c# pdf reader writer : Delete page from pdf file SDK control API .net azure asp.net sharepoint TextWrangler_User_Manual13-part971

Go Menu Reference
131
Markers
When you choose this command, BBEdit opens a floating window which lists any markers 
associated with the active document. (For information about setting markers, see “Using 
Markers” on page 106). You can filter the list by typing a partial marker name into the 
search box.
Jump Points
The following commands are available in any document.
Previous
When you choose this command, BBEdit will go to the last selection you made in the 
document which was outside the current view (an automatic jump mark), or the last 
location you marked with the Set command (see “Set” on the preceding page). If the 
current document does not contain any jump marks, this command is disabled.
Next
When you choose this command after navigating to an earlier jump mark, BBEdit will go 
to the next later jump mark, or return to the most recent position of the insertion point. If 
you have not jumped back to a jump mark, this command is disabled.
Set
Choose this command to define the current insertion point location or selection range as a 
manual jump mark within the active document. You can navigate to jump marks using the 
Jump Back and Jump Forward commands.
Delete page from pdf file - remove PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Provides Users with Mature Document Manipulating Function for Deleting PDF Pages
delete pages of pdf reader; delete page from pdf acrobat
Delete page from pdf file - VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Visual Basic Sample Codes to Delete PDF Document Page in .NET
add and remove pages from a pdf; delete pages pdf online
132
Chapter 7: Searching
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
C# File: Merge PDF; C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages; C# Page: Delete PDF pages; C# Read: PDF Text Extract; C# Read: PDF
cut pages from pdf file; delete pdf pages
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
your PDF document is unnecessary, you may want to delete this page adding a page into PDF document, deleting unnecessary page from PDF file and changing
delete pages from pdf reader; delete page from pdf
133
CHAP TE R 
8
Searching with Grep
This chapter describes the Grep option in TextWrangler’s Find command, which 
allows you to find and change text that matches a set of conditions you specify. 
Combined with the multi-file search and replace features described in Chapter 7, 
TextWrangler’s grep capabilities can make many editing tasks quicker and easier, 
whether you are modifying Web pages, extracting data from a file, or just 
rearranging a phone list.
In this chapter
What Is Grep or Pattern Searching?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Writing Search Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
Most Characters Match Themselves – 134
Escaping Special Characters – 134
Wildcards Match Types of Characters – 136
Character Classes Match Sets or Ranges of Characters – 138
Matching Non-Printing Characters – 139
Other Special Character Classes – 140
Quantifiers Repeat Subpatterns – 141
Combining Patterns to Make Complex Patterns – 142
Creating Subpatterns – 142 • Using Backreferences in Subpatterns – 143
Using Alternation – 144 • The “Longest Match” Issue – 144
Non-Greedy Quantifiers – 145
Writing Replacement Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 146
Subpatterns Make Replacement Powerful – 146
Using the Entire Matched Pattern – 146
Using Parts of the Matched Pattern – 147
Case Transformations – 148
Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149
Matching Identifiers – 149 • Matching White Space – 149
Matching Delimited Strings – 150 • Marking Structured Text – 150
Marking a Mail Digest – 151 • Rearranging Name Lists – 151
Advanced Grep Topics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151
Matching Nulls – 152 • Backreferences – 152
POSIX-Style Character Classes – 153
Non-Capturing Parentheses – 154
Perl-Style Pattern Extensions – 155 • Comments – 155
Pattern Modifiers – 156 • Positional Assertions – 157
Conditional Subpatterns – 159 • Once-Only Subpatterns – 160
Recursive Patterns – 162
Writing Search Patterns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
page processing functions, such as how to merge PDF document files by C# code, how to rotate PDF document page, how to delete PDF page using C#
delete page pdf file reader; delete pages from pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
Besides, in the process of splitting PDF document, developers can also remove certain PDF page from target PDF file using C#.NET PDF page deletion API.
delete a page from a pdf; delete page on pdf
134
Chapter 8: Searching with Grep
What Is Grep or Pattern Searching?
Grep patterns offer a powerful way to make changes to your data that “plain text” searches 
simply cannot. For example, suppose you have a list of people’s names that you want to 
alphabetize. If the names appear last name first, you can easily put these names in a 
TextWrangler window and use the Sort tool. But if the list is arranged first name first, a 
simple grep pattern can be used to put the names in the proper order for sorting. 
A grep pattern, also known as a regular expression, describes the text that you are looking 
for. For instance, a pattern can describe words that begin with C and end in l. A pattern like 
this would match “Call”, “Cornwall”, and “Criminal” as well as hundreds of other words. 
In fact, you have probably already used pattern searching without realizing it. The Find 
window’s “Case sensitive” and “Entire word” options turn on special searching patterns. 
Suppose that you are looking for “corn”. With the “Case sensitive” option turned off, you 
are actually looking for a pattern that says: look for a C or c, O or o, R or r, and N or n. With 
the “Entire word” option on, you are looking for the string “corn” only if it is surrounded 
by white space or punctuation characters; special search characters, called metacharacters, 
are added to the search string you specified to indicate this.
What makes pattern searching counterintuitive at first is how you describe the pattern. 
Consider the first example above, where we want to search for text that begins with the 
letter “C” and ends with the letter “l” with any number of letters in between. What exactly 
do you put between them that means “any number of letters”? That is what this chapter is 
all about.
Note
Grep is the name of a frequently used Unix command that searches using regular 
expressions, the same type of search pattern used by TextWrangler. For this reason, 
you will often see regular expressions called “grep patterns,” as TextWrangler does. 
They’re the same thing.
Writing Search Patterns
This section explains how to create search patterns using TextWrangler’s grep syntax. For 
readers with prior experience, this is essentially like the syntax used for regular expressions 
in the Perl programming language. (However, you do not need to understand anything 
about Perl in order to make use of TextWrangler’s grep searching.)
Most Characters Match Themselves
Most characters that you type into the Find window match themselves. For instance, if you 
are looking for the letter “t”, Grep stops and reports a match when it encounters a “t” in the 
text. This idea is so obvious that it seems not worth mentioning, but the important thing to 
remember is that these characters are search patterns. Very simple patterns, to be sure, but 
patterns nonetheless.
Escaping Special Characters
In addition to the simple character matching discussed above, there are various special 
characters that have different meanings when used in a grep pattern than in a normal 
search. (The use of these characters is covered in the following sections.)
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
using RasterEdge.XDoc.PDF; Add and Insert a Page to PDF File Using VB. doc2.Save( outPutFilePath). Add and Insert Blank Page to PDF File Using VB.
delete pages from pdf document; delete page from pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in vb.
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
delete pdf pages android; delete pages from a pdf online
Writing Search Patterns
135
However, sometimes you will need to include an exact, or literal, instance of these 
characters in your grep pattern. In this case, you must use the backslash character \ before 
that special character to have it be treated literally; this is known as “escaping” the special 
character. To search for a backslash character itself, double it \\ so that its first appearance 
will escape the second.
For example, perhaps the most common “special character” in grep is the dot: “.”. In grep, 
a dot character will match any character except a return. But what if you only want to 
match a literal dot? If you escape the dot: “\.”, it will only match another literal dot 
character in your text.
So, most characters match themselves, and even the special characters will match 
themselves if they are preceded by a backslash. TextWrangler’s grep syntax coloring helps 
make this clear.
Note
When passing grep patterns to TextWrangler via AppleScript, be aware that both the 
backslash and double-quote characters have special meaning to AppleScript. In order 
to pass these through correctly, you must escape them in your script. Thus, to pass \r 
for a carriage return to TextWrangler, you must write \\r in your AppleScript string.
C# PDF File Compress Library: Compress reduce PDF size in C#.net
Since images are usually or large size, images size reducing can help to reduce PDF file size effectively. Delete unimportant contents Embedded page thumbnails.
cut pages out of pdf file; delete pages from a pdf
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
document file, and choose to create a new PDF file in .NET NET document imaging toolkit, also offers other advanced PDF document page processing and
delete page from pdf online; delete blank pages from pdf file
136
Chapter 8: Searching with Grep
Wildcards Match Types of Characters
These special characters, or metacharacters, are used to match certain types of other 
characters:
Being able to specifically match text starting at the beginning or end of a line is an 
especially handy feature of grep. For example, if you wanted to find every instance of a 
message sent by Patrick, from a log file which contains various other information like so:
From: Rich, server: barebones.com
To: TextWrangler-Talk, server: lists.barebones.com
From: Patrick, server: example.barebones.com
you could search for the pattern:
^From: Patrick
and you will find every occurrence of these lines in your file (or set of files if you do a 
multi-file search instead).
It is important to note that ^ and $ do not actually match return characters. They match 
zero-width positions after and before returns, respectively. So, if you are looking for “foo” 
at the end of a line, the pattern “foo$” will match the three characters “f”, “o”, and “o”. If 
you search for “foo\r”, you will match the same text, but the match will contain four 
characters: “f”, “o”, “o”, and a return.
Note
^ and $ do not match the positions after and before soft line breaks.
You can combine ^ and $ within a pattern to force a match to constitute an entire line. For 
example:
^foo$
will only match “foo” on a line by itself, with no other characters. Try it against these three 
lines to see for yourself:
foobar
foo
fighting foo
The pattern will only match the second line.
Wildcard Matches…
.
any character except a line break (that is, a carriage 
return)
^
beginning of a line (unless used in a character class)
$
end of line (unless used in a character class)
Writing Search Patterns
137
Other Positional Assertions
TextWrangler’s grep engine supports additional positional assertions, very similar to ^ and 
$.
Examples (the text matched by the pattern is underlined)
Search for:
\bfoo\b
Will match:
bar foo
bar
Will match:
foo
bar
Will not match:
foobar
Search for:
\bJane\b
Will match:
Jane
's
Will match:
Tell Jane
about the monkey.
Search for:
\Afoo
Will match:
foo
bar
Will not match:
This is good foo.
Escape
Matches
\A
only at the beginning of the document (as 
opposed to ^, which matches at the beginning 
of the document and also at the beginning of 
each line)
\b
any word boundary, defined as any position 
between a \w character and a \W character, in 
either order
\B
any position that is not a word boundary
\z
at the end of the document (as opposed to $, 
which matches at the end of the document and 
also at the end of each line)
\Z
at the end of the document, or before a trailing 
return at the end of the doc, if there is one
138
Chapter 8: Searching with Grep
Character Classes Match Sets or Ranges of 
Characters
The character class construct lets you specify a set or a range of characters to match, or to 
ignore. A character class is constructed by placing a pair of square brackets […] around the 
group or range of characters you wish to include. To exclude, or ignore, all characters 
specified by a character class, add a caret character ^ just after the opening bracket [^…]. 
For example:
You can use any number of characters or ranges between the brackets. Here are some 
examples: 
A character class matches when the search encounters any one of the characters in the 
pattern. However, the contents of a set are only treated as separate characters, not as words. 
For example, if your search pattern is [beans] and the text in the window is “lima beans”, 
TextWrangler will report a match at the “a” of the word “lima”.
To include the character ] in a set or a range, place it immediately after the opening bracket. 
To use the ^ character, place it anywhere except immediately after the opening bracket. To 
match a dash character (hyphen) in a range, place it at the beginning of the range; to match 
it as part of a set, place it at the beginning or end of the set. Or, you can include any of these 
character at any point in the class by escaping them with a backslash. 
Character 
Class
Matches
[xyz]
any one of the characters x, y, 
z
[^xyz]
any character except x, y, z
[a-z]
any character in the range a to 
z
Character Class
Matches
[aeiou]
any vowel
[^aeiou]
any character that is not a vowel
[a-zA-Z0-9]
any character from a-z, A-Z, or 0-9
[^aeiou0-9]
any character that is neither a vowel nor a 
digit
Character 
Class
Matches
[]0-9]
any digit or ]
[aeiou^]
a vowel or ^
[-A-Z]
a dash or A - Z
Writing Search Patterns
139
Character classes respect the setting of the Case Sensitive checkbox in the Find window. 
For example, if Case Sensitive is on, [a] will only match “a”; if Case Sensitive is off, [a] 
will match both “a” and “A”.
Matching Non-Printing Characters
As described in Chapter 7 on searching, TextWrangler provides several special character 
pairs that you can use to match common non-printing characters, as well as the ability to 
specify any arbitrary character by means of its hexadecimal character code (escape code). 
You can use these special characters in grep patterns as well as for normal searching. 
For example, to look for a tab or a space, you would use the character class [\t ] (consisting 
of a tab special character and a space character).
Use \r to match a line break in the middle of a pattern and the special characters ^ and $ 
(described above) to “anchor” a pattern to the beginning of a line or to the end of a line. In 
the case of ^ and $, the line break character is not included in the match.
[--A]
any character in the range from - to 
A
[aeiou-]
any vowel or -
[aei\-ou]
any vowel or -
Character
Matches
\r
line break (carriage return)
\n
Unix line break (line feed)
\t
tab
\f
page break (form feed)
\a
alarm (hex 07)
\cX
a named control character, like \cC for Control-C
\b
backspace (hex 08) (only in character classes)
\e
Esc (hex 1B)
\xNN
hexadecimal character code NN (for example, 
\x0D for CR)
\x{NNNN}
any number of hexadecimal characters NN… (for 
example, \x{0} will match a null, \x{304F} will 
match a Japanese Unicode character)
\\
backslash
Character 
Class
Matches
140
Chapter 8: Searching with Grep
Other Special Character Classes
TextWrangler uses several other sequences for matching different types or categories of 
characters. 
A “word” is defined in TextWrangler as any run of non-word-break characters bounded by 
word breaks. Word characters are generally alphanumeric, and some characters whose 
value is greater than 127 are also considered word characters. 
Note that any character matched by \s is by definition not a word character; thus, anything 
matched by \s will also be matched by \W (but not the reverse!).
Special 
Character
Matches
\s
any whitespace character (space, tab, carriage 
return, line feed, form feed)
\S
any non-whitespace character (any character 
not included by \s)
\w
any word character (a-z, A-Z, 0-9, _, and some 
8-bit characters)
\W
any non-word character (all characters not 
included by \w, including carriage returns)
\d
any digit (0-9)
\D
any non-digit character (including carriage 
return)
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested