c# pdf reader using : Delete blank pages in pdf files control SDK system azure winforms web page console Teachers%20Guide%20Book2-part761

21
Calculating square area
AIM: To stimulate children’s imagination and help them to grasp
concepts of time and space and extrapolate them to our dwindling
natural resources.
OBJECTIVE: To calculate the area of regular and irregular objects and
relate this to the battle for space we are fighting on behalf of wild tigers.
INTRO: Teachers are always looking for ways to make maths and numbers
exciting. This can be done through flash cards, maths games and simulations
to help children understand the concept of square area.
CONTENT: Map and total land area of Panna Tiger Reserve.
METHODOLOGY:
Team One counts tiles along the length of the room. Team Two
counts tiles along the breadth. Team Three counts every single tile in the
room. The teams write their respective figures on the blackboard.
When Team One’s figure is multiplied by Team Two’s does it equal
Team Three’s figure? Make a floor plan on the blackboard, marking
the total number of tiles. Explain how length x breadth provides the
same answer. You can also use graph paper.
Draw a large square on the blackboard. Divide this square into a 4x4
grid, comprising 16 smaller squares. Draw a rough map of the Panna
Tiger Reserve on the grid. Count the squares on which the tiger reserve
occupies more than half the square and ignore the squares on which
it occupies less than half. Explain how more-than-half roughly
compensates for less-than-half for irregular shapes.
Now introduce the idea of Project Tiger parks explaining the scale.
Ask kids to calculate the total area of a park protected for tigers
from the scale map.
If a female tiger requires a presumed minimum of 10 sq. km. of
territory, how many female tigers can be accommodated in this park?
Explain how more square area is required to be added to the park
for cubs that grow up and need territories of their own. Protection
of tiger habitats is vital to the survival of the species.
Maths
Maths Lesson Plan
Delete blank pages in pdf files - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page in pdf file; delete pages from a pdf file
Delete blank pages in pdf files - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete pages pdf file; delete pages pdf preview
22
AIDS: Measuring tapes, floor tiles, Project Tiger maps, graph paper.
BLACKBOARD:  Diagram of class with length and breadth in tiles.
 Grid-marked unit of 4x4, showing the 16 smaller squares.  Panna
Tiger Reserve map on grid.
EVALUATION:  Do students understand that for more tigers to
survive, they must have larger forests in which to live?  Are we at a
juncture in history when we hold the future of the tiger in our hands?
ACTIVITY:
Distribute flash cards (four tigers, all the rest deer and wildboar). Tell
the children  to imagine that their  classroom is the  Panna
Tiger Reserve. Their desks are green plants (producers). The four
tigers (secondary consumers) sit at desks — one in each of the four
corners of the class. All the other students are deer and wildboar
(primary consumers).
Now tell them that one-quarter, or 25 per cent of the tiger reserve is
required for a dam reservoir. All the deer and wildboar must move
Lesson Plan
Maths Lesson Plan
R
a
g
h
u
C
h
u
n
d
a
w
a
t
/
N
e
e
l
G
o
g
a
t
e
/
W
i
l
d
l
i
f
e
I
n
s
t
i
t
u
t
e
o
f
I
n
d
i
a
Area of tiger 01
Area of tiger 02
Area of tiger 03
Area of tiger 04
Panna Tiger Reserve
Home Ranges of Radio-Collared Tigers
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using Add and Insert Blank Pages to PDF File in
acrobat remove pages from pdf; add and delete pages in pdf
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
Create PDF from Open Office files. Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; // Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages PDFDocument doc
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete pages from pdf in reader
23
out of this area to the rest of the room, where they must stand
because there are no desks (food) for them. The tiger cannot move
(he symbolically leaves the class for one minute) because no other
tiger will let him near. Vary the percentage of the ‘forest’ to be drowned.
Explain that tigers cannot adjust to smaller and smaller forests because
humans want dams, mines and roads. Tigers need space to survive.
Note: The number of tigers that can be supported by a forest depends on
both square area (size) and prey density (number of deer per sq. km.).
Ask the children to work out the following sums in their books.
i) If one tiger eats 75 deer in a year, how many deer will 32 tigers
living in Panna eat in a year? Emphasise the fact that the actual number
of deer living in the forest would need to be much larger as deer
must reproduce to replace the ones that are preyed upon. We must
increase the square area of protected areas (sanctuaries and national
parks) to protect tigers.
ii) Find out the total area of your state. Find out the total land area
protected by sanctuaries and national parks. What is the percentage
of protected areas to the total land area?
iii) If a fig tree feeds 50 parakeets, 12 monkeys and 15 squirrels during
the day, plus 20 bats, four owls and four civet cats at night, how
many animals does it feed in all?
In all forests some animals are active during the day (diurnal) and
others at night (nocturnal). If your school were to be open day and
night how many students would be able to study on the premises?
Put the nozzle of an empty one-litre bottle of water under a leaking
tap. Find out exactly how long the bottle takes to fill up. Now calculate
how much water is wasted in: i) one hour ii) one day  iii) one week iv)
one month v) one year.
(Hint: if the bottle takes 60 minutes to fill that means one litre per hour.
If it takes 23 minutes to fill it works out to 2.60 litres per hour (60/23).
Maths Lesson Plan
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page instance may consist of newly created blank pages or image VB.NET: Edit and Manipulate PDF Pages.
delete pages pdf files; acrobat export pages from pdf
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document in VB.NET. Ability to create a blank PDF page with related by using following online
copy pages from pdf to new pdf; delete page on pdf document
24
The Tiger in Indian History
AIM: To help children understand that through Indian history, the tiger
has been associated with beauty, power and strength in the subcontinent.
OBJECTIVE: To provide children with a feel of the shifting fortunes
of tigers and how they have now come perilously close to the brink of
extinction.
INTRO: Discuss the national symbols of the country expanding on why
the tiger was chosen as India’s national animal.
CONTENT: The Indus Valley Civilisation 3,200-1,600 B.C: Though
largely agricultural the Harappans lived at a time when the Indus Valley
was thick with forests. This fact is confirmed by their many seals, which
depicted rhinos, elephants and tigers.
254 B.C: Although the exact dates of Asoka’s life are a matter of dispute
among scholars, he was born around 304 B.C. and became the third king
of the Mauryan dynasty in 254 B.C. after the death of his father, Bindusara.
His given name was Asoka but he assumed the title Devanampiya Piyadasi
which means “Beloved-of-the-Gods, He Who Looks On With Affection.”
During his reign, the state had a responsibility not just to protect and
promote the welfare of its people but also its wildlife. Hunting certain
species of wild animals was banned, forest and wildlife reserves were
established and cruelty to domestic and wild animals was prohibited.
The Moghul Period 1526-1857:  The attachment of the Moghuls to nature
stemmed largely from their ‘scientific’ interest. Most of the great Moghul
emperors were keen naturalists who were known for their detailed
observations of fauna and flora and their love of the hunt.
Tipu Sultan 1750-1799: Totally fascinated by the tiger, Tipu Sultan dressed
his men in tiger jackets and decorated his personal possessions with tiger
designs and stripes. He used to say that he would like to live two days like
a tiger, rather than 200 years like a lamb! He was born in Devanhalli,
Karnataka. His father, Hyder Ali, appointed himself as the Muslim ruler
of Mysore around 1761. Since  his childhood Tipu travelled with his father
on military campaigns, fighting in the First and Second Mysore Wars. Tipu
History Lesson Plan
C# Word - Insert Blank Word Page in C#.NET
specify where they want to insert (blank) Word document rotate Word document page, how to delete Word page NET, how to reorganize Word document pages and how
cut pages from pdf file; delete page from pdf online
C# PowerPoint - Insert Blank PowerPoint Page in C#.NET
where they want to insert (blank) PowerPoint document PowerPoint document page, how to delete PowerPoint page to reorganize PowerPoint document pages and how
delete page pdf acrobat reader; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
25
Sultan became the ruler of Mysore when his father died in 1782.
The British Rule: The tiger was almost wiped out thanks to shikar. Indian
royals competed with the British to kill tigers, adding to its trauma.
1947: After Independence, thousands of Indians began to exercise their
‘right’ to shoot tigers, which was earlier a privilege enjoyed only by the
British or Royalty. This brought the tiger to the very brink of extinction.
1969: The tiger was listed as a species in grave danger.
1970: Tiger shikar was totally banned.
1972: On April 10,  a representative of the World Wildlife Fund, Guy
Mountfort met the Prime Minister, Mrs. Indira Gandhi to ask for help to
save the tiger. She became the tiger’s greatest defender.
1973: Project Tiger was launched, with Kailash Sankhala as its first Director.
Initially, nine ‘Reserves’ were chosen. Today we have 27 reserves.
1990: After being recognised as the world’s most successful nature
conservation project for almost two decades, Project Tiger floundered, as
it lost political support after Mrs. Gandhi’s death in 1984.
2000: The tiger is still in crisis. One tiger continues to be killed each day.
2001: Kids for Tigers, is launched.The tiger wins one million new young
friends.
2014: Kids for Tigers with millions of new and old friends is still a great
friend of the endangered tiger.
METHODOLOGY:
List the various qualities associated with the tiger.
How many tigers are left in India.
Why is India called the ‘land of the tiger’?
Use the time line to make a chart of the history of the tiger, starting
with the tiger in mythology (mentioned in the Vedas, Mahabharata
and Ramayana).
Indus Valley civilisation depicted in seals and terracotta figures.
History Lesson Plan
How to C#: Cleanup Images
returned. Delete Blank Pages. Set property BlankPageDelete to true , blank pages in the document will be deleted. Remove Edges or Borders.
cut pages from pdf reader; delete pages pdf online
VB.NET Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file
Dim outputFile As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc As PDFDocument = PDFDocument
delete pages from pdf file online; delete page on pdf
26
Asoka and his understanding of living close to Nature
Moghul Emperors and their love for nature.
Tipu Sultan and his fascination for the tiger.
How the British and their brand of fascination led to the decimation
of tigers –  30,000 at the turn of the century, 1,400+ today.
The tiger is declared India’s national animal.
Project Tiger is launched.
Re-emphasise  how the tiger represents the safety  of  all  of
natural India.
List highlights of Kids for Tigers and how kids can make a difference.
AIDS: Symbols of the Nation’s Pride.
BLACKBOARD:  Write down the url www.kidsfortigers.org  Draw
a tiger time-line. Ask kids to turn the timeline into an illustrated project.
EVALUATION:  Why do you think the tiger played such a significant
role through Indian history?  Why are conditions for the tiger so different
today?
ACTIVITIES: Make a colourful Tiger Timeline Chart for the Tiger
Notice Board.
History Lesson Plan
Animals have been depicted in Indian art and culture for eons.
VB.NET PDF: Get Started with PDF Library
Auto Fill-in Field Data. Field: Insert, Delete, Update Field. RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" ' Create a new PDF Document object with 2 blank pages Dim doc
pdf delete page; delete pdf pages android
27
Things to do
The heart of the Kids for Tigers programme is its focus on catalysing kids to think and act in
defence of the tiger and nature itself. This brief listing of ideas for creative activities is merely
indicative of the kind of stimulation teachers can provide to their wards. More often than not,
boys tend to be self-conscious about activities like needle-work and jewellery design. We encourage
teachers to team one boy and girl together to give the creative expressions of boys the best chance
to emerge.
KIDS FOR TIGERS’ NOTICE BOARD: Every participating school must
provide space for a notice board so that all students in school have an opportunity
to share the mission of the kids in Classes III-VIII. The Notice Board is a vital
tool to communicate information about Kids for Tigers. Also to display children’s
essays, poems, art and craft and tiger news and facts from www.kidsfortigers.org.
NEW EXERCISE BOOKS FROM WASTE PAPER: Each year, when
student are promoted, some pages from their exercise books are left blank. Ask
students to carefully tear out all extra pages from their notebooks. Hand these
pages over to one responsible member of the school nature club. He or she
should collate and staple (use a heavy duty stapler) 50 pages together 5 mm.
from the left edge. Now, using rice paste (just mix boiled rice with water), stick
the specially made Kids for Tigers Notebook Cover on the top and your notebook
is ready. If you wish to give it a professional finish, take help from the stationery
supplier in school and have him trim three sides of your notebook.
DESIGN A TIGER GAME: This could be a dice game, a puzzle, a word
game,  or  one  that  can  be  played  at  the  school  fete  (look  up
www.kidsfortigers.org for ideas).
MASK MAKING: This is an ancient art. Consult your arts and crafts teacher.
CLAY MODELLING: Make tigers and other animals that live in their jungles.
Use clay, bread dough or any other suitable material.
DESIGN JEWELLERY: Do not use shells, or any wild animal products.
Instead, use waste materials and your creativity to make necklaces, earrings,
pendants, friendship bands, etc.
RECYCLE PAPER: Visit www.kidsfortigers.org to find out how. Turn waste
paper into greeting cards and stationary for your nature club.
Kids for Tigers
Creative Expression
28
FOOD CHAIN MOBILES: These are easy to make. All you need is string
and hangers. Cut small pieces of cardboard (the same weight) and draw different
animals on them. For instance you could start with a tiger, under which could be
deer, wildboar and a monkey. Under these place grasses, trees and fruit. Optionally,
start with the sun, under which you can place a trees and a bush. Under these two
you could place a bee, a monkey and a deer Think up your own food chain
mobiles. But remember to trim them so they balance right.
MAKE A WIND CHIME: You will need a string, a small ring and some
hollow bamboo, or waste metal tubes. Just tie each bamboo piece, or metal
tubes to the ring and then hang the ring near a window. Now wait for the wind
to blow!
WILD ADS: Symbols and images of wildlife are constantly being used to
advertise products. Communicators use images from nature and wildlife because
they appeal to people’s emotions and they impart specific qualities and ‘personality’
to products. Some examples: Elephant- TV, cement, adhesives, Cat - battery cells,
Penguin - refrigerators, Lion - televisions, Rhino - tyres, Tortoise - mosquito coils,
Cheetah - motorcycles, Dove - toilet soaps, Tiger - biscuits, Honey bee - honey, Butterfly
- mobile phones.
OBJECTIVE:
To ask students to identify more wild animals used in
advertisements/products and explain the possible reason for the choice.
ACTIVITY:
Ask the students to bring cuttings of advertisements that depict animals
from newspapers and magazines they read at home.
Ask them to list the qualities of the animals that attracted the makers of the
products.
Ask them to consider whether such products/companies are ‘doing’ anything
to ‘return the favour’ to the animals whose help they are taking.
Trigger a discussion or debate in class about whether or not animals should
be thus used.
Ask kids to create their own newspaper- advertisement campaigns around
the theme of saving the tiger.
Creative Work
Creative Expression
29
Kids for Tigers
Nature Game
Wildlife: Symbol of a Nation
The Botanical and Zoological Surveys of India have proposed this list
of mammals, birds and trees for each state.
State
Mammal
Bird
Tree
A&N Islands
Dugong
Wood Pigeon
Padauk
Andhra Pradesh
Blackbuck
Indian Roller
Neem
Assam
One-horned rhino
White-winged Wood Duck
Hollong
Bihar
Gaur
House Sparrow
Sacred fig
Delhi
House Sparrow
Gujarat
Asiatic lion
Greater Flamingo
Mango
Goa
Gaur
Black-crested Bulbul
Asan
Himachal Pradesh
Snow leopard
Western Tragopan
Deodar
Karnataka
Indian elephant
Indian Roller
Sandalwood
Madhya Pradesh
Barasingha
Asian Paradise Flycatcher
Banyan
Maharashtra
Indian giant squirrel
Yellow-footed Green Pigeon
Mango
Manipur
Sangai
Mr. Hume’s Pheasant
Indian Mahogany
Rajasthan
Camel
Greater Indian Bustard
Khejri
Tamil Nadu
Nilgiri tahr
Emerald Dove
Palmrya palm
Uttar Pradesh
Swamp deer
Sarus Crane
Ashoka tree
West Bengal
Fishing cat
White-breasted Kingfisher
Chatim
OBJECTIVE: To make students aware of how wildlife refelect the pride
of nations that used them as symbols, flags, coins, stamps and ‘State Animals’.
ACTIVITY:  Some countries issue stamps with pictures of endangered species.
In India coins and currency notes have images of wildlife. States have chosen
their representative mammals, birds and trees as their symbols.
 Put up this list in the classroom. Ask students, individually or in small groups,
to select one state each.  Ask students to find out about and describe: i) the
characteristics of their State Animal, State Bird and State Tree. ii) Whether these
species are abundant, threatened or endangered? iii) The values they represent
that may have led to their being chosen.
SHOW AND TELL:  Ask each student to bring a coin, currency note or
stamp, which has used the image of an Indian animal (mammal, bird, reptile)/
plant (tree, flower).  Ask them to display the items and explain to the class
why they chose those animals.  Encourage discussion on the reasons and
advantages of such depictions.  Students may also design a stamp of their
favourite Indian animal/plant keeping the basics of stamp design in view.
Ask them to design a logo for the nature club, justifying why a particular
animal/plant was chosen.
30
Ethics/Expression/Art/Animal Welfare
FACT: The condition of animals in zoos and circuses in India is abysmal.
Changes are being introduced, but very slowly. Some zoos and circuses
are being investigated as sources for the illegal wildlife trade.
OBJECTIVE: To sensitise students to the suffering of animals and thus
to all suffering, including human.
ACTIVITY 1: Organise a visit to a city zoo. While the students are there,
ask them to a) write an essay b) draw or paint an image to depict how they
feel about the tiger, or any other large animals they have seen in captivity.
(suggested triggers for discussion: are they safer here than in jungles? How
are they treated? Do they have feelings? Would they prefer to be free in the
jungle?
ACTIVITY 2: Ask the children to see a documentary on National
Geographic, Discovery or Animal Planet. Based on what they saw, ask
them to write out a script for a proposed documentary on the tiger for an
Indian audience.
ACTIVITY 3: Here are some incomplete sentences. Ask students to imag-
ine that they are tigers in captivity.  Then ask them to complete the follow-
ing sentences using between 10 and 25 words.
I feel scared when....
I feel sad when….
I feel angry when....
I wish I could....
I hurts when ....
ACTIVITY 4: Find out how many stray dogs and cats live near your
home? What do they eat? Find out the names of individuals/animals wel-
fare organisations that look after them. Does your family support any
animal welfare groups?
Creative Work
Nature Activity
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested