c# pdf reader using : Delete page from pdf control SDK platform web page wpf asp.net web browser technologyroadmapcarboncaptureandstorage3-part784

28
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
Figure 7: Policy gateways within a CCS policy framework
Source: IEA, 2012f.
Quantity support mechanism
Carbon price
CCS unit costs
CCScost/carbonprice
Carbon price
Time
Capital grants
Operating subsidies
First gateway
Second gateway
Technical feasibility
First cost threshold
Further cost reductions
Infrastructure development
Technical demonstration
Sector-specific deployment
Wide-scale deployment
Action 2: develop national laws and 
regulations as well as provisions 
for multilateral finance that 
effectively require new-build, base-
load, fossil-fuel power generation 
capacity to be CCS-ready.
Given that the cost of electricity from fossil-fuel 
power plants equipped with CCS – particularly 
those that are coal-fired – is not competitive 
with unabated power generation capacity, 
and expectations of CO
2
prices (or equivalent 
constraints) are low, power plants continue to 
be built at an astounding rate (in some markets) 
without considering CCS. By and large, these power 
plants are built today in a way that makes the later 
addition of capture more difficult and expensive 
than need be, or in locations where transport of 
captured CO
2
may be challenging. To avoid this 
potential lock-in, governments should require 
through laws and regulations that new-built base-
load fossil-fuel power plants be constructed in a 
way that allows for the addition of CO
2
capture 
at a later date (Box 8). This requirement should 
not necessarily extend to “peaking” capacity (e.g. 
open cycle gas turbines) where the capital costs of 
retrofitting with CCS would be difficult to recoup, 
nor to CHP plants. International finance institutions 
should also include such requirements in their 
lending policies. 
Delete page from pdf - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete a page from a pdf; cut pages from pdf preview
Delete page from pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
copy pages from pdf to another pdf; delete page from pdf reader
29
Actions and milestones for the next seven years: creating conditions for deployment 
Box 8. CCS-ready power generation and retrofitting power plants with CCS
With more than 1 600 GW of installed 
generation capacity in 2010, global coal 
power-plant installations account for almost 
9 GtCO
2
of emissions each year. Moreover, the 
number of coal-fired power-plant installations 
has been expanding rapidly in the past decade 
and is expected to continue to grow in the 
near future due to relatively low international 
coal prices driven by coal-to-gas switching in 
the United States (IEA, 2012e). The emissions 
from these installations pose a serious threat 
to the climate. To avoid retiring existing, but 
not fully depreciated, power plants early, while 
staying within a 2DS carbon trajectory, they 
can in some cases be retrofitted with capture 
(IEA, 2012c). In some circumstances, retrofitting 
plants is a lower-cost option to reduce CO
2
emissions than replacing the plant with an 
alternative form of low-carbon electricity 
generation (IEAGHG, 2011b). 
Retrofitting CCS to existing plants is a complex 
process, encompassing many site-specific 
aspects, and largely depends on market- and 
technology-specific operational conditions. A 
combination of technical factors will determine 
the technical attractiveness of retrofitting 
capture to the installation, and the access to 
transport and storage is also critical (IEAGHG, 
2011b; IEAGHG, 2007).
To ensure that retrofits are technically feasible 
and improve the economic attractiveness of 
future retrofits, it is possible to take actions at 
the time of design and construction that will 
reduce the cost of a retrofit, thus making the 
facility “CCS-ready”. A CCS-ready facility is a 
large industrial or power source of CO
2
which is 
intended to be retrofitted with CCS technology 
when the necessary regulatory and economic 
drivers are in place, and which has designed 
and taken steps to ensure that the retrofitted 
plant will be as competitive as possible with 
other newly built CCS-equipped plants. 
These steps include: ensuring that sufficient 
space is available on site for the installation of 
additional capture-related equipment; installing 
high-performance flue-gas desulphurisation; 
allowance for extra cooling (i.e. water) and 
heating (i.e. steam) needs; and ensuring that 
appropriate rights-of-way are available to 
allow for CO
2
transport to identified potential 
storage sites (IEA, 2010). The assessment of 
CO
2
transport and storage solutions moves this 
definition beyond that for ‘capture ready’.
CCS readiness does not stop with the 
construction of the plant but has to be 
maintained until the plant is operating with 
CCS. For example, for a power plant to hold 
a temporary exemption under the recent 
Canadian emissions performance standard 
for coal-fired electricity generation it must 
regularly demonstrate that its CCS-ready status 
is preserved (Reduction of Carbon Dioxide 
Emissions from Coal-Fired Generation of 
Electricity Regulations, 2012).
Action 3: significantly increase 
efforts to improve understanding 
among the public and stakeholders 
of CCS technology and the 
importance of its deployment.
In some parts of the world, CCS is not well 
understood and perceived as risky by the public 
and some climate and energy stakeholders. To 
address these concerns and win support for CCS, 
concerted effort by all relevant players is needed. 
Governments need to take responsibility for 
explaining the role of CCS in national energy and 
climate strategies, also discussing its risks and the 
ways of addressing them. 
National, regional and local government, where 
political, social and cultural traditions allow, 
should also work with important stakeholders at 
both national and CCS project levels to facilitate 
information exchange and fair dialogue. Industry 
must take responsibility for explaining the benefits 
and risks of particular CCS projects to the local 
population. Working actively to gain public 
acceptance is an integral part of any single CCS 
project and subsequently of wider deployment.  
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete a page in a pdf file; delete page from pdf file online
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C# .NET, how to
delete pages from pdf without acrobat; delete page in pdf
30
As part of the United Kingdom (UK) CCS 
roadmap, the government identified the 
types and timing of actions that it will 
undertake in support of CCS infrastructure 
development. The government stated that 
it was willing to consider supporting the 
development of infrastructure through the 
CCS Commercialisation Programme that 
anticipates future demand as well as the 
development of local networks, provided there 
is clear value for money justification. Beyond 
the CCS Commercialisation Programme, the 
government’s long-term strategy is that CCS 
infrastructure be funded through private 
investment and develop over time in line 
with demand. The UK government has also 
established regulatory powers to ensure that 
third parties can access infrastructure on a fair 
and equitable basis, and that new pipelines can 
interconnect with existing capacity in order for 
a network to develop. 
The government sought views on how to 
most effectively develop the pipeline and 
storage capacity needed for CCS deployment 
as part of a consultation on developing CCS 
infrastructure in 2010. It was particularly 
interested in whether setting up a single 
body, whose role was to construct a pipeline 
and storage network (either nationally or 
regionally), would make it easier for the United 
Kingdom to make more effective decisions 
about the timing, scale and location of 
investment in CCS infrastructure. The results 
were inconclusive, and the government remains 
open to the possibility of different structural 
arrangements in the future.
Source: UK DECC, 2012.
Box 9:  Example of UK government actions in determining  
its role in developing CCS infrastructure
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
Other key stakeholders such as NGOs and academia 
can also play an important role in national and 
international policy development, as well as in 
shaping up public opinion.
Action 4: governments and 
international development banks 
should ensure that funding 
mechanisms are in place to 
support demonstration of CCS in 
non-OECD countries. 
Some of the lowest-cost opportunities for 
demonstration projects, and some of the largest 
potential for deployment sites exist in non-
OECD countries. Several international financing 
mechanisms like the CDM, Nationally Appropriate 
Mitigation Actions (NAMAs) and the Green Climate 
Fund have been established by the UNFCCC to 
facilitate climate change mitigation actions in 
developing countries and assist developing countries 
in implementing those measures that they select 
as appropriate for their national circumstances 
and priorities. These mechanisms have to be made 
suitable for financing CCS projects, technical studies 
and CCS-related policy development.
Action 5: governments should 
determine the role they will 
play in the design and operation 
of CO
2
transport and storage 
infrastructure.
Scaling up CCS deployment is not possible without 
transport and storage infrastructure. As policies 
move CCS towards commercial viability in the 
coming years, these components of the CCS chain 
will need to develop into industrial activities with 
established revenue streams. However, at this early 
stage of CCS development, there may be a need 
for governments to step in and initiate activities 
that are normally performed by the private sector. 
Governments should consult with stakeholders on 
the options for future ownership and operation of 
CO
2
transport and storage infrastructure, and the 
extent to which government co-ordination might  
be required.
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
PDF: Insert PDF Page. VB.NET PDF - How to Insert a New Page to PDF in VB.NET. Easy to Use VB.NET APIs to Add a New Blank Page to PDF Document in VB.NET Program.
add remove pages from pdf; delete page pdf
C# PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in C#.
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
delete page on pdf; cut pages out of pdf file
31
Actions and milestones for the next seven years: creating conditions for deployment 
It will be valuable for governments to examine 
patterns of current industrial production and 
its development in order to determine whether 
opportunities exist to significantly lower the public 
and private costs of CCS through joint development 
of infrastructure. Innovative approaches should 
also be considered to encourage the emergence of 
multi-user CO
2
transport and storage infrastructure 
in industrial clusters (e.g. public investment in 
pipeline capacity).
This roadmap recommends the following actions
Time frame
Action 6: implement policies that encourage storage exploration, characterisation, and 
development for CCS projects.
2013-20
Action 7: implement governance frameworks that ensure safe and effective storage, 
encourage sound management of natural resources – including pore space – and ensure that 
the public is appropriately consulted in the development of storage projects.
2013-20
Action 8: continue to develop and employ co-ordinated international approaches and 
methodologies to improve understanding of storage resources and to enhance best 
practices.
2013-20
Action 9: where CO
2
-EOR is being undertaken as part of geological storage operations, 
ensure that it is conducted under a storage-specific regulatory regime.
2013-20
Action 10: support R&D into novel technologies that could utilise significant quantities of 
CO
2
in a manner that leads to their permanent retention from the atmosphere.
2013-20
Timely identification of suitable CO
2
storage is paramount
Identifying suitable storage capacity that can 
safely accept CO
2
at desired injection rates and 
retain this injected CO
2
is perhaps the largest 
challenge associated with CCS. This challenge is 
also exacerbated by the large amount of CO
2
to be 
stored unless solutions are found to significantly 
reduce the amount of fossil fuels used globally in 
power generation and industrial processes.  Actions 
are needed to assess, identify and characterise 
suitable storage formations. While high-level 
assessments of storage resources have been carried 
out at national and global levels, the focus should 
shift now to the identification and siting of specific 
storage locations. Governments need to initiate 
or incentivise the identification of storage sites for 
capture projects that are under development and 
in planning. Some legal issues, especially those 
related to long-term liability and stewardship, need 
to be resolved to render CO
2
storage less risky for 
investors. Given that CO
2
-EOR creates an early 
opportunity for CCS and makes it economical in the 
absence of strong climate regulations, this type of 
CCS should be carefully examined and regulated 
as CO
2
storage in addition to being subjected to 
regulations that are usually applied to oil fields. This 
will create incentives for CO
2
storage and secure the 
environmental integrity of CCS-EOR projects.  
Action 6: implement policies that 
encourage storage exploration, 
characterisation, and 
development for CCS projects.
Given the length of lead times and the commercial 
risks associated with delivering proven storage 
capacity, there is a need for publicly funded 
regional or national pre-competitive exploration 
and evaluation programmes. The IEA estimates 
suggest that the cost of pre-competitive storage 
investigation work necessary to meet the 2020 
roadmap goal will be in the order of the magnitude 
of USD 1 billion globally.
While some countries and regions have undertaken 
thorough assessments of potential storage capacity, 
others may still require specific actions in this 
regard. Governments (together with appropriate 
industrial players) should review the key gaps 
in storage data coverage and knowledge in all 
of the emissions-intensive regions/countries to 
establish priorities for storage exploration and 
characterisation. In jurisdictions where there 
is public ownership of subsurface resources, 
governments must develop processes by which 
VB.NET PDF delete text library: delete, remove text from PDF file
VB.NET: Delete a Character in PDF Page. It demonstrates how to delete a character in the first page of sample PDF file with the location of (123F, 187F).
delete a page from a pdf; delete pages pdf online
VB.NET PDF remove image library: remove, delete images from PDF in
C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; Delete image objects in selected PDF page in ASPX webpage.
delete pages out of a pdf file; delete pdf pages reader
32
the CO
2
storage resources will be allocated 
(e.g. licensing rounds for exploration blocks). 
Governments may consider amending (or, if 
appropriate, developing) subsurface resource 
management plans to include CO
2
storage 
resources.
Action 7: implement governance 
frameworks that ensure safe and 
effective storage, encourage 
sound management of natural 
resources – including pore space 
– and ensure that the public is 
appropriately consulted in the 
development of storage projects.
Governments should undertake a comprehensive 
review of their existing laws and regulations to 
identify barriers to storage of CO
2
, and determine 
whether an existing regulatory framework is suited 
to the regulation of geologic storage. Governments 
should engage with industry, academia, and civil 
society to develop suitable laws and regulations, 
including permitting procedures, to enable safe and 
effective storage.
Governments should also ensure that the public 
participation requirements of environmental impact 
assessment processes (or other applicable storage-
specific regulations) are tailored for consistency 
with commonly accepted best-practice principles.
Unresolved long-term liability issues have been 
causing concerns to the industry and contributing to 
the financial risks of investing in CCS. Governments 
should develop a clear framework for the 
management of long-term liability and storage site 
stewardship, including appropriate risk-sharing 
between the private and public sectors.
Action 8: continue to develop and 
employ co-ordinated international 
approaches and methodologies to 
improve understanding of storage 
resources and to enhance best 
practices.
To improve comparability of national/regional 
storage information, governments and relevant 
authorities and stakeholders should agree on a 
shared global method to estimate and classify 
CO
storage capacity. As a first step, stakeholders 
should share their respective methodologies 
and understand their differences so that these 
differences can be considered when data are 
compared across jurisdictions. They should also 
encourage participation of relevant industry, non-
governmental organisations and intergovernmental 
bodies in relevant standard-making processes (e.g. 
ISO TC265 and International Maritime Organization 
[IMO] processes) and ensure that the knowledge 
gained from first-mover CCS projects is reflected 
in emerging technical standards. The 2006 
Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) 
Inventory Guidelines for national GHG reporting 
include provisions for CO
2
accounting from 
CCS projects. These Guidelines should be made 
mandatory under the UNFCCC to facilitate global 
consistency in treating CCS projects in terms of CO
2
emissions accounting.
Industry and the research community should 
also demonstrate the monitoring and verification 
procedures specific to the post-injection phase 
of CO
2
storage projects. As well, they should 
demonstrate techniques to manage unintended 
migration of CO
2
or formation fluids outside 
the storage complex, and develop and improve 
tools for predicting special reservoir and cap 
rock characteristics. In addition, it is important to 
continue advancing the state-of-the-art techniques 
for managing injection pressure build-up, including 
the production and treatment of formation fluids 
where necessary.
Action 9: where CO
2
-EOR is being 
undertaken as part of long-term 
geologic storage operations, 
ensure that it is conducted under 
appropriate, storage-specific 
regulatory regimes.
It is important for governments to decide what 
role they consider EOR should play in long-term 
CO
2
storage. If EOR is to be considered a strategy 
for long-term storage, the relevant regulatory 
requirements must be put in place. In consultation 
with industry, governments must develop MMV 
frameworks suited to CO
2
-EOR.
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
C# PDF delete text Library: delete, remove text from PDF file in
C#.NET Sample Code: Delete Text from Specified PDF Page. The following demo code will show how to delete text in specified PDF page. // Open a document.
delete page from pdf; delete pages of pdf online
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Allow C# Developers to Read, Add, Edit, Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Remove and delete metadata from PDF file.
delete pages from pdf in reader; delete pages pdf document
33
Actions and milestones for the next seven years: creating conditions for deployment 
Action 10: support R&D into novel 
technologies that could utilise 
significant quantities of CO
2
in 
a manner that leads to their 
permanent retention from the 
atmosphere.
There are several potential uses of CO
2
that could 
effectively store CO
2
in material products and 
provide alternative business cases for CO
2
capture 
(see Box 3). These include mineral carbonation and 
CO
2
concrete curing. Today, these technologies 
are at a very early stage of development and 
further research is required to prove concepts, 
increase scale and demonstrate the effectiveness 
and cost-benefit of resulting building materials. 
Other uses of CO
2
for chemicals and fuels, which 
do not lead to permanent CO
2
storage, could play 
a role in providing individual early projects with 
an additional revenue stream. In addition to the 
conversion of CO
2
by algae, these applications 
include the production of synthetic natural 
gas, methanol, fertilisers, plastics and speciality 
chemicals. A key focus for research will be the 
catalytic, photocatalytic and electrocatalytic 
reduction of CO
2
. Another critical R&D topic will be 
the clean production of hydrogen, which is likely to 
be essential for the conversion of CO
2
to products.
This roadmap recommends the following actions
Time frame
Action 11: reduce the cost of electricity from power plants equipped with capture 
through continued technology development and use of highest possible efficiency power 
generation cycles.
2013-20
Action 12: prove capture systems at pilot scale in industrial applications where CO
2
capture 
has not yet been demonstrated.
2013-20
Action 13: support research into novel capture technologies and power generation cycles 
that will dramatically lower the cost of capture and resource consumption.
2013-20
Improvements and cost reductions of capture technology 
through RD&D need to be pursued
While the current capture technologies are mature 
in some applications, there is much learning that is 
still required for others – namely certain processes 
in iron and steel, cement, refining, chemicals, 
and pulp and paper sectors. In addition, there 
is significant room for improvement in current, 
reasonably mature capture technologies, as they 
are relatively inefficient from the standpoint of 
energy requirements (e.g. McGlashan and Marquis, 
2007; Bhown and Freeman, 2011) and water use 
(Zhai, Rubin and Versteeg, 2011). A forthcoming 
CCS technology roadmap developed by the 
Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) 
provides more details on the status and needs of 
technological development of CCS (CSLF, 2013).
By taking the following actions, decision-makers in 
government and industry – including equipment 
manufacturers – can help drive cost reductions and 
the development of improved and novel capture 
technologies.
Action 11: reduce the cost 
of electricity from power 
plants equipped with capture 
through continued technology 
development and use of highest 
possible efficiency power 
generation cycles.
Many technical improvements are possible on 
capture technologies. R&D efforts have identified 
actions that would improve the efficiency of CO
2
capture and reduce costs. The improvements 
include: reduced regeneration energy requirements 
for solvents used in pre- and post-combustion 
capture; improved heat integration of the capture 
plant with the base plant while considering 
operability requirements; better management of 
corrosion issues for post-combustion technologies 
at high solvent concentrations; optimised absorber 
feed gas composition when using amine-based 
34
solvents to reduce solvent degradation; and reduced 
concentration of nitrogen oxide (NO
x
), SO
2
and 
possibly oxygen in flue gas to minimise degradation 
and operational costs. These improvements can 
be made with dedicated R&D efforts supported by 
governments and industry, sharing of experiential 
learning, and shared research efforts that could 
reduce costs for all parties. Training of qualified 
experts would also contribute to the development 
and updating of new techniques and technologies. 
Standardised training should be developed for flue-
gas scrubbing-system operators in sectors where 
these processes are unfamiliar.
The cost of electricity from a power plant equipped 
with CCS is lower when the base power plant 
has higher efficiency parameters. In 2012, the IEA 
developed a roadmap on HELE power plants, and 
actions in the HELE roadmap should be followed (IEA, 
2012f). The HELE roadmap particularly calls for, at 
minimum, installation of supercritical technology on 
all new combustion power plants of over 300 MW.
Action 12: prove capture systems 
at pilot scale in industrial 
applications where CO
2
capture 
has not yet been demonstrated.
Pilot-scale tests are needed of gas scrubbing at 
cement kilns; gas scrubbing at steel blast furnaces; 
and gas scrubbing at steam and catalytic crackers.
Further research is needed into cost-effective 
capture techniques for gas recycling blast furnaces. 
Optimised solutions for aggregating CO
2
sources at 
refinery and petrochemical complexes for flue-gas 
scrubbing are also needed.
Additional improvements are required in hot gas 
clean-up technology, and designs for cement 
production based on oxy-firing must be improved 
to minimise air leakage into cement kilns being 
retrofitted with CO
2
capture. Further research 
enabling refractories to withstand higher operating 
temperatures needs to be undertaken, and the 
commercial viability of cement clinker produced via 
oxy-firing techniques has to be proved.
Options could be explored for fluidised catalytic 
cracking and heat and power production at refinery 
and petrochemical sites using oxy-firing. 
Pilot-scale CCS projects on industrial installations 
are most beneficial if done through open-access 
capture pilots (similar to the pilot facility at 
Mongstad in Norway). Open-access approaches 
to projects developed with public funding could 
accelerate the learning curve through distributed 
peer review, knowledge-sharing and process 
transparency.
Action 13: support R&D into 
novel capture technologies and 
power generation cycles that 
will dramatically lower the 
cost of capture and resource 
consumption.
Novel approaches and techniques to alleviate the 
high energy penalty and related additional costs 
of CO
2
capture technologies have already been 
identified, but need to be pursued and tested. 
For example, innovative flue-gas scrubbing 
processes using sorbents (i.e. ultra-high surface 
area porous materials), hybrid capture systems and 
novel regeneration methods (e.g. electrolysis and 
electrodialysis) should be tested at pilot scale.  
Novel processes for oxy-fired power generation, 
such as oxy-fired gas turbines, should also be tested 
at pilot scale. 
Likewise, new CO
2
separation processes for 
hydrogen or syngas production (e.g. for IGCC) 
such as high-temperature solvents, solid sorbents, 
membranes, and enhanced water-gas shift reactors 
should be tested. In cement production, the 
suitability of membranes and solid absorption 
processes for CO
2
capture should be tested at 
pilot scale, along with new production processes 
for industrial products that integrate low-cost  
CO
2
capture.
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
35
Actions and milestones for the next seven years: creating conditions for deployment 
It is clear that large-scale networks will be required 
to transport millions of tonnes of CO
2
annually 
to selected storage sites at various distances 
from capture sites. Planning and development of 
transportation networks and clusters is needed 
now. In addition, countries will need regulations to 
address siting of pipelines, their safe operation and 
rights for third-party access.
Action 14: encourage efficient 
development of CO
2
transport 
infrastructure by anticipating 
locations of future demand 
centres and future volumes of CO
2
.
Various future demands and conditions must 
be considered when developing transport 
infrastructure that will support CO
2
transportation 
for years to come. Among many considerations are 
offshore storage and the capital cost of shipping 
infrastructure, and oversizing and routing to 
minimise cost in the future. Development of 
integrated pipeline networks should also be 
considered. Governments will need to decide on 
what role they intend to play in at least the first 
steps of CO
2
transport infrastructure development.
Action 15: resolve outstanding 
legal issues pertaining to the 
trans-boundary movement of CO
2
for geological storage.
Annex 1 of the 1996 London Protocol was amended 
in 2006, with the intent of allowing trans-boundary 
movement of CO
2
for offshore geological storage. 
However, the ratification of the amendment by 
contracting parties has proven difficult; contracting 
parties must therefore continue to pursue this 
ratification to enable trans-boundary movement 
of CO
2
. In the absence of ratification of this 
amendment of the London Protocol, they could 
consider alternative approaches to enable such 
movements of CO
2
(e.g. provisional application, 
separate agreement between contracting parties).
Action 16: ensure that laws and 
regulations are suitable for 
pipelines and shipping.
Laws and regulations that facilitate infrastructure 
siting must be adapted to include CO
2
pipelines. It 
must be ensured that health and safety laws and 
regulations pertaining to pipelines are adequate 
for CO
2
transport, including requirements for 
monitoring, and public participation provisions 
should be included in CO
2
transportation 
regulations. Governments should establish market 
rules for transport providers by 2020.
Action 17: reduce the cost and 
risk of pipeline transport through 
knowledge sharing and use of 
common methodologies.
While transport of CO
2
is the most mature 
technology of the CCS chain, improvements are 
still possible and desirable. CO
2
behaviour during 
leakage events could be better understood so that 
appropriate and cost-effective mitigation plants 
could be developed. International standards 
would provide guidance and confidence to the 
transport industry and governments hosting 
CO
2
transportation routes; relevant industry 
should be encouraged to participate in pertinent 
standard-making processes (e.g. ISO TC265 and 
IMO processes). Governments and industry should 
ensure that the lessons from first-mover CCS 
demonstration projects are reflected in emerging 
technical standards.
This roadmap recommends the following actions
Time frame
Action 14: encourage efficient development of CO
2
transport infrastructure anticipating 
locations of future demand centres and future volumes of CO
2
.
2013-20
Action 15: resolve outstanding legal issues pertaining to the trans-boundary movement of 
CO
2
for geologic storage under the London Protocol.
2013-20
Action 16: ensure that laws and regulations are suitable for pipelines and shipping.
2013-20
Action 17: reduce the cost and risk of pipeline transport by sharing knowledge gained from 
experience and developing common methodologies.
2013-20
Development of CO
2
transport infrastructure should 
anticipate future needs
36
Our vision to 2030: CCS grows into an industry, 
with large-scale deployment picking up 
speed; continued R&D and economies of scale 
reduce costs significantly; business cases are 
consolidated and drive private investment.
An objective observer who, in 2030, looks at the 
progress in CCS deployment since 2020 will see a 
technology that has grown explosively and matured 
greatly over the past decade. Over the decade 2020 
to 2030, CCS will have been deployed on two out of 
every three new coal-fired power plants, and one out 
of eight gas- or biomass-fired power plants – hundreds 
of gigawatts of CCS-equipped generation capacity, 
primarily in OECD member countries and China. 
Bioenergy with CCS and biofuel plants equipped 
with CCS will have begun to play an important role 
in removing CO
2
from the atmosphere (Box 10). In 
addition, almost one-third of global gas processing 
capacity will be CCS-equipped, along with large 
amounts of biofuel, chemicals, and hydrogen 
production capacity (in refining). While most capture 
processes employ improved versions of tried-and-
true solutions (e.g. amine-based absorption), new 
processes are under testing at pilot scales, and a 
portfolio of novel technologies – including production 
processes with inherent CO
2
separation – are under 
development.
Such growth will have been driven by the creation 
of sound business models for private companies 
involved in developing capture, transport and storage 
projects. Positive results from CCS projects will have 
yielded the confidence and wide acceptance of the 
public. In the first half of the decade, incentives for 
CCS in most applications will have been transitioned 
from demonstration-phase mechanisms to early 
deployment (e.g. quantity commitments or portfolio 
standards). At the same time, a CCS-focused service 
industry has emerged, engaged in developing storage 
solutions for individual projects and the financial 
valuation of pore space as a resource. This service 
industry also explores and develops tens of billions of 
tonnes of CO
2
storage capacity. During the decade, 
storage regulations have been revised in many 
regions to ensure that they reflect the emerging body 
of knowledge. By the latter half of the decade, a 
networked pipeline infrastructure that moves billions 
of tonnes of CO
2
annually has emerged in many 
places, reducing the commercial risks from failure of 
any single piece of infrastructure (e.g. storage sites). 
Technology Roadmap  Carbon capture and storage
Actions and milestones for 2020 to 2030: 
large-scale deployment picks up speed
Bioenergy with carbon capture and storage 
(BECCS) is an emissions reduction technology 
offering permanent net removal of CO
2
from 
the atmosphere. BECCS works by using biomass 
that has removed atmospheric carbon during 
its growth cycle, and then permanently storing 
underground the CO
2
emissions that result from 
its combustion or fermentation. A decrease in 
the amount of CO
2
in the atmosphere results 
from the combination of the benefits of 
biomass use with the benefits of CCS, with the 
ultimate aim of storing more CO
2
from biomass 
use than that emitted from fossil fuel use.
While BECCS has significant potential, it 
is important to ensure that the biomass is 
produced sustainably, as this will significantly 
impact the level of emissions reduction that 
can be achieved, and will hence define “how 
negative” the resulting emissions can be 
(IEAGHG, 2011c). BECCS can be applied to a 
wide range of biomass conversion processes 
and may also be attractive from a relative cost 
perspective. Applications range from capturing 
CO
2
from biomass co-firing and biomass-
fired power plants, to biofuel production 
processes. To date, however, BECCS has not 
been fully recognised or realised. Incentive 
policies to support it need to be based on an 
assessment of the net impact on emissions that 
the technology can achieve. The IEA (2011c) 
recommends that, to the greatest extent 
possible, all carbon impacts of BECCS be fully 
reflected in carbon reporting and accounting 
systems under the UNFCCC and Kyoto 
Protocol. A solid understanding of the life-cycle 
emissions savings that BECCS could achieve will 
be an essential prerequisite for well-calibrated 
BECCS support. BECCS merits a specific set of 
incentives that reflects the negative life-cycle 
emissions that BECCS can achieve compared to 
emissions reductions of other CCS applications.
Source: IEA, 2012c.
Box 10: Combining CCS with biomass energy sources
37
Actions and milestones for 2020 to 2030: large-scale deployment picks up speed
Our vision foresees a significant industrial-scale 
ramp-up of CCS deployment during the 2020s, 
as compared with this decade (i.e. through 2020). 
Achieving this vision will require many actions to 
be taken. While many of the actions below may 
be applicable only as of 2020, it is important to 
consider them now as part of a co-ordinated policy 
framework for CCS, as they will influence the 
decisions to be taken before 2020. The underlying 
assets to which CCS will be applied (e.g. coal-fired 
power plants, steel mills) have a lifespan of multiple 
decades and require many years of advance 
planning. We also stress that, in addition to the 
specific actions listed below, the success of the 
period 2020 to 2030 will depend on the success of 
the actions from 2013 to 2020 which are necessary 
to create the conditions for rapid deployment of 
CCS between 2020 and 2030.
This roadmap recommends the following actions
Time frame
Action 18: governments should manage the transition from demonstration phase support 
to wider deployment mechanisms.
2020-30
Action 19: governments in non-OECD member countries should build on global CCS 
demonstration project experiences and develop appropriate support mechanisms to 
encourage deployment.
2020-30
Action 20: increase RD&D collaboration among nations to further decrease the electricity 
cost and resource footprint of fossil-fuel plants equipped with capture.
2020-30
Action 21: encourage R&D into innovative and novel processes that will reduce the cost of 
production equipped with CCS.
2020-30
Action 22: encourage the development of integrated transport and storage networks 
to reduce risk to network users from failures or bottlenecks in the system. Enable long-
distance, cross-border, multi-modal transport of CO
2
.
2020-30
Action 23: continue learning and improvement in developing best practices for storage and 
its regulation.
2020-30
Action 24: foster a commercial environment for geological storage.
2020-30
Action 18: governments should 
manage the transition from 
demonstration-phase support to 
wider deployment mechanisms.
An evolving policy framework needs to be in place 
that allows graduation from targeted support for 
early CCS demonstration projects to wider sector-
specific quantity mechanisms, such as feed-in 
tariffs or portfolio standards. These policies will 
complement carbon pricing and drive private 
financing of CO
2
capture. The emphasis of support 
mechanisms should start to shift from technology 
learning to achieving significant emissions 
reductions through CCS early in this period.
By this period, the roadmap anticipates that a 
global emissions reduction framework will be in 
operation, through which long-term and ambitious 
GHG emissions reduction goals are established, 
along with mechanisms and tools to facilitate their 
attainment. This framework should create certainty 
for national policy makers as well as private 
sector players that any investments in low-carbon 
technologies and measures will have increasing 
value over time. In this context, costly investments 
in all steps of the CCS process will be more easily 
justified. However, given that carbon prices – or 
the equivalent policies – may not quickly reach 
levels to make CCS-equipped facilities competitive 
in the marketplace, and also recognising that other 
market and non-market barriers will exist, sector-
specific support mechanisms are likely to be needed 
for early projects. Support will also be needed 
to facilitate storage and transport infrastructure 
development at scale. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested