c# pdf viewer : How to rearrange pages in a pdf reader control Library platform web page asp.net wpf web browser what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-1-part1077

Preface 
All over the world today there is growing interest in Buddhism. 
Numerous societies and study-groups have come into being, and 
scores of books have appeared on the teaching of the Buddha.  It 
is to be regretted, however, that most of them have been written 
by those who are not really competent, or who bring to their task 
misleading assumptions derived from other religions, which must 
misinterpret and misrepresent their subject. A professor of com-
parative  religion  who  recently wrote a book on  Buddhism  did 
not even know that Ananda, the devoted attendant of the Buddha, 
was  a  bhikk.hu (a  monk),  but thought  he  was  a  layman!  The 
knowledge  of Buddhism propagated by books like these can be 
left to the reader's imagination. 
I have tried in this little book to address myself first of all to the 
educated  and  intelligent  general  reader,  uninstructed  in  the 
subject,  who  would  like  to  know  what  the  Buddha  actually 
taught.  For his  benefit I  have  aimed  at  giving  briefly,  and  as 
directly and simply as possible, a faithful and accurate account of 
the actual words used by the Buddha as they are to be found in 
the  original  Pah  texts  of the  Tipitaka,  universally  accepted  by 
scholars  as  the  earliest  extant  records  of the  teachings  of the 
Buddha. The material used and the passages quoted here are taken 
directly from these originals.  In a few places I have referred to 
some later works too. 
I have borne in mind, too, the reader who has already some 
knowledge  of  what  the  Buddha  taught  and  would  like  to  go 
further with his studies. I have therefore provided not only the 
Pali equivalents of most of the key-words, but also references to 
the original texts in footnotes, and a select bibliography. 
The difficulties of my task have been manifold: throughout I 
have  tried  to  steer  a  course  between  the  unfamiliar  and  the 
popular, to give the English reader of the present day something 
which  he  could  understand  and  appreciate,  without  sacrificing 
anything  of the  matter  and  the  form  of the  discourses  of the 
viii 
How to rearrange pages in a pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages pdf file; change pdf page order preview
How to rearrange pages in a pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reordering pdf pages; rearrange pages in pdf reader
Buddha. Writing the book I have had the ancient texts running 
in my mind, so I have deliberately kept the synonyms and repeti-
tions  which were a part of the Buddha's speech as it has  come 
down to us through oral tradition, in order that the reader should 
have some notion of the form used by the Teacher. I have kept as 
close  as  I  could  to  the  originals,  and  have  tried  to  make  my 
translations easy and readable. 
But there is a point beyond which it is difficult to take an idea 
without losing in the interests of simplicity the particular meaning 
the Buddha was interested in developing. As the title 'What the 
Buddha Taught' was selected for this book, I felt that it would be 
wrong not to set down the words of the Buddha, even the  figures 
he  used, in preference to a  rendering which might provide the 
easy  gratification  of comprehensibility  at  the  risk  of distortion 
of meaning. 
 have  discussed  in  this  book  almost  everything  which  is 
commonly accepted as the essential and fundamental teaching of 
the Buddha. These are the doctrines of the Four Noble Truths, 
the Noble Eightfold Path, the Five Aggregates, Karma, Rebirth, 
Conditioned Genesis (Paticcasamuppada), the doctrine of No-Soul 
{Anatta),  Satipatthana  (the  Setting-up  of Mindfulness).  Naturally 
there will be in the discussion expressions which must be unfamiliar 
to the Western reader. I would ask him, if he is interested, to take 
up  on his first reading the opening chapter,  and then  go  on to 
Chapters V, VII and VIII, returning to Chapters II, III, IV and 
VI when the general  sense is clearer  and more vivid.  It would 
not be possible  to write a book on  the teaching of the Buddha 
without dealing with the subjects which Theravada and Mahayana 
Buddhism have accepted as fundamental in his system of thought. 
The term Theravada—Hinayana or  'Small Vehicle' is no longer 
used in informed circles—could be translated as 'the School of the 
Elders' (theras), and Mahayana as 'Great Vehicle'. They are used of 
the  two  main forms  of Buddhism  known in  the  world  today. 
Theravada, which is regarded as the original orthodox Buddhism, 
is followed in  Ceylon,  Burma,  Thailand,  Cambodia,  Laos,  and 
Chittagong in East Pakistan. Mahayana, which developed relatively 
later, is followed in other Buddhist countries like China, Japan, 
Tibet, Mongolia, etc. There are certain differences, mainly with 
regard to some beliefs, practices and observances between these 
viii 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
move pdf pages in preview; reorder pages in pdf preview
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages around in pdf; change page order in pdf file
two schools, but on the most important teachings of the Buddha, 
such as those discussed here,  Theravada and Mahayana are unani-
mously agreed. 
It only remains for me now to express my sense of gratitude to 
Professor E. F. C. Ludowyk, who in fact invited me to write this 
book, for all the help given me, the interest taken in it, the sugges-
tions  he  offered,  and  for  reading  through  the  manuscript.  To 
Miss Marianne Mohn too, who went through the manuscript and 
made  valuable  suggestions,  I  am  deeply grateful.  Finally  I  am 
greatly  beholden  to  Professor  Paul  Demieville,  my  teacher  in 
Paris, for his kindness in writing the Foreword. 
W.  RAHULA 
Paris 
July 1958 
viii 
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
move pages in pdf document; pdf reorder pages online
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
pages simply with a few lines of C# code. C# Codes to Sort Slides Order. If you want to use a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange
how to reorder pages in pdf online; reorder pdf page
To  M ani 
Sabbadanam dhammadanam jinati 
'The gift of Truth excels all other gifts' 
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages in extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reordering pages in pdf; how to move pages in a pdf file
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
change pdf page order; how to move pages in pdf acrobat
The  Buddha 
The Buddha, whose personal name was Siddhattha (Siddhartha in 
Sanskrit),  and  family  name  Gotama  (Skt.  Gautama),  lived  in 
North India  in the  6th  century B.C. His  father, Suddhodana, was 
the  ruler  of the  kingdom  of the  Sakyas  (in  modern  Nepal).  His 
mother was  queen  Maya.  According  to  the  custom  of the time, 
he was married quite young, at the age of sixteen, to a beautiful 
and devoted young princess named Yasodhara. The young prince 
lived in his palace with every luxury at his command. But all of a 
sudden,  confronted  with  the  reality of life  and  the  suffering  of 
mankind,  he  decided  to  find  the  solution—the  way  out  of this 
universal  suffering.  At  the  age  of 29,  soon after the  birth  of his 
only  child,  Rahula,  he  left  his  kingdom  and  became  an  ascetic 
in search  of this solution. 
For six years the ascetic Gotama wandered about the valley of 
the  Ganges,  meeting  famous  religious  teachers,  studying  and 
following  their  systems  and  methods,  and  submitting himself to 
rigorous  ascetic  practices.  They  did  not  satisfy  him.  So he 
abandoned all  traditional  religions  and  their  methods  and  went 
his  own  way.  It  was  thus that  one  evening,  seated under a tree 
(since then known as the Bodhi- or Bo-tree, 'the Tree of Wisdom'), 
on  the bank  of the  river  Neranjara  at  Buddha-Gaya (near  Gaya 
in modern Bihar), at the age of 35, Gotama attained Enlightenment, 
after which he was known as the Buddha, 'The Enlightened One'. 
After  his  Enlightenment,  Gotama  the  Buddha  delivered  his 
first sermon to a group of five ascetics, his old colleagues, in the 
Deer Park at Isipatana (modern Sarnath) near Benares.  From that 
day, for 45  years, he taught all classes of men and women—kings 
and peasants,  Brahmins and outcasts,  bankers and  beggars, holy 
men  and  robbers—without  making  the  slightest  distinction 
between  them.  He  recognized  no  differences  of  caste  or  social 
groupings,  and  the  Way  he  preached was  open  to  all  men  and 
women  who were ready to understand and to follow it. 
xv 
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods and powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pdf pages in preview; moving pages in pdf
At  the  age  of  80,  the  Buddha  passed  away  at  Kusinara  (in 
modern Uttar Pradesh in  India). 
Today  Buddhism  is  found  in  Ceylon,  Burma,  Thailand, 
Cambodia,  Laos,  Vietnam,  Tibet,  China,  Japan,  Mongolia, 
Korea, Formosa, in some parts of India, Pakistan and Nepal, and 
also in the Soviet  Union.  The Buddhist population of the world 
is over  500 million. 
xvi 
CHAPTER  I 
TH E  B UDD H IS T  A T T I T U D E  O F  M IND 
Among the founders of religions  the Buddha (if we are permitted 
to  call him the founder of a religion in  the popular sense  of the 
term) was the only teacher who did not claim to be other than a 
human being,  pure and  simple.  Other teachers  were either God, 
or his  incarnations  in  different forms,  or inspired  by him.  The 
Buddha was not only a human being;  he  claimed no inspiration 
from  any  god  or  external  power  either.  He  attributed  all  his 
realization,  attainments  and  achievements  to  human  endeavour 
and  human  intelligence.  A  man  and  only  a  man  can  become  a 
Buddha. Every man has within himself the potentiality of becom-
ing  a  Buddha,  if he  so  wills  it and endeavours.  We  can call the 
Buddha a man
par excellence.
He was so perfect in his 'human-ness' 
that he  came  to be  regarded  later in popular  religion almost as 
'super-human'. 
Man's position, according to Buddhism, is supreme. Man is his 
own  master,  and  there is  no  higher  being or  power  that  sits in 
judgment over his  destiny. 
'One is one's own refuge, who else could be the refuge ?'
1
said 
the Buddha. He admonished his disciples to 'be a refuge to them-
selves', and never to seek refuge in or help from anybody else.
He  taught,  encouraged  and  stimulated  each  person  to  develop 
himself and  to work out his  own emancipation, for man has the 
power  to  liberate  himself  from  all  bondage  through  his  own 
personal effort and intelligence. The Buddha says: 'You should do 
your work, for the Tathagatas
3
only teach the way.'
4
If the Buddha 
is  to be  called  a  'saviour'  at all, it  is  only in  the  sense  that he 
1
Dhp. XII 4. 
2
D II (Colombo, 1929), p. 62 (Mabaparinibbana-sutta). 
3
Tathagata lit. means 'One who has come to Truth', i.e., 'One who has discovered 
Truth'. This is the term usually used by the Buddha referring to himself and to the 
Buddhas in general. 
4
Dhp. XX 4. 
discovered and  showed the  Path to Liberation, Nirvana.  But we 
must tread the Path ourselves. 
It  is  on  this  principle  of  individual  responsibility  that  the 
Buddha  allows  freedom  to  his  disciples.  In the
Mahaparinibbana-
sutta
the  Buddha  says  that he  never  thought  of controlling  the 
Sangha
(Order of Monks)
1
, nor did he want the
Sangha
to depend 
on him. He said that there was no esoteric doctrine in his teaching, 
nothing hidden in the 'closed-fist of the teacher'
(acarija-mutthi),
or 
to put it in other words, there never was anything 'up his sleeve'.
The freedom of thought allowed by the Buddha is  unheard of 
elsewhere  in the  history  of religions.  This  freedom is  necessary 
because,  according to  the  Buddha,  man's  emancipation  depends 
on his own realization of Truth, and not on the benevolent grace of 
a  god or any external power as  a  reward for his  obedient good 
behaviour. 
The Buddha once visited a small town called Kesaputta in the 
kingdom of Kosala.  The inhabitants of this town were known by 
the common name Kalama. When they heard that the Buddha was 
in their town, the Kalamas paid him a visit,  and told him: 
'Sir, there are some recluses and brahmanas who visit Kesaputta. 
They explain and illumine only their own doctrines, and despise, 
condemn and spurn others' doctrines.  Then  come  other recluses 
and brahmanas,  and they, too, in their turn, explain and illumine 
only their own doctrines, and despise, condemn and spurn others' 
doctrines.  But, for us,  Sir,  we have always  doubt and perplexity 
as to who among these venerable recluses  and brahmanas  spoke 
the truth, and who spoke falsehood.' 
Then the Buddha gave them this advice, unique in the history 
of religions: 
'Yes, Kalamas, it is proper that you have doubt, that you have 
perplexity, for a doubt has arisen in a matter which is  doubtful. 
Now, look you Kalamas,  do  not be  led by reports,  or tradition, 
or hearsay. Be not led  by the authority of religious texts, nor by 
mere  logic or inference,  nor by considering appearances,  nor by 
the  delight in  speculative opinions, nor by seeming possibilities, 
1
Sangha lit. means 'Community'. But in Buddhism this term denotes 'The Com-
munity  of Buddhist  monks'  which is  the Order of Monks.  Buddha,  Dhamma 
(Teaching) and Sangha (Order) are known as Tisarana 'Three Refuges' or Tiratana 
(Sanskrit Triratna) 'Triple-Gem'. 
2
D II (Colombo, 1929), p. 62. 
nor  by  the  idea:  'this  is  our  teacher'.  But,  O  Kalamas,  when, 
you  know  for  yourselves  that  certain  things  are  unwholesome 
(akusala),
and wrong, and bad, then give them up .  .  . And when 
you  know  for  yourselves  that  certain  things  are  wholesome 
(kusala)
and  good, then accept them and follow them.'
The  Buddha went even  further.  He  told  the  bhikkhus  that a 
disciple should examine even the Tathagata (Buddha) himself, so 
that he (the disciple) might be fully convinced of the true value of 
the teacher whom he followed.
According  to the  Buddha's  teaching,  doubt
(vicikiccha)
is  one 
of  the  five  Hindrances
(nivarana)
3 to the clear understanding 
of  Truth  and  to  spiritual  progress  (or  for  that  matter  to  any 
progress).  Doubt,  however,  is  not a  'sin',  because there  are no 
articles of faith in Buddhism. In fact there is no 'sin' in Buddhism, 
as  sin  is  understood  in  some  religions.  The  root  of all  evil  is 
ignorance
(avijja)
and false views
(micchd
ditthi).
It is an undeniable 
fact that as long as there is doubt, perplexity, wavering, no progress 
is possible. It is also equally undeniable that there must be doubt 
as long as one does not understand or see clearly. But in order to 
progress further it is absolutely necessary to get rid of doubt. To 
get  rid of doubt one has to see clearly. 
There is no point in saying that one should not doubt or one 
should believe. Just to say 'I believe' does not mean that you under-
stand and see. When a student works on a mathematical problem, 
he  comes  to  a  stage  beyond  which  he  does  not  know  how  to 
proceed, and where he is in doubt and perplexity. As long as he 
has  this  doubt,  he  cannot  proceed.  If he  wants  to  proceed,  he 
must  resolve  this  doubt.  And  there  are  ways  of  resolving  that 
doubt. Just to say 'I believe', or 'I do not doubt' will certainly not 
solve  the  problem.  To  force  oneself to  believe  and  to  accept  a 
thing  without  understanding  is  political,  and  not  spiritual  or 
intellectual. 
The Buddha was always eager to dispel doubt. Even just a few 
minutes before his death, he requested his disciples several times 
to ask him if they had any doubts  about his teaching, and not to 
1
A (Colombo, 1929), p. 115. 
2
Vimamsaka-sutla, no.  47  of M. 
3
The Five Hindrances are: (1) Sensuous Lust, (2) Ill-will, (3) Physical and mental 
torpor and languor, (4) Restlessness and Worry, (5) Doubt. 
feel  sorry  later that they  could  not  clear  those  doubts.  But the 
disciples  were  silent.  What he  said then  was  touching:  'If it  is 
through respect for the Teacher that you do not ask anything, let 
even one of you inform his friend' (i.e., let one tell his friend so 
that the latter may ask the question on the other's behalf).
Not only the freedom of thought, but also the tolerance allowed 
by  the  Buddha  is  astonishing  to  the  student  of  the  history  of 
religions.  Once in Nalanda a prominent and wealthy householder 
named  Upali,  a  well-known  lay  disciple  of Nigantha  Nataputta 
(Jaina Mahavira), was expressly sent by Mahavira himself to meet 
the Buddha and defeat him in argument on certain points in the 
theory of Karma, because the Buddha's views on the subject were 
different from those of Mahavira.
2
Quite contrary to expectations, 
Upali, at the end of the discussion, was convinced that the views 
of the Buddha were right and those of his master were wrong.  So 
he begged the Buddha to accept him as  one  of his  lay  disciples 
(Vpasaka).
But the Buddha asked him to reconsider it,  and not to 
be in a hurry, for  'considering  carefully is good for well-known 
men like you'. When Upali expressed his desire again, the Buddha 
requested him to continue to respect and support his old religious 
teachers as he used to.
In the third century B.C., the great Buddhist Emperor Asoka 
of India,  following  this  noble  example  of tolerance  and  under-
standing, honoured and  supported all other religions  in his  vast 
empire. In one of his Edicts carved on rock, the original of which 
one may read even today, the Emperor declared: 
'One should not honour only one's  own religion and condemn 
the religions of others, but one should honour others' religions for 
this  or that  reason.  So  doing,  one  helps  one's  own religion to 
grow and renders  service to the religions of others too. In acting 
otherwise one digs the grave of one's own religion and also does 
harm to other religions. Whosoever honours his own religion and 
condemns other religions, does so indeed through devotion to his 
own religion, thinking  "I will  glorify my own religion".  But on 
the contrary, in so doing he injures his own religion more gravely. 
1
DII (Colombo, 1929), p. 95; A (Colombo, 1929), p. 239. 
2
Mahavira, founder of Jainism, was a contemporary of the Buddha, and was 
probably a few years older than the Buddha. 
3
Upali-sutta,  no. 56 of M. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested