c# pdf reader using : Acrobat extract pages from pdf Library application component asp.net html winforms mvc TCoPermissionsinSnowLeopard-1.0-sample0-part757

Check for Updates
 
Make sure you have the latest information!
Help   Catalog   Feedback   Order Print Copy  
TidBITS Publishing Inc.
Take Control of
Permissions
Brian Tanaka
v1.0
$10 
Snow 
Leopard
in
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf file; delete pages from a pdf reader
Acrobat extract pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
cut pages from pdf; delete a page from a pdf acrobat
Table of Contents 
Read Me First  4
!
Updates ................................................................................4!
Basics...................................................................................4!
What’s New...........................................................................5!
Introduction  7
!
Permissions Quick Start  8
!
Problems and Solutions  9
!
About Permissions  10
!
The Anatomy of Permissions  13
!
Choose a Method of Setting Permissions  18
!
Set Permissions Using the Info Window  20
!
Set Permissions Using FileXaminer  22
!
Use Access Control Lists  25
!
Advantages of ACLs...............................................................25!
Apply ACLs...........................................................................25!
Permissions Inheritance..........................................................29!
Understand Default Permissions  30
!
Permissions on New Items......................................................30!
Set Permissions for New Items................................................33!
The Case of the Promiscuous Folder.........................................36!
The Shared Folder.................................................................37!
Permissions on Copied Items...................................................40!
Work with User Names, UIDs, and GIDs  48
!
How They Work.....................................................................48!
Floating Permissions ..............................................................49!
UID Problems........................................................................50!
Manage Groups.....................................................................54!
Understand Default Users and Groups......................................55!
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Extract hyperlink inside PDF. PDF Write. Redact text content, images, whole pages from PDF file. Annotate & Comment. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete page pdf acrobat reader
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pdf pages; delete page from pdf document
Understand Ignore Ownership  58
!
Repair Permissions with Disk Utility  61
!
Learn Advanced Unix Techniques  64
!
List Folder Contents with ls.....................................................65!
Change Permissions with chmod..............................................67!
Change Owners with chown....................................................70!
Change Groups with chgrp......................................................71!
Change File Flags with chflags.................................................71!
Bit Masking...........................................................................72!
Set a Umask.........................................................................74!
Work with the Set UID, Set GID, and Sticky Bits........................74!
Learn More  77
!
Appendix A: Fixes for Common Problems  79
!
Can’t Give a File to Another User.............................................79!
I Don’t Own My Files on a Non-Boot Volume..............................81!
FTP Default Permissions Incorrect............................................81!
Web Server Gives “403 Forbidden” Error...................................82!
File Won’t Delete...................................................................82!
Appendix B: Converting to Octal  84
!
Use Math..............................................................................85!
Appendix C: Use the man Command  87
!
About This Book 
88
!
About the Author...................................................................88!
Author’s Acknowledgements....................................................88!
About the Publisher................................................................89!
Production Credits .................................................................89!
Copyright and Fine Print  90
!
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
delete page in pdf preview; delete page from pdf
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
add and delete pages from pdf; add and remove pages from pdf file online
Read Me First 
Welcome to Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard, version 
1.0, published in April 2010 by TidBITS Publishing Inc. This book 
was written by Brian Tanaka and edited by Geoff Duncan (with help 
from Tonya Engst and Sandro Menzel). 
This book helps you control the often-perplexing world of permis-
sions in Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard. It explains how permissions 
work, how to resolve common problems, and how to best control 
access to your files in a variety of situations.  
Copyright © 2010, Brian Tanaka. All rights reserved. 
If you have an ebook version of this title, please note that if you 
want to share it with a friend, we ask that you do so as you would 
a physical book: “lend” it for a quick look, but ask your friend to buy 
a new copy to read it more carefully or to keep it for reference. 
Discounted classroom and Mac user group copies are also available. 
UPDATES AND MORE 
You can access extras related to this ebook on the Web. Once you’re 
on the ebook’s Take Control Extras page, you can: 
•  Download any available new version of the ebook for free, or 
purchase any subsequent edition at a discount.  
•  Download alternate formats, including .pdf and—usually—.epub 
and .mobi. (Learn about reading this ebook on handheld devices 
at http://www.takecontrolbooks.com/device-advice.) 
•  Read postings to the ebook’s blog. These may include new infor-
mation and tips, as well as links to author interviews. At the top 
of the blog, you can also see any update plans for the ebook. 
•  Get a discount when you order a print copy of the ebook. 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages on pdf online; delete page pdf file reader
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat. VB example code to create graphics watermark on multiple PDF pages within the
cut pages from pdf preview; delete pdf pages reader
BASICS 
In reading this book, you may get stuck if you are unfamiliar with 
the way I describe working with the Mac. Please note the following: 
•  Path syntax: I occasionally use a path to show the location of 
a file or folder. For example, Mac OS X stores most utilities, such 
as Terminal, in the Utilities folder. The path to Terminal is: 
/Applications/Utilities/Terminal
The slash at the beginning of a path tells you to start from the root 
level of the disk. Some paths begin with 
~
(tilde), which is a shortcut 
for any user’s home directory. For example, if a person with the user 
name 
joe
wants to install fonts that only he can access, he would 
install them in the 
~/Library/Fonts
folder, which is another way 
of writing 
/Users/joe/Library/Fonts
.
•  Menus: When I describe choosing a command from a menu in 
the menu bar, I use an abbreviated description. For example, the 
abbreviated description for the menu command that opens an Info 
window on a file or folder from the Finder is “File > Get Info.” 
WHAT’S NEW 
This book is a complete, Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard-specific update 
to Take Control of Permissions in Leopard. Whereas that book cov-
ered all versions of Mac OS X up to and including 10.5 Leopard, this 
book focuses tightly on Snow Leopard.  
Changes in this edition include: 
•  Of the three third-party tools that I recommended in earlier 
editions of this book (FileXaminer, Super Get Info, and XRay), 
only FileXaminer remains available for Snow Leopard. See Set 
Permissions Using FileXaminer (p. 22). 
•  ACLs are on by default in Snow Leopard. Therefore, we no longer 
need to test whether or not ACLs are on. Furthermore, we pre-
viously used fsacltl to test ACL status, but fsacltl has been removed 
from Mac OS X. See Use Access Control Lists (p. 25). 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete pages of pdf preview
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
as a kind of compensation for limitations (other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS on slide with no more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete pages from pdf reader; delete page from pdf reader
•  In Leopard, a umask in 
/etc/launchd.conf
did not work, contrary 
to Apple’s documentation. In Snow Leopard, it does work, but the 
warning from the last edition to avoid using this technique still 
stands. See Understand Default Permissions (p. 30). 
•  In Snow Leopard, a umask in 
~/.launchd.conf
doesn’t work, 
contrary to Apple’s documentation. Unfortunately, that means 
there is no way in Snow Leopard to set default permissions on files 
and folders created by the Finder or Mac OS X applications on an 
account-by-account basis. Read Understand Default Permissions 
(p. 30). 
•  Many of the default permissions (and ACLs) that result from the 
copy operations described in “Permissions on Copied Items” have 
changed. I have updated the tables accordingly. For example, when 
copying a file to another user’s Drop Box, unlike in Mac OS X ver-
sions prior to Snow Leopard, the ACLs on the resulting file are such 
that the receiving user can edit the file, and more interestingly, after 
saving, the file ownership switches to the receiving user’s account. 
See Permissions on Copied Items (p. 40). 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
DICOM to PDF Converter | Convert DICOM to PDF, Convert PDF to
users do not need to load Adobe Acrobat or any Convert all pages or certain pages chosen by users; download & perpetual update. Start Image DICOM PDF Converting.
delete blank pages in pdf; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
BMP to PDF Converter | Convert Bitmap to PDF, Convert PDF to BMP
for Adobe Acrobat Reader & print driver during conversion; Support conversion of Bitmap - PDF files in both single & batch mode; Convert all pages or certain
delete pages pdf files; delete pages pdf document
Introduction 
Even if you don’t know a thing about permissions, if you’re using 
Mac OS X, you’re using them right now. Every file and folder on your 
computer carries permissions from the moment it’s created until the 
moment it’s deleted. Because permissions are literally everywhere 
on your computer and because they control who can access what, it’s 
tremendously advantageous to understand them. You’ll have better 
control over your Mac, and you’ll be able to share items and access 
shared items with greater ease. 
Problems arising from improperly set permissions are common and 
can be frustrating: sharing files among users on one computer can be 
problematic if you don’t understand permissions, and sharing items 
on a network raises yet another set of potential problems.  
In this book I teach you how to prevent and fix permissions problems 
with ease—and much more. You’ll learn how to interpret and manip-
ulate permissions with the Info window in the Finder, Disk Utility, 
third-party tools, and Unix commands. You’ll learn how accounts and 
groups work (and how permissions control them), how default permis-
sions work, how to repair permissions, and how to ignore permissions 
on an attached volume. 
Equipped with this expertise, you’ll be able to handle permissions 
problems when sharing files locally or across networks, booting from 
multiple volumes, exchanging files with other users, running FTP and 
Web servers, and much more. 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
Permissions Quick Start 
The first sections of this book teach the basics of permissions and 
how to set them. The remaining sections explore more advanced 
techniques and concepts that help you solve problems. 
Learn about permissions: 
•  Find out what permissions are, and why you need them. See About 
Permissions (p. 10). 
•  Permissions are composed of simple interrelated parts. Discover 
how they work together. See The Anatomy of Permissions (p. 13). 
•  If you already know a bit about permissions and want an overview 
of what’s new in Snow Leopard, read What’s New (p. 5). 
Set permissions: 
•  There’s more than one way to set permissions. See Choose a Method 
of Setting Permissions (p. 18). 
•  Learn to Set Permissions Using the Info Window (p. 20) and to Set 
Permissions Using FileXaminer (p. 22). And, if you need more fine-
grained tools for controlling permissions, read Use Access Control 
Lists (p. 25). 
•  To solve a permissions-related problem, see Problems and Solutions 
(next page), for a quick index to helpful info. 
•  If you enjoy working in Unix or need the fine-grained control 
that Unix can provide, Learn Advanced Unix Techniques (p. 64). 
Delve deeper into permissions: 
•  Discover how your Mac assigns default permissions in Understand 
Default Permissions (p. 30), and increase your permissions IQ by 
reading Work with User Names, UIDs, and GIDs (p. 48). 
•  Learn to use two important Mac OS X features in Understand Ignore 
Ownership (p. 58) and Repair Permissions with Disk Utility (p. 61). 
•  Unix commands empower you to do things you can’t do from 
the graphical user interface, which you’ll see when you Learn 
Advanced Unix Techniques (p. 64). 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
Problems and Solutions 
I discuss a variety of common problems in Appendix A: Fixes For 
Common Problems (p. 79), but you will find help with solving other 
problems throughout the book. Use the links below to navigate to info 
that will help you with specific problems: 
•  I’m having trouble with The Shared Folder (p. 37). 
•  The Info window doesn’t show permissions settings I know exist. 
See Set Permissions Using FileXaminer (p. 19) and Learn Advanced 
Unix Techniques (p. 64). 
•  I don’t own my own files! See Work with User Names, UIDs, and 
GIDs (p. 48). 
•  I am concerned about the privacy of files and folders that I created 
and saved in my user account, and I want to make sure that others 
on the computer cannot access them in any way. Read The Case of 
the Promiscuous Folder (p. 36). 
•  When do I use Ignore Ownership on This Volume? See Understand 
Ignore Ownership (p. 58). 
•  Everyone tells me to use Repair Permissions but I don’t understand 
what it does. Learn the real story in Repair Permissions with Disk 
Utility (p. 61). 
•  I can see why understanding octal is useful when setting permis-
sions, but I can’t seem to get my head around it. See Appendix B: 
Converting to Octal (p. 84). 
•  When I copy or create items, I can’t predict what the permissions 
will be. It’s driving me batty! Find help in Understand Default 
Permissions (p. 30). 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
10 
About Permissions 
Like all Unix-based operating systems, Mac OS X is designed to make 
it easy for multiple people, termed users, to share the same computer. 
Each user has a user account (or more than one in some situations). 
Having your own personal user account is useful and convenient for 
a number of reasons. It enables you, for instance, to customize your 
account settings and preferences without affecting other users. It also 
enables you to store and organize your personal files and folders in 
your home folder—a special folder reserved for your exclusive use. 
Note: I discuss user accounts in this book enough to help you 
understand permissions. For more info, I highly recommend 
reading Take Control of Users & Accounts in Snow Leopard
In addition to an account for each user, Mac OS X computers have 
other types of accounts organized in a system based on Unix account 
management. Traditionally, in Unix there is an all-powerful account 
called root. Root has absolute authority and can, among other things, 
override permissions on items and change item ownership without 
restriction. All other accounts fall into two categories: user accounts, 
which are accounts used by actual humans, and system accounts, 
which are not associated with specific users and exist to perform tasks 
requiring special authority but not the absolute authority of root. 
User accounts, on Unix systems, can be granted the power to run 
individual programs as root, most commonly via the sudo facility. 
In Mac OS X, this highly flexible system of root account, system, 
and user accounts, and the granting of arbitrary administrative power, 
is nicely presented in a simplified form. Specifically, it offers several 
types of accounts: 
•  Root: The root account is authorized to do anything. 
•  Administrator: Administrator accounts can perform certain 
administrative tasks that require authorization beyond that of 
standard accounts, such as: changing global system preferences; 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested