c# pdf reader text : Delete page from pdf file online application SDK cloud windows winforms asp.net class TaoMeasureTheory5-part709

1.2. Lebesgue measure
35
the middle third interval removed, let I
2
:= [0;1=9] [ [2=9;1=3] [
[2=3;7=9][[8=9;1] be I
1
with the interior of the middle third of each
of the two intervals of I
1
removed, and so forth. More formally, write
I
n
:=
[
a
1
;:::;a
n
2f0;2g
[
Xn
i=1
a
i
3i
;
Xn
i=1
a
i
3i
+
1
3n
]:
Let C :=
T
1
n=1
I
n
be the intersection of all the elementary sets I
n
.
Show that C is compact, uncountable, and a null set.
Exercise 1.2.10. (Thisexercisepresumessomefamiliaritywith point-
set topology.) Show that the half-open interval [0;1) cannot be ex-
pressed as the countable union of disjoint closed intervals. (Hint: It
is easy to prevent [0;1) from being expressed as the nite union of
disjoint closed intervals. Next, assume for sake of contradiction that
[0;1) is the union of innitely many closed intervals, and conclude
that [0;1) is homeomorphic to the middle thirds Cantor set, which is
absurd. It is also possible to proceed using the Baire category theo-
rem (x1.7 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I.) For an additional challenge,
show that[0;1) cannotbeexpressed asthecountableunion ofdisjoint
closed sets.
Now we look at the Lebesgue measure m(E) of a Lebesgue mea-
surable set E, which is dened to equal its Lebesgue outer mea-
sure m
(E). If E is Jordan measurable, we see from (1.2) that
the Lebesgue measure and the Jordan measure of E coincide, thus
Lebesgue measure extends Jordan measure. This justies the use of
the notation m(E) to denote both Lebesgue measure of a Lebesgue
measurable set, and Jordan measure of a Jordan measurable set (as
well as elementary measure of an elementary set).
Lebesguemeasureobeyssignicantlybetter properties thanLebesgue
outer measure, when restricted to Lebesgue measurable sets:
Lemma 1.2.15 (The measure axioms).
(i) (Empty set) m(;) = 0.
(ii) (Countable additivity) If E
1
;E
2
;:::  R
d
is a countable se-
quence of disjointLebesgue measurablesets, then m(
S
1
n=1
E
n
)=
P
1
n=1
m(E
n
).
Delete page from pdf file online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf reader; cut pages from pdf file
Delete page from pdf file online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages from a pdf online; delete page on pdf
36
1. Measure theory
Proof. The rst claim is trivial, so we focus on the second. We deal
with an easy case when all of the E
n
are compact. By repeated use
of Lemma 1.2.5 and Exercise 1.2.4, we have
m(
[N
n=1
E
n
)=
XN
n=1
m(E
n
):
Using monotonicity, we conclude that
m(
[1
n=1
E
n
)
XN
n=1
m(E
n
):
(We can use m instead of m
throughout this argument, thanks to
Lemma 1.2.13). Sending N ! 1 we obtain
m(
[1
n=1
E
n
)
X1
n=1
m(E
n
):
On the other hand, from countable subadditivity one has
m(
[1
n=1
E
n
)
X1
n=1
m(E
n
);
and the claim follows.
Next, wehandlethecase whentheE
n
are bounded but notneces-
sarily compact. We use the "=2
n
trick. Let " > 0. Applying Exercise
1.2.7, we know that each E
n
is the union of a compact set K
n
and a
set of outer measure at most "=2n. Thus
m(E
n
) m(K
n
)+"=2
n
and hence
X1
n=1
m(E
n
) (
X1
n=1
m(K
n
))+":
Finally, from the compact case of this lemma we already know that
m(
1[
n=1
K
n
)=
X1
n=1
m(K
n
)
while from monotonicity
m(
1[
n=1
K
n
) m(
1[
n=1
E
n
):
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Provides you with examples for adding an (empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
add and remove pages from pdf file online; cut pages out of pdf online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various file formats, such as
delete page from pdf file online; delete a page from a pdf in preview
1.2. Lebesgue measure
37
Putting all this together we see that
X1
n=1
m(E
n
) m(
1[
n=1
E
n
)+"
for every " > 0, while from countable subadditivity we have
m(
[1
n=1
E
n
)
X1
n=1
m(E
n
):
The claim follows.
Finally, we handle the case when the E
n
are not assumed to be
bounded or closed. Here, the basic idea is to decompose each E
n
as a
countabledisjoint union ofbounded Lebesgue measurablesets. First,
decompose R
d
as the countable disjoint union R
d
=
S
1
m=1
A
m
of
bounded measurable sets A
m
;for instance one could take the annuli
A
m
:= fx 2 R
d
:m  1  jxj < mg. Then each E
n
is the countable
disjoint union of the bounded measurable sets E
n
\A
m
for m =
1;2;:::, and thus
m(E
n
)=
X1
m=1
m(E
n
\A
m
)
by the previous arguments. In a similar vein,
S
1
n=1
E
n
is the count-
able disjoint union of the bounded measurable sets E
n
\A
m
for
n;m = 1;2;:::, and thus
m(
1[
n=1
E
n
)=
X1
n=1
X1
m=1
m(E
n
\A
m
);
and the claim follows.
From Lemma 1.2.15 one of course can conclude nite additivity
m(E
1
[:::[E
k
)= m(E
1
)+::: +m(E
k
)
whenever E
1
;:::;E
k
 R
d
are Lebesgue measurable sets. We also
have another important result:
Exercise 1.2.11 (Monotone convergence theorem for measurable
sets).
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
in your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page PDF Page and File Splitting. If you want to split PDF file into two or small files, you
delete pages from pdf reader; delete pages from pdf preview
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
with other PDF files to form a new PDF file. Using this C#.NET PDF document splitting library can easily and accurately disassemble multi-page PDF document into
best pdf editor delete pages; copy pages from pdf to new pdf
38
1. Measure theory
(i) (Upward monotone convergence) Let E
1
E
2
:::  R
n
be a countable non-decreasing sequence of Lebesgue mea-
surable sets. Show that m(
S
1
n=1
E
n
) = lim
n!1
m(E
n
).
(Hint: Express
S
1
n=1
E
n
as the countable union of the lacu-
nae E
n
n
S
n 1
n0=1
E
n0
.)
(ii) (Downward monotone convergence) Let Rd  E
1
 E
2
::: bea countablenon-increasing sequence of Lebesguemea-
surable sets. If at least oneof the m(E
n
)is nite, show that
m(
T
1
n=1
E
n
)= lim
n!1
m(E
n
).
(iii) Give a counterexample to show that the hypothesis that at
least one of the m(E
n
)is nite in the downward monotone
convergence theorem cannot be dropped.
Exercise 1.2.12. Show that any map E 7! m(E) from Lebesgue
measurablesets to elements of[0;+1] that obeys theaboveemptyset
and countable additivity axioms will also obey the monotonicity and
countable subadditivity axioms from Exercise 1.2.3, when restricted
to Lebesgue measurable sets of course.
Exercise 1.2.13. Wesay that a sequence E
n
of sets in R
d
converges
pointwise to another set E in R
d
if the indicator functions 1
E
n
con-
verge pointwise to 1
E
.
(i) Show that if the E
n
are all Lebesgue measurable, and con-
verge pointwise to E, then E is Lebesgue measurable also.
(Hint: usetheidentity1
E
(x) = liminf
n!1
1
E
n
(x) or1
E
(x) =
limsup
n!1
1
E
n
(x) to write E in terms of countable unions
and intersections of the E
n
.)
(ii) (Dominated convergence theorem) Suppose that the E
n
are
all contained in another Lebesgue measurable set F of nite
measure. Show that m(E
n
)converges to m(E). (Hint: use
the upward and downward monotoneconvergence theorems,
Exercise 1.2.11.)
(iii) Give a counterexample to show that the dominated conver-
gence theorem fails if the E
n
are not contained in a set of
nite measure, even if we assume that the m(E
n
) are all
uniformly bounded.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET we suggest you go to C# Imaging - how to insert a new empty page to PDF file
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages from a pdf file
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete pages pdf; delete page from pdf acrobat
1.2. Lebesgue measure
39
In later sections we will generalise the monotone and dominated
convergence theorems to measurable functions instead of measurable
sets; see Theorem 1.4.44 and Theorem 1.4.49.
Exercise 1.2.14. Let E  R
d
. Show that E is contained in a
Lebesgue measurable set of measure exactly equal to m
(E).
Exercise 1.2.15 (Inner regularity). Let E  Rd be Lebesgue mea-
surable. Show that
m(E) =
sup
KE;K
compact
m(K):
Remark 1.2.16. The inner and outer regularity properties of mea-
sure can be used to dene theconcept of a Radon measure (see x1.10
of An epsilon of room, Vol. I.).
Exercise 1.2.16 (Criteria for nite measure). Let E  R
d
. Show
that the following are equivalent:
(i) E is Lebesgue measurable with nite measure.
(ii) (Outer approximation by open) For every " > 0, one can
containE inan opensetU ofnitemeasurewithm
(UnE) 
".
(iii) (Almost open bounded) E diers from a bounded open set
by a set of arbitrarily small Lebesgue outer measure. (In
other words, for every " > 0 there exists a bounded open set
U such that m
(EU)  ".)
(iv) (Inner approximation by compact) For every " > 0, one can
nd a compact set F contained in E with m
(EnF)  ".
(v) (Almost compact) E diers from a compact set by a set of
arbitrarily small Lebesgue outer measure.
(vi) (Almost bounded measurable) E diers from a bounded
Lebesguemeasurablesetbya setofarbitrarilysmall Lebesgue
outer measure.
(vii) (Almost nite measure) E diers from a Lebesgue measur-
able set with nite measure by a set of arbitrarily small
Lebesgue outer measure.
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete pages of pdf reader; delete pdf pages ipad
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages. This online VB tutorial
delete page from pdf reader; delete pages from pdf acrobat
40
1. Measure theory
(viii) (Almost elementary) E diers from an elementary set by a
set of arbitrarily small Lebesgue outer measure.
(ix) (Almostdyadicallyelementary)For every" > 0, thereexists
an integer n and a nite union F of closed dyadic cubes of
sidelength 2
n
such that m
(EF)  ".
One can interpret theequivalence of (i) and (ix) in the above ex-
erciseasasserting thatLebesgue measurablesets arethose which look
(locally) \pixelated" at suciently ne scales. This will beformalised
in later sections with the Lebesgue dierentiation theorem (Exercise
1.6.24).
Exercise 1.2.17 (Caratheodory criterion, one direction). Let E 
Rd. Show that the following are equivalent:
(i) E is Lebesgue measurable.
(ii) For every elementary set A, one has m(A) = m
(A\E)+
m
(AnE).
(iii) For every box B, one has jBj = m
(B \E)+m
(BnE).
Exercise 1.2.18 (Inner measure). Let E  R
d
be a bounded set.
Dene the Lebesgue inner measure m
(E) of E by the formula
m
(E) := m(A) m
(AnE)
for any elementary set A containing E.
(i) Show that this denition is well dened, i.e. that ifA;A
0
are
two elementary sets containing E, that m(A) m
(AnE) is
equal to m(A0) m(A0nE).
(ii) Show that m
(E)  m
(E), and that equality holds if and
only if E is Lebesgue measurable.
Dene a G
set to be a countable intersection
T
1
n=1
U
n
of open
sets, and an F
set to be a countable union
S
1
n=1
F
n
of closed sets.
Exercise 1.2.19. Let E  R
d
. Show that the following are equiva-
lent:
(i) E is Lebesgue measurable.
(ii) E is a G
set with a null set removed.
1.2. Lebesgue measure
41
(iii) E is the union of a F
set and a null set.
Remark 1.2.17. From the above exercises, we see that when de-
scribing what it means for a set to be Lebesgue measurable, there is
atradeo between the type of approximation one is willing to bear,
and the type of things one can say about the approximation. If one
is only willing to approximate to within a null set, then one can only
say that a measurable set is approximated by a G
or a F
set, which
is a fairly weak amount of structure. If one is willing to add on an
epsilon oferror (as measured intheLebesgue outer measure), onecan
make a measurable set open; dually, if one is willing to take away an
epsilon of error, one can makea measurable set closed. Finally, if one
is willing to both add and subtract an epsilon of error, then one can
make a measurable set (of nitemeasure) elementary, or even a nite
union of dyadic cubes.
Exercise 1.2.20 (Translation invariance). If E  R
d
is Lebesgue
measurable, show that E +x is Lebesgue measurable for any x 2 R
d
,
and that m(E +x)= m(E).
Exercise 1.2.21 (Change of variables). If E  R
d
is Lebesgue mea-
surable, and T : R
d
!R
d
is a linear transformation, show that T(E)
is Lebesgue measurable, and that m(T(E)) = jdetTjm(E). We cau-
tion that if T : R
d
!R
d
0
is a linear map to a space R
d
0
of strictly
smaller dimension than Rd, then T(E) need not be Lebesgue mea-
surable; see Exercise 1.2.27.
Exercise 1.2.22. Let d;d
0
1 be natural numbers.
(i) If E  R
d
and F  R
d
0
, show that (m
d+d
0
)
(E  F) 
(m
d
)
(E)(m
d
0
)
(F), where(m
d
)
denotesd-dimensionalLebesgue
measure, etc.
(ii) Let E  R
d
,F  R
d
0
be Lebesgue measurable sets. Show
thatEF  Rd+d
0
isLebesguemeasurable, with md+d
0
(E
F) = m
d
(E) m
d
0
(F). (Note that we allow E or F to have
innite measure, and so one may have to divide into cases
or take advantage of the monotone convergence theorem for
Lebesgue measure, Exercise 1.2.11.)
42
1. Measure theory
Exercise 1.2.23 (UniquenessofLebesguemeasure). ShowthatLebesgue
measure E 7! m(E) is the only map from Lebesgue measurable sets
to [0;+1] that obeys the following axioms:
(i) (Empty set) m(;) = 0.
(ii) (Countable additivity) If E
1
;E
2
;:::  R
d
is a countable se-
quenceofdisjointLebesguemeasurablesets, then m(
S
1
n=1
E
n
)=
P
1
n=1
m(E
n
).
(iii) (Translation invariance) If E is Lebesgue measurable and
x2 R
d
,then m(E +x) = m(E).
(iv) (Normalisation) m([0;1]
d
)= 1.
Hint: First show that m must match elementary measure on elemen-
tary sets, then show that m is bounded by outer measure.
Exercise 1.2.24 (Lebesguemeasureas thecompletion of elementary
measure). The purpose of the following exercise is to indicate how
Lebesguemeasure can be viewed as a metriccompletion ofelementary
measure in some sense. To avoid some technicalities we will not work
in all of R
d
,but in some xed elementary set A (e.g. A = [0;1]
d
).
(i) Let 2
A
:= fE : E  Ag be the power set of A. We say
that two sets E;F 22A are equivalent if EF is a null set.
Show that this is a equivalence relation.
(ii) Let 2
A
= be the set of equivalence classes [E] := fF 2
2
A
:E  Fg of 2
A
with respect to the above equivalence
relation. Denea distanced : 2
A
= 2
A
=! R
+
between
two equivalence classes [E];[E0] by dening d([E];[E0]) :=
m
(EE
0
). Show that this distance is well-dened (in the
sense that m(EE
0
)= m(FF
0
)whenever [E] = [F] and
[E
0
] = [F
0
]) and gives 2
A
= the structure of a complete
metric space.
(iii) Let E  2A be the elementary subsets of A, and let L  2A
be the Lebesgue measurable subsets of A. Show that L= 
is the closure of E=  with respect to the metric dened
above. In particular, L=  is a complete metric space that
contains E=  as a dense subset; in other words, L=  is a
metric completion of E= .
1.2. Lebesgue measure
43
(iv) Show that Lebesgue measure m : L ! R
+
descends to a
continuous function m : L= ! R+, which by abuse of
notation we shall still call m. Show that m : L= ! R
+
is
theuniquecontinuousextensionoftheanalogouselementary
measure function m : E= ! R
+
to L= .
Fora furtherdiscussionofhow measurescanbeviewedascompletions
of elementary measures, see x2.1 of An epsilon of room, Vol. I.
Exercise 1.2.25. Denea continuously dierentiable curve in R
d
to
be a set of the form f (t): a  t  bg where [a;b] is a closed interval
and   : [a;b] ! R
d
is a continuously dierentiable function.
(i) If d  2, show that every continuously dierentiable curve
has Lebesgue measure zero. (Why is the condition d  2
necessary?)
(ii) Conclude that if d  2, then the unit cube [0;1]d cannot
be covered by countably many continuously dierentiable
curves.
We remark that if the curve is only assumed to be continuous, rather
than continuously dierentiable, then these claims fail, thanks to the
existence of space-lling curves.
1.2.3. Non-measurable sets. In the previous section we have set
out a rich theory of Lebesgue measure, which enjoys many nice prop-
erties when applied to Lebesgue measurable sets.
Thus far, we have not ruled out the possibility that every single
set is Lebesgue measurable. There is good reason for this: a famous
theorem of Solovay[So1970] asserts that, if one is willing to drop the
axiom of choice, there exist models of set theory in which all subsets
of R
d
are measurable. So any demonstration of the existence of non-
measurable sets must use the axiom of choice in some essential way.
That said, wecan givean informal (and highly non-rigorous) mo-
tivation as to why non-measurable sets should exist, using intuition
from probability theory rather than from set theory. The starting
point is the observation that Lebesgue sets of nite measure (and
in particular, bounded Lebesgue sets) have to be \almost elemen-
tary", in the sense of Exercise 1.2.16. So all we need to do to build
44
1. Measure theory
anon-measurable set is to exhibit a bounded set which is not almost
elementary. Intuitively, we want to build a set which has oscillatory
structure even at arbitrarily ne scales.
We will non-rigorously do this as follows. We will work inside
the unit interval [0;1]. For each x 2 [0;1], we imagine that we  ip a
coin to give either heads or tails (with an independent coin  ip for
each x), and let E  [0;1] be the set of all the x 2 [0;1] for which
the coin  ip came up heads. We suppose for contradiction that E
is Lebesgue measurable. Intuitively, since each x had a 50% chance
of being heads, E should occupy about \half" of [0;1]; applying the
law of large numbers (see e.g. [Ta2009, x1.4]) in an extremely non-
rigorous fashion, we thus expect m(E) to equal 1=2.
Moreover, given anysubinterval [a;b] of [0;1], the samereasoning
leads us to expect that E \[a;b] should occupy about half of [a;b],
so that m(E \ [a;b]) should be j[a;b]j=2. More generally, given any
elementary set F in [0;1], we should have m(E \ F) = m(F)=2.
This makes it very hard for E to be approximated by an elementary
set; indeed, a little algebra then shows that m(EF) = 1=2 for any
elementary F  [0;1]. Thus E is not Lebesgue measurable.
Unfortunately, the above argument is terribly non-rigorous for a
number ofreasons,not theleast ofwhich is thatitusesanuncountable
number of coin  ips, and the rigorous probabilistic theory that one
would have to use to model such a system of random variables is too
weak
12
to be able to assign meaningful probabilities to such events
as \E is Lebesgue measurable". So we now turn to more rigorous
arguments that establish the existence of non-measurable sets. The
argumentswill befairly simple, butthesetsconstructedaresomewhat
articial in nature.
Proposition 1.2.18. There exists a subset E  [0;1] which is not
Lebesgue measurable.
Proof. We usethefactthattherationals Q are an additivesubgroup
of the reals R, and so partition thereals R into disjoint cosets x+Q.
This creates a quotient group R=Q := fx + Q : x 2 Rg. Each
coset C of R=Q is dense in R, and so has a non-empty intersection
12
Forsome further discussionofthispoint, see [Ta2009,x1.10].
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested