
Darboux integral
R
b
a
f(x) dx of f on [a;b] by the formula
Z
b
a
f(x) dx :=
inf
hf;
piecewise constant
p.c.
Z
b
a
h(x) dx:
Clearly
R
b
a
f(x) dx 
R
b
a
f(x) dx. If these two quantities are equal,
we say that f is Darboux integrable, and refer to this quantity as the
Darboux integral of f on [a;b].
Note that the upper and lower Darboux integrals are related by
the re ection identity
Z
b
a
f(x) dx =  
Z
b
a
f(x) dx:
Exercise 1.1.22. Let [a;b] be an interval, and f : [a;b] ! R be a
bounded function. Show that f is Riemann integrable if and only
if it is Darboux integrable, in which case the Riemann integral and
Darboux integrals are equal.
Exercise 1.1.23. Show that any continuous function f : [a;b] !
Ris Riemann integrable. More generally, show that any bounded,
piecewise continuous
8
function f : [a;b] ! R is Riemann integrable.
Now we connect the Riemann integral to Jordan measure in two
ways. First, we connect the Riemann integral to one-dimensional
Jordan measure:
Exercise 1.1.24 (Basic properties of the Riemann integral). Let
[a;b] be an interval, and let f;g : [a;b] ! R be Riemann integrable.
Establish the following statements:
(1) (Linearity)For anyreal number c, cf and f+g areRiemann
integrable, with
R
b
a
cf(x) dx = c 
R
b
a
f(x) dx and
R
b
a
f(x)+
g(x) dx =
R
b
a
f(x) dx+
R
b
a
g(x) dx.
(2) (Monotonicity) If f  g pointwise (i.e. f(x)  g(x) for all
x2 [a;b]) then
R
b
a
f(x) dx 
R
b
a
g(x) dx.
8
Afunctionf :[a;b]!R is piecewise continuous if one can partition[a;b]into
nitely many intervals, suchthat f is continuous on eachinterval.
VB.NET PDF copy, paste image library: copy, paste, cut PDF images
Copy, paste and cut PDF image while preview without adobe reader component installed. Image resize function allows VB.NET users to zoom and crop image.
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete page from pdf
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Remove bookmarks, annotations, watermark, page labels and article threads from PDF while compressing. Also a preview component enables compressing and
add remove pages from pdf; delete pages from pdf in preview
1.2. Lebesgue measure
17
(3) (Indicator) If E is a Jordan measurable of[a;b], then the in-
dicator function 1
E
:[a;b] ! R (dened bysetting 1
E
(x) :=
1when x 2 E and 1
E
(x) := 0 otherwise) is Riemann inte-
grable, and
R
b
a
1
E
(x) dx = m(E).
Finally, show that these properties uniquely dene the Riemann inte-
gral, in the sense that the functional f 7!
R
b
a
f(x) dx is the only map
from the space of Riemann integrable functions on [a;b] to R which
obeys all three of the above properties.
Next, weconnecttheintegralto two-dimensional Jordanmeasure:
Exercise 1.1.25 (Area interpretation of the Riemann integral). Let
[a;b] be an interval, and let f : [a;b] ! R be a bounded function.
Show that f is Riemann integrable if and only if the sets E
+
:=
f(x;t) : x 2 [a;b];0  t  f(x)g and E
:= f(x;t) : x 2 [a;b];f(x) 
t 0g are both Jordan measurable in R
2
,in which case one has
Z
b
a
f(x) dx = m
2
(E
+
) m
2
(E
);
where m
2
denotes two-dimensional Jordan measure. (Hint: First
establish this in the case when f is non-negative.)
Exercise 1.1.26. Extend thedenitionoftheRiemann andDarboux
integrals to higher dimensions, in such a way that analogues of all the
previous results hold.
1.2. Lebesgue measure
In Section 1.1, we recalled the classical theory of Jordan measure on
Euclidean spaces R
d
.This theory proceeded in the following stages:
(i) First, one dened the notion of a box B and its volume jBj.
(ii) Using this, one dened the notion of an elementaryset E (a
nite union of boxes), and denes the elementary measure
m(E) of such sets.
(iii) From this, one dened the inner and Jordan outer measures
m
;(J)
(E);m;(J)(E) ofanarbitraryboundedsetE  Rd. If
those measures match, we say that E is Jordan measurable,
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
applications. Support adding and inserting one or multiple pages to existing PDF document. Forms. Ability to add PDF page number in preview. Offer
delete page on pdf file; acrobat extract pages from pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
VB.NET comment annotate PDF, VB.NET delete PDF pages, VB.NET Able to cut and paste image into another PDF Remove PDF image in preview without adobe PDF reader
delete pages from pdf acrobat; delete page from pdf preview
18
1. Measure theory
andcall m(E) = m
;(J)
(E)= m
;(J)
(E) theJordan measure
of E.
As long as one is lucky enough to only have to deal with Jordan
measurable sets, the theory of Jordan measure works well enough.
However, asnoted previously, notall sets areJordan measurable, even
if one restricts attention to bounded sets. In fact, we shall see later
in these notes that there even exist bounded open sets, or compact
sets, which are not Jordan measurable, so the Jordan theory does
not cover many classes of sets of interest. Another class that it fails
to cover is countable unions or intersections of sets that are already
known to be measurable:
Exercise 1.2.1. Show that the countable union
S
1
n=1
E
n
or count-
able intersection
T
1
n=1
E
n
of Jordan measurable sets E
1
;E
2
;:::  R
need not be Jordan measurable, even when bounded.
This creates problems with Riemann integrability (which, as we
saw in Section 1.1, was closely related to Jordan measure) and point-
wise limits:
Exercise 1.2.2. Giveanexampleofa sequenceofuniformlybounded,
Riemann integrable functions f
n
: [0;1] ! R for n = 1;2;::: that
converge pointwise to a bounded function f : [0;1] ! R that is not
Riemann integrable. What happens if we replace pointwise conver-
gence with uniform convergence?
These issues can be rectied by using a more powerful notion of
measure than Jordan measure, namely Lebesgue measure. To dene
this measure, we rst tinker with the notion of the Jordan outer
measure
m
;(J)
(E) :=
inf
BE;B
elementary
m(B)
of a set E  R
d
(we adopt the convention that m
;(J)
(E) = +1 if
Eis unbounded, thus m;(J) now takes values in the extended non-
negativereals[0;+1], whose properties we will brie yreview below).
Observe from the nite additivity and subadditivity of elementary
measure that we can also write the Jordan outer measure as
m
;(J)
(E) :=
inf
B
1
[:::[B
k
E;B
1
;:::;B
k
boxes
jB
1
j+::: +jB
k
j;
VB.NET PDF url edit library: insert, remove PDF links in vb.net
Able to embed link to specific PDF pages in VB.NET Copy, cut and paste PDF link to another PDF file in Edit PDF url in preview without adobe PDF reader control.
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pages from a pdf online
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages. Advanced component for splitting PDF document in preview without any third-party plug-ins
delete pages of pdf reader; delete page pdf online
1.2. Lebesgue measure
19
i.e. the Jordan outer measure is the inmal cost required to cover E
by a nite union of boxes. (The natural number k is allowed to vary
freely in the above inmum.) We now modify this by replacing the
nite union of boxes by a countable union of boxes, leading to the
Lebesgue outer measure
9
m
(E) of E:
m
(E) :=
inf
S
1
n=1
B
n
E;B
1
;B
2
;:::
boxes
X1
n=1
jB
n
j;
thus the Lebesgue outer measure is the inmal cost required to cover
E by a countable union of boxes. Note that the countable sum
P
1
n=1
jB
n
jmaybeinnite, and so theLebesgueouter measure m
(E)
could well equal +1.
Clearly, we always have m
(E) m
;(J)
(E) (sincewecan always
pad out a nite union of boxes into an innite union by adding an
innite number of empty boxes). But m
(E) can be a lot smaller:
Example 1.2.1. Let E = fx
1
;x
2
;x
3
;:::g  R
d
be a countable set.
We know that the Jordan outer measure of E can be quite large;
for instance, in one dimension, m
;(J)
(Q) is innite, and m
;(J)
(Q\
[ R;R]) = m
;(J)
([ R;R]) = 2R since Q\[ R;R] has [ R;R] as its
closure (see Exercise1.1.18). On the other hand, all countable sets E
have Lebesgue outer measure zero. Indeed, one simply covers E by
the degenerate boxes fx
1
g;fx
2
g;::: of sidelength and volume zero.
Alternatively, ifone does notlike degenerateboxes, one can cover
each x
n
by a cube B
n
of sidelength "=2n (say) for some arbitrary
" > 0, leading to a total cost of
P
1
n=1
("=2
n
)
d
,which converges to
C
d
"
d
for some absolute constant C
d
. As " can be arbitrarily small,
we see that the Lebesgue outer measure must be zero. We will refer
to this type of trick as the "=2n trick; it will be used many further
times in this text.
From this example we see in particular that a set may be un-
bounded while still having Lebesgue outer measure zero, in contrast
to Jordan outer measure.
9
Lebesgue outer measure is also denoted m
(E)in some texts.
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
Independent component for splitting PDF document in preview without using separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages.
delete pdf pages reader; delete pages from a pdf in preview
C# PDF insert image Library: insert images into PDF in C#.net, ASP
An independent .NET framework viewer component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF reader installed. Able
delete pages from a pdf file; delete blank pages from pdf file
20
1. Measure theory
As we shall see in Section 1.7, Lebesgue outer measure (also
known as Lebesgue exterior measure) is a special case of a more gen-
eral concept known as an outer measure.
In analogy with the Jordan theory, we would also like to dene
aconcept of \Lebesgue inner measure" to complement that of outer
measure. Here, there is an asymmetry (which ultimately arises from
the fact that elementary measure is subadditive rather than superad-
ditive): one does not gain any increase in power in the Jordan inner
measure by replacing nite unions of boxes with countable ones. But
onecan get a sort of Lebesgue inner measure by taking complements;
see Exercise1.2.18. This leads to onepossible denition for Lebesgue
measurability, namely the Caratheodory criterion for Lebesgue mea-
surability, see Exercise 1.2.17. However, this is not the most intuitive
formulation ofthis conceptto workwith, and wewill instead usea dif-
ferent (but logically equivalent) denition of Lebesgue measurability.
Thestarting point istheobservation (see Exercise1.1.13)that Jordan
measurable sets can be eciently contained in elementary sets, with
an error that has small Jordan outer measure. In a similar vein, we
will dene Lebesgue measurable sets to be sets that can be eciently
contained in open sets, with an error that has small Lebesgue outer
measure:
Denition 1.2.2 (Lebesgue measurability). A set E  R
d
is said
to be Lebesgue measurable if, for every " > 0, there exists an open
set U  R
d
containing E such that m
(UnE)  ". If E is Lebesgue
measurable, we refer to m(E) := m
(E) as the Lebesgue measure of
E(note thatthisquantitymaybeequal to +1). Wealso write m(E)
as m
d
(E) when we wish to emphasise the dimension d.
Remark 1.2.3. The intuition that measurable sets are almost open
is also known as Littlewood’s rst principle, this principleisa triviality
with our current choiceof denitions, though less so if oneuses other,
equivalent, denitions of Lebesgue measurability. See Section 1.3.5
for a further discussion of Littlewood’s principles.
As we shall see later, Lebesgue measureextends Jordan measure,
in thesense thateveryJordanmeasurableset isLebesguemeasurable,
VB.NET PDF insert image library: insert images into PDF in vb.net
NET. An independent .NET framework component supports inserting image to PDF in preview without adobe PDF control installed. Access
add and delete pages in pdf online; cut pages from pdf online
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Preview PDF documents without other plug-ins. The following example will tell you how to create a PDF document with 2 empty pages.
delete page from pdf document; pdf delete page
1.2. Lebesgue measure
21
and the Lebesgue measure and Jordan measure of a Jordan measur-
able set are always equal. We will also see a few other equivalent
descriptions of the concept of Lebesgue measurability.
In thenotesbelow wewillestablishthebasicproperties ofLebesgue
measure. Broadly speaking, this concept obeys all the intuitive prop-
erties one would ask of measure, so long as one restricts attention
to countable operations rather than uncountable ones, and as long
as one restricts attention to Lebesgue measurable sets. The latter is
not a serious restriction in practice, as almost every set one actually
encounters in analysis will be measurable (the main exceptions be-
ing some pathological sets that are constructed using the axiom of
choice). In the next set of notes we will use Lebesgue measure to
set up the Lebesgue integral, which extends the Riemann integral in
the same way that Lebesgue measure extends Jordan measure; and
the manypleasant properties of Lebesgue measure will bere ected in
analogous pleasant properties of the Lebesgue integral (most notably
the convergence theorems).
We will treat all dimensions d= 1;2;::: equally here, but for the
purposes of drawing pictures, we recommend to the reader that one
setsdequal to 2. However, forthistopicatleast, no additionalmathe-
matical diculties will be encountered in thehigher-dimensional case
(though of course there are signicant visual diculties once d ex-
ceeds 3).
1.2.1. Properties of Lebesgue outer measure. We begin by
studying the Lebesgue outer measure m
,which was dened earlier,
and takes values in the extended non-negative real axis [0;+1]. We
rst record three easy properties of Lebesgue outer measure, which
we will use repeatedly in the sequel without further comment:
Exercise 1.2.3 (The outer measure axioms).
(i) (Empty set) m
(;) = 0.
(ii) (Monotonicity) If E  F  R
d
,then m
(E)  m
(F).
(iii) (Countable subadditivity) If E
1
;E
2
;:::  R
d
is a count-
able sequence of sets, then m(
S
1
n=1
E
n
)
P
1
n=1
m(E
n
).
(Hint: Usethe axiom of countable choice, Tonelli’s theorem
22
1. Measure theory
for series, and the "=2
n
trick used previously to show that
countable sets had outer measure zero.)
Notethat countablesubadditivity, whencombinedwiththeempty
set axiom, gives as a corollary the nite subadditivity property
m
(E
1
[:::[E
k
) m
(E
1
)+::: +m
(E
k
)
for any k  0. These subadditivity properties will be useful in estab-
lishing upper bounds on Lebesgue outer measure. Establishing lower
bounds will often be a bit trickier. (More generally, when dealing
with a quantity that is dened using an inmum, it is usually easier
to obtain upper bounds on that quantity than lower bounds, because
the former requires one to bound just one element of the inmum,
whereas the latter requires one to bound all elements.)
Remark 1.2.4. Later on in this text, when we study abstract mea-
suretheory on a general set X, we will dene the concept of an outer
measure on X, which is an assigment E 7! m
(E) of element of
[0;+1] to arbitrary subsets E of a space X that obeys the above
three axioms of the empty set, monotonicity, and countable subaddi-
tivity; thus Lebesgueouter measureis a model exampleofan abstract
outer measure. On the other hand (and somewhat confusingly), Jor-
dan outer measure will not be an abstract outer measure (even after
adopting theconvention that unbounded sets haveJordan outer mea-
sure +1): it obeys the empty set and monotonicity axioms, but is
only nitely subadditive rather than countably subadditive. (For in-
stance, the rationals Q have innite Jordan outer measure, despite
being the countable union of points, each of which have a Jordan
outer measure of zero.) Thus we already see a major benet of al-
lowing countable unions of boxes in the denition of Lebesgue outer
measure, in contrast to the nite unions of boxes in the denition
of Jordan outer measure, in that nite subadditivity is upgraded to
countable subadditivity.
Of course, one cannot hope to upgrade countable subadditivity
to uncountable subadditivity: R
d
is an uncountable union of points,
each of which has Lebesgue outer measure zero, but (as we shall
shortly see), R
d
has innite Lebesgue outer measure.
1.2. Lebesgue measure
23
It is natural to ask whether Lebesgueouter measure has thenite
additivity property, that is to say that m(E [F) = m(E)+m(F)
whenever E;F  R
d
are disjoint. The answer to this question is
somewhat subtle: as we shall see later, we have nite additivity (and
even countable additivity) when all sets involved are Lebesgue mea-
surable, but that nite additivity (and hence also countable additiv-
ity) can break down in the non-measurable case. The diculty here
(which, incidentally, also appears in the theory of Jordan outer mea-
sure) is that if E and F are suciently \entangled" with each other,
it is not always possible to take a countable cover of E [F by boxes
and split the total volume of that cover into separate covers of E and
F without some duplication. However, we can at least recover nite
additivity if the sets E;F are separated by some positive distance:
Lemma 1.2.5 (Finite additivity for separated sets). Let E;F  R
d
be such that dist(E;F) > 0, where
dist(E;F) := inffjx  yj : x 2 E;y 2Fg
is the distance
10
between E and F. Then m
(E [ F) = m
(E) +
m(F).
Proof. From subadditivity one has m
(E[F)  m
(E)+m
(F), so
it suces to prove the other direction m
(E)+m
(F)  m
(E [F).
This is trivial if E [ F has innite Lebesgue outer measure, so we
may assume that it has nite Lebesgue outer measure (and then the
same is true for E and F, by monotonicity).
We use the standard \giveyourself an epsilon of room" trick (see
Section 2.7 of An epsilon of room, Vol I.). Let " > 0. By denition
of Lebesgue outer measure, we can cover E[F by a countable family
B
1
;B
2
;::: of boxes such that
X1
n=1
jB
n
j m
(E [F)+":
Supposeitwas thecasethateach boxintersectedatmostoneofE and
F. Then we could divide this family into two subfamilies B
0
1
;B
0
2
;:::
10
Recallfrom theprefacethatweuse theusualEuclideanmetric j(x
1
;:::;x
d
)j:=
q
x2
1
+:::+x2
d
onR
d
.
24
1. Measure theory
and B
00
1
;B
00
2
;B
00
3
;:::, the rst of which covered E, and the second of
which covered F. From denition of Lebesgueouter measure, wehave
m
(E) 
X1
n=1
jB
0
n
j
and
m
(F) 
X1
n=1
jB
00
n
j;
summing, we obtain
m
(E) +m
(F) 
X1
n=1
jB
n
j
and thus
m
(E)+m
(F)  m
(E [F)+ ":
Since " was arbitrary, this gives m
(E) + m
(F)  m
(E [ F) as
required.
Ofcourse, it isquite possiblefor someof the boxes B
n
to intersect
both E and F, particularly if the boxes are big, in which case the
above argument does not work because that box would be double-
counted. However, observe that given any r > 0, one can always
partition a large box B
n
into a nite number of smaller boxes, each
of which has diameter
11
at most r, with the total volume of these
sub-boxes equal to the volume of the original box. Applying this
observation to each of the boxes B
n
, we see that given any r > 0,
we may assume without loss of generality that the boxes B
1
;B
2
;:::
covering E[F have diameter atmost r. In particular, wemay assume
that all such boxes have diameter strictly less than dist(E;F). Once
we do this, then it is no longer possible for any box to intersect both
Eand F, and then the previous argument now applies.
In general, disjoint sets E;F need not have a positive separation
from each other (e.g. E = [0;1) and F = [1;2]). But the situation
improves when E;F are closed, and at least one of E;F is compact:
11
The diameter of a setB is dened as supfjx yj:x;y 2Bg.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested