c# pdf viewer : Rearrange pdf pages in reader software application project winforms html .net UWP what-every-body-is-saying3-part1060

MASTERING THE SECRETS OF NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION  17
Commandment 10: When observing others, be subtle about it. 
Using nonverbal behavior requires you to observe people carefully and 
decode their nonverbal  behaviors  accurately. However, one thing you 
don’t want to do when observing others is to make your intentions obvi-
ous. Many individuals tend to stare at people when they first try to spot 
nonverbal cues. Such intrusive observation is not advisable. Your ideal 
goal is to observe others without their knowing it, in other words, unob-
trusively.
Work at perfecting your observational skills, and you will reach a 
point where your efforts will be both successful and subtle. It’s all a mat-
ter of practice and persistence.
You have now been introduced to your part of our partnership, the 
ten commandments you need to follow to decode nonverbal communica-
tion successfully. The question now becomes “What nonverbal behaviors 
should I be looking for, and what important information do they re-
veal?” This is where I come in.
Identifying Important Nonverbal Behaviors 
and Their Meanings
Consider this. The human body is capable of giving off literally thou-
sands of nonverbal “signals” or messages. Which ones are most impor-
tant and how do you decode them? The problem is that it could take a 
lifetime of painstaking observation, evaluation, and validation to identify 
and interpret important nonverbal communications accurately. Fortu-
nately, with the help of some very gifted researchers and my practical 
experience as an FBI expert on nonverbal behavior, we can take a more 
direct approach to get you on your way. I have already identified those 
nonverbal behaviors that are most important, so you can put this unique 
knowledge to immediate use. We have also developed a paradigm or 
model that makes reading nonverbals easier. Even if you forget exactly 
what a specific body signal means, you will still be able to decipher it.
As you read through these pages, you will learn certain information 
about nonverbal behavior that has never been revealed in any other text 
Rearrange pdf pages in reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; move pages in pdf reader
Rearrange pdf pages in reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf page order reverse; how to move pages around in pdf
18 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
on  body  language  (including  examples  of  nonverbal behavioral clues 
used to solve actual FBI cases). Some of the material will surprise you. 
For example, if you had to choose the most “honest” part of a person’s 
body—the part that would most likely reveal an individual’s true feeling 
or intentions—which part would you select? Take a guess. Once I reveal 
the answer, you’ll know a prime place to look when attempting to decide 
what a business associate, family member, date, or total stranger is think-
ing, feeling, or intending. I will also explain the physiological basis for 
nonverbal behavior, the role the brain plays in nonverbal behavior. I will 
also reveal the truth about detecting deception as no counterintelligence 
agent has done before.
I firmly believe that understanding the biological basis for body lan-
guage will help you appreciate how nonverbal behavior works and why 
it is such a potent predictor of human thoughts, feelings, and intentions. 
Therefore, I start the next chapter with a look at that magnificent organ, 
the human brain, and show how it governs every facet of our body lan-
guage. Before I do so, however, I will share an observation concerning 
the validity of using body language to understand and assess human be-
havior.
FOR WHOM THE TELLS TOLL
On a fateful date in 1963, in Cleveland, Ohio, thirty-nine-year veteran 
Detective Martin McFadden watched two men walk back and forth in 
front of a store window. They took turns peeking into the shop and then 
walking away. After multiple passes, the two men huddled at the end of 
the street looking over their shoulders as they spoke to a third person. 
Concerned that the men were “casing” the business and intending to rob 
the store, the detective moved in, patted down one of the men, and found 
a concealed handgun. Detective McFadden arrested the three men, thus 
thwarting a robbery and averting potential loss of life.
Officer McFadden’s detailed observations became the basis for a land-
mark U.S. Supreme  Court decision (Terry  v.  Ohio, 1968, 392 U.S.  1) 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
change pdf page order reader; how to move pdf pages around
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pages in pdf file; how to move pages in a pdf file
MASTERING THE SECRETS OF NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION  19
known to every police officer in the United States. Since 1968, this ruling 
has allowed police officers to stop and frisk individuals without a war-
rant when their behaviors telegraph their intention to commit a crime. 
With this decision, the Supreme Court acknowledged that nonverbal 
behaviors presage criminality if those behaviors are observed and de-
coded properly. Terry v. Ohio provided a clear demonstration of the rela-
tionship  between  our  thoughts,  intentions,  and  nonverbal  behaviors. 
Most important, this decision provided legal recognition that such a rela-
tionship exists and is valid (Navarro & Schafer, 2003, 22–24).
So the next time someone says to you that nonverbal behavior does 
not have meaning or is not reliable, remember this case, as it says other-
wise and has stood the test of time.
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
move pages in a pdf; reverse page order pdf online
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
reorder pdf pages online; reorder pages in a pdf
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order in pdf file; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
how to rearrange pdf pages online; change page order pdf acrobat
TW O
Living Our Limbic Legacy
T
ake a moment and bite your lip. Really, take a second and actually 
do it. Now, rub your forehead. Finally, stroke the back of your 
neck.  These  are  things we do  all the time.  Spend some  time 
around other people and you’ll see them engaging in these behaviors 
on a regular basis.
Do you ever wonder why they do it? Do you ever wonder why you do 
it? The answer can be found hidden away in a vault—the cranial vault—
where the human brain resides. Once we learn why and how our brain 
recruits our body to express its emotions nonverbally, we’ll also discover 
how to interpret these behaviors. So, let’s take a closer look inside that 
vault and examine the most amazing three pounds of matter found in 
the human body.
Most people think of themselves as having one brain and recognize 
that brain as the seat of their cognitive abilities. In reality, there are three 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pdf pages; how to move pages in pdf converter professional
22 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
“brains” inside the human skull, each performing specialized functions 
that work together as the “command-and-control center” that regulates 
everything our body does. Back in 1952, a pioneering scientist named 
Paul MacLean began to speak of the human brain as a triune brain con-
sisting of a “reptilian (stem) brain,” “mammalian (limbic) brain,” and “hu-
man (neocortex) brain” (see diagram of the limbic brain). In this book, we 
will be concentrating on the limbic system of the brain (the part MacLean 
called the mammalian brain), because it plays the largest role in the ex-
pression of our nonverbal behavior. However, we will use our neocortex 
(our human brain or thinking brain) to analyze critically the limbic reac-
tions of those around us in order to decode what other people are think-
ing,  feeling,  or  intending  (LeDoux,  1996,  184–189;  Goleman,  1995, 
10–21).
It is critical to understand that the brain controls all behaviors, whether 
conscious or subconscious. This premise is the cornerstone of understand-
ing all nonverbal communications. From simply scratching your head to 
composing a symphony, there is nothing you do (except for some involun-
tary muscle reflexes) that is not governed or directed by the brain. By this 
Diagram of the limbic brain with major features such as the amygdala and the 
hippocampus.
Neocortex
Neocortex
Hypothalamus
Hypothalamus
Amygdala
Amygdala
Reptilian Brain
Reptilian Brain
Cerebellum
Cerebellum
Hippocampus
Hippocampus
Thalamus
Thalamus
Corpus Callosum
Corpus Callosum
Fig. 3
LIVING OUR LIMBIC LEGACY 
23
logic, we can use these behaviors to interpret what the brain is choosing to 
communicate externally.
THE VERY ELEGANT LIMBIC BRAI N
In our study of nonverbal communications, the limbic brain is where the 
action is. Why? Because it is the part of the brain that reacts to the world 
around  us  reflexively  and  instantaneously,  in  real time,  and without 
thought. For that reason, it gives off a true response to information com-
ing in from the environment (Myers, 1993, 35–39). Because it is uniquely 
responsible for our survival, the limbic brain does not take breaks. It is 
always “on.” The limbic brain is also our emotional center. It is from 
there that signals go out to various other parts of the brain, which in turn 
orchestrate  our  behaviors  as  they  relate  to  emotions  or  our  survival 
(LeDoux, 1996, 104–137). These behaviors can be observed and decoded 
as they manifest physically in our feet, torso, arms, hands, and faces. 
Since these reactions occur without thought, unlike words, they are gen-
uine. Thus, the limbic brain is considered the “honest brain” when we 
think of nonverbals (Goleman, 1995, 13–29).
These limbic survival responses go back not only to our own infancy, 
but also to our ancestry as a human species. They are hardwired into our 
nervous system, making them difficult to disguise or eliminate—like 
trying to suppress a startle response even when we  anticipate  a  loud 
noise. Therefore, it is axiomatic that limbic behaviors are honest and reli-
able behaviors; they are true manifestations of our thoughts, feelings, and 
intentions (see box 7).
The third part of our brain is a relatively recent addition to the cra-
nial vault. Thus it is called the neocortex, meaning new brain. This part 
of our brain is also known as the “human,” “thinking,” or “intellectual” 
brain, because it is responsible for higher-order cognition and memory. 
This is the part of the brain that distinguishes us from other mammals 
due to the large amount of its mass (cortex) used for thinking. This is 
the brain that got us to the moon. With its ability to compute, analyze, 
24 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
BOX 7:
HEAD-ING OFF A BOMBER
Since the limbic part of our brain cannot be cognitively regulated, the 
behaviors it generates should be given greater importance when inter-
preting nonverbal communications. You can use your thoughts to try to 
disguise your true emotions all you want, but the limbic system will self-
regulate and give off clues. Observing these alarm reactions and knowing 
that they are honest and significant is extremely important; it can even 
save lives.
An example  of this occurred in December of 1999, when an alert 
U.S. customs officer thwarted a terrorist who came to be known as the 
“millennial bomber.” Noting the nervousness and excessive sweating of 
Ahmed Reesam as he entered the United States from Canada, Officer 
Diana Dean asked him to step out of his car for further questioning. At 
that point Reesam attempted to flee but was soon captured. In his car, 
officers  found  explosives  and  timing  devices.  Reesam  was  eventually 
convicted of plotting to bomb the Los Angeles Airport.
The nervousness and sweating that Officer Dean observed were reg-
ulated in the brain as a response to immense stress. Because these lim-
bic behaviors are genuine, Officer Dean could be confident in pursuing 
Reesam, with the knowledge that her observations had detected body 
language that justified further investigation. The Reesam affair illustrates 
how one’s psychological state manifests nonverbally in the body. In this 
case, the limbic system of a would-be bomber—who was obviously ex-
tremely frightened by the possibility of being detected—gave away his 
nervousness, despite all conscious attempts he made to hide his underly-
ing emotions. We owe Officer Dean our gratitude for being an astute ob-
server of nonverbal behavior and foiling a terrorist act.
LIVING OUR LIMBIC LEGACY 
25
interpret, and intuit at a level unique to the human species, it is our 
critical and creative brain. It is also, however, the part of the brain that is 
least honest; therefore, it is our “lying brain.” Because it is capable of 
complex thought, this brain—unlike its limbic counterpart—is the least 
reliable of the three major brain components. This is the brain that can 
deceive, and it deceives often (Vrij, 2003, 1–17).
Returning to our earlier example, while the limbic system may compel 
the millennial bomber to sweat profusely while being questioned by the 
customs officer, the neocortex is quite capable of allowing him to lie about 
his true sentiments. The thinking part of the brain, which is the part that 
governs our speech (specifically, Broca’s area), could cause the bomber to 
say, “I have no explosives in the car,” should the officer inquire as to what 
is in his automobile, even if that claim is an utter falsehood. The neocor-
tex can easily permit us to tell a friend that we like her new haircut when 
we, in fact, do not, or it can facilitate the very convincing statement, “I did 
not have sexual relations with that woman, Ms. Lewinsky.”
Because the neocortex (the thinking brain) is capable of dishonesty, it 
is not a good source of reliable or accurate information (Ost, 2006, 259–
291). In summary, when it comes to revealing honest nonverbal behaviors 
that help us read people, the limbic system is the holy grail of body lan-
guage. Thus, this is the area of the brain where we want to focus our at-
tention.
OUR LIMBIC  RESPONSES—THE THREE F’S 
OF NONVERBALS
One of the classic ways the limbic brain has assured our survival as 
a species—and produced a reliable number of nonverbal tells in the pro-
cess—is by regulating our behavior when confronting danger, whether it 
be a prehistoric man facing a Stone Age beast or a modern-day employee 
facing a stone-hearted boss. Over the millennia, we have retained the 
competent, life-saving visceral reactions of our animal heritage. In order 
to ensure our survival, the brain’s very elegant response to distress or 
26 
WHAT EV ERY  BODY IS  S AYING
threats, has taken three forms: freeze, flight, and fight. Like other animal 
species whose limbic brains protected them in this manner, humans pos-
sessing these limbic reactions survived to propagate because these behav-
iors were already hardwired into our nervous system.
I am sure that many of you are familiar with the phrase “fight-or-flight 
response,” which is common terminology used  to describe the way  in 
which we respond to threatening or dangerous situations. Unfortunately, 
this phrase is only two-thirds accurate and half-assed backward! In reality, 
the way animals, including humans, react to danger occurs in the follow-
ing order: freeze, flight, fight. If the reaction really were fight or flight, 
most of us would be bruised, battered, and exhausted much of the time.
Because we have retained and honed this exquisitely successful pro-
cess for dealing with stress and danger—and because the resulting reac-
tions generate nonverbal behaviors that help us understand a person’s 
thoughts, feelings, and intentions—it is well worth our time to examine 
each response in greater detail.
The Freeze Response
A million years ago, as early hominids traversed the African savanna, 
they were faced with many predators that could outrun and overpower 
them. For early man to succeed, the limbic brain, which had evolved 
from our animal forebearers, developed strategies to compensate for the 
power advantage our predators had over us. That strategy, or first de-
fense of the limbic system, was to use the freeze response in the presence 
of a predator or other danger. Movement attracts attention; by immedi-
ately holding still upon sensing a threat, the limbic brain caused us to 
react in the most effective manner possible to ensure our survival. Most 
animals, certainly  most  predators,  react  to—and are  attracted by—
movement. This ability to freeze in the face of danger makes sense. 
Many carnivores go after moving targets and exercise the “chase, trip, 
and bite” mechanism exhibited by large felines, the primary predators 
of our ancestors.
Many animals not only freeze their motion when confronted by preda-
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested