c# pdf viewer : How to move pages in pdf acrobat control software platform web page html winforms web browser what-every-body-is-saying23-part1057

DETECTING DECEPTION 
217
Take  note  of the head movements  of  those with whom  you  are 
speaking. If a person’s head begins to shake either in the affirmative or 
in the negative as he is speaking, and the movement occurs simultane-
ously with what he is saying, then the statement can typically be relied 
upon as being truthful. If, however, the head shake or head movement is 
delayed or occurs after the speech, then most likely the statement is con-
trived and not truthful. Although it may be very subtle, the delayed 
movement of the head is an attempt to further validate what has been 
stated and is not part of the natural flow of communication. In addi-
tion, honest head movements should be consistent with verbal denials or 
affirmations. If a head movement is inconsistent with or contrary to a 
person’s statement, it may indicate deception. While typically involving 
more subtle than exaggerated head movements, this incongruity of ver-
bal and nonverbal signals happens more often than we think. For ex-
ample, someone may  say,  “I  didn’t do it,”  while  his head  is  slightly 
nodding in the affirmative.
During discomfort, the limbic brain takes over, and a person’s face 
can conversely either flush or lighten in color. During difficult conversa-
tions, you may also see increased perspiration or breathing; note whether 
the person is noticeably wiping off sweat or trying to control his or her 
breathing  in  an  effort  to  remain calm.  Any  trembling  of  the  body, 
whether of the hands, fingers, or lips, or any attempt to hide or restrain 
the hands or lips (through disappearing or compressed lips), may be in-
dicative of discomfort and/or deception, especially if it occurs after nor-
mal nervousness should have worn off.
A person’s voice may crack or may seem inconsistent during deceptive 
speech; swallowing becomes difficult as the throat becomes dry from 
stress, so look for hard swallows. These can be evidenced by a sudden 
bob or jump of the Adam’s apple and may be accompanied by the clear-
ing or  repeated clearings of  the  throat—all  indicative  of discomfort. 
Keep in mind that these behaviors are indicators of distress, not guaran-
tees of deception. I have seen very honest people testify in court display-
ing all these behaviors simply because they were nervous, not because 
they were lying. Even after years of testifying in federal and state courts, 
How to move pages in pdf acrobat - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages within a pdf document; reordering pages in pdf document
How to move pages in pdf acrobat - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages in a pdf; reorder pages in pdf document
218 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
I still get nervous when I am on the stand, so signs of tension and stress 
always need to be deciphered in context.
Pacifiers and Discomfort
When interviewing suspects during my years with the FBI, I looked for 
pacifying behaviors to help guide me in my questioning and to assess 
what was particularly stressful to the interviewee. Although pacifiers 
alone are not definitive proof of deception (since they can manifest in in-
nocent people who are nervous), they do provide another piece of the 
puzzle in determining what a person is truly thinking and feeling.
The following is a list of twelve things I do—and the points I keep in 
mind—when I want to read pacifying nonverbals in interpersonal inter-
actions. You might consider using a similar strategy when you interview 
or converse with others, be it a formal inquiry, a serious conversation 
with a family member, or an interaction with a business associate.
(1) Get a clear view. When I conduct interviews or interact with 
others, I don’t want anything blocking my total view of the 
person, as I don’t want to miss any pacifying behaviors. If, for 
example, the person pacifies by wiping his hands on his lap, I 
want to be able to see it—which is difficult if there is a desk in 
the way. Human resource personnel should be aware that the 
best way to interview is in a physically open space—with noth-
ing blocking your view of the candidate—so you may fully 
observe the person you are interviewing.
(2) Expect some pacifying behaviors. A certain level of pacifying 
behavior is normal in everyday nonverbal displays; people do this 
to calm themselves. When my daughter was young, she would 
soothe herself  to  sleep by  playing  with her hair, curling  the 
strands in her fingers, seemingly oblivious to the world. So I ex-
pect people to pacify more or less, throughout the day, just as I 
expect them to breathe, as they adapt to an ever-changing envi-
ronment.
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
manipulate & convert standard PDF documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat.
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; reordering pages in pdf document
C# powerpoint - PowerPoint Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. PowerPoint to PDF Conversion.
move pages in pdf online; rearrange pages in pdf file
DETECTING DECEPTION 
219
(3) Expect initial nervousness. Initial nervousness in an interview 
or serious conversation is normal, particularly when circum-
stances surrounding the meeting are stressful. For example, a 
father asking his son about his homework assignment will not 
be as stressful as asking the boy why he was expelled from 
school for disruptive behavior.
(4) Get the person with whom you’re interacting to relax first. As an 
interview, important meeting, or significant discussion progresses, 
eventually those involved should calm down and become more 
comfortable. In fact, a good interviewer will make sure this hap-
pens by taking time to let the person become more relaxed before 
asking questions or exploring topics that might be stressful.
(5) Establish a baseline. Once a person’s pacifying behaviors have 
decreased and stabilized to normal (for that person), the inter-
viewer can use that pacifying level as a baseline for assessing 
future behavior.
(6) Look for increased use of pacifiers. As the interview or conver-
sation continues, you should be observant of pacifying behav-
iors and/or an increase (spike) in their frequency, particularly 
when they occur in response to a specific question or piece of 
information. Such an increase is a clue that something about 
the question or information has troubled the person pacifying, 
and that topic likely deserves further attention and focus. It is 
important to identify correctly the specific stimulus (whether a 
question, information, or event) that caused the pacifying re-
sponse; otherwise you might draw the wrong conclusions or 
move the discussion in the wrong direction. For example, if 
during an employment interview the candidate starts to venti-
late his shirt collar (a pacifier) when asked a certain question 
about his former position, that specific inquiry has caused suf-
ficient stress that his brain is requiring pacification. This indi-
cates the issue needs to be pursued further. The behavior does 
not necessarily mean that deception is involved, but simply that 
the topic is causing the interviewee stress.
C# Word - Word Conversion in C#.NET
Word documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Word to PDF Conversion.
rearrange pdf pages in reader; pdf change page order acrobat
C# Excel - Excel Conversion & Rendering in C#.NET
Excel documents in .NET class applications independently, without using other external third-party dependencies like Adobe Acrobat. Excel to PDF Conversion.
change pdf page order preview; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
220 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
(7) Ask, pause, and observe. Good interviewers, like good con-
versationalists, do not machine gun questions by firing one 
right after the other in a staccato fashion. You will be hard-
pressed to detect deception accurately if your impatience or 
impertinence  antagonizes  the  person  with  whom  you  are 
speaking. Ask a question and then wait to observe all the re-
actions. Give the interviewee time to think and respond, and 
build in pregnant pauses to achieve this objective. Also, ques-
tions should be crafted in such a way as to elicit specific an-
swers in order to better zero in on facts and fiction. The more 
specific the question, the more likely you are to elicit precise 
nonverbals, and now that you have better understanding of 
the meaning of subconscious actions, the more accurate your 
assessments will be. In law enforcement interviews, unfortu-
nately, many false  confessions  have  been obtained  through 
sustained staccato-like questioning, which causes high stress 
and obfuscates nonverbal cues. We now know that innocent 
people will confess  to crimes, and  even  give written state-
ments,  in  order to  terminate a  stressful  interview  wherein 
pressure is applied (Kassin, 2006, 207–228). The same holds 
true for sons, daughters, spouses, friends, and employees when 
grilled  by  an  overzealous person, be  it a  parent, husband, 
wife, companion, or boss.
(8) Keep  the  person  you  are  interviewing  focused.  Interviewers 
should keep in mind that many times when people are simply 
talking—when they are telling their side of the story—there will 
be fewer useful nonverbals performed than when the interviewer 
controls the scope of the topic. Pointed questions elicit behavioral 
manifestations that are useful in assessing a person’s honesty.
(9) Chatter is not truth. One mistake made by both novice and 
experienced  interviewers  is  the  tendency  to  equate talking 
with truth. When interviewees are talking, we tend to believe 
them; when they are reserved, we assume they are lying. Dur-
ing  conversation,  people  who  provide  an  overwhelming 
DETECTING DECEPTION 
221
amount of information and detail about an event or situation 
may appear to be telling the truth; however, they may be pre-
senting a fabricated smoke screen they hope will obfuscate the 
facts or lead the conversation in another direction. The truth 
is revealed not in the volume of material spoken but through the 
verification of facts provided by the speaker. Until the infor-
mation is verified, it is self-reported and perhaps meaningless 
data (see box 58).
(10) Stress coming in and going out. Based on years of studying in-
terviewee behavior, I have concluded that a person with guilty 
knowledge will present two distinct behavior patterns, in se-
quence, when asked a difficult question such as, “Did you ever 
go inside the home of Mr. Jones?” The first behavior will re-
BOX 58:
IT’S ALL A LIE
I remember one case in which I interviewed a woman in Macon, Georgia. 
For three days she voluntarily provided us with page after page of infor-
mation. I really felt we were on to something when the interview was fi-
nally over, until it came time to corroborate what this woman had said. For 
over a year we investigated her claims (both in the United States and in 
Europe), but in the end, after expending significant effort and resources, 
we discovered that everything she had told us was a lie. She had provided 
us pages and pages of plausible lies, even implicating her innocent hus-
band. Had I remembered that cooperation does not always equal truth, 
and had I scrutinized her more carefully, we would have been spared 
wasting a great deal of time and money. The information this woman had 
given sounded good and seemed plausible, but it was all trash. I wish I 
could say this incident happened to me early in my career, but it did not. 
I am neither the first—nor will I be the last—interviewer to be bamboozled 
this way. Though some people naturally talk more than others, you should 
always be on the lookout for this kind of chatty ploy.
222 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
flect the stress experienced when hearing the question. The 
interviewee will subconsciously respond with various distanc-
ing behaviors including foot withdrawal (moving them away 
from the investigator); he may lean away or may tighten his 
jaw and lips. This will be followed by the second set of related 
behaviors, pacifying responses to the stress that may include 
signals such as neck touching, nose stroking, or neck massag-
ing as he ponders the question or answer.
(11)  Isolate the cause of the stress. Two behavior patterns in se-
ries—the stress indicators followed by pacifying behaviors—
have traditionally been erroneously associated with deception. 
This is unfortunate, because these manifestations need to be 
explained more simply as what they are—indicators of stress 
and stress relief—not necessarily dishonesty. No doubt some-
one who is lying may display these same behaviors, but indi-
viduals who are nervous also show them. Occasionally I will 
hear someone say, “If people talk while touching their nose, 
they are lying.” It may be true that people who are deceptive 
touch their nose while speaking, but so do individuals who 
are honest but under stress. The nose touching is a pacifying 
behavior to relieve internal tension—regardless of the source 
of that discomfort. Even a retired FBI agent who is stopped 
for speeding with  no  legitimate explanation will  touch  his 
nose when pulled over (yes, I paid the ticket). My point is this. 
Don’t be so hasty to assume deception when you see someone 
touching his or her nose. For everyone who does it while ly-
ing, you will find a hundred who do it out of habit to relieve 
stress.
(12) Pacifiers say so much. By helping us identify when a person is 
stressed, pacifying behaviors help us identify issues that need 
further focus and exploration. Through effective questioning 
we can both elicit and identify these pacifiers in any interper-
sonal interaction to achieve a better understanding of a person’s 
thoughts and intentions.
DETECTING DECEPTION 
223
TWO PRINCIPAL NONVERBAL BEHAVIORAL PATTERNS 
TO CONSIDER IN DETECTING DECEPTION
When it comes to body signals that alert us to the possibility of decep-
tion,  you should  be  watching  for  nonverbal  behaviors involving  syn-
chrony and emphasis.
Synchrony
Earlier in this chapter, I discussed the importance of synchrony as a way 
to assess for comfort in interpersonal interaction. Synchrony is also im-
portant, however, in assessing for deception. Look for synchrony between 
what is being said verbally and nonverbally, between the circumstances 
of the moment and what the subject is saying, between events and emo-
tions, and even synchrony of time and space.
When being questioned, a person answering in the affirmative should 
have congruent head movement that immediately supports what is said; 
it should not be delayed. Lack of synchrony is exhibited when a person 
states, “I did not do it,” while her head is nodding in an affirmative mo-
tion. Likewise, asynchrony is demonstrated when a man is asked, “Would 
you lie about this?” and his head gives a slight nod while he answers, 
“No.” Upon catching themselves in this faux pas, people will reverse 
their head movements in an attempt to do damage control. When asyn-
chronous behavior is observed, it looks contrived and pathetic. More of-
ten a mendacious statement, such as an untruthful “I did not do it,” is 
followed by a noticeably delayed and less emphatic negative head move-
ment. These behaviors are not synchronous and therefore more likely to 
be equated with deception because they show discomfort in their pro-
duction.
There should also be synchrony between what is being said and the 
events of the moment. For instance, when parents are reporting the al-
leged kidnapping of their infant, there should be synchrony between the 
event (kidnapping) and their emotions. The distraught mother and fa-
ther should be clamoring for law enforcement assistance, emphasizing 
224 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
every detail, feeling the depths of despair, eager to help, and willing to 
tell and retell the story, even at personal risk. When such reports are 
made by placid individuals, more concerned with getting one particular 
version of the story out and lacking in consistent emotional displays, or 
who are more concerned about their own well-being and how they are 
perceived, it is behavior that is totally out of synchrony with circum-
stances and inconsistent with honesty.
Lastly, there should be synchrony between events, time, and place. A 
person who delays reporting a significant event, such as the drowning of 
a friend, spouse, or child, or who travels to another jurisdiction to report 
the event should rightfully come under suspicion. Furthermore, the re-
porting of events that would have been impossible to observe from the 
person’s vantage point is asynchronous, and therefore suspect. People 
who lie do not consider how synchrony fits into the equation, and their 
nonverbals and stories will eventually fail them. Achieving synchrony is a 
form of comfort and, as we have seen, plays a major role during police 
interviews and the reporting of crimes; but it will also set the stage for 
successful and meaningful conversations about all manner of serious is-
sues in which detecting deceit is important.
Emphasis
When we speak, we naturally utilize various parts of our body—such as 
the eyebrows, head, hands, arms, torso, legs, and feet—to emphasize a 
point about which we feel deeply or emotionally. Observing emphasis is 
important because emphasis is universal when people are being genuine. 
Emphasis is the limbic brain’s contribution to communication, a way to 
let others know just how potently we feel. Conversely, when the limbic 
brain does not back up what we say, we emphasize less or not at all. For 
the most part, in my experience and that of others, liars do not empha-
size (Lieberman, 1998, 37). Liars will engage their cognitive brains in 
order to decide what to say and how to deceive, but rarely do they think 
about the presentation of the lie. When compelled to lie, most people are 
not aware of how much emphasis or accentuation enters into everyday 
DETECTING DECEPTION 
225
conversations. When liars attempt to fabricate an answer, their emphasis 
looks unnatural or is delayed; rarely do they emphasize where appropri-
ate, or they choose to do so only on relatively unimportant matters.
We emphasize both verbally and nonverbally. Verbally, we emphasize 
through voice, pitch, or tone, or through repetition. We also emphasize 
nonverbally, and these behaviors can be even more accurate and useful 
than words when attempting to detect the truth or dishonesty in a con-
versation or interview. People who typically use their hands while speak-
ing punctuate their remarks with hand gestures, even going so far as 
pounding on a desk as they emphasize. Other individuals accentuate 
with the tips of the fingers by either gesturing with them or touching 
things. Hand behaviors complement honest speech, thoughts, and true 
sentiments (Knapp & Hall, 2002, 277–284). Raising our eyebrows (eye-
brow flash) and widening our eyes are also ways of emphasizing a point 
(Morris, 1985, 61; Knapp & Hall, 2002, 68).
Another manifestation of emphasis is seen when someone leans for-
ward with the torso, showing interest. We employ gravity-defying ges-
tures such as rising up on the balls of our feet when we make a significant 
or emotionally charged point. When seated, people emphasize by raising 
the knee (staccato-like) while highlighting important points, and added 
emphasis can be shown by slapping the knee as it comes up, indicating 
emotional exuberance. Gravity-defying gestures are emblematic of em-
phasis and true sentiment, something liars rarely display.
In contrast, people de-emphasize or  show lack  of commitment to 
their own speech by speaking behind their hands (talking while covering 
their mouths) or showing limited facial expression. People control their 
countenance and engage in other movement restriction and withdrawal 
behaviors when they are not committed to what they are saying (Knapp 
& Hall, 2002, 320; Lieberman, 1998, 37). Deceptive people often show 
deliberative, pensive displays, such as fingers to the chin or stroking of 
cheeks, as though they are still thinking about what to say; this is in stark 
contrast to honest people who emphasize the point they are making. De-
ceptive people spend time evaluating what they say and how it is being 
received, which is inconsistent with honest behavior.
226 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
SPECIFIC NONVERBAL BEHAVIORS TO 
CONSIDER IN  DETECTING DECEPTION
Below are some specific things you’ll want to watch for when examining 
emphasis as a means for detecting possible deception.
Lack of Emphasis in Hand Behaviors
As Aldert Vrij and others have reported, lack of arm movement and lack 
of emphasis are suggestive of deception. The problem is there is no way 
of measuring this, especially in a public or social setting. Nevertheless, 
strive to note when it occurs and in what context, especially if it comes 
after a significant topic is brought up (Vrij, 2003, 25–27). Any sudden 
change in movement reflects brain activity. When arms shift from being 
animated to being still, there must be a reason, be it dejection or (possi-
bly) deception.
In my own interviewing experiences, I have noticed that liars will 
tend to display less steepling. I also look for the white knuckles of the 
individual who grabs the chair armrest in a fixed manner as though in 
an “ejector seat.” Unfortunately, for this uncomfortable person, ejection 
from  the  discussion is often impossible. Many  criminal investigators 
have found that when the head, neck, arms, and legs are held in place 
with little movement and the hands and arms are clutching the armrest, 
such behavior is very much consistent with those who are about to de-
ceive, but again, it is not definitive (Schafer & Navarro, 2003, 66) (see 
figure 88).
Interestingly, as individuals make declarative statements that are false, 
they will avoid touching not only other people, but objects such as a po-
dium or table as well. I have never seen or heard a person who is lying 
yell affirmatively, “I didn’t do it,” while pounding his fist on the table. 
Usually what I have seen are very weak, nonemphatic statements, with 
gestures that are equally mild. People who are being deceptive lack com-
mitment and confidence in what they are saying. Although their think-
ing brain (neocortex) will decide what to say in order to mislead, their 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested