c# pdf viewer : Change pdf page order online control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-0-part1076

Change pdf page order online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
change page order in pdf reader; how to reorder pages in pdf
Change pdf page order online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pages in pdf reader; reordering pdf pages
Bhaisajja-guru. The Buddha as  the  Great Doctor 
for the Ills of the  World—from  Japan 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; change pdf page order preview
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page from PDF file and changing the position, orientation and order of PDF file into two or small files, you may refer to this online guide. PDF Page inserting.
change page order in pdf online; how to rearrange pages in pdf document
WA L P O L A  S RI  R A H U L A 
TripitakavagUvaracharya 
What  t he  Buddha  T aug ht 
(Revised edition) 
With  a  Foreword by 
PA UL  DEMI EVI LLE 
and 
a collection of illustrative texts translated from 
the original Pali 
• 
Grove Press 
New York 
Grove Press 
New York 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
change pdf page order; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
reorder pdf pages; reorder pages in pdf
Also by Walpola  Sri Rahula 
History  of Buddhism  in  Ceylon 
The  Heritage  of the Bhikkhu 
Copyright ©  1959 by W. Rahula 
Second and enlarged edition copyright ©  1974 by W.  Rahula 
All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any 
form or by any electronic or mechanical means, including 
information storage and retrieval systems, without permission in 
writing from the publisher, except by a reviewer, who may quote 
brief passages in a review.  Any members of educational 
institutions wishing to photocopy part or all of the work for 
classroom use, or publishers who would like to obtain permission 
to include the work in an anthology, should send their inquiries to 
Grove/Atlantic, Inc., 841 Broadway, New York, NY  10003. 
Printed in the United States of America 
Library of Congress Catalog Card Number: 73-21017 
ISBN 0-8021-3031-3 
Grove Press 
841 Broadway 
New York, NY  10003 
05  45  44  43  42  41  40  39 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
For example, you may change your Word document order from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to 3, 5, 4, 2,1 with C# coding. C#.NET: Extracting Page(s) from Word.
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; move pages in pdf acrobat
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF
reorder pdf pages online; pdf reverse page order
Contents 
Page 
List of Illustrations 
vii 
Foreword 
ix 
Preface  -  xi 
The 
Buddha- 
xv 
CH APT ER  I 
The Buddhist Attitude  of Mind 
Man  is  supreme—One  is  one's  refuge—Responsibility—Doubt— 
Freedom  of Thought—Tolerance—Is Buddhism  Religion  or  Philo-
sophy?—Truth  has no  label—No  blind faith  or belief,  but seeing 
and understanding—No  attachment even  to  Truth—Parable  of the 
raft—Imaginary  speculations  useless—Practical  attitude—Parable 
of the  wounded man  -  1 
THE  FOUR  NOBLE  TRUTHS 
CH APT ER  II 
The  First  Noble  Truth:  Dukkha 
Buddhism neither pessimistic nor optimistic, but realistic—Meaning 
of  'Dukkha'—Three  aspects  of  experience—Three  aspects  of 
'Dukkha'—What  is  a  'being'?—Five  Aggregates—No  spirit 
opposed  to  matter—Flux—Thinker  and  Thought—Has  life  a 
beginning?  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  .. 
..  16 
CHA PTE R  III 
The  Second  Noble  Truth:  Samudaya:  'The  Arising  of Dukkha' 
—Definition—Four  Nutriments—Root cause  of suffering and conti-
nuity—Nature  of  arising  and  cessation—Karma  and  Rebirth— 
What is death?—What is rebirth? 
29 
CHA PTE R  IV 
The  Third Noble  Truth:  Nirodha:  'The  Cessation  of Dukkha'— 
What is  Nirvana?—Language  and Absolute  Truth—Definitions of 
Nirvana—Nirvana  not  negative—Nirvana  as  Absolute  Truth— 
What  is  Absolute  Truth?—Truth  is  not  negative—Nirvana  and 
Samsara—Nirvana  not a  result—What  is  there  after  Nirvana?— 
Incorrect expressions—What happens to an Arahant after death?— 
If no Self, who realises Nirvana?—Nirvana in this life  .. 
..  35 
CH APT ER  v 
The Fourth Noble  Truth:  Magga:  'The  Path' 
Middle Path or Noble Eightfold Path—Compassion and Wisdom— 
Ethical  Conduct—Mental  Discipline—Wisdom—Two  sorts  of 
Understanding—Four Functions regarding the Four Noble Truths  45 
viii 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# users to reorder and rearrange multi-page Tiff file Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move pages or make a totally new order for all
move pages in pdf reader; move pages in a pdf
RasterEdge.com General FAQs for Products
receive a copy of email containing order confirmation and via the email which RasterEdge's online store sends & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order in pdf online; pdf change page order
CH APT ER  VI 
The  Doctrine  of No-Soul:  Anatta 
What  is  Soul or  Self?—God and Soul:  Self protection and Self-
preservation—Teaching  'Against  the  Current'—Analytical  and 
Synthetical methods—Conditioned Genesis—Question of Free-will— 
Two kinds of Truths—Some erroneous views—The Buddha definitely 
denies 'Atman'—The Buddha's  silence—The  idea  of Self a  vague 
impression—Correct  attitude—If no  Self,  who gets  the  result  of 
Karma?—Doctrine of Anatta not negative 
..  ..  ..  51 
CH APT ER  VII 
'Meditation' or Mental Culture: Bhavana 
Erroneous views—Meditation is no escape from life—Two forms of 
Meditation—The  Setting-up  of  Mindfulness—'Meditation'  on 
breathing—Mindfulness of activities—Living in the present moment 
—'Meditation' on Sensations—on Mind—on Ethical, Spiritual and 
Intellectual subjects  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  ..  67 
CH APTE R  V III 
What the Buddha  Taught and the  World  Today 
Erroneous  views—Buddhism for  all—In  daily  life—Family  and 
social life—Lay life held in high esteem—How to become a Buddhist— 
Social and economic problems—Poverty: cause of crime—Material 
and  spiritual progress—Four  kinds  of happiness for  laymen—On 
politics, war and peace—Non-violence—The ten duties of a ruler— 
The  Buddha's  Message—Is  it  practical?—Asoka's  Example-
The  Aim  of Buddhism 
SE LECT ED  TEXTS  .. 
Setting in Motion the Wheel of Truth (Dhammacakkappavattana 
sutta) 
The Fire Sermon (Adittapariyaya-sutta) 
Universal Love (Metta-sutta) 
Blessings (Mahgala-sutta) 
Getting rid of All Cares and Troubles (Sabbasava-sutta) .. 
The Parable of the Piece of Cloth ( Vatthupama-suttd)  . . 
The Foundations of Mindfulness (Satipaffhana-sutta)  . . 
Advice to  Sigala (Sigalovada-sutta) 
The Words  of Truth (.Dhammapada) 
The  Last  Words  of  the  Buddha  (from  the  Mahaparinibbana 
sutta) 
Abbreviations 
Selected Bibliography 
Glossary 
.. 
Index  . 
76 
9
92 
95 
97 
98 
99 
106 
109 
119 
125 
136 
!39 
140 
142 
148 
VI 
Illustrations 
FRONT ISPIECE 
The Buddha as Bhaisajya-guru or Bhisakka  in Pali texts  (A.  Colombo, 
Ed. p.  822), the  Great Doctor for the Ills of the World.  He holds the 
casket  of medicine  in his  left hand,  raising his  right hand  in Abhaya-
mudra,  the  symbol  of  safety  and  peace.  Yakushi  Nyorai.  Wood. 
1
9th century A.C.  Gango-Ji Temple, Japan.  Photo: Bullo^, Paris. 
BETW EEN  PAG ES  16  AND  17 
I.  The  bust of the Buddha.  Bronze.  Thailand.  Sukhotai. About  14th 
century A.C. Musee Guimet, Paris. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
II.  The  head  of the  colossal  stone  statue  of the  recumbent  Buddha. 
Galvihara, Polonnaruva,  Ceylon.  12th century A.C. By courtesy of Mrs. 
Mona de Mel. 
BET WEE N  PAGES  J2  A ND  }) 
III.  The  interior  of one  of  the  cave  temples  at  Dambulla,  Ceylon. 
1st century B.C.  The statues  and  paintings  seen in the illustration are 
of later date. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
IV.  The Great  Renunciation. Prince  Siddhartha leaving his wife and 
child  and  palace  to  become  an  ascetic  in  search  of  Truth.  Ananda 
Temple,  Pagan,  Burma,  nt h  to  12th  century  A.C.  By  courtesy  of the 
Musee Guimet, Paris. 
V.  The Buddha. Mathura, India.  5 th Century A.C. Mathura Museum. 
By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
VI.  The  Buddha.  Yun  Kang  style.  China.  End  of  the  5 th century 
A.C. Musee Guimet, Paris. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
BETWE EN  PAGES  4 8  AND  4 9 
VII.  The  Buddha  showing  the  myrobalan  fruit  (or  gem?)  on  his 
right  palm.  Here  is  represented  the  significance  of  the  expression 
ehi-passika 'come and see',  which is used to describe his teaching—see 
p. 9. Bronze from Tibet. Musee Guimet, Paris. By courtesy of the Musee 
Guimet, Paris. 
viii 
VIII.  Head  of  the  Buddha.  Hadda,  Afghanistan.  Stucco.  Graeco-
Indian style,  3rd to 4th century A.C. Musee Guimet, Paris. By courtesy 
of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
IX.  The  Buddha.  Prah  Khan,  Cambodia.  Khmer  Art,  Bayon  style. 
12th century A.C. Musee Guimet, Paris. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, 
Paris. 
X.  Samsara-cakra  or Bhava-cakra,  the  Cycle  of Existence  and  Con-
tinuity. Tibet. Museum fur Volkerkunde, Hamburg. By courtesy of the 
Musee Guimet, Paris. 
be t w e e n  p a g e s  6 4  a n d  6 5 
XI.  Sujata offering milk-rice to the Buddha on the day of his Enlight-
enment.  Borobudur,  Java.  8th century  A.C.  By  courtesy of the  Musee 
Guimet, Paris. 
XII.  Head  of  the  Buddha.  Borobudur,  Java.  8th  century  A.C. 
Museum, Leiden. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
Xni.  The  Buddha  in  Dharmacakra-mudra,  symbolizing  preaching. 
Borobudur, Java. 8th century A.C. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
XIV.  The  Parinirvana  of  the  Buddha.  Ajanta,  India.  Cave  26.  6th 
century A.C. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
be t w e e n  p a g e s  80  a n d  8  i 
XV.  The  Buddha  in  Dharmacakra-mudra,  symbolizing  preaching. 
Sarnath, India. 5 th century A.C. By courtesy of the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
XVI.  The Buddha.  Borobudur, Java.  8th century A.C. By courtesy of 
the Musee Guimet, Paris. 
viii 
Foreword 
by  Paul  Demieville 
Member  of  the  Institut de  France, 
Professor at the College de France 
Director  of Buddhist Studies at  the School 
of Higher  Studies  (Paris) 
Here  is  an  exposition  of  Buddhism  conceived  in  a  resolutely 
modem  spirit  by  one  of  the  most  qualified  and  enlightened 
representatives of  that religion.  The  Rev.  Dr. W.  Rahula received 
the  traditional  training  and  education  of  a  Buddhist  monk  in 
Ceylon,  and held eminent positions in one of the leading monastic 
institutes  (Pirivena)  in  that island,  where  the Law  of the  Buddha 
flourishes  from the time of Asoka and has preserved all its vitality 
up to this day. Thus brought up in an ancient tradition, he decided, 
at  this  time when  all  traditions  are  called in question,  to face  the 
spirit  and  the  methods  of  international  scientific  learning.  He 
entered  the Ceylon University,  obtained  the B.A.  Honours  degree 
(London),  and then won the degree of Doctor of Philosophy of the 
Ceylon  University  on  a  highly  learned  thesis  on  the  History  of 
Buddhism  in  Ceylon.  Having  worked  with  distinguished  profes-
sors  at  the  University of Calcutta and come in contact with adepts 
of  Mahayana (the  Great  Vehicle),  that  form  of Buddhism  which 
reigns  from  Tibet  to  the  Far  East,  he  decided  to  go  into  the 
Tibetan  and  Chinese  texts  in  order  to  widen  his  cecumenism, 
and  he  has  honoured  us  by  coming  to  the  University  of  Paris 
(Sorbonne)  to  prepare  a  study  of  Asanga,  the  illustrious  philo-
sopher  of  Mahayana,  whose  principal  works  in  the  original 
Sanskrit are lost, and can only be read in their Tibetan and Chinese 
translations.  It is now  eight  years  since  Dr.  Rahula  is  among  us, 
wearing  the  yellow  robe,  breathing  the  air  of  the  Occident, 
searching  perhaps  in  our  old  troubled  mirror  a  universalized 
reflection  of the  religion  which is  his. 
The  book,  which  he  has  kindly  asked  me  to  present  to  the 
public of the  West,  is  a  luminous  account,  within  reach  of every-
body,  of the  fundamental  principles  of the  Buddhist  doctrine,  as 
ix 
they  are  found  in  the  most  ancient  texts,  which  are  called  'The 
Tradition'  (Agama)  in  Sanskrit  and  'The  Canonic  Corpus' 
(Nikaja)  in  Pali.  Dr.  Rahula,  who  possesses  an  incomparable 
knowledge  of  these  texts,  refers  to  them  constantly  and  almost 
exclusively.  Their  authority is  recognized  unanimously  by  all  the 
Buddhist  schools,  which  were  and  are  numerous,  but  none  of 
which ever deviates  from these texts,  except with the intention of 
better interpreting the  spirit beyond the letter.  The  interpretation 
has indeed been varied in the course  of the expansion of Buddhism 
through  many centuries  and  vast  regions,  and  the  Law has  taken 
more than  one  aspect.  But the aspect  of Buddhism here  presented 
by  Dr.  Rahula—humanist,  rational,  Socratic  in  some  respects, 
Evangelic in others,  or again almost scientific—has for its support 
a great  deal  of authentic  scriptural evidence which he only had  to 
let  speak  for themselves. 
The  explanations  which  he  adds  to  his  quotations,  always 
translated with  scrupulous  accuracy,  are  clear,  simple,  direct,  and 
free from all pedantry.  Some among them might lead to discussion, 
as  when  he  wishes  to  rediscover  in  the  Pali  sources  all  the 
doctrines  of  Mahayana;  but  his  familiarity  with  those  sources 
permits  him to  throw new light  on  them.  He  addresses himself to 
the  modern  man,  but  he  refrains  from  insisting  on  comparisons 
just  suggested  here  and  there,  which  could  be  made  with  certain 
currents  of  thought  of  the  contemporary  world:  socialism, 
atheism,  existentialism,  psycho-analysis.  It  is  for  the  reader  to 
appreciate  the  modernity,  the  possibilities  of  adaptation  of  a 
doctrine which,  in  this  work of genuine  scholarship,  is  presented 
to  him  in  its  primal  richness. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested