c# pdf reader text : Delete pages from pdf file online SDK application service wpf windows asp.net dnn tb64lesen0-part744

Introductory viewing experience
::: Eglie’scrittoin linguamatematica,ei
caratterisontriangoli,cerchi,ed altre gure
geometriche:::
|Galileo,writingon physicalscience
To view an article, the modern scientist using
Acro
DVI
can simplypush its
DVI
leicon onto the
icon of Acro
DVI
. The
DVI
le is quickly converted
to
PDF
; then a window pops up for viewing by
Acrobat Reader. If you are not already familiar
with Acrobat Reader, the biggest thrill will surely
be the top-quality graphics and typography, both
superior in various respects to what web browsers
oer. WorthnotingforT
E
Xusers arethehypertext
features familiar from web browsers. All this is
remarkable, but only the notion that
DVI
can be
the rootformat is new.
In theAcro
DVI
viewing experience,even those
familiarwithAcrobatReaderwillenjoyonenovelty:
272
TUGboat,Volume20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999AnnualMeeting
SergeyLesenkoand Laurent Siebenmann
Viewing
DVI
leswithAcrobatReader:
DVIPDF
givesbirthto Acro
DVI
Sergey Lesenko
Institutefor HighEnergyPhysics (
IHEP
)
Protvino(Moscow Region)
142284 Russia
lesenko@mx.ihep.su
Laurent Siebenmann
Mathematique, B^at. 425
UniversitedeParis-Sud
91405-Orsay, France
Laurent.Siebenmann@math.u-psud.fr
Abstract
The rst author's
DVIPDF
program converts from
DVI
, the output format
of T
E
X, to
PDF
, the input format for Adobe's Acrobat Reader. Although
DVIPDF
has existed as a prototype for about three years, the uses to which
it will be put by the T
E
X community are only gradually emerging. This
article presents one concrete application.
DVIPDF
has been adapted under the
Windows 9X/
NT
operating systems to allow \drag-and-drop" viewing of
DVI
les in Acrobat Reader. The resulting viewer is called Acro
DVI
: it involves
DVIPDF
and the Acrobat Reader, operating in concert. Intended for viewing
legacy
DVI
les, it aimstosupport the mostcommon \specialcommands. An
evolutivechangein electronicpublishingpracticeisproposed inthisconnection:
the conventional
EPS
graphics format couldwellbe replacedby various optimal
formats:
JPEG
or
PNG
for bitmaps, and
PDF
for vectorial graphics. These
can then be conveniently exploited in some natural ways hitherto unavailable:
shared,re-edited,or directlyviewed.
enhanced visibility of the graphics objects. They
appear not only in the
PDF
page view but also
autonomously in native formats suitable for reuse
and also for display at an optimal scale. The
three formats that Acro
DVI
deals with directly are
PNG
(Portable Network Graphics) for bitmapped
high contrast graphics,
JPEG
(Joint Photographic
ExpertsGroup)forcolorphotos,and
PDF
(Portable
Document Format) for vectorial graphics (more on
these later).
One of these formats should be
optimal for just about any still (that is, non-
moving)graphics object.
If you push the icon of a
PNG
or
JPEG
or
PDF
le onto that of Acro
DVI
, then it will be
immediately viewed in an Acrobat Reader window.
Likewise for
EPS
les, provided Acrobat Distiller
or Ghostscript is accessible and enough fonts are
available. Latent in Acrobat Reader, which does
not directly process
PNG
or
JPEG
les, are broad
graphics viewing capabilities, and
DVIPDF
has
Delete pages from pdf file online - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pdf pages in preview; delete pages from pdf
Delete pages from pdf file online - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete a page from a pdf in preview; delete page pdf file
merely tapped into them; Adobe could have done
asmuch for AcrobatReader,but chosenotto.
There are many specialized tools for both
viewing and editing
PNG
and
JPEG
les, notably
the free
XN
view under Windows and Linux and
the shareware program Graphics Converter on the
Macintosh. If you takecare toviewat scale100%,
then you will see the bitmapped graphics at their
bestpossiblequality.
The most widely used tools for viewing
PNG
and
JPEG
graphicsare probably the web browsers.
Thisisanopeninvitationtomakedoubleuseofthe
graphics in an article: rst,in an illustrated
HTML
introduction, and second, in the
DVI
le for the
article's body. Thus,Acro
DVI
providespolyvalence
for graphics. At the same time, it providesa basic
polyvalencefortext,namely,the possibilitytoview
the same
DVI
le with Acrobat Reader and with
traditional
DVI
viewers.
Theneed for polyvalenceandlowbulkwas the
immediate motivation for developing Acro
DVI
. It
arose for mathematics journal content in the
CD-
ROM
project called Math
CD
,for which the second
author is managing editor. Indeed, Math
CD
has
anorderofmagnitudelessspaceavailableformany
journals than a single journal can aord to use on
theInternet.
Where space is at a premium, as on some
CD-ROM
s and in personal electronic libraries, the
DVI
format plus auxiliary native graphics can now
reasonably replace the
PDF
format. On the other
hand, where space is virtually unlimited, as on
manyInternetsites,expecttoseemoreformatsand
greaterbulk.
There are relatively few hyper-references in
the electronic journal articles on Math
CD
. Cur-
rently,
DVIPDF
doessupporthyper-referencesusing
a \special syntax, parallel to Acrobat Distiller's
pdfmark syntax. However, it does not yet sup-
portthe mostcommon \specialsyntax of today's
DVI
les,namely the oneintroduced byxhdvi and
paralleling
HTML
.
What is Acro
DVI
really?
The technologically aware user will tend to see
Acro
DVI
as the sum of its parts:
DVIPDF
plus
Acrobat Reader plus some Windows programming
usingtheDynamic Data Exchange(
DDE
)protocol
astheframeworkforcollaborationbetween
DVIPDF
and AcrobatReader.
However,tothepassinguser,thewholewillbe
more important than the parts. That is, Acro
DVI
actsasaviewerthatdirectlyaccepts most
DVI
les
TUGboat, Volume 20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999Annual Meeting
273
AcroD
V
d
(modulo font availability), as well as graphics les
in the
PNG
,
JPEG
,or
PDF
formats|it is the rst
viewer todoallthis.
Wehavedecided to dignifythewhole with the
the acronym Acro
DVI
. A viewing eye is what you
should seein the logo:
thatisputtogetherbyaT
E
Xmacro\AcroDVIfrom
piecesofstandard T
E
Xfonts.
The Windows icon is a colored iris (an \eye-
con"); les to be viewed are dragged and dropped
on top of the icon. (See Fig. 1 for black-and-white
renditions ofthecurrenticon.)
In its present provisional state, Acro
DVI
in-
volvesasinglebinaryexecutablecalleddvipdf.exe
while the shortcut icon to it and the distribution
directory arecalled Acro
DVI
. This makes
DVIPDF
and Acro
DVI
rather like amarsupial`mother-with-
baby-in-pouch'.
Tofacilitate portability, source code is divided
into modules of C++ source code devoted exclu-
sivelytotheAcro
DVI
viewerfunctionsandmodules
of C code that can hopefully be compiled as a
\black box" processor to implement
DVIPDF
as
astand-alone
DVI
-to-
PDF
converter. Incidentally,
most of the \special features developed recently
forviewinglegacy
DVI
les(seebelow)havebecome
permanentadditions tothe\blackbox"partofthe
DVIPDF
program.
What shape will maturity bring to Acro
DVI
?
Twooptionscurrentlyhold ourattention.
In Lesenko (1997), it was proposed to build
a
DVIPDF
plug-in for Acrobat Reader. With this
approach, to view a given
DVI
le in Acrobat
Reader, one would push its icon onto the Acrobat
Readericonratherthanontothe
DVIPDF
icon. The
plug-inarchitecturepromisestopromoteportability
of Acro
DVI
.
Asecond reasonableoption would make Acro-
DVI
an autonomous Windows application distinct
from
DVIPDF
. This architecture promises to fa-
cilitate orchestration by Acro
DVI
of multilateral
collaborations among
DVIPDF
,Netscape, Zip, Ac-
robatReader,Ghostscript,and soon.
As soonasGhostscript/GhostviewunderWin-
dows provide support for the key functions \Open
Doc"and \CloseDoc" of
DDE
,wewill make avail-
able a new Acro
DVI
conguration that replaces
Acrobat Reader by Ghostscript/Ghostview. It will
probablybeless luxurious than with Reader,but it
will, in addition,accept
EPS
les.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
empty) page to a PDF and adding empty pages to a PDF from a supported file format, with You may feel free to define some continuous PDF pages and delete.
delete pdf pages android; delete a page from a pdf file
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using programmers are capable of adding and inserting (empty) PDF page or pages from various
copy pages from pdf to word; acrobat remove pages from pdf
Fonts
DVI
les do not contain fonts|that is one basic
reasonwhytheyaresocompact. Thequestionthen
arises: where are fonts for Acro
DVI
to come from?
The best one can hope is that, in practice, enough
Type1fonts willbe in Acro
DVI
'sexpansiblereper-
toire, which is based chiefly on B.K. Malyshev's
BaKoMa Type 1 font collection, covering essen-
tially all fonts commonly used in freely distributed
electronicsciencepublications.
Adobe's Type 1 is currently the only font
format supported by
DVIPDF
;TrueType fonts are
not accepted. Nor areAdobeType 3fontsallowed,
bitmapped or not; Acrobat Reader would in any
casehandlethem poorly.
The Adobe Type Manager, which rst made
screen viewing with scalable (vectorized) fonts a
signicant reality is not needed by Acro
DVI
since
the relevant functions have been absorbed into
AcrobatReader.
OnMath
CD
,therearejustafew
DVI
les that
call for commercial Adobe Type 1 fonts.
DVIPDF
willnotcurrentlyhandletheseunlessyouhavethem
installed in Type 1 format. Since many of these
have acceptable TrueType versions preinstalled by
Windows, more support for TrueType would be
desirable.
Until then, we recommend Malyshev's own
DView for such fonts. It oers essentiallyuniversal
fontsupport|althoughdierent graphicssupport.
Installing Acro
DVI
Acro
DVI
(including
DVIPDF
)currently runs under
allrecentversionsofMicrosoftWindows(notunder
version 3.x). It is freely available on the Internet
(see Resources).
Currently, both Acro
DVI
and
DVIPDF
are
presentedasadirectoryofapproximately1.5mega-
octets (Mo),notincludingtheBaKoMafont collec-
tion,which is anotherfewmegaoctets. Asformany
Windows programs,an installerprogramis used.
The installed system is largely autonomous
in that it requires only the prior presence of the
AcrobatReader (v.4.0orhigher),andnon-invasive
in that it alters the behavior ofnothing outside its
own installed directory (currently called dvipdf).
To deinstallit,onejustdeletes that directory.
Hopefully, this means that Acro
DVI
willbe as
simple to use as AcrobatReader itself. For sophis-
ticatedusers,thereisanextensivecongurationle
toplaywith.
274
TUGboat,Volume20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999AnnualMeeting
SergeyLesenkoand Laurent Siebenmann
Performance testing
The following performance gures are for a 1997
PC
with a Pentium I processor operating at clock
speed 200Mhz under Windows 95.
For other
Windows environments, a simple correction for
clock speed should give agood rst approximation
to performance. The standard warning that \your
mileage may vary" is appropriate. The programs,
like vehicles, are extensively congurable, and the
les,liketerrain,arediverse.
For a typical mathematics article, the conver-
sion to
PDF
format goes at about 15 pages per
second, about 4 times greater than with Acrobat
Distiller, or with Ghostscript in its
PS2PDF
mode.
Comparison is relevant since it would be possi-
ble to publish compressed PostScript les without
included fonts while giving Acrobat Distiller or
Ghostscript access to the same BaKoMa font col-
lection.
For its
PDF
output,
DVIPDF
does both font
subsetting and stream compression. (The new
compressed Type 1 font format has yet to be
exploited by
DVIPDF
.) Theeciencyof its default
PDF
outputisthusrespectablebutnotyetoptimal.
Forexample,itiscomparabletothatofthe
PDF
les
currently published bytheAmerican Mathematical
Society, for the electronic research journal ERA
(Electronic Research Announcements). However,
by playing with the settings of Distiller, we were
usually able to do better with Distiller, typically
by a 3:2 ratio, particularly for small les. Do not
rush toconclude that this ratioin favorofDistiller
applies to allmath journals. Indeed,theadvantage
swungin favorof
DVIPDF
forthenexttest by(not
quite) a 2:3 ratio. It seems that both these
PDF
compilers couldstillreduce
PDF
bulksomewhat,in
spite ofmany yearsof eortin this direction. From
this point,however, we willfocus on Acro
DVI
as a
viewer of
DVI
,while ignoring its role as acompiler
of
PDF
.
The
DVI
les used by Acro
DVI
are far less
bulky than the
PDF
les used by Acrobat Reader.
As evidence,herearea fewexamplesfrom the rst
1999issue of the ElectronicJournalof Probability,
which added the
PDF
format compiled by Distiller
toits web oerings in 1998:
ArticlePages.pdf .pdf.gz.dvi.dvi.gz Adv
1
11
402
284
48
22
12.9
2
19
437
320
78
27
11.8
3
19
459
343
85
35
9.8
4
81 1162
960
412
154
6.2
5(?) 12
251
112
55
33
3.4
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online VB.NET may use the following VB.NET demo code to insert multiple pages of a PDF file to a
best pdf editor delete pages; add or remove pages from pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
splitting PDF file into two or multiple files online. Support to break a large PDF file into smaller files. Separate PDF file into single ones with defined pages
copy pages from pdf into new pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
All le sizes are given in kilo-octets (Ko). Notice
that
DVI
les regularly compress to about 40%
of their original size while
PDF
les compress far
less (as big internal chunks are precompressed).
The last column of the table, the
DVI
advantage,
gives the size ratio of compressed
PDF
les to
compressed
DVI
les. This is an accurate measure
of modem transfer speed ratios|whether the les
are compressed or not|because during modem
transfer,allmaterialiscompressed. Thesameratio
will be roughly the le size advantage of
DVI
les
on a
CD-ROM
such as Math
CD
, which attempts
to make the best use of available space. Indeed,
a thoroughly precompressed form of
PDF
would
be chosen for such a
CD-ROM
while the
DVI
les
would probably be zip-compressed, alongwith any
auxiliarygraphics les.
Thefth articlewasanomalous in anumberof
respects. It had \special commands; there were
two .epsgures, and these were complemented by
their .pdf versions from Distiller, and the total
of these graphics inclusions was less than 12Ko
of insertions (compressed). The explanation for
PDF
being only 3.4 times less ecient than
DVI
turned out, on investigation, to be mostly due to
acommon error in the production of
PDF
;namely,
it was made with bitmapped T
E
X fonts, which
performdisastrouslyin AcrobatReader. When this
is corrected, one can expect a
PDF
size similar to
that ofthe rstarticle.
Here are a couple of further examples, the
shortest and longest available articles from a 1999
issueofERA:
Article Pages.pdf.pdf.gz.dvi.dvi.gz Adv
1
3
105
84
12
5.5
15.3
2
12
248
215
66
27
8.0
These examples were reworked by us using well-
tuned settings for Distiller (Windows version); the
results (see below) are more flattering for the
PDF
format while leaving substantial advantage to
DVI
. Notethat the dierence between ecientand
inecient
PDF
isoftenmanytimesgreaterthanthe
totalsizeofa
DVI
version.
ArticlePages.pdf.pdf.gz.dvi.dvi.gzAdv
1
3
62
50
12
5.5
9.1
2
12
144
118
66
27
4.4
In the same vein, we note that the electronic
journalGeometryand Topology(seewww.emis.de)
posts no T
E
X format whatsoever, just the Adobe
formats
PS
and
PDF
. For their rst 1000 pages
the average
PDF
bulk per page is 10Ko (fonts
included)orabout 8Kocompressed. Thus,the
DVI
TUGboat, Volume 20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999Annual Meeting
275
AcroD
V
d
advantagewouldprobablybesomewhatlessthan 4.
Expertuseof
PDF
does makeabigdierence.
The modem bottleneck. Modem transfer speed
is animportanttimefactor. With agood telephone
modem and a good line one can hope to get a
transferrateofabout5Kopersecondofcompressed
material. Now,amathematicsarticlein
DVI
format
is about 2Ko per compressed page, and thus the
transfer rate is about 2.5 pages per second. This
is about the speed atwhich one can scrollthrough
the article with the 200 MHz PC used for these
tests. Note that
DVIPDF
converts to
PDF
format
at 6 times this speed. The time taken is perhaps
timelost,butit is negligible.
Withpoortelephone lines ormodems,oragain
congested web conditions, transfers that last more
thanaminuteortwoarelikelytobebroken;clearly
the large
PDF
les are the ones at greatest risk,
and with present web protocols, partial transfers
arecompletely wasted.
Article transport costs. To get a very rough
costestimate,consideramathematics articleof100
pages posted on the Internet and ultimately down-
loaded by a thousand readers (the typical number
of subscriptionsto apaper journal). Letis assume,
togetaneasilycalculatedgure,thateveryoneuses
a contempory 56Kbaud modem with telephone
charges of $2 per hour and in compensation let us
neglect all other charges. With these gures, the
telephonecostfordeliveringthearticleisabout$22
for
DVI
format and between $70 and $250for
PDF
format. Such gures suggest that use of
DVI
does
reducedatatransportcosts signicantly.
Improving the Acro
DVI
environment. First,
theproblemtobesolved: inbrowsingtheliterature,
it is not uncommon to look quickly at dozens of
articles. This can quickly eat up many megaoctets
of disk space if
PDF
format is involved. Now, one
of Murphy's computing laws asserts that any hard
disk that isn't new is surely nearly full, no matter
what its capacity, since \data expands to ll any
void". Thus,
DVIPDF
constantly risks running out
of space.
To largely eliminate this overflow risk, there
will be a setting for Acro
DVI
that makes the
PDF
le ephemeral and invisible. As soon as the next
DVI
le is processed, the previous invisible
PDF
will be erased. (That is no loss, since it can be
regenerated quickly.) With this scheme, it suces
toverifyatthebeginningofabrowsingsessionthat
your hard disk has enough space for the largest
VB.NET PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple
PDF document file to one-page PDF files or they can separate source PDF file to smaller PDF documents by every given number of pages. This online VB tutorial
delete pdf pages reader; delete a page from a pdf online
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively will also take up too much space, glyph file unreferenced can Delete unimportant contents
delete page on pdf reader; delete blank pages in pdf files
single
PDF
le you expect to read, plus enough
spacefor the relatively small
DVI
les.
Going one step further, the speed of Acro
DVI
cannowbedoubled byswitchingocompressionof
the the
PDF
output. At this point Acro
DVI
has
beennicelyoptimized as a
DVI
viewer|atthecost
oftemporarilyneglectingitsroleasa
PDF
compiler.
Comparing
PDF
and
DVI
formats
Adobe's Acrobat Reader has
PDF
as its native le
format. This formatisvery autonomous:
 Graphics objects are always embedded within
the
PDF
le.
 Fonts are usually embedded as well (the al-
ternative, to use system fonts, has proved
somewhat unreliable).
Thesepositive features bringsome disadvantages:
 Bitmapped graphics are unlikely to be dis-
playedon-screenatoptimumqualitysincethat
means no scaling. Vectorialgraphics may not
be seen in their full glory since that often
requiresthefull screen.
 It is dicult to export graphics objects from
the
PDF
leinthemost usefulformats.
PDF
lestendtobemanytimeslargerthan
DVI
les. This is, of course, partly because of the
font burden,
1
but the complexity of the
PDF
lestructurebrings substantialhidden costs.
Besides its space economy, the
DVI
format
has other virtues worth mentioning. Like all of
T
E
X, the
DVI
format is very stable, in spite of
(and even because of) its \special appendages.
This is important for archiving. Second,
DVI
is
simple: only a few pages in Knuth's book on the
T
E
X program (Knuth, 1986) are needed to dene
it adequately. Finally, one can derivefrom
DVI
all
formats currently used for mathematics, excepting
T
E
Xsource(i.e. the .texle).
The strongest argument for
PDF
format has
been the wide availability and high performanceof
the Acrobat Reader. Particularly outstanding are
the user interface, the graphics quality, and the
graphics speed. Adding to this: search, hypertext,
copy-and-paste to text les, annotations, printing
facilities,andPostScript(or
EPS
)export,itis clear
that Acrobat Reader is a major contender for the
aections of the readingpublic.
1
ThejournalGeometryandTopologyposts
PDF
formatbothwithand withoutincluded fonts;omis-
sionoffontseconomizes25%overtherstthousand
pagesofarticles.
276
TUGboat,Volume20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999AnnualMeeting
SergeyLesenkoand Laurent Siebenmann
This does not prove that Acrobat Reader has
no rivals among
DVI
readers. For example, xdvi
(under unix) is byfar the fastest viewer;the recent
BaKoMaDView candobetter inqualityandscope
of typography; emT
E
X provides better search and
text export. Interesting new
DVI
viewers continue
to appear: for example, tkdvi and nDVI (see
Resources for details). It would be destructive
not to serve such
DVI
readers. And ultimately
destructive of T
E
X itself since T
E
X systems are
typicallybuilt around them.
EPS
, and now
PDF
,
PNG
and
JPEG
The schemes to be described follow proposals in
(Siebenmann, 1996); they are just some of many
thathavebeenelaboratedforintegrationofgraphics
intothe
PDF
output of
DVIPDF
(seeLesenko,1997,
1998).
Let us begin by considering the graphics in-
tegration issue that arose for electronic journal
articles to appear on Math
CD
. The
DVI
format is
usuallyoneoftwoorthreepresented,anditentails,
for each article, one
DVI
le accompanied perhaps
by some
EPS
graphics les. For Math
CD
it was
important that the T
E
Xversion of the articles not
be necessary for the integration of the reformatted
graphicsles.
Since
DVIPDF
cannot,on itsown,convert
EPS
graphics to
PDF
,itwas initiallydecided to provide
PDF
versions of the graphics objects via Distiller.
One reason for this decision was that the
PDF
versions of vectorial graphics les are of optimal
quality and often quite ecient, provided that font
subsetting is used in creating them. Inasmuch
as these
PDF
les can be immediately viewed by
AcrobatReader on most platforms,this conversion
is ofimmediatebenet toalmostallusers.
Gradually, itbecameapparentthatconversion
to
PNG
and
JPEG
formats by various methods
sometimes oers greater advantages. Fortunately,
the solution to be described for
PDF
extends to
PNG
and
JPEG
graphicsles.
The \special syntax in the
DVI
les used
for
EPS
integration was most often the one used
by Tomas Rokicki's epsf.tex. Aiming to exploit
pre-existing
DVI
les using with Rokicki's dvips,
we decided to have
DVIPDF
interpret the existing
Rokickisyntax:
\special{Psfile=test.eps llx=11 lly=22
urx=33 ury=44 rwi=550 rhi=660}
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page pdf; delete pdf pages
VB.NET PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in vb.net
Combine multiple specified PDF pages in into single one file. Append one PDF file to the end of another one in VB library download and VB.NET online source code
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete page in pdf
This is probably the world's most common \spe-
cialsyntax.
2
The unit for the rst four \bounding box"
entriesis1bp(\bigpoint"). llxisthex-coordinate
of the lower left corner of the bounding box, etc.
Mostoften (butnotalways),thisboundingboxhas
simply been copied by T
E
Xfrom the boundingbox
indicated in the
EPS
leheader.
The last two entries, tagged by rwi (for real
width)and byrhi(forrealheight),specify,inunits
of 0.1bp, the width and height of the integrated
bounding box on the output page. Either of these
two entries, may be absent, in which case uniform
scaling is used. By convention, the integrated box
has itslowerleftcornerplacedat the
DVI
insertion
point.
The (expanded) argument of this \special
commandis passed intact intothe
DVI
le. Beware
that itis normally generated insideofT
E
X,so that
theauthor sees onlysome high-levelcommands,as
thosefound in epsf.tex.
Forboththe .epsleanditsderived.pdfle,
thegureis locatedonacoordinateplanewithunit
oflength = 1bp;also,the scaleand orientationare
the same for both planes. In the event the .pdf
le was created by Ghostscript,thetwocoordinate
systems will be exactly the same. Then the dvips
rules of integration from dvips are applied without
modicationand theresultsareidentical.
If the .pdf le was created by Distiller, the
twocoordinate systems arerelatedby atranslation
and some care is required required to make it
predictable. We omit the details.
In fact, Math
CD
has used Distiller mainly,en-
countering only occasional problems. Fortunately,
the reader of an article will be completely obliv-
ious to such complications; only website editors,
CD-ROM
editors, and conscientious authors are
concerned.
Generalizing to bitmapped graphics. Thereis
an important variant of the above mechanism that
is optimal for bitmaps.
EPS
and
PDF
are very
generalformats that can accommodatevectorialor
bitmappedimages;however,forbitmaps,
EPS
tends
tobebulkyandslow,andbothseemtoobstructthe
recoveryof embeddedbitmaps. On the other hand,
bitmap manipulation tools such as
XN
view under
Windows and Linux/
UNIX
or Graphics Converter
for Macintosh are easy to obtain and can generate
2
It is not, however, the simplest for the job;
indeed, one could get by without the \bounding
box"entries (cf.Siebenmann, 1996).
TUGboat, Volume 20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999Annual Meeting
277
AcroD
V
d
an
EPS
format at any time. Thus, to the extent
that you wish to grant full control of bitmapped
graphicstothe readerofyour article,youmaywish
touseanativebitmapped norm.
The converse applies too: one can lock a
PDF
le or restrict its use in various ways. And it must
be concededthat
PDF
managestoinheritthespace
eciencyofbothleadingpublicbitmappedformats:
PNG
and
JPEG
.
Recall that
PNG
(Portable Network Graphics)
is the mostecientcontemporarynormfor faithful
bitmap compression and is suitable for scientic
gures and for most of the myriad uses which the
commercial
GIF
format enjoys on the web.
PNG
is typically 15% more compact than
GIF
.
3
JPEG
is the dominant \lossy" format for compression of
low-contrast color images such as photos.
JPEG
(like
GIF
)is well supported by current versions of
the Web browsers.
Hopefully, the above considerations will en-
courage more T
E
X users to exploit
PNG
and
JPEG
bitmaps. Those who are still restricted to vector
graphics in T
E
X should be reminded, every time
theyseeawebbrowser,thatthefullgamutof(still)
bitmapped images, color included, as seen on the
web,are beggingtobeusedin T
E
X.
What we have said about
PNG
and
JPEG
beingnativeoreditablegraphicsformatsistosome
extenttruefor
PDF
. Indeed,theWindows graphics
programMayuraDrawusesitasitsstorageformat;
however,it does notread arbitrary
PDF
les.
It is clear from the above conversion, that
the preparation ab initio of a manuscript in
DVI
formatwith
PNG
bitmappedgraphicsinclusionscan
use the conventional
EPS
integration mechanism.
We summarize since the process applies with little
change alsoto
JPEG
and
PDF
:
 convert the
PNG
graphics to
EPS
, in
XN
view
or similarprogram;
 integrate the .eps le using the consensual
specialcommand;and nally,
 replace the .eps le by the original .png le
(the .eps le is usually bulky and is perhaps
best discarded since it can be regenerated if
theneed arises).
The end user then just pushes the .dvi le onto
the Acro
DVI
icon and viewing in Acrobat Reader
willbegin|usingthe original
PNG
graphics.
3
Unfortunately, the leading browsers, Netscape
and Internet Explorer, have been tardy and half-
hearted in their support for
PNG
. It may become
necessary for Acro
DVI
tosupport
GIF
.
But there is a shortcut; it is unnecessary to
generatean
EPS
le. Specifying
DoBBoxFile =YES
in aconguration le,previewthe
PNG
by pushing
itsiconontothatofAcro
DVI
.Asaby-product,this
previewingcreates an auxiliaryle (extension.bb),
which containstheBoundingBoxcommentasin an
EPS
le header. With a suitable macro package
such as boxedeps.tex (version for year 2000) or
the L
A
T
E
Xpackagesgraphicsorgraphicx,the.bb
lecan be used inlieu of an
EPS
le.
Auxiliary roles for Ghostscript. The rst is
to allow on-the-fly integration by Acro
DVI
of
EPS
les into
DVI
format; optionalsettings of Acro
DVI
enable this when Ghostscript is present. This is
veryusefulforviewinglegacy
DVI
-plus-
EPS
postings
prevalent on the Internet.
When an author or publisher is preparing an
article for publication in
DVI
format with graph-
ics inclusions, the strategy should be to vary the
graphics format: maximize image quality while
minimizingbulk. Eort spent on this often leadsto
surprisingbutusefulresults(seethe1999documen-
tation for boxedeps). Thus, it is advisable to urge
authorstopresentoriginalsofallgraphicsobjects.4
Secondly, Ghostscript is a valuable converter
to bitmap formats from
PS
,
EPS
, and even
PDF
;
it has command-line options for parameters such
as resolution. Unfortunately, Ghostscript has its
quirks as a rasterizer. On the other hand, we
havementionedthattheAdobe
PS
-and
PDF
-based
systems seem loath to surrender internally stored
bitmaps; they can be likened to a bank so eager
for deposits that it has forgotten to provide for
withdrawals. When need for withdrawals comes,
Ghostscript maybeyourbest friend.
The medium molds the message. One has to
bear in mind that the various graphics formats
and the various viewing mechanisms may influence
whatultimately reaches thehuman eye. Thepages
of TUGboat, for example, are printed in black
and white by photo-oset methods and will never
faithfully render the colored iris that is the icon
forAcro
DVI
.
For the reader's amusement, Fig.1 shows in
black-whiteseveralratherdierentrenditionsofthe
iris,allofwhichderivefromonemulticoloredpastel
originalcontributedbyTinaandKeiraMiyata. This
4
Forexample,in preparingMath
CD
,thelackof
such originalshasbeenmoreof avexation than the
lackofT
E
Xsourceles!
278
TUGboat,Volume20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999AnnualMeeting
SergeyLesenkoand Laurent Siebenmann
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Figure1
was scanned in 32-bit color to a 450450-pixel
bitmap, and stored as a57Kole in
JPEG
format.
This TUGboat article used the .epsversions.
(a) a suitable projection to black-white (= b/w)
by GraphicsConverter;size 30Koas .eps.gz,
20Koas .pdf.gz,14Koas
.png
.
(b) isderivedbyFloyd-SteinberglteringbyGraph-
ics Converter; size36Koas .eps.gz,26Ko as
.pdf,and 18Koas.png,
(c) (colored) arises from vectorization, by 16 re-
gions of flat color, using Adobe's Stream-
line (v.3); size 144Ko as .eps.gz, 146Ko as
.pdf.gz,and 30Koas.jpg.
(d) (b/w) is the 1000 or so curves that are the
boundaries of the 16 colors of (c); size 203Ko
as .eps.gz, 186Ko as .pdf.gz, and 15Ko as
.png. This last bitmap blurred the curves;
doubled resolution gavea53Ko.pngle.
The quest for image clarity and beauty is an
empirical art;with notesting,theresults of photo-
oset printingmay bedisappointing. Weapologize
in advance.
On the need for
DVI
eciency
There is currently lukewarm support for the use
of ecient methods. What can be done eciently
by astute programming is by preference done by
the liberal expenditure of RAM or disk space
or processor power. Thus, for Acro
DVI
to be
taken seriously, cogent evidence is wanted that
the resources economized through maintainingand
developing the ecient
DVI
format can be used
decisively.
This is perhaps most evident with
CD-ROM
s.
A
CD-ROM
contains about 650Mo of data. If
exploitedtoarchivemathematicsincompressed
DVI
form(andnoother)a
CD-ROM
couldcontainabout
300,000pagesofmathematics. Thatisenoughspace
to record all the mathematics currently on the
xxx.lanl.gov \e-print" archive (recently named
\arXiv"),which is saidtoamounttoabout200,000
pages. Alternatively, it is enough to distribute
all the mathematics research articles published in
one year (on paper or electronically). Again, it is
enough spaceto reprint thewhole of theAnnals of
Math (themost prestigeousmath journal) plus the
whole of Crelle(theoldest mathjournal).
Goingbeyond mathematics,it might be possi-
ble to present a complete encyclopedia on a single
CD
(or two), usingcompressed
DVI
(and graphics)
les for storage and Acro
DVI
for viewing. Cur-
rently,thefavored storageformat for encyclopedias
is
RTF
(Rich Text Format) and the usual viewer
is
MSW
ord.
RTF
enjoys eciency comparable to
that of
HTML
and
DVI
;it allowsthesame enviable
flexibility of line length as
HTML
, and it is some-
what more expressive than
HTML
but less sothan
DVI
. Acro
DVI
(allied with Acrobat Reader) oers
the besttypographyand $peed.
Although such projects maynot be realized in
the immediate future, Math
CD
is intended to hint
atthemall.
There should also be evidence that
CD-ROM
capacity will not grow so fast that it outstrips the
increasingdemandforsuch permanentstorage. Ifit
does,thenitisplausiblethatthereisroomforwaste.
The spectacular 1000-fold growth of the capacity
of inexpensive hard disks in the last dozen years
has fed wild expectations of storage technologies.
But the reality for
CD-ROM
sis sobering. It is now
known that the next (second) generation of
CD-
ROM
s,called
DVD
s(DigitalVersatile Disc) coming
about 15 years after the rst, will be based on a
simple evolution of the current
CD-ROM
s: a rough
doubling of density is involved, along with use of
bothsidesofthedisk. Thecapacitygainto4.5Gig5
will be somewhat less than 10-fold (not 1000-fold).
Thisis afactor frighteningly similarto thewastage
factor that would be imposed by general adoption
of the bulky
PDF
format. Furthermore, it could
be a decade before the new
CD-ROM
format is
sold at the aordable prices of today's
CD-ROM
s,
5
Double that for two-layer versions|whose
durabilityis,unfortunately,in doubt.
TUGboat, Volume 20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999Annual Meeting
279
AcroD
V
d
since that is the time it took for today's
CD
s to
reach mass consumer prices. This is one of the
strongest arguments for retaining the ecient
DVI
norm. Fortunately,
DVD
readerswillaccepttoday's
CD-ROM
s.
The current pause in progress of telephone
modem speeds gives additionalarguments. The 56
kilobaud telephonemodems oftodayareconsidered
to be the last gasp of a tired technology up
against what is called the \Shannon limit". In
this case, a dramatic switch to
ADSL
(Asymetrical
Digital Subscriber Lines) is being promoted with
great speed gains: nominally 1.5 megabits/sec
download and .5 megabits for upload (but, in
practice, perhaps only one third or one quarter of
that). There remains the question whether and
whenthistechnologywillbeaswidelyavailableand
as aordableas thepresentmodemtechnology.
Although hard disk capacity has been growing
prodigiously, electroniclibraries such as ELibMath
EMS
(www.emis.de) could come to need
DVI
's
polyvalenceandeciency. Thusfar,aharddiskofa
fewgigaoctetsissucienttostoretheentirelibrary
ofafewdozenjournals. Atcurrentaordableprices
for storage, dozens of mirror copies of the library
have been established worldwide. As time passes,
journals are not only multiplying and individually
growingbut areoeringmoreand moreformatsfor
downloading,notably the bulky
PDF
. If and when
this causesoverflowofthecurrentgenerationofthe
ELibMath hard disks,
DVI
format could oer an
attractiveremedy.
Thexxx.lanl.gove-printserverhasshownthe
way on economy by deriving essentially all formats
from a .tex source on demand. This server suc-
cessfully deploys immense expertise and resources
under
UNIX
systems and manages to compile any
document from .tex les to derive on-the-fly any
other format the user requests. To do much the
same on a
CD-ROM
,but using .dvi format,seems
just within the realm of possibility|relying heav-
ily on the greater simplicity and wide acceptance
of
DVI
format. The rst edition of Math
CD
will
nevertheless be far more liberal (heteroclite) than
the xxx.lanl.govserver.
Weconcludethattheeconomyandpolyvalence
of T
E
X's original
DVI
norm may indeed be the
magicalstufrom which dreams can bewoven.
Is Acro
DVI
in the lead?
As afront end to AcrobatReader for
DVI
viewing,
howwelldoesAcro
DVI
facecompetition?
There areseveral interesting indirect competi-
tors that we merely mention in historical order:
Ghostscript/Ghostview,then Distillerteamed with
Acrobat Reader, and most recently pdfT
E
X (see
Thanh, 1998),alsoforusewith the Reader.
Potentially, the strongest indirect competitor
would be Acrobat Reader itself using a more com-
pactand agileversion of
PDF
format|butthereis
nosign of that.
OnedirectcompetitorofAcro
DVI
isMalyshev's
BaKoMa DView, which not only has the broadest
typographic capabilities in the T
E
Xworld of 1999,
but also the ability to output
PDF
les. We leave
theuser tojudge the relative virtues. Both willbe
provided on Math
CD
.
A second direct competitor is dvipdfm by
Mark A. Wicks, which surfaced in 1998. It is
an autonomous converter quite similar in concept
to
DVIPDF
.
Executable binaries are available
on
CTAN
for 2 platforms, W9X/
NT
and i386
Linux. The reviewer of our paper informed us of
manycompiled dvipdfmbinaries on theT
E
X-Live4
CD-ROM
. The platform/
OS
combinations served
include:
DEC
alpha/
OSF
4,
HP
/
HPUX
10, i386
/Linux,
SGI
/
IRIX
6.2, RS6000/
AIX
4.1.4, Sparc/
Solaris 2.5{2.6,andWindows (32-bit).
Thusfar,neitherofthesedirectcompetitorshas
provided closeintegration with Acrobat Reader. It
isprobablyfairtosaythatbotharepresentlyaiming
at
PDF
publication, not
DVI
viewing. Theyare not
yetcompetingfrontally|but they soon could.
As for support of the most frequently used
\special commands, BaKoMa DView is well ad-
vanced, thanks to adherence to dvips syntax.
Acro
DVI
has some catching up to do here because
it originally fashioned its own \special syntax;
basic functionality for color and hyper-references
are, however, present. Least adapted for viewing
legacy
DVI
lesisdvipdfm|becauseofitsreliance
on `pdfmark' syntax; however, it has good basic
\specialfunctionality.
On the other hand, the recent wide porting
of dvipdfm and distribution via the T
E
X-Live
CD
could well eclipse
DVIPDF
, and with it, Acro
DVI
.
If that is our fate, we hope that both
DVIPDF
and Acro
DVI
will nevertheless be remembered as
seminalproofs offeasibility.
Acknowledgements and History
Thesecond authorisgratefulforan invitationfrom
Stanislas Klimenko to visit
IHEP
in Protvino for
several weeks in the autumn of 1997to work with
therstauthor,andalsowithBasilMalyshev. Basil
280
TUGboat,Volume20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999AnnualMeeting
SergeyLesenkoand Laurent Siebenmann
hasverykindly permitted us todistributeaversion
of his BaKoMafontcollectionwith Acro
DVI
.
The idea of exploiting
DVIPDF
and Acrobat
Reader together as a feature-rich
DVI
reader has
been a subject of discussion between us (Lesenko
and Siebenmann) since the 1996
TUG
meeting in
Dubna, Russia. For a long time, this project
remained on a back burner while basic features
of
DVIPDF
were perfected by the rst author.
As Math
CD
project took shape, it oered many
stimulatingdesignchallenges,and the last year has
brought substantial progress that seems to justify
ourearlyoptimism.
Resources
Acrobat: a series of products by Adobe Inc.,
including Acrobat Reader, and Acrobat Dis-
tiller;theformer is free whilethe latter is sold
(but low prices for Distiller are available to
academicusers in manycountries). Supported
platforms include: Windows 3.x, Windows 9X,
Windows
NT
, Macintosh, OS/2-Warp, Linux,
IBM-AIX
, Sun
OS
, Solaris,
SGI-IRIX
,
HP-UX
,
and Digital
UNIX
. Adobe's website address:
www.adobe.com.
There is an active news list (comp.text.pdf)
that can provide user support. See also
EMJ
,
below, in particular Nelson Beebe's comments
of23April1999.
AcroD
V
d
 (with
DVIPDF
): by S. Lesenko and L.
Siebenmann. Alpha versions are posted by
anonymous ftpin Europe and N.America:
topo.math.u-psud.fr/pub/tex/
cmstex.maths.umanitoba.ca/pub/acrodvi
When Acro
DVI
is reasonably stable, it will be
submitted tothe
CTAN
archive.
BaKoMaT
E
X: byBasilK.Malyshev. AT
E
Ximple-
mentation for the MicrosoftWindows
OS
that
appearedin1998.Includesanadvancedversion
of the BaKoMafont collection,the
DVI
viewer
DV
iew,anda
DVI
-to-
PDF
converter. Available
from
CTAN
and from ftp://ftp.mx.ihep.su.
boxedeps: by Laurent Siebenmann. A macro
package for
EPS
graphics integration that is
valid for all
PS
printer drivers. Available from
CTAN
. Theyear2000versionco-operateswith
some
PDF
compilers to integrate
PDF
,
PNG
,
JPG
graphics using.bbles.
dvips: by Tomas G. Rokicki; availablefrom
CTAN
in the dviwaredirectory.
dvipdfm: by Mark A. Wicks. A
DVI
-to-
PDF
converter that appeared in 1998:
http://odo.kettering.edu/dvipdfm/
Currently available on
CTAN
for i386 Linux,
andforWindows9X/
NT
aspartoftheMikT
E
X
andfpT
E
Xdistributions.
EMJ:theElectronicMath Journalsdiscussion list:
http://math.albany.edu:8800/hm/emj.
graphics, graphicx: L
A
T
E
X2
"
packages by David
Carlisle andSebastianRahtz,on
CTAN
.
Graphics Converter: by Thorsden Lemke. bitmap
editorandconverterforMacintosh;shareware.
www.lemkesoft.de.
Ghostscript: by Peter L. Deutsch.
A PostScript and
PDF
interpreter, that pro-
vides bitmapped or
PDF
output; the latter
function is called
PS2PDF
.
ftp.cs.wisc.edu/pub/ghost/aladdin.
GSview: by Russell Lang. A viewer based on
Ghostscript
ftp.cs.wisc.edu/pub/ghost/rjl/.
MathCD:
CD-ROM
(in prep.) devoted chiefly to
journals and softwarefor mathematics.
Go to MathCD.html at the editors' web sites:
www.math.washington.edu/~burdzy,
topo.math.u-psud.fr/~lcs,and
rsp.math.brandeis.edu.
MayuraDraw: agraphicsprogrambyKarunakaran
Rajeev;itsnativeformat is adialectof
PDF
.
www.wix.com/mdraw210.zip.
nDVI: a
DVI
viewer by K.Peeters.
norma.nikhef.nl/~t16/ndvi
doc.html.
tkdvi: a
DVI
viewer by A. Lingnau.
www.tm.informatik.uni-frankfurt.de
/~lingnau/tkdvi.
XNview: by Pierre-E.Gougelet,bitmap editor and
converter for Windows, Linux, etc.:
latour.univ-paris8.fr/~pierre.
TUGboat, Volume 20(1999),No.3|Proceedingsofthe1999Annual Meeting
281
AcroD
V
d
References
Bienz, Tim; Richard Cohn; and James Meehan.
Portable Document Format Reference Manual.
Addison-Wesley,Reading,Massachusetts,1993.
Knuth,Donald.T
E
XTheProgram.Addison-Wesley,
Reading,Mass.,1986.
Lesenko,Sergey.\The
DVIPDF
Program."
TUGboat 17(3),252{254(1996).
Lesenko,Sergey. \
DVIPDF
and Graphics."
TUGboat 18(3),166{169(1997).
Lesenko, Sergey. \
DVIPDF
and Embedded
PDF
."
Proceedings of Euro-T
E
X Conference, St. Malo.
CahiersGUTenberg 28{29,231{241(1998).
www.gutenberg.eu.org/pub/GUTenberg/
Malyshev, Basil. \Problems of the conversion of
METAFONT fonts to PostScript Type 1". TUG-
boat 16(1),60{68(1995).
Siebenmann, Laurent. \
DVI
-based Electronic Pub-
lication."TUGboat 17(2),206{214(1996).
Sojka,Petr,HanTh^e
ThanhandJirZlatuska.\The
joyofT
E
X2
PDF
|AcrobaticswithanAlternative
to
DVI
Format."TUGboat17(3),244{251(1996).
Thanh,HanTh^e
.\ThepdfT
E
XProgram."Proceed-
ings of Euro-T
E
XConference, St. Malo. Cahiers
GUTenberg28{29,197{210(1998).
www.gutenberg.eu.org/pub/GUTenberg/
Post-Conference Addendum
With reference to the discussion on modem down-
loading speeds (section \On the need for
DVI
eciency"), Michael Doob reports top speeds near
500Ko/sec on an optical cable network installed
originally for cabled home television. This is stun-
ningprogress;even the authors'institutionalether-
net
LAN
s have never oered speeds quite so high.
Curiously, the slower
ASDL
technology is attract-
ing more investment. One should bear in mind
that better Internet accessmay wellincrease `peak
time' Internet congestion, at which times eective
throughput is oftenless thanforasimpletelephone
modem.
We authors thank Michael Doob for hosting
our alpha version, and also for making the oral
presentationinVancouver,when,atthelastminute,
the rstauthor wasunableto attend.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested