c# pdf reader using : Delete pdf page acrobat application software tool html windows winforms online technologyroadmapcarboncaptureandstorage1-part782

8
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
To significantly reduce energy-related CO
2
emissions, massive deployment of many different 
low-carbon energy technologies is required. This 
includes efforts to increase energy efficiency in 
power and industrial production, and on the 
demand side. A broad portfolio of renewable 
energy, nuclear power and new transport 
technologies are also critical in reducing the carbon 
footprints of our societies. While not a “silver bullet” 
in itself, CCS must be a key part of this portfolio of 
technologies. 
Coal continues to be the largest incremental source 
of global primary energy consumption. Over the last 
decade, coal has been the fastest growing source 
of primary energy, with incremental consumption 
over 50% higher than the incremental demand for 
oil and gas combined. In 2011, coal demand grew 
by 4.3% from 7 080 megatonnes (Mt) in 2010 to 
7 384 Mt in 2011, with most of this growth arising 
in non-OECD countries, particularly China and India 
(IEA, 2012b). This continued expansion of coal and 
other fossil fuels, despite strong advances in clean 
energy technologies worldwide, has meant that 
the CO
2
emissions intensity of the global energy 
supply has been stable but overall energy-related 
emissions have grown (IEA, 2013a). Thus, it is clear 
that in spite of rapidly increasing shares of non-
fossil energy sources, coal and other fossil fuels will 
inevitably play a role for many decades to come. 
CCS offers a solution for dealing with emissions 
from fossil fuel use.
Governments and private entities around the 
world have proven reserves of coal, oil, and gas 
that, if combusted, would release approximately 
2 860 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (GtCO
2
(IEA, 2012a). If the world is to have a reasonable 
chance of limiting the global average temperature 
increase to 2 °C, a cumulative total of 884 GtCO
2
can be emitted from energy use between 2012 
and 2050. This means that less than one-third of 
proven reserves of fossil fuels can be consumed 
prior to 2050, unless CCS technology is widely 
deployed (IEA, 2012a). Not only does CCS serve our 
climate objectives, but investing in development 
and deployment of CCS is an important risk 
management (“hedging”) response for companies 
and governments who derive significant income 
from fossil fuels. CCS therefore promises to preserve 
the economic value of fossil fuel reserves and the 
associated infrastructure in a world undertaking the 
strong actions necessary to mitigate climate change  
(IEA, 2012a).
CCS also has strategic value because it can delay the 
retirement of valuable production and conversion 
assets in a CO
emissions-restricted world. CO
2
emissions from infrastructure in operation or under 
construction in 2011 (e.g. power plants, industrial 
facilities, even transportation fuel manufacturing) 
will total approximately 550 GtCO
2
through 2035, 
much of the emissions budget mentioned above. 
Retrofitting these applications with CCS will 
help prevent the “lock-in” of emissions from this 
infrastructure. 
CCS is also a low-cost emissions reduction option 
for the electricity sector. If CCS is removed from the 
list of emissions reduction options in the electricity 
sector, the capital investment needed to meet the 
same emissions constraint is increased by 40% (IEA, 
2012c). It is clear that CCS is the only technology 
available today that has the potential to protect 
the climate while preserving the value of fossil fuel 
reserves and existing infrastructure.
What is more, CCS is currently the only large-scale 
mitigation option available to make deep reductions 
in the emissions from industrial sectors such as 
cement, iron and steel, chemicals and refining. 
Today, these emissions represent one-fifth of total 
global CO
2
emissions, and the amount of CO
2
they 
produce is likely to grow over the coming decades. 
Further energy efficiency improvements in these 
sectors, while urgently needed, have limited 
potential to reduce CO
2
emissions, partly due to the 
non-energy-related emissions from many industrial 
processes. Failure to utilise CCS technology in 
industrial applications poses a significant threat to 
the world’s capacity to tackle climate change (IEA, 
2013b).
Some societies may have preferences for other 
low-carbon energy sources, such as prioritising 
renewable energy. However, this choice is not 
always cost effective, and in some cases, unavailable 
– notably – in industrial applications where fossil 
fuels are currently an intrinsic part of production 
processes. Improvements in energy efficiency will 
also affect CCS in one way or another. For example, 
the enhanced efficiency of power generation will 
reduce the impact of the energy penalty of CCS in 
the power sector (by lowering the levelised cost 
of energy) and improve its economics (IEA,2012f). 
Given the magnitude of required GHG emission 
reductions globally, it is important to understand 
that CCS is not wholly interchangeable with 
other climate mitigation options. All low carbon 
technologies – such as various forms of renewable 
Delete pdf page acrobat - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
copy page from pdf; delete page in pdf preview
Delete pdf page acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
delete page in pdf; delete pages pdf preview
9
Introduction
energy, high efficiency coal power generation, 
improved efficiency at industrial facilities, demand 
side energy efficiency measures and new transport 
technologies – will play a role in required emission 
reductions. The role of each of these technologies 
will be defined by their characteristics and 
limitations. Their performance in addressing CO
emissions may influence the level of challenge for 
CCS in the long term. 
CCS developments since the 
previous roadmap
Since the first IEA CCS roadmap, CCS technology 
and supporting policies have progressed, albeit at a 
slower pace than expected. Among developments 
in CCS between 2009 and 2013 are: increased 
experience and confidence with CO
2
capture 
technologies; increased understanding of the 
factors affecting the cost of storage; considerable 
progress in understanding the sizes and distribution 
of technically accessible storage resources; 
significant progress made by many OECD countries 
in developing laws that ensure that CCS is carried 
out safely and effectively; and the inclusion of CCS 
under the United Nations Framework Convention 
on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Clean Development 
Mechanism (CDM).
Much of the increased experience and confidence 
in CCS technology comes from the continued 
operation of four large-scale CCS projects that 
have stored millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide 
per year (CO
2
/ yr), and at least four other projects 
capturing similarly large volumes of CO
2
for use in 
enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Between 2009 and 
2013, additional experience has come from at least 
two new projects that capture millions of tonnes 
of CO
2
/yr for EOR and multiple relatively large – i.e. 
tens of megawatts of power generation capacity or 
hundreds of kilotonnes of carbon dioxide per year 
Box 2: Rationale for CCS demonstration
The next step for many CO
capture 
technologies is to move to demonstration 
scale. This is also true for CO
storage, where 
the number of sites where CO
is injected and 
monitored at a rate and under commercial 
conditions representative of CCS on an 
industrial level remains limited. Without the 
experience that can only be gained through 
demonstration, CCS will not become a 
commercially investable proposition due to 
unresolved technical challenges and uncertain 
cost estimates.
New technologies do not jump directly from 
the pilot stage to full-scale operation. In the 
gas turbine industry, it can take over a decade 
to move a new design, such as a more efficient 
blade configuration, from pilot scale to an 
off-the-shelf product. During this period, large 
turbines are commercially operated, but under 
business arrangements that take into account 
the risks of first-of-a-kind plants. For example, 
equipment suppliers are often partners in these 
projects to gain experience and spread the risks.
Demonstration is therefore an essential 
intermediate technical step with reduced risk 
exposure that facilitates learning-by-doing 
and culminates in a technology that can be 
sold in the marketplace with performance 
guarantees bankable for investors. Individual 
demonstration projects need be only at a scale 
that is sufficiently large to be representative 
of commercial operation. This provides the 
marketplace and the engineering community 
with new information on equipment 
performance, the market for low-carbon 
production, the integration of the CCS value 
chain and the behaviour of stored CO
2
. The 
scale is generally considered to be at least 
0.8 megatonnes of carbon dioxide per year 
(MtCO
2
/ yr) for a coal-based power plant, or at 
least 0.4 MtCO
2
/yr for other emission-intensive 
industrial facilities (Global CCS Institute, 2013).
.NET PDF Document Viewing, Annotation, Conversion & Processing
Edit, update, delete PDF annotations from PDF file. Print. Support for all the print modes in Acrobat PDF. Print only specified page ranges.
delete pdf pages online; delete pages from pdf without acrobat
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. to image or document, or from PDF document to other file formats, like multi-page TIFF file
delete pages out of a pdf file; copy pages from pdf to word
10
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
– pilot projects2 that have come online. In addition, 
positive investment decisions were made for seven 
projects that will demonstrate large-scale capture 
and storage and, as of 2013, are in construction.
Cumulative spending between 2007 and 2012 on 
projects that demonstrate CCS – or component 
technologies in the CCS chain – at large scale 
2.  Examples of large-scale pilot projects that began operation 
between 2009 (or thereabouts) and 2013 include: Schwarze 
Pumpe, (Germany), Mountaineer, (United States), Lacq, 
(France), Brindisi, (Italy), Plant Barry, (United States), Test Center 
Mongstad, (Norway), Compostilla, (Spain), Callide-A, (Australia), 
Decatur, (United States) and Citronelle (United States).
reached almost USD 10.2 billion (IEA, 2013a).3 
USD 7.7 billion of this total came from private 
financing, and while this figure reflects, in most 
cases, the costs related to the full industrial project 
and not just CCS components for controlling 
the facility’s emissions, it is nonetheless a sign of 
growing confidence in CCS technology. In addition, 
research and development (R&D) funding from 
government and industry has driven a compound 
annual growth rate of 46% in CCS-related patent 
applications between 2006 and 2011 (IEA, 2013a).
Progress, although insufficient, has been made on 
a variety of fronts between 2009 and 2013 towards 
meeting some of the short-term milestones set in 
the IEA 2009 CCS roadmap, (Table 1).
3.  This total includes spending on CCS-equipped power generation 
with a capacity greater than 100 megawatts (MW) and at all scales 
for industrial applications of CCS under construction or operating 
between 2007 and the end of 2012. The private finance share 
includes significant spending on capture projects that supply CO
for EOR, some of which may not carry out monitoring sufficient to 
prove that injected CO
2
will be permanently retained.
Table 1: Progress in CCS
Note: unless otherwise stated, all material in figures and tables derives from IEA data and analysis.
 Injection at the In Salah project was suspended in June 2011. The future injection strategy is under review; a comprehensive 
monitoring programme continues. The IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO
2
Monitoring and Storage Project ended in 2011, although 
Cenovus and Apache continue to operate the Weyburn and Midale fields, respectively, as CO
2
-flood EOR projects. Snøhvit and 
Sleipner projects continue operation as integrated CCS projects.
**  Some of these government grants are to CCS-equipped power generation with a capacity of less than 100 MW, while others may be 
to large projects in power or industry that have not yet reached construction or, in some cases, have been cancelled.
Area
Progress as of 2013
The 2009 CCS roadmap highlighted the need to 
develop 100 CCS projects between 2010 and 2020, 
storing around 300 MtCO
2
/yr.
Four large-scale CCS projects have carried out 
sufficient monitoring to provide confidence 
that injected CO
2
will be permanently retained. 
Collectively, these projects have stored approximately 
50 megatonnes of carbon dioxide (MtCO
2
).
*
Nine 
further projects under construction together have the 
potential to capture and store 13 MtCO
2
/yr. All nine 
projects should be operational by 2016. Numerous 
other large projects are in operation and demonstrate 
one or more technologies in the CCS chain.
The 2009 CCS roadmap suggested that OECD 
countries will need to invest USD 3.5 billion per 
year (b/yr) to USD 4 b/yr, and non-OECD countries 
USD 1.5 b/yr to USD 2 b/yr between 2010 and 2020 
to meet the roadmap deployment milestones.
Actual cumulative spending between 2007 and 2012 
on projects that demonstrate CCS reached almost 
USD 10.2 billion. Hence, while spending has been 
significant, the level targeted by the 2009 roadmap 
has largely not been met. Government grants 
contributed USD 2.4 billion of this total. Almost all 
of this funding is from governments in the United 
States and Canada (federal and state or provincial). In 
addition, over the same period a USD 12.1 billion of 
public funds was made available to CCS.**
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.PowerPoint SDK
delete pages from pdf document; delete pages in pdf reader
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Word
delete pages of pdf; delete blank page in pdf online
11
Introduction
Table 1: Progress in CCS (continued)
Note: unless otherwise stated, all material in figures and tables derives from IEA data and analysis.
Area
Progress as of 2013
The 2009 CCS roadmap highlighted the importance 
of CCS in industrial sectors and called for dedicated 
actions in specific industrial sectors.
Despite significant activity in some industrial areas, 
notably gas processing, CCS action in a number 
of key industrial sectors is almost totally absent 
(IEA/ UNIDO, 2011). There is a dearth of projects in the 
iron and steel, cement, oil refining, biofuels and pulp 
and paper sectors. Only two possible demonstration 
projects at iron and steel plants, and one at coal-to-
chemicals/liquids plants, are at advanced stages of 
planning (Global CCS Institute, 2013).
The 2009 CCS roadmap presented a vision for CO
2
transport and storage that started with analysis of 
CO
2
sources, sinks and storage resources, followed 
by the development of best-practice guidelines and 
safety regulations by 2020 and leading to a roll-out 
of pipeline networks to developed storage sites.
Considerable progress has been made in 
understanding the size and distribution of technically 
accessible storage resources, factors affecting 
the cost of storage, and in the development of 
best-practice recommendations and standards 
for geologic storage (CSA, 2012; DNV, 2009). The 
International Organization for Standardization 
(ISO) has also started a process to develop a series 
of international standards for CCS. However, much 
more needs to be done to develop these two 
elements of the CCS chain to support the scale of 
CCS deployment required in the near future.
Development of comprehensive CCS regulatory 
frameworks in all countries by 2020 and the 
resolution of legal issues for trans-boundary transfer 
of CO
2
by 2012 were identified as key regulatory 
milestones in the 2009 CCS roadmap.
Some OECD countries (e.g. in Europe; the United 
States; Canada; Australia) have made significant 
progress in developing laws ensuring that CO
2
storage is carried out safely and effectively, and are 
continuing to refine aspects of their frameworks 
through secondary legislation (IEA, 2012d). Other 
countries that plan to demonstrate CCS, such as 
South Africa, are undertaking processes that will 
lead to comprehensive regulations for CCS. In the 
area of international law, the 2007 amendment to 
the Convention for the Protection of the Marine 
Environment of the North-East Atlantic (OSPAR 
convention) entered into force in 2011; however, the 
2009 amendment to the London Protocol has not 
yet been ratified by a sufficient number of signatory 
governments. As an important political development, 
CCS has also been accepted as a CDM activity under 
the UNFCCC with related modalities and procedures.
In recent years, there has been increased interest 
in the possibilities for improving CCS economics 
through commercial use of captured CO
2
in place of 
direct geologic storage. It has been suggested that 
this could also boost public support. Save for use 
of CO
2
in EOR, efforts in this area have not achieved 
meaningful results (Box 3). In addition to the 
challenge of achieving sufficient scale of CO
2
use, 
quantifying any claimed reductions in net emissions 
– either through the long-term isolation of CO
2
from 
the atmosphere or the displacement of additional 
fossil fuel use – is not always straightforward. This 
creates a substantial challenge to the business case 
for such applications.
C# Windows Viewer - Image and Document Conversion & Rendering in
standard image and document in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Convert to PDF.
delete a page in a pdf file; delete page pdf
VB.NET PDF: How to Create Watermark on PDF Document within
or image (such as business's logo) on any desired PDF page. And with our PDF Watermark Creator, users need no external application plugin, like Adobe Acrobat.
delete page from pdf acrobat; delete pages pdf document
12
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
Box 3: CO
2
utilisation
Utilisation of CO
has been proposed as a 
possible alternative or complement to geologic 
storage of CO
2
that could enhance an economic 
value for captured CO
2
. Many uses of CO
2
are 
known, although most of them remain at a 
small scale. Between 80 Mt and 120 Mt of CO
2
are sold commercially each year for a wide 
variety of applications (Global CCS Institute, 
2011; IPCC, 2005). These include use as 
chemical solvents, for decaffeination of coffee, 
carbonation of soft drinks and manufacture 
of fertiliser. Some of these applications, such 
as refrigerants and solvents, demand small 
quantities of much less than 1 MtCO
2
per year 
(MtCO
2
/yr) while the beverage industry utilises 
8 Mt/yr. The largest single use is for enhanced 
oil recovery (EOR) which consumes upwards 
of 60 MtCO
2
/ yr, mostly from natural sources 
(Box 5). Other emerging uses, such as plastics 
production or enhanced algae cultivation for 
chemicals and fuels, are still small scale or 
require years of development ahead before they 
reach technical maturity.
Chemical uses of CO
2
, which is a relatively 
abundant source of carbon, remain limited 
despite carbon being the basis for most of 
our goods and fuels. This is because CO
2
is 
unreactive and usually requires large amounts 
of energy to break its chemical bonds. This is 
the same property that makes it an inert and 
safe gas to trap underground. Research into 
catalysts that can reduce the energy required 
for CO
2
conversion is an active area (Cole and 
Bocarsley, 2010; Centi et al., 2013; Peters et al.). 
The main challenge is scale. Given today’s 
uses for CO
2
, the future potential of CO
2
demand is immaterial when compared to 
the total potential of CO
2
supply from large 
point sources (Global CCS Institute, 2011). 
Mineral carbonation and CO
2
concrete curing 
have the potential to provide long-term 
storage in building materials. However, the 
mass of calcium carbonate that would result 
if the captured CO
2
in the 2DS were used for 
carbonation would equate to nearly double 
the total projected world demand for cement 
between today and 2050. 
Another challenge is what happens to the CO
2
when it is used. In most existing commercial 
uses the CO
2
is not permanently isolated from 
the atmosphere and does not assist climate 
change mitigation. Carbon used in urea 
fertilisers returns to the atmosphere during a 
plant’s lifecycle and fuels manufactured from 
CO
2
release the carbon when combusted. On 
the other hand, uses of CO
2
that can verify that 
the CO
2
is isolated from the atmosphere, such as 
bauxite residue carbonation in the aluminium 
industry and monitored EOR operations, can be 
classified as CCS.
If it cannot be verified that the use of the captured 
CO
2
permanently isolates it from the atmosphere, it 
is unlikely that the party capturing the CO
2
would 
receive an economic benefit within a climate policy 
framework. The user of the CO
2
would thus have 
to pay a price that covered the cost of capturing 
the CO
2
, and may furthermore need to agree to 
long-term contracts to provide sufficient certainty 
for the other party to invest in CO
2
capture4. If 
4.  In this same case, but when a carbon price is present and it is 
higher than the cost of CO
2
capture and transport, the user 
of the CO
2
would have to pay a price for the CO
2
to cover the 
total penalty paid by the capturing facility, as the CO
2
would be 
considered to be emitted. In another possible case, if a captured 
CO
2
stream could be split between available geologic storage 
and utilisation, the user may need to pay above the carbon price 
in order to make the sale of CO
2
for utilisation more attractive 
than its permanent storage.
use of CO
2
displaces fossil fuel use, for example 
in the production of fuel from algae, and results 
in lifecycle emissions reduction, any resulting 
economic benefits would need to be distributed 
between the party capturing the CO
2
and the user 
in a manner that avoids double counting. These 
issues, including how the displacement of fossil 
fuels by using captured CO
2
in fuels production 
would be rewarded in carbon pricing systems, will 
need to be carefully considered by governments 
and businesses.
VB.NET PowerPoint: VB Code to Draw and Create Annotation on PPT
other documents are compatible, including PDF, TIFF, MS platform-friendly, this .NET PPT page annotating component more plug-ins needed like Acrobat or Adobe
delete pages from pdf acrobat reader; delete blank pages in pdf files
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion. This page will tell you how to use XDoc.Excel
delete blank pages in pdf online; delete pages out of a pdf
13
Status of capture, transport, storage and integrated projects today: CCS is ready for scale-up
Figure 1:  CCS chain
Syngas-hydrogen 
capture
Post-process 
capture
Oxy-fuel 
combustion
Inherent separation
hase industrial 
pplications
Gas processing
-
-
-
Sweetening
Iron and steel
direct reduced iron 
(DRI)
*
, smelting (e.g. 
Corex)
-
DRI
*
Refining
-
-
-
Coal-to-liquids; 
synthetic natural gas 
from coal
be supplied on demand. The relative costs of gas-
5.  USD 7.40 per gigajoule in the United States.
Box 4. CCS and gas-fired power generation
Fuel switching from coal- to gas-fired power 
generation is presently attractive due to 
current low prices in some regions. Gas 
produces less CO
2
(less than 400 kilograms per 
megawatt hour [kg/MWh] compared to around 
800 kg/ MWh for coal) and provides insurance 
against potentially rising CO
2
prices. Today, 
investments in gas-fired capacity can also be 
more attractive than coal because gas plants are 
better able to follow the residual load in systems 
with high capacities of variable renewables. 
They are also less capital-intensive, which is 
especially appealing given uncertainties over 
future gas prices and climate policies.
However, natural gas is not a carbon-free fuel. 
Switching from coal to gas can assist with 
meeting near-term GHG emissions reduction 
goals, but from 2025 in the ETP 2012 2DS 
scenario, the goal for average emissions 
intensity of global electricity generation is 
below that of a gas-fired plant. The only way to 
enable gas-fired plants to conform to a lower 
emissions trajectory will be to fit many of them 
with CCS.
Using CCS to avoid 85% or more of the 
emissions from gas-fired power plants has 
been proven technically possible in pilot-
scale projects such as the one at Mongstad 
in Norway. The most mature method is 
post-combustion capture. It is estimated 
that capturing the CO
would reduce the net 
efficiency of power generation from around 
57% to 48%, but that the price of electricity 
generated would still be competitive (IEA, 
2011a). At a cost of around USD 80 to 100 per 
MWh, a combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) 
plant
6
with CCS is competitive on a levelised 
cost of electricity (LCOE) basis with solar, wind 
and coal plants with CCS (IEA, 2011a).
Cost estimates are, naturally, highly sensitive 
to gas price and load factor assumptions. 
The higher the number of hours the plant 
operates in a year, the lower the electricity 
price necessary to recuperate the investment in 
the power plant, including CCS components. 
Conversely, if gas plants are used to follow the 
variable load of renewable power and thus 
run for less than half of their available hours, 
the payback period may be longer and less 
attractive to investors. In the 2DS, 20% of gas-
fired capacity is equipped with CCS in 2050. 
In general, capacity that operates at low load 
factors does not have CCS installed.
A gas plant with CCS could therefore be an 
attractive investment prospect in the 2030s if 
the world (or a particular region) endeavours 
toward a maximum 2 °C temperature rise. By 
2050 all gas plants providing more than just 
occasional peaking power would likely need to 
be equipped with CCS.
6. 
Gas plants today are generally CCGT.
16
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
It is important to note, however, that the capital 
costs and efficiencies of power plants equipped 
with capture are expected to improve both as a 
result of R&D to improve technology, and due to 
learning effects as capacity increases (McDonald 
and Schrattenholzer, 2001; Rubin et al., 2007; Jones, 
McVey and Friedman, 2012).
Transporting CO
2
is the 
most technically mature  
step in CCS
Transport of CO
2
in pipelines is a known and mature 
technology, with significant experience from 
more than 6 000 km of CO
2
pipes in the United 
States. There is also experience, albeit limited, with 
transport of CO
2
using offshore pipelines in the 
Snøhvit project in Norway. Guidance for the design 
and operation of CO
2
pipelines that supplements 
existing technical standards for pipeline transport of 
fluids (e.g. ISO 13623 and ASME B31.4) was released 
in 2010 (DNV, 2010). CO
2
is also transported by 
ship, but in small quantities; understanding of 
the technical requirements and conditions for 
CO
2
transport by ship has improved recently (e.g. 
Decarre et al., 2010; Chiyoda Corporation, 2011). 
To achieve CCS deployment at the scales envisioned 
in the ETP 2012 2DS, it will be necessary to link 
CO
2
pipeline networks across national borders 
and to shipping transportation infrastructure (i.e. 
temporary storage and liquefaction facilities) to 
allow access to lowest-cost storage capacity. The 
main challenge is to develop long-term strategies 
for CO
2
source clusters and pipeline networks that 
optimise source-to-sink transport. Government-led 
national or regional planning exercises are required 
in this regard.
CO
2
storage has been 
demonstrated but further 
experience is needed  
at scale
Geological storage of CO
2
involves the injection of 
CO
2
into appropriate geologic formations that are 
typically located between one and three kilometres 
under the ground; it also involves the subsequent 
monitoring of injected CO
2
. Suitable geologic 
formations include saline aquifers, depleted oil 
and gas fields, oil fields with the potential for CO
2
-
flood EOR, and coal seams that cannot be mined 
with potential for enhanced coal-bed methane 
(ECBM) recovery (Figure 2). Storage in other 
types of geologic formations (e.g. basalts) and for 
other purposes, such as enhanced gas recovery 
or geothermal heat recovery, are active topics of 
investigation.
Figure 2: Storage overview
Source: Global CCS Institute, 2013.
2
3
4
1
1
Saline formations/aquifers
2
Injection into deep unminable coal seams or ECBM
3
Use of CO in enhanced oil recovery
2
4
Depleted oil and gas reservoirs
17
Status of capture, transport, storage and integrated projects today: CCS is ready for scale-up
The fundamental physical processes and 
engineering aspects of geological storage 
are well understood, based on decades of 
laboratory research and modelling; operation 
of analogous processes (e.g. acid gas injection, 
natural gas storage, EOR);7 studies of natural 
CO
2
accumulations; pilot projects; and currently 
operating large-scale storage projects. These 
experiences have shown not only that CO
2
storage 
can be undertaken safely – provided proper site 
selection, planning and operations – but that all 
storage reservoirs are different and need extensive 
dedicated characterisation.
Progress has been made in understanding the size 
and distribution of technically accessible storage 
resources on a country or regional level (e.g. NETL, 
2010; Ogawa et al., 2011; Council for Geoscience, 
2010; Vangkilde-Pedersen et al., 2009; Carbon 
Storage Taskforce, 2009; Norwegian Petroleum 
Directorate, 2012). However, such estimates are not 
easily comparable, as countries or organisations 
typically use their own methods to estimate CO
2
storage resources. It is therefore important to 
ensure that jurisdictional or national-scale CO
2
storage resource assessments are comparable 
with each other and can be aggregated to provide 
meaningful assessment of the global CO
2
storage 
resource (IEA, 2013c).
Beyond these general but very useful assessments, 
the current level of efforts around the world to 
identify specific storage sites will be insufficient 
for the rapid deployment of CCS (IEAGHG, 2011a). 
Exploring for suitable CO
2
storage resources is an 
activity with an associated risk that a site will be 
found to be unsuitable (i.e. the risk of “drilling dry 
wells” in oil industry jargon). Today, the rewards 
for finding suitable pore space to store CO
2
are 
small. There are no incentives for industry to 
carry out comprehensive and costly exploration 
works, and governments have generally not been 
proactive in commissioning such investigations. 
Yet the availability of specific storage sites that can 
accept CO
2
injection at rates comparable to those of 
capture from large emission sources could limit CCS 
deployment.
A suitable geologic formation for CO
2
storage must 
have sufficient capacity and injectivity to allow the 
desired quantity of CO
2
to be injected at acceptable 
rates through a reasonable number of wells. It must 
also be able to prevent this CO
2
(and any brine 
7.  Numerous comprehensive studies of analogues have been made: 
for example, Benson et al. (2002), Benson and Cook (2005) and 
Bachu (2008).
originally present in the formation) from reaching 
the atmosphere, sources of potable groundwater, 
or other sensitive regions in the subsurface (Bachu, 
2008). In addition, the potential for interaction with 
other uses of the subsurface must be considered, 
such as other CO
2
storage sites, oil and gas 
operations, or geothermal heat mining. One of the 
major technical challenges for CO
2
storage is to 
ensure that geological formations can accept the 
injection of CO
2
at a rate comparable to that of oil 
and gas extraction from the subsurface today.
The availability and characteristics of storage will 
have a strong influence on the cost and spatial 
patterns of deployment of capture and transport 
infrastructure (Middleton et al., 2012). It is expected 
that storage will be the part of the CCS value chain 
that will determine the pace of CCS deployment 
in some regions. Experience indicates that it 
typically takes five to ten years from the initial site 
identification to qualify a new saline formation for 
CO
2
storage, and in some cases even longer. For 
projects using depleted oil and gas reservoirs or 
storing through EOR, this lead time may become 
shorter, but the storage capacities are usually more 
limited (CSLF, 2013). While the cost of storage is 
considered to be much lower than the capture cost, 
lessons from existing projects show that many years 
and often several hundred million dollars of at-risk 
funds must be made available for the development 
of a storage site (Chevron, 2012).
It is difficult to make general statements about 
the cost, performance and, to some extent, 
risk associated with geological storage, due 
to geological variability and site-specific 
characteristics. However, based on experience from 
operating projects, storage analogues and studies, 
the risks associated with geological storage can be 
addressed through careful storage site selection, 
thorough monitoring of CO
2
behaviour during and 
after storage operations, as well as a clear plan for 
remedial actions. Since selection of an appropriate 
storage site is the first step in addressing storage 
risks it is particularly important that it is done 
properly and with careful analysis.
Legal and regulatory frameworks8 are critical to 
ensuring that geological storage of CO
2
is both safe 
and effective, that natural resources are effectively 
used, and that storage sites and the accompanying 
risks are appropriately managed after sites are 
closed. In addition, they may also be required to 
8.  While all parts of the chain may have their distinct legal issues, the 
most significant and novel areas for regulation are in CO
2
storage.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested