c# pdf reader using : Reader extract pages from pdf SDK application service wpf html asp.net dnn TCoPermissionsinSnowLeopard-1.0-sample1-part758

13 
The Anatomy 
of Permissions 
As I mentioned in the previous section, every item on your computer 
is owned by an account and carries a set of permissions. These permis-
sions control the access that each of three classes—owner, group, and 
other—has to an item.  
Here’s a quick explanation of what I mean by owner, group, and other: 
•  Owner: The owner is the user account that owns an item, such as 
a file, folder, or disk. Every item is owned by an account. (Tradition-
ally in Unix, this is known as the user class, and Unix commands 
abbreviate it with a u.) 
•  Group: In addition to being owned by a user account, every item 
is also owned by a group. A group is a set of user accounts concep-
tually clumped together so permissions can apply to its members 
collectively. Mac OS X provides a number of default groups, and 
you can create additional groups. 
•  Other: Everyone else! Other refers to all user accounts on the 
system other than the owner and members of the group. You will 
see this type referred to as “others” (in the Finder’s Info window) 
and “world” (by other tools). 
Permissions for an item say whether owner, group, and other have 
these three permissions, which Table 1, next page, further explains:  
•  Read: View the contents of the item. 
•  Write: Change the item. 
•  Execute: Execute the item. 
Note:
Table 1
covers permissions from the Unix point of view. 
The Mac OS X Finder describes them using somewhat different 
terminology. See Set Permissions Using the Info Window
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
Reader extract pages from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
acrobat remove pages from pdf; delete pages on pdf
Reader extract pages from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages of pdf online; delete pdf pages in reader
18 
Choose a Method of 
Setting Permissions 
You can set permissions in Mac OS X in more than one way. Namely, 
you can use: 
•  The Info window in the Mac OS X Finder 
•  Third-party tools 
•  Unix commands 
Each method has relative advantages and disadvantages, as you can 
see in Table 2. 
Table 2: Methods of Setting Permissions 
Method 
Advantages 
Disadvantages 
Info window  Easier and more intuitive 
than Unix commands. 
Limited capabilities. Not as 
powerful or flexible as Unix 
commands. 
Third-party 
tools 
More features than the Info 
window. 
Not present by default. May 
require additional expense. 
Unix 
commands 
More powerful and flexible 
than the Info window. May 
be faster if you are familiar 
with Unix. 
Less intuitive than the Info 
window. 
Deciding which method to use in any given situation is up to you, and 
depends on the demands of the situation at hand. 
Personally, I prefer to set permissions from the Terminal using Unix 
commands. I find that it’s the fastest, easiest, and most flexible way 
to handle both simple and complex permissions. For simple situations, 
the amount of time and effort I expend is roughly the same or less than 
I would expend setting permissions via a graphical user interface such 
as the Info window or a third-party tool. And, for more complicated 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in C#.net
Page: Extract, Copy and Paste PDF Pages. Easy to Use C# Code to Extract PDF Pages, Copy Pages from One PDF File and Paste into Others in C#.NET Program.
add and delete pages in pdf; delete page in pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Extract Library: copy, paste, cut PDF pages in vb.
VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Save into a New PDF File. You VB.NET: Extract PDF Pages and Overwrite the Original PDF File. Instead
best pdf editor delete pages; add remove pages from pdf
20 
Set Permissions 
Using the Info Window 
For simple tasks relating to setting permissions, I recommend that 
you use the Finder’s Info window. The Info window does not provide 
the degree of control that Unix commands do—you can’t, for instance, 
manipulate individual Unix permissions. However, setting permissions 
via the Info window is quite easy and is perfectly adequate for most 
day-to-day situations. 
Set permissions with the Info window by following these steps: 
1.  Working in the Finder, select an item. 
2.  Choose File > Get Info (Command-I) to open the Info window. 
3.  In the Info window, you may need to click the Sharing & 
Permissions triangle to reveal more detail, as shown in Figure 1. 
Figure 1:
Ownership and permissions for a typical file as viewed in 
the Info window. 
4.  Click the lock (
) icon to change permissions. You’ll be prompted 
to authenticate, which you should do. 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF file in
inputFilePath); PDFTextMgr textMgr = PDFTextHandler.ExportPDFTextManager(doc); // Extract text content C# example code for text extraction from all PDF pages.
delete pages out of a pdf; copy pages from pdf to another pdf
VB.NET PDF Text Extract Library: extract text content from PDF
PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Text. VB.NET PDF - Extract Text from PDF Using VB. How to Extract Text from PDF with VB.NET Sample Codes in .NET Application.
delete page from pdf file online; delete pages from pdf acrobat
22 
Set Permissions 
Using FileXaminer 
The Info window is adequate for most day-to-day, basic permissions 
editing. However, it has a limited feature set and can’t handle many 
permissions-related tasks. Though Unix commands can perform every 
conceivable permission management task, not everyone feels comfort-
able with the requisite learning curve. Fortunately, a $10 third-party 
tool from Gideon Softworks, FileXaminer, performs many of the tasks 
the Info window can’t handle (http://www.gideonsoftworks.com/ 
filexaminer.html). 
FileXaminer does what the Info window does and more, and provides 
finer control over permissions. The interface and features—at least as 
far as permissions are concerned—are very similar, and FileXaminer 
provides good help documentation and contextual menus.  
Discontinued Third-Party Utilities 
Prior to Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, there were two other third 
party tools that helped manage permissions: Super Get Info and 
XRay. Super Get Info has been discontinued. XRay has a number 
of issues with both Leopard and Snow Leopard, and, at the time 
of this writing, the author does not plan to release an update that 
resolves those issues. 
FileXaminer has several advantages over the Info window. A partial list 
of its permissions-related features includes: 
•  Batch edit: You can change permissions (and other settings) on 
multiple items simultaneously. 
•  Manipulate the set UID, set GID, and sticky bits: I cover 
these advanced file attributes in Work with the Set UID, Set GID, 
and Sticky Bits, later. 
•  Change ownership recursively: Although the Finder’s Info 
window will allow you to apply permission changes to items 
enclosed within a folder, it will not allow you to apply ownership 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› C# PDF: Extract PDF Image. How to C#: Extract Image from PDF Document.
delete page on pdf reader; delete blank page in pdf online
VB.NET PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images
Image: Extract Image from PDF. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Extract PDF Image. VB.NET PDF - Extract Image from PDF Document in VB.NET.
delete page pdf; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
25 
Use Access Control Lists 
ACLs supplement Unix permissions and provide more detailed 
control over permissions. They also provide better interoperability 
with Samba (free file- and printer-sharing software used in many 
Unix and Linux systems for compatibility with Windows file and 
print servers) and Microsoft Windows. ACLs provide advantages 
over traditional Unix permissions, but the average Mac user run-
ning a non-server version of Mac OS X may never need them. 
Unless you are supporting multiple users with complex sharing 
requirements, you may want to skim or skip this section. 
ADVANTAGES OF ACLS 
Though Unix permissions are adequate for most situations, ACLs 
provide some clear advantages, including: 
•  ACLs offer more kinds of permissions than read, write, and execute. 
For example, ACLs provide a delete permission. 
•  ACLs are tremendously valuable if you have multiple individuals or 
groups working on collaborative projects, because they work around 
the “single user, single group” problem, which is perhaps the biggest 
limitation of traditional Unix permissions. For example, if you have 
a file that’s owned by the user 
bob
and the group 
developers
, you 
cannot grant permissions for a user who is not 
bob
or in the group 
developers
. However, with ACLs, you can specify that user 
frida
can, for instance, write to the file even though she is not in the 
developers
group. Likewise, you can specify permissions for 
another group such as, for example, one called 
designers
•  ACLs coexist nicely with traditional Unix permissions. ACLs are 
evaluated, and, if none apply, the Unix permissions apply. 
APPLY ACLS 
In the standard, non-server version of Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, ACLs are 
disabled by default. However, in 10.5 Leopard and 10.6 Snow Leopard, 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
doc2.Save(outPutFilePath); Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using C#. Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in C#.NET.
delete pages pdf online; acrobat export pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Page: Insert PDF Pages. |. Home ›› XDoc.PDF ›› VB.NET PDF: Insert PDF Page. Add and Insert Multiple PDF Pages to PDF Document Using VB.
delete page from pdf acrobat; copy page from pdf
30 
Understand 
Default Permissions 
Because all items have permissions, Mac OS X must decide which 
permissions to apply any time an item is created, copied, moved, 
extracted from an archive, and so on. Understanding these default 
behaviors is invaluable. You’ll know what to expect, and you’ll 
identify problems quickly and fix them by changing permissions 
to suit your needs. 
PERMISSIONS ON NEW ITEMS 
Various factors influence the default, initial permissions on new items. 
At the most fundamental level, a global bit mask turns off certain per-
mission bits by default. A bit mask is a pattern of zeros and ones that 
influences the pattern of another series of zeros and ones, as I show in 
the examples ahead. 
The global bit mask in Mac OS X is 
000 010 010
Note: In Unix documentation, you will see this global bit mask 
expressed as 022 octal. Octal is the base-8 numbering system. 
Counting in octal is simple: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 
15, 16, 17, 20, 21, 22, and so on. Octal skips 8 and 9, as well as 
18 and 19. 
The base permissions—the original permissions used in conjunction 
with the global bit mask to calculate default permissions—are: 
•  For folders: 
111 111 111 (rwxrwxrwx)
•  For files: 
110 110 110 (rw-rw-rw-)
When the base permission bits “drop through” the mask, any 
1
that 
encounters another 
1
in the mask is cleared, that is, changed to 
0
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
48 
Work with User Names, 
UIDs, and GIDs 
Since Mac OS X displays the user name of the account that owns 
a folder or file, it’s easy to assume that that account with that user 
name owns the item. In reality, it’s not quite so simple. The owner 
is actually determined by a number called the UID—the user identi-
fication number, not by the user name. In addition the group is, in 
fact, determined by the GID—the group identification number. 
HOW THEY WORK 
A famous quotation from Romeo and Juliet reads: “What’s in a name? 
That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet.” 
Deep down in Unix and Mac OS X, names—or, rather, user names— 
are just as incidental. 
Every account has a user name (Mac OS X calls it the short name), 
a numeric UID, and a numeric GID. User names, such as 
rose
, are 
strictly for the convenience of we humans who use the accounts. After 
all, it’s easier, if your name is Rose, to remember 
rose
than some 
number, such as 501. 
When it comes to file ownership, however, the operating system 
doesn’t care if your user name is 
rose
. It cares only about the UID. 
So, when it assigns or determines ownership, it uses the UID, not the 
user name, and it uses a numeric GID to identify an item’s group 
ownership. 
To reveal your account’s UID and primary GID, type 
id
in a Terminal 
window (and then press Return). The output of the 
id
command looks 
like this: 
uid=511(bob) gid=20(staff) 
groups=20(staff),103(com.apple.sharepoint.group.2) 
As you can see, bob’s account’s UID is 511. His account’s primary group 
is 
staff
, which is GID 20. An account can belong to multiple groups. 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
58 
Understand 
Ignore Ownership 
You can tell Mac OS X to ignore ownership of all files and folders on 
a non-boot volume. Since permissions depend on ownership, when 
you ignore ownership, permissions are much less effective. This can 
be helpful in a variety of situations, such as sharing files with a group 
of people or dealing with ownership problems resulting from having 
multiple boot volumes. 
Although ignoring permissions makes them less effective, it does 
not make them totally irrelevant, because—despite the name of 
the option—ignoring ownership doesn’t actually ignore ownership. 
Instead, each item on the volume takes on a special UID and GID 
that tell the operating system to act as if any account that accesses 
the item is the item’s owner. (Ownership of items created before 
ignore permissions was enabled reverts to the original owners 
when the ignore ownership option is disabled.) 
For example, if you ignore ownership on a volume, the operating 
system will report that whichever account you’re using owns all items 
on that volume. If a different account looks at items on the volume, 
the operating system will report that that account is the owner. 
It’s like setting a box with your name written on it on a table and 
leaving the room. When the next person walks in, he sees his name 
written on the box. If another person walks in and stands beside the 
first person, she will see her name. To whom does the box belong? 
Anyone who looks at it! Magic! 
However, when an account attempts to work with the item, the per-
missions relevant to the item’s owner apply, as usual. If, for instance, 
the permissions allow the owner read permission only, then that item 
is still read-only. 
Still, for the vast majority of typical items on a typical volume, this 
effectively means that all accounts have free access to all items since 
most items have liberal permissions for the owner. The net effect 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
61 
Repair Permissions 
with Disk Utility 
Mac OS X’s Disk Utility can verify and repair permissions on some 
files and folders. To be accurate, it doesn’t actually repair permissions. 
Rather, it simply resets permissions according to guidelines I discuss 
later in this section. 
Further, to say Disk Utility repairs permissions implies that permis-
sions can “go bad” or become corrupted over time and therefore need 
repairing because they’re broken. This is not true. Permissions stay 
the way they are set until someone or something comes along and sets 
them another way. 
So, if permissions stay the way they are, what’s changing them long 
after they’re initially set and causing all the fuss? Why do we need the 
Repair Permissions feature at all? A number of things can be at fault: 
•  Installers: Some installers change permissions on existing files 
and folders as a necessary part of the installation process, but fail 
to return them to their proper settings. To guard against slovenly 
installers, try running Verify or Repair Permissions after installing 
software, especially third-party software. 
•  User error: Mistakes can lead to problems requiring use of Disk 
Utility. A simple mistake with the chmod command, for instance, 
can play havoc with permissions, requiring correction with Disk 
Utility. 
Much of the software you install on your Macintosh is installed from 
packages. When a package is installed, the installer creates a Bill of 
Materials (.bom) file in that package’s receipts file. Installers store 
installation receipts in 
/Library/Receipts/
. The Bill of Materials file 
lists the files installed by the package and the initial permissions for 
those files. 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
64 
Learn Advanced 
Unix Techniques 
I saved this more advanced portion for the end of the book because 
many readers want to dive in and use tools that are familiar to them; 
therefore, I first discussed tools offering a graphical user interface. 
This section is for those who want to take control of the command 
line and harness its power. Because Unix is a broad and deep sub-
ject, this section is meant more as a practical overview than an 
exhaustive exploration. 
These advanced techniques are not required for taking control of 
permissions, and we’ve covered quite a bit of ground already, so 
don’t worry if you’ve hit information overload and want to skip 
this section. 
Why use Unix? Unix has a reputation for being hard to learn. 
Though this is often true, it’s also paradoxically easy to use. Once 
you clear the initial learning hurdle, the power and flexibility at 
your fingertips makes working with your computer easier. 
Translating between Symbolic and Absolute in Dashboard 
Two free (and almost identically-named) Dashboard widgets can 
translate Unix permissions between symbolic and absolute mode: 
•  Unix Permissions Calculator: 
http://vocaro.com/trevor/software/widgets/ 
•  Unix Permission Calculator: http://www.liepins.org/en/ 
dashboard/unix-permission-calculator/ 
The permissions-related commands are: 
•  ls: List files; covered in List Folder Contents with ls
•  chmod: Change file mode; see Change Permissions with chmod. 
•  chown: Change owner; flip ahead to Change Owners with chown
•  chgrp: Change group owner; see Change Groups with chgrp. 
Click here to buy the full 91-page “Take Control of Permissions in Snow Leopard” for only $10!
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested