c# pdf reader using : Delete pdf page acrobat application software utility azure windows winforms visual studio technologyroadmapcarboncaptureandstorage0-part781

Technology Roadmap
2035
2040
2045
2050
E
n
e
r
g
y
T
e
c
h
n
olo
g
y P
e
r
s
p
e
c
t
i
v
e
s
Carbon capture and storage
2013 edition
Delete pdf page acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete page from pdf file online; delete page on pdf document
Delete pdf page acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page on pdf reader; copy pages from pdf into new pdf
2020
2025
2030
2013
2015
Technology Roadmap   Carbon capture and storage - 2013 edition
International Energy Agency – IEA
9 rue de la Fédération, 75015 Paris, France
Tel: +33 (0)1 40 57 65 00/01 
Fax: +33 (0)1 40 57 65 59
Email: info@iea.org, Web: www.iea.org
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
cut pages out of pdf; delete blank page from pdf
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. to image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file
delete pages pdf online; delete page pdf acrobat reader
INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY
The International Energy Agency (IEA), an autonomous agency, was established in November 1974. 
Its primary mandate was – and is – two-fold: to promote energy security amongst its member 
countries through collective response to physical disruptions in oil supply, and provide authoritative 
research and analysis on ways to ensure reliable, affordable and clean energy for its 28 member 
countries and beyond. The IEA carries out a comprehensive programme of energy co-operation among 
its member countries, each of which is obliged to hold oil stocks equivalent to 90 days of its net imports. 
The Agency’s aims include the following objectives: 
n  Secure member countries’ access to reliable and ample supplies of all forms of energy; in particular, 
through maintaining effective emergency response capabilities in case of oil supply disruptions. 
n  Promote sustainable energy policies that spur economic growth and environmental protection 
in a global context – particularly in terms of reducing greenhouse-gas emissions that contribute 
to climate change. 
n  Improve transparency of international markets through collection and analysis of 
energy data. 
n  Support global collaboration on energy technology to secure future energy supplies 
and mitigate their environmental impact, including through improved energy 
efficiency and development and deployment of low-carbon technologies.
n  Find solutions to global energy challenges through engagement and 
dialogue with non-member countries, industry, international 
organisations and other stakeholders.
IEA member countries:
Australia
Austria 
Belgium
Canada
Czech Republic
Denmark
Finland 
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Ireland 
Italy
Japan
Korea (Republic of)
Luxembourg
Netherlands
New Zealand 
Norway
Poland
Portugal
Slovak Republic
Spain
Sweden
Switzerland
Turkey
United Kingdom
United States
The European Commission 
also participates in 
the work of the IEA.
© OECD/IEA, 2013
International Energy Agency 
9 rue de la Fédération 
75739 Paris Cedex 15, France
www.iea.org
Please note that this publication 
is subject to specific restrictions 
that limit its use and distribution. 
The terms and conditions are available online at  
http:
//
www.iea.org
/
termsandconditionsuseandcopyright
/
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.PowerPoint SDK
delete page pdf file; delete pages in pdf online
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Word
delete pdf pages acrobat; delete pages from pdf acrobat
1
Foreword
As long as fossil fuels and carbon-intensive 
industries play dominant roles in our economies, 
carbon capture and storage (CCS) will remain a 
critical greenhouse gas reduction solution. With 
coal and other fossil fuels remaining dominant in 
the fuel mix, there is no climate friendly scenario 
in the long run without CCS. CCS has so far 
been developing at a slow pace despite some 
technological progress, and urgent action is now 
needed to accelerate its deployment. 
It is clear that the world needs to dramatically 
reduce its energy-related CO
2
emissions in 
the coming decades. This will require massive 
deployment of various clean energy technologies, 
including renewable energy, nuclear energy, cleaner 
transport technologies, energy efficiency, and 
carbon capture and storage. Indeed, CCS must be 
firmly placed in this wider energy context. As we 
develop and deploy CCS, we should also strive to 
minimise the amounts of CO
2
resulting from fossil 
fuel use by building and operating most efficient 
power stations and industrial facilities. For the IEA, 
CCS is not a “silver bullet” by itself, but a necessary 
part of a coherent portfolio of energy solutions that 
can reinforce one another. 
After many years of research, development, and 
valuable but rather limited practical experience, we 
now need to shift to a higher gear in developing 
CCS into a true energy option, to be deployed in 
large scale. It is not enough to only see CCS in long-
term energy scenarios as a solution that happens 
some time in a distant future. Instead, we must get 
to its true development right here and now. 
This Roadmap is an update of the 2009 IEA CCS 
Technology Roadmap. The energy landscape has 
shifted between 2009 and 2013 and new insights 
into the challenges and needs of CCS have been 
learned. This CCS roadmap aims at assisting 
governments and industry in integrating CCS in 
their emissions reduction strategies and in creating 
the conditions for scaled-up deployment of all 
three components of the CCS chain: CO
2
capture, 
transport and storage. To get us onto the right 
pathway, this roadmap highlights seven key actions 
needed in the next seven years to create a solid 
foundation for deployment of CCS starting by 
2020. These near-term actions are directly relevant 
for government and industry decision-makers 
today. Perhaps the most critical task is to create 
business cases for the uptake of CCS. This will 
require decisive action from governments, but also 
continued engagement of the industry in a long 
term perspective. 
It is critical that governments, industry, the research 
community and financiers work together to ensure 
the broad introduction of CCS by 2020, making 
it part of a sustainable future that takes economic 
development, energy security and environmental 
concerns into account. As we are all important 
stakeholders in this effort, we should join this 
journey and make it a success.
This publication is produced under my authority 
as Executive Director of the IEA.
Maria van der Hoeven
Executive Director 
International Energy Agency
Foreword
This publication reflects the views of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Secretariat but does not necessarily reflect 
those of individual IEA member countries. The IEA makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, in respect 
to the publication’s contents (including its completeness or accuracy) and shall not be responsible for any use of, or 
reliance on, the publication. 
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete pages in pdf; delete pages from a pdf in preview
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
delete pages on pdf; delete pages from pdf
2
Technology Roadmap Carbon capture and storage
Foreword 
1
Acknowledgements 
4
Key findings and actions 
5
What have we found? 
5
What we need to do: seven key actions for the next seven years 
6
Introduction 
7
Purpose for the roadmap 
7
Rationale for CCS: CCS remains critically important 
7
CCS developments since the previous roadmap 
9
Status of capture, transport, storage and integrated projects today: CCS is ready for scale-up 13
Capture technologies: well understood but expensive 
13
Transporting CO
2
is the most technically mature step in CCS 
16
CO
2
storage has been demonstrated but further experience is needed at scale 
16
Progress with integrated projects 
20
Assembling the parts still presents significant challenges 
20
Vision for CCS: where does CCS need to be by the middle of the century? 
22
Actions and milestones for the next seven years: creating conditions for deployment 
25
Policy and regulatory frameworks are critical to CCS deployment 
25
Timely identification of suitable CO
2
storage is paramount 
31
Improvements and cost reductions of capture technology through RD&D need to be pursued 
33
Development of CO
2
transport infrastructure should anticipate future needs 
35
Actions and milestones for 2020 to 2030: large-scale deployment picks up speed 
36
Actions and milestones after 2030: CCS goes mainstream 
40
Near-term actions for stakeholders 
41
Annex 1. Detailed actions 
42
Actions 2013 to 2020 
42
Actions 2020 to 2030 
45
Annex 2. CCS deployment in IEA scenarios: regional and sectoral specificities 
47
CCS in the electricity sector 
47
CCS in industrial applications 
49
Annex 3. CCS incentive policy frameworks 
52
Abbreviations, acronyms and units of measure 
55
Abbreviations and acronyms 
55
Units of measure 
55
References 
56
Table of contents
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS platform-friendly, this .NET PPT page annotating component more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete page pdf online; delete page on pdf
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Excel
delete pdf pages android; pdf delete page
3
Table of contents
List of figures
Figure 1. CCS chain 
13
Figure 2. Storage overview 
16
Figure 3.  Large-scale CO
2
capture projects in operation, under construction or at an advanced stage of plan-
ning as of end-2012, by sector, storage type, capture potential and actual or estimated start date 19
Figure 4. CCS in the power and industrial sectors in the 2DS 
22
Figure 5. Cumulative CO
2
captured 2015-30 and to 2050, by region in the 2DS 
23
Figure 6. CCS contributes 14% of total emission reductions through 2050 in 2DS compared to 6DS 
24
Figure 7. Policy gateways within a CCS policy framework 
28
Figure 8.  Coal, gas, and biomass-fired power generation capacity equipped with capture (as well as sum of 
capacity) for ten regions of the world 2020-50 in the 2DS 
47
Figure 9. CO
2
captured from industrial applications in the 2DS, by source region for seven key regions 
49
Figure 10. CO
2
captured and stored through CCS in industrial sectors analysed in the 2DS 
50
Figure 11.  Illustration of CO
2
avoidance costs and sizes of CO
2
sources for capture 
at archetypal industrial sites 
51
List of tables
Table 1   Progress in CCS 
10
Table 2.  Routes to CO
2
capture in power generation (by fuel) and industrial applications (by sector) 
14
Table 3.  Selected national or regional CO
2
storage regulatory frameworks 
18
Table 4.  Average cost and performance impact of adding CO
2
capture in OECD countries 
48
Table 5.  Examples of existing and/or developing policies with potential to incentivise CCS deployment 
53
List of boxes
Box 1. 
IEA technology roadmaps 
7
Box 2. 
Rationale for CCS demonstration 
9
Box 3. 
CO
2
utilisation 
12
Box 4. 
CCS and gas-fired power generation 
15
Box 5. 
CO
2
storage and EOR 
20
Box 6. 
ETP 2012 2DS and 6DS 
24
Box 7. 
Possible gateways within a CCS policy framework 
27
Box 8. 
CCS-ready power generation and retrofitting power plants with CCS 
29
Box 9. 
Example of UK government actions in determining its role in developing CCS infrastructure 
30
Box 10.  Combining CCS with biomass energy sources 
36
4
Technology Roadmap Carbon capture and storage
Beijing Institute of Technology/Administrative 
Centre for China’s Agenda 21, MOST; Paal Frisvold, 
Bellona Europe; Peter Gerling, BGR; Tony Espie, 
BP Alternative Energy International Limited; Luke 
Warren, Carbon Capture and Storage Association; 
Arthur Lee, Chevron Services Company; Peter 
Radgen, E.ON; Christian Oeser, French Ministry 
of Ecology, Sustainable Development and Energy; 
Daniel Rennie, Global CCS Institute; Douglas 
Forsythe, Government of Canada; Howard 
Herzog, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
(MIT); Dick Wells, National Carbon Capture 
and Storage Council, Australia; David Hawkins, 
Natural Resources Defense Council; Lars Ingolf 
Eide, Research Council of Norway; Ryozo Tanaka, 
Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the 
Earth (RITE), Japan; Bjorg Bogstrand, Norwegian 
Government; Paul van Slobbe, Ministry of Economic 
Affairs, the Netherlands; Andrew Garnett, University 
of Queensland; Dominique Copin, TOTAL; Mark 
Ackiewicz, US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil 
Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory; 
John Overton, UK Department of Energy & Climate 
Change; Jon Gibbins and Hannah Chalmers, 
University of Edinburgh (and UK CCS Research 
Centre); Benjamin Sporton, World Coal Association; 
Brendan Beck, South African Centre for Carbon 
Capture & Storage; Tim Dixon and Stanley Santos, 
IEAGHG; Sarah Forbes, World Resources Institute; 
Bob Pegler, BBB Energy; Mick Buffier, Glencore 
Xstrata; Jeff Phillips, EPRI; Alex Zapantis, Rio Tinto; 
Rob Bioletti, Alberta Energy; and Jon Hildebrand, 
Natural Resources Canada.
The IEA is grateful for long-standing support from 
the Global CCS Institute, both for this specific work 
and for our CCS work programme in general. 
The authors would like to thank the editor, 
Kristine Douaud, and the IEA Communication and 
Information Office (CIO), particularly Rebecca 
Gaghen, Muriel Custodio, Astrid Dumond, Cheryl 
Haines, Angela Gosmann and Bertrand Sadin. Jane 
Berrington provided logistical and administrative 
support throughout the roadmap’s development.
This publication was prepared by the International 
Energy Agency (IEA) Carbon Capture and Storage 
(CCS) Unit. Ellina Levina, Simon Bennett and Sean 
McCoy were the primary authors of this report. 
Ellina Levina also provided project management and 
co-ordination. Juho Lipponen, Head of the CCS Unit, 
provided valuable guidance and input to this work. 
IEA colleagues Dennis Best, Wolf Heidug and Justine 
Garrett made important contributions to the report. 
Philippe Benoit, Head of the Energy Efficiency and 
Environment (EED) Division, and Didier Houssin, 
Director of the Sustainable Energy Policy and 
Technology (SPT) Directorate provided additional 
guidance and valuable input.
Several other IEA colleagues contributed to the 
work on this roadmap, in particular: Laszlo Varro, 
Keith Burnard, Cecilia Tam, Araceli Fernandez, 
Uwe Remme, Nathalie Trudeau, Carlos Fernandez 
Alvarez, and Jean-François Gagné.
The study was guided by several IEA Standing 
Committees: the IEA Committee on Energy Research 
and Technology (CERT), the Standing Group on 
Long-Term Co-operation (SLT), as well as the 
Working Party on Fossil Fuels (WPFF) and the Coal 
Industry Advisory Board (CIAB). Their members 
provided important reviews and comments that 
helped to improve this publication.
This roadmap has benefited tremendously from 
insights received from the members of the roadmap 
advisory committee: Jeff Chapman, Carbon 
Capture & Storage Association; Jim Dooley, PNNL; 
Jens Hetland, SINTEF; John Gale, IEAGHG; John 
Litynski and Bruce M. Brown, Office of Coal Power 
R&D, U.S. Department of Energy National Energy 
Technology Laboratory; John Topper, IEA Clean Coal 
Centre; Oyvind Vessia, European Commission DG 
Energy; Richard (Dick) Rhudy, EPRI; Tone Skogen, 
Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum and Energy; 
Tony Surridge, South African Centre for Carbon 
Capture & Storage; Bill Spence, Shell International; 
Christopher Short, Global CCS Institute; and Jiutian 
Zhang, Administrative Centre for China’s Agenda 21, 
Ministry of Science and Technology of China.
The IEA is also grateful to industry, government 
and non-government experts for insightful 
and helpful discussions during the roadmap 
workshops, as well as for comments and support 
received from the stakeholders during the drafting 
process. We would like to acknowledge the 
following experts: Filip Neele, TNO; Giles Dickson, 
ALSTOM; Wayne Calder, Australia Department 
of Resources, Energy and Tourism; Xian Zhang, 
Acknowledgements
5
Key findings and actions
What have we found?
 Carbon capture and storage (CCS) will be a 
critical component in a portfolio of low-carbon 
energy technologies if governments undertake 
ambitious measures to combat climate change. 
Given current trends of increasing global energy 
sector carbon dioxide (CO
2
) emissions and the 
dominant role that fossil fuels continue to play 
in primary energy consumption, the urgency 
of CCS deployment is only increasing. Under 
the International Energy Agency (IEA) Energy 
Technology Perspectives 2012 (ETP 2012) 2 °C 
Scenario (2DS)1, CCS contributes one-sixth of CO
2
emission reductions required in 2050, and 14% 
of the cumulative emissions reductions between 
2015 and 2050 compared to a business-as-usual 
approach, which would correspond to a 6 °C rise 
in average global temperature.
 The individual component technologies 
required for capture, transport and storage 
are generally well understood and, in some 
cases, technologically mature. For example, 
capture of CO
2
from natural gas sweetening and 
hydrogen production is technically mature and 
commercially practiced, as is transport of CO
2
by pipelines. While safe and effective storage of 
CO
2
has been demonstrated, there are still many 
lessons to gain from large-scale projects, and 
more effort is needed to identify viable storage 
sites. However, the largest challenge for CCS 
deployment is the integration of component 
technologies into large-scale demonstration 
projects. Lack of understanding and acceptance 
of the technology by the public, as well as some 
energy and climate stakeholders, also contributes 
to delays and difficulties in deployment.
 Governments and industry must ensure that 
the incentive and regulatory frameworks are in 
place to deliver upwards of 30 operating CCS 
projects by 2020 across a range of processes and 
industrial sectors. This would be equivalent to all 
projects in advanced stages of planning today 
reaching operation by that time. Co-operation 
among governments should be encouraged to 
ensure that the global distribution of projects 
covers the full spectrum of CCS applications, and 
mechanisms should be established to facilitate 
knowledge sharing from early CCS projects.  
1.  The 2DS describes how technologies across all energy sectors 
may be transformed by 2050 for an 80% chance of limiting 
average global temperature increase to 2 °C.
 CCS is not only about electricity generation. 
Almost half (45%) of the CO
2
captured between 
2015 and 2050 in the 2DS is from industrial 
applications. In this scenario, between 25% and 
40% of the global production of steel, cement 
and chemicals must be equipped with CCS 
by 2050. Achieving this level of deployment 
in industrial applications will require capture 
technologies to be demonstrated by 2020, 
particularly for iron and steelmaking, as well as 
cement production.
 Given their rapid growth in energy demand, 
the largest deployment of CCS will need to 
occur in non-Organisation for Economic Co-
operation and Development (OECD) countries. 
By 2050, non-OECD countries will need to 
account for 70% of the total cumulative mass 
of captured CO
2
, with China alone accounting 
for one-third of the global total of captured CO
2
between 2015 and 2050. OECD governments 
and multilateral development banks must work 
together with non-OECD countries to ensure 
that support mechanisms are established to 
drive deployment of CCS in non-OECD countries 
in the coming decades. 
 This decade is critical for moving deployment 
of CCS beyond the demonstration phase in 
accordance with the 2DS. Mobilising the large 
amounts of financial resources necessary will 
depend on the development of strong business 
models for CCS, which are so far lacking.  
Urgent action is required from industry and 
governments to develop such models and to 
implement incentive frameworks that can help 
them to drive cost-effective CCS deployment. 
Moreover, planning and actions which take 
future demand into account are needed to 
encourage development of CO
2
storage and 
transport infrastructure.
Key findings and actions
6
Technology Roadmap Carbon capture and storage
What we need to do:  
seven key actions for  
the next seven years
The next seven years are critical to the accelerated 
development of CCS, which is necessary to achieve 
low-carbon stabilisation goals (i.e. limiting long-
term global average temperature increase to 2 °C). 
The seven key actions below are necessary up 
to 2020 to lay the foundation for scaled-up CCS 
deployment. They require serious dedication by 
governments and industry, but are realistic and 
cover all three elements of the CCS process.
 Introduce financial support mechanisms for 
demonstration and early deployment of CCS to 
drive private financing of projects. 
 Implement policies that encourage storage 
exploration, characterisation and development 
for CCS projects.
 Develop national laws and regulations as well as 
provisions for multilateral finance that effectively 
require new-build, base-load, fossil-fuel power 
generation capacity to be CCS-ready.
 Prove capture systems at pilot scale in industrial 
applications where CO
2
capture has not yet been 
demonstrated.
 Significantly increase efforts to improve 
understanding among the public and 
stakeholders of CCS technology and the 
importance of its deployment.  
 Reduce the cost of electricity from power plants 
equipped with capture through continued 
technology development and use of highest 
possible efficiency power generation cycles.
 Encourage efficient development of CO
2
transport 
infrastructure by anticipating locations of future 
demand centres and future volumes of CO
2
7
Introduction
Introduction
Between 2009 when the first IEA Carbon Capture and 
Storage (CCS) roadmap was published, and 2013, 
the need for CCS has not diminished: the urgency of 
its deployment has in fact grown. There have been 
many developments and significant gains in CCS 
technology and the enabling policy frameworks. 
However, given today’s level of fossil fuel utilisation, 
and that a carbon price as a key driver for CCS 
remains missing, the deployment of CCS is running 
far below the trajectory required to limit long-term 
global average temperature increases to 2 °C.
Purpose for the roadmap
The goal of this updated CCS roadmap is to describe 
and analyse actions needed to accelerate CCS 
deployment to levels that would allow it to fulfil 
its CO
2
emissions reduction potential. The IEA is 
revising the 2009 roadmap to reflect developments 
in CCS that have occurred over the last four years 
and to develop a plan of action that fully reflects the 
current context. 
This roadmap provides a brief status report on CCS 
technologies, outlines a vision for CCS deployment 
between 2013 and 2050 consistent with limiting the 
average global temperature increase to 2 °C, and 
suggests actions that need to be taken to facilitate 
this envisaged deployment, particularly between 
2013 and 2020. We believe that the recommended 
near-term actions are of vital importance to the 
deployment of CCS not only to limit average 
global temperature increase to 2 °C, but for any 
scenario designed to achieve stabilisation of global 
temperature changes at 4 °C or below.
Rationale for CCS: CCS 
remains critically important 
Global energy-related CO
2
emissions continue to 
rise. In 2011 they increased by 3.2% from 2010, 
reaching a record high of 31.2 gigatonnes (Gt) (IEA, 
2012a). If this trend continues, it will put emissions 
on a trajectory corresponding to an average 
global temperature increase of around 6 °C in the 
long term (IEA, 2012a). The greater the emissions 
of greenhouse gases (GHGs), such as CO
2
, the 
greater the warming and severity of the associated 
consequences. These consequences include a rise in 
sea levels, causing dislocation of human settlements, 
as well as extreme weather events, including 
a higher incidence of heat waves, destructive 
storms, and changes to rainfall patterns, resulting 
in droughts and floods affecting food production, 
human disease and mortality (IPCC, 2007).
The IEA technology roadmaps identify 
priority actions for governments, industry, 
financial partners and civil society that will 
advance technology development and uptake 
based on the ETP 2DS (the current one being 
ETP 2012 [IEA, 2012c]). Roadmaps are important 
strategic planning tools for governments and 
industry to address future challenges, including 
energy security and climate change. The IEA 
low-carbon energy technology roadmaps seek 
to create an international consensus about 
priority actions and milestones that must be 
reached to achieve a technology’s full potential. 
These IEA Technology Roadmaps cover a wide 
spectrum of technologies, including various 
renewable energy technologies; nuclear power; 
energy efficiency in buildings; the cement 
sector; high-efficiency, low-emissions (HELE) 
coal power; CCS and others.
Low-carbon energy technology roadmaps have 
a number of key commonalities. These include 
their elaboration of a vision for deployment 
of the technology and its CO
2
,
abatement 
potential relative to an identified baseline. 
Milestones for technology development are 
outlined, and the corresponding actions for 
areas such as policy, financing, research, public 
outreach and engagement, and international 
collaboration are described. Given the 
expected growth in energy use and related 
emissions outside of IEA member countries, the 
roadmaps also consider the role of technology 
development and diffusion in emerging 
economies. The roadmaps are designed 
to facilitate greater collaboration among 
governments, business and civil society in both 
industrialised and developing countries.
Box 1: IEA technology roadmaps
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested