c# pdf viewer : How to reverse page order in pdf Library SDK component .net wpf web page mvc what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-10-part1078

leading  up  to  very  high  mystic  attainments
{dhyana).
Besides, 
the  power  of  concentration  is  essential  for  any  kind  of  deep 
understanding,  penetration,  insight  into  the  nature  of  things, 
including  the  realization  of  Nirvana. 
Apart  from  all  this,  this  exercise  on  breathing  gives  you 
immediate  results.  It  is  good  for  your  physical  health,  for  relaxa-
tion,  sound  sleep,  and  for  efficiency  in  your  daily  work.  It  makes 
you  calm and  tranquil.  Eve n  at moments when you  are nervous  or 
excited,  if  you  practise  this  for  a  couple  of minutes,  you  will  see 
for  yourself that  you  become  immediately  quiet  and  at peace.  Yo u 
feel  as  if you  have  awakened  after  a  good  rest. 
Another  very  important,  practical,  and  useful  form  of  'medita-
tion'  (mental  development)  is  to  be  aware  and  mindful  of  what-
ever  you  do,  physically  or  verbally,  during  the  daily  routine  of 
work  in  your  life,  private,  public  or  professional.  Whether  you 
walk,  stand,  sit,  lie  down,  or  sleep,  whether  you  stretch  or  bend 
your  limbs,  whether  you  look  around,  whether  you  put  on  your 
clothes,  whether  you  talk  or  keep  silence,  whether  you  eat  or 
drink,  even  whether  you  answer  the  calls  of nature—in  these  and 
other  activities,  you  should  be  fully  aware  and  mindful  of the  act 
you  perform  at  the  moment.  That  is  to  say,  that  you  should  live 
in  the  present  moment,  in  the  present  action.  This  does  not  mean 
that  you  should  not  think  of the  past  or  the  future  at  all.  On  the 
contrary,  you  think  of  them  in  relation  to  the  present  moment, 
the  present  action,  when  and  where  it  is  relevant. 
People  do  not  generally  live  in  their  actions,  in  the  present 
moment.  They  live in  the past  or in  the  future.  Though they seem 
to be doing something  now,  here,  they  live somewhere else in their 
thoughts,  in  their  imaginary  problems  and  worries,  usually  in  the 
memories  of  the  past  or  in  desires  and  speculations  about  the 
future.  Therefore  they do  not live in,  nor  do  they enjoy,  what  they 
do  at  the moment.  So  they are  unhappy  and  discontented  with  the 
present moment,  with  the  work  at  hand,  and naturally they cannot 
give  themselves  fully  to  what  they  appear  to  be  doing. 
Sometimes  you  see  a man  in  a  restaurant  reading while  eating— 
a very common  sight.  He gives  you the impression  of being  a  very 
busy  man,  with  no  time  even  for  eating.  You  wonder  whether 
he  eats  or  reads.  One  may  say  that  he  does  both.  In  fact,  he  does 
neither,  he  enjoys  neither.  He  is  strained,  and  disturbed  in  mind, 
7i 
How to reverse page order in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reorder pages in pdf reader; change pdf page order reader
How to reverse page order in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order in pdf reader; how to move pages in a pdf
and  he  does  not enjoy  what  he does  at  the  moment,  does  not  live 
his  life  in  the  present  moment,  but  unconsciously  and  foolishly 
tries  to  escape from  life.  (This  does  not  mean,  however,  that  one 
should  not  talk  with  a  friend  while  having  lunch  or  dinner.) 
Yo u  cannot  escape  life  however  you  may  try.  As  long  as  you 
live, whether in a town  or in  a  cave,  you  have to face it and live it. 
Real  life  is  the  present  moment—not  the  memories  of  the  past 
which is  dead and  gone,  nor the  dreams  of the future which is not 
yet  born.  One who  lives  in  the  present  moment  lives  the  real life, 
and  he  is  happiest. 
When  asked  why  his  disciples,  wh o  lived  a  simple  and  quiet 
life  with  only  one  meal  a  day,  were  so  radiant,  the  Buddha 
replied:  'They  do  not  repent  the  past,  nor  do  they brood  over  the 
future.  They  live  in  the  present.  Therefore  they  are  radiant.  By 
brooding  over  the  future  and  repenting  the  past,  fools  dry  up 
like  green  reeds  cut  down  (in  the  sun).'
Mindfulness,  or  awareness,  does  not  mean  that  you  should 
think  and  be  conscious  'I  am  doing  this'  or  'I am  doing  that'.  No. 
Just  the  contrary.  The  moment  you  think  'I  am  doing  this',  you 
become  self-conscious,  and  then you  do  not live in  the  action,  but 
you  live  in  the  idea  'I  am',  and  consequently  your  work  too  is 
spoilt.  Y ou  should  forget yourself completely,  and  lose yourself in 
what  you  do.  The  moment  a  speaker  becomes  self-conscious  and 
thinks  'I  am  addressing  an  audience',  his  speech  is  disturbed  and 
his  trend  of  thought  broken.  B ut  when  he  forgets  himself  in  his 
speech,  in  his  subject,  then  he  is  at  his  best,  he  speaks  well  and 
explains  things  clearly.  All  great  work—artistic,  poetic,  intellec-
tual  or  spiritual—is  produced  at  those  moments  when  its  creators 
are  lost  completely  in  their  actions,  when  they  forget  themselves 
altogether,  and  are  free  from  self-consciousness. 
This  mindfulness  or  awareness  with  regard  to  our  activities, 
taught by  the Buddha,  is  to  live  in  the  present  moment,  to  live  in 
the  present  action.  (This  is  also  the  Zen  way  which  is  based  pri-
marily  on  this  teaching.)  Here  in  this  form  of  meditation,  you 
haven't  got  to  perform  any  particular  action  in  order  to  develop 
mindfulness,  but  you  have  only  to  be  mindful  and  aware  of 
whatever  you  may  do.  You  haven't  got  to  spend  one  second  of 
1
7
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pdf pages; reorder pages in a pdf
your  precious  time  on  this  particular  'meditation':  you  have 
only to cultivate mindfulness  and awareness  always, day and night, 
with  regard  to  all  activities  in  your  usual  daily  life.  These  two 
forms  of'meditation' discussed above are connected with our body. 
Then  there  is  a  way  of practising  mental  development  ('medita-
tion')  with regard  to  all our  sensations  or feelings,  whether happy, 
unhappy or neutral.  Let  us  take  only one  example.  Yo u  experience 
an  unhappy,  sorrowful  sensation.  In  this  state  your  mind  is 
cloudy,  hazy,  not  clear,  it is  depressed.  In  some cases,  you  do  not 
even  see  clearly  why  you  have  that  unhappy  feeling.  First  of  all, 
you  should  learn  not  to  be  unhappy  about  your  unhappy  feeling, 
not  to  be  worried  about  your  worries.  But  try  to  see  clearly  why 
there is a sensation or a feeling of unhappiness, or worry, or sorrow. 
Tr y  to  examine  how  it  arises,  its  cause,  how  it  disappears,  its 
cessation. Try to examine it as  if you are  observing it from outside, 
without  any  subjective  reaction,  as  a  scientist  observes  some 
object.  Here,  too,  you  should  not  look  at  it as  'my feeling'  or  'my 
sensation'  subjectively,  but  only  look  at  it  as  'a  feeling'  or  'a 
sensation'  objectively.  You  should  forget  again  the  false  idea  of 
T.  When  you  see  its  nature,  how  it  arises  and  disappears,  your 
mind  grows  dispassionate  towards  that  sensation,  and  becomes 
detached  and  free.  It  is  the  same  with  regard  to  all  sensations  or 
feelings. 
No w  let  us  discuss  the  form  of 'meditation'  with  regard  to  our 
minds.  Y ou  should  be  fully  aware of the fact  whenever  your  mind 
is  passionate  or  detached,  whenever  it  is  overpowered  by  hatred, 
ill-will,  jealousy,  or  is  full  of  love,  compassion,  whenever  it  is 
deluded  or  has  a  clear  and  right  understanding,  and  so  on  and  so 
forth.  We  must  admit  that very  often  we  are  afraid  or  ashamed  to 
look  at  our  own  minds.  So  we  prefer  to  avoid  it.  One  should  be 
bold  and  sincere  and  look  at  one's  own  mind  as  one  looks  at 
one's  face  in  a  mirror.
Here  is  no  attitude  of criticizing  or  judging,  or  discriminating 
between right and wrong, or good and  bad.  It is simply observing, 
watching,  examining.  Y ou  are  not  a  judge,  but  a  scientist.  When 
you observe your mind,  and see its true  nature clearly,  you become 
dispassionate  with  regard  to  its  emotions,  sentiments  and  states. 
1
M I (PTS), p. 1oo. 
73 
Thus you  become detached  and free,  so that  you may see  things as 
they  are. 
Let us  take  one  example.  Say you  are  really angry,  overpowered 
by  anger,  ill-will,  hatred.  It  is  curious,  and  paradoxical,  that  the 
man  who  is  in  anger  is  not  really  aware,  not  mindful  that  he  is 
angry.  The  moment  he  becomes  aware and  mindful  of that state of 
his  mind,  the moment  he  sees  his  anger,  it  becomes,  as  if it  were, 
shy  and  ashamed,  and  begins  to  subside.  Y ou  should  examine  its 
nature,  how  it  arises,  how  it  disappears.  Here  again  it  should  be 
remembered  that  you  should  not  think  'I  am  angry',  or  of  'my 
anger'.  You  should  only  be  aware  and  mindful  of the  state  of  an 
angry  mind.  Y ou  are  only  observing  and  examining  an  angry 
mind  objectively.  This  should  be  the  attitude  with  regard  to  all 
sentiments,  emotions,  and  states  of  mind. 
Then  there  is  a  form  of  'meditation'  on  ethical,  spiritual  and 
intellectual  subjects.  All  our  studies,  reading,  discussions,  conver-
sation  and  deliberations  on  such  subjects  are  included  in  this 
'meditation'.  To  read  this  book,  and  to  think  deeply  about  the 
subjects  discussed  in  it,  is  a  form  of  meditation.  We  have  seen 
earlier
1
that  the  conversation  between  Khemaka  and  the  group 
of monks  was  a  form  of meditation  which  led  to  the  realization  of 
Nirvana. 
So,  according to this form  of meditation,  you  may  study,  think, 
and  deliberate  on  the  Five  Hindrances
(Nivarana),
namely: 
1.  lustful desires
(kamacchanda), 
2.  ill-will,  hatred  or  anger
(vjapada), 
3.  torpor  and  languor
(thina-middha), 
4.  restlessness  and  worry
(uddhacca-kukkucca), 
5.  sceptical doubts
(vicikiccha). 
These  five  are  considered  as  hindrances  to  any  kind  of  clear 
understanding,  as  a  matter  of fact,  to  any kind  of progress.  When 
one is over-powered  by them and  when one  does not know how to 
get  rid  of them,  then  one  cannot  understand  right  and  wrong,  or 
good  and  bad. 
One may also  'meditate'  on  the  Seven  Factors  of Enlightenment 
(Bojjhanga).
They  are: 
1
See above p. 65. 
74 
1.  Mindfulness
(sati),
i.e.,  to  be  aware  and  mindful  in  all 
activities and  movements both  physical  and  mental,  as  we 
discussed  above. 
2.  Investigation  and  research  into  the  various  problems  of 
doctrine
(dhamma-vicayd).
Included  here  are  all  our 
religious,  ethical  and  philosophical  studies,  reading, 
researches,  discussions,  conversation,  even  attending 
lectures  relating  to  such  doctrinal  subjects. 
3.  Energy
(viriya),
to  work  with  determination  till  the  end. 
4. Joy (piti),  the  quality  quite  contrary  to  the  pessimistic, 
gloomy  or  melancholic  attitude  of mind. 
5.  Relaxation
(passaddhi)
Of both body and mind. One should 
not  be  stiff physically  or  mentally. 
6.  Concentration
(samadhi),
as  discussed  above. 
7.  Equanimity
(upekkha),
i.e.,  to  be  able  to  face  life in  all its 
vicissitudes  with  calm  of  mind,  tranquillity,  without 
disturbance. 
To cultivate  these qualities  the most essential  thing  is  a  genuine 
wish,  will,  or  inclination.  Many  other  material  and  spiritual  con-
ditions  conducive  to  the  development  of  each  quality  are  des-
cribed  in  the  texts. 
One  may  also  'meditate'  on  such  subjects  as  the  Five  Aggre-
gates  investigating  the  question  'What  is  a  being ?'  or  'What  is  it 
that  is  called  1 ?',  or  on  the  F our  Noble  Truths,  as  we  discussed 
above.  Study  and  investigation  of  those  subjects  constitute  this 
fourth  form  of  meditation,  which  leads  to  the  realization  of 
Ultimate  Truth. 
Apart  from  those  we  have  discussed  here,  there  are  many  other 
subjects  of meditation,  traditionally forty  in number,  among which 
mention  should  be  made  particularly  of  the  four  Sublime  States: 
(Brahma-vihara):
(1)  extending  unlimited,  universal  love  and 
good-will
(metta)
to  all  living  beings  without  any  kind  of  discri-
mination,  'just  as  a  mother  loves  her  only  child';  (2)  compassion 
(\karuna)
for  all  living  beings  who  are  suffering,  in  trouble  and 
affliction;  (3)  sympathetic  joy
(muditd)
in  others'  success,  welfare 
and  happiness;  and  (4)  equanimity
(upekkha)
in  all  vicissitudes  of 
life. 
75 
CHAPTER  VIII 
W H A T  T H E  B U D D H A  T A U G H T  A N D 
TH E  W O R L D  T O D A Y 
There are some wh o believe that Buddhism is  so  lofty and  sublime 
a system that it  cannot be practised by ordinary men  and women in 
this workaday world  of ours,  and that one has  to retire from it  to a 
monastery,  or  to  some  quiet  place,  if  one  desires  to  be  a  true 
Buddhist. 
This  is  a  sad  misconception,  due  evidently  to  a  lack  of  under-
standing  of the  teaching  of the  Buddha.  People  run  to  such  hasty 
and  wrong  conclusions  as  a  result  of  their  hearing,  or  reading 
casually,  something  about  Buddhism  written  by  someone,  who, 
as  he  has  not  understood  the  subject  in  all its  aspects,  gives  only 
 partial  and  lopsided  view  of it.  The  Buddha's  teaching  is  meant 
not  only for  monks  in  monasteries,  but also  for  ordinary  men and 
women  living  at  home  with  their  families.  The  Noble  Eightfold 
Path,  which  is  the  Buddhist  way  of life,  is  meant  for  all,  without 
distinction  of  any  kind. 
The  vast  majority  of  people  in  the  world  cannot  turn  monk, 
or  retire into caves  or  forests.  However noble and  pure  Buddhism 
may be, it would  be useless to the  masses  of mankind if they  could 
not  follow  it  in  their  daily  life  in  the  world  of  today.  But  if  you 
understand  the  spirit  of  Buddhism  correctly  (and  not  only  its 
letter),  you  can  surely  follow  and  practise  it  while  living  the  life 
of  an  ordinary  man. 
There  may  be  some  who  find  it  easier  and  more  convenient  to 
accept Buddhism, if they  do  live in  a  remote  place,  cut off from the 
society  of  others.  Others  may  find  that  that  kind  of  retirement 
dulls  and depresses their whole being both physically and mentally, 
and  that it  may not  therefore  be  conducive  to  the  development  of 
their  spiritual  and  intellectual  life. 
True  renunciation  does  not  mean  running  away  physically 
from  the  world.  Sariputta,  the  chief disciple  of the  Buddha,  said 
76 
that  one  man  might  live  in  a  forest  devoting  himself  to  ascetic 
practices,  but might be  full  of impure  thoughts  and  'defilements'; 
another  might  live  in  a  village  or  a  town,  practising  no  ascetic 
discipline, but his mind might be pure, and free from 'defilements'. 
Of these  two,  said  Sariputta,  the  one  who  lives  a  pure  life  in  the 
village  or  town is  definitely  far  superior  to,  and  greater  than,  the 
one  who  lives  in  the  forest.
The  common  belief  that  to  follow  the  Buddha's  teaching  one 
has  to  retire  from  life  is  a  misconception.  It  is  really  an  uncon-
scious  defence against practising it.  There are numerous references 
in  Buddhist  literature  to  men  and  women  living  ordinary,  normal 
family  fives  who  successfully  practised  what  the  Buddha  taught, 
and  realized  Nirvana.  Vacchagotta  the  Wanderer,  (whom  we  met 
earlier  in  the  chapter  on  Anatta),  once  asked  the  Buddha  straight-
forwardly  whether  there  were  laymen  and  women  leading  the 
family  life,  who  followed  his  teaching  successfully  and  attained 
to  high  spiritual states.  The  Buddha categorically  stated  that there 
were  not  one  or  two,  not  a  hundred  or  two  hundred  or  five hun-
dred,  but  many  more  laymen  and  women  leading  the  family  life 
wh o  followed  his  teaching  successfully  and  attained  to  high 
spiritual  states.
It  may  be  agreeable  for  certain  people  to  live  a  retired  life  in  a 
quiet  place  away  from  noise  and  disturbance.  But  it  is  certainly 
more  praiseworthy  and  courageous  to  practise  Buddhism  living 
among  your  fellow  beings,  helping  them  and  being  of  service  to 
them.  It may  perhaps  be  useful  in  some  cases  for  a  man  to  live  in 
retirement  for  a  time  in  order  to  improve his  mind  and  character, 
as  preliminary  moral,  spiritual  and  intellectual  training,  to  be 
strong  enough  to  come  out  later  and  help  others.  B ut  if  a  man 
lives  all his  life in solitude,  thinking only  of his  own happiness  and 
'salvation',  without  caring  for  his  fellows,  this  surely  is  not  in 
keeping  with  the  Buddha's  teaching  which  is  based  on  love, 
compassion,  and  service  to  others. 
One  might  now  ask:  If  a  man  can  follow  Buddhism  while 
living  the  life  of  an  ordinary  layman,  why  was  the  Sangha,  the 
Order  of monks,  established  by  the  Buddha ?  The  Order provides 
opportunity  for  those  who  are  willing  to  devote  their  lives  not 
1M
(PTS), 
pp. 
2
Ibid.,  pp.  490 ff. 
77 
only  to  their  own  spiritual  and  intellectual  development,  but  also 
to  the  service  of others.  An  ordinary  layman  with  a  family  cannot 
be  expected  to  devote  his  whole  life  to  the  service  of  others, 
whereas  a  monk,  who  has  no  family  responsibilities  or  any  other 
worldly ties, is in a position to devote his whole life 'for the good of 
the many, for the happiness  of the many' according to the Buddha's 
advice.  That  is  how  in  the  course  of  history,  the  Buddhist 
monastery  became  not  only  a  spiritual  centre,  but  also  a  centre  of 
learning  and  culture. 
The
Sigala-sutta
(N o.  31  of  the
Digha-nikaya)
shows  with  what 
great  respect  the  layman's  life,  his  family  and  social  relations  are 
regarded  by  the  Buddha. 
 young  man  named  Sigala  used  to  worship  the  six  cardinal 
points of the heavens—east,  south, west,  north, nadir and  zenith— 
in  obeying  and  observing  the  last  advice  given  him  by  his  dying 
father.  The  Buddha  told  the  young  man  that  in  the  'noble 
discipline'
(ariyassa vinaye)
of  his  teaching  the  six  directions  were 
different.  According  to  his  'noble  discipline'  the  six  directions 
were:  east:  parents;  south:  teachers;  west:  wife  and  children; 
north:  friends,  relatives  and  neighbours;  nadir:  servants,  workers 
and  employees;  zenith:  religious  men. 
'One  should worship these six directions'  said  the Buddha.  Here 
the  word  'worship'
(namasseyya)
is  very  significant,  for  one 
worships  something  sacred,  something  worthy  of  honour  and 
respect.  These  six  family  and  social  groups  mentioned  above  are 
treated  in  Buddhism  as  sacred,  worthy  of  respect  and  worship. 
But  how  is  one  to  'worship'  them?  The  Buddha  says  that  one 
could  'worship'  them  only  by  performing  one's  duties  towards 
them.  These  duties  are  explained  in  his  discourse  to  Sigala. 
First:  Parents  are  sacred  to  their  children.  The  Buddha  says: 
'Parents  are  called Brahma'
(Brahmati  matapitaro).
The  term
Brahma 
denotes  the highest and  most  sacred  conception in Indian  thought, 
and  in  it  the  Buddha  includes  parents.  So  in  good  Buddhist 
families  at  the  present  time  children  literally  'worship'  their 
parents  every  day,  morning  and  evening.  They  have  to  perform 
certain  duties  towards  their  parents  according  to  the  'noble 
discipline':  they  should  look  after  their  parents  in  their  old  age; 
should do whatever they have to do on their behalf; should maintain 
the  honour  of  the  family  and  continue  the  family  tradition; 
78 
should  protect  the  wealth  earned  by  their  parents;  and  perform 
their  funeral  rites  after  their  death.  Parents,  in  their  turn,  have 
certain  responsibilities  towards  their  children:  they  should  keep 
their children away from evil courses;  should engage  them in good 
and  profitable  activities;  should  give  them  a  good  education; 
should  marry  them  into  good  families;  and  should  hand  over  the 
property  to  them  in  due  course. 
Second:  Th e  relation  between  teacher and  pupil:  a pupil  should 
respect  and  be  obedient  to  his  teacher;  should  attend  to  his 
needs  if  any;  should  study  earnestly.  And  the  teacher,  in  his 
turn,  should  train  and  shape his  pupil  properly;  should  teach  him 
well;  should  introduce  him  to  his  friends;  and  should  try  to 
procure  him  security  or  employment  when  his  education  is  over. 
Third:  The  relation  between  husband  and  wife:  love  between 
husband  and  wife  is  considered  almost  religious  or  sacred.  It  is 
called
sadara-Brahmacariya
'sacred  family  life'.  Here,  too,  the 
significance  of  the  term
Brahma
should  be  noted:  the  highest 
respect is given to this relationship.  Wives and husbands should be 
faithful,  respectful  and  devoted  to  each  other,  and  they  have 
certain  duties  towards  each  other:  the  husband  should  always 
honour his wife and  never be wanting  in respect to  her;  he  should 
love  her  and  be  faithful  to  her;  should  secure  her  position  and 
comfort;  and  should  please  her  by  presenting  her  with  clothing 
and  jewellery.  (The fact  that  the Buddha did not forget to  mention 
even  such  a  thing  as  the  gifts  a  husband  should  make  to  his  wife 
shows  how  understanding  and  sympathetic  were  his  humane 
feelings  towards  ordinary  human  emotions.)  The  wife,  in  her 
turn,  should  supervise  and  look  after  household  affairs;  should 
entertain  guests,  visitors,  friends,  relatives  and  employees; 
should  love  and  be  faithful  to  her  husband;  should  protect  his 
earnings;  should  be  clever  and  energetic  in  all  activities. 
Fourth:  The relation between friends,  relatives and  neighbours: 
they  should  be  hospitable  and  charitable  to  one  another;  should 
speak  pleasantly  and  agreeably;  should  work  for  each  other's 
welfare;  should  be  on  equal  terms  with  one  another;  should  not 
quarrel  among  themselves;  should  help  each  other  in  need; 
and  should  not  forsake  each  other  in  difficulty. 
Fifth:  The  relation  between  master  and  servant:  the  master  or 
the  employer  has  several  obligations  towards  his  servant  or  his 
79 
employee:  work  should  be  assigned  according  to  ability  and 
capacity;  adequate  wages  should  be  paid;  medical  needs  should 
be  provided;  occasional  donations  or  bonuses  should  be  granted. 
Th e  servant  or  employee,  in  his  turn,  should  be  diligent  and  not 
lazy;  honest  and  obedient  and  not  cheat  his  master;  he  should  be 
earnest  in  his  work. 
Sixth:  The  relation  between  the  religious  (lit.  recluses  and 
brahmanas)  and  the  laity:  lay  people  should  look  after  the 
material  needs  of the  religious with  love and respect;  the  religious 
with  a  loving  heart  should  impart  knowledge  and  learning  to  the 
laity,  and  lead  them  along  the  good  path  away  from  evil. 
We  see then  that  the lay life,  with its  family  and social relations, 
is  included  in  the  'noble  discipline',  and  is  within  the  framework 
of  the  Buddhist  way  of life,  as  the  Buddha  envisaged  it. 
So  in  the
Samyutta-nikaya,
one  of  the  oldest  Pali  texts,  Sakka, 
the  king of the gods
(devas),
declares  that he worships  not only the 
monks who live a virtuous holy life, but also 'lay disciples
(upasaka) 
wh o  perform  meritorious  deeds,  who  are  virtuous,  and  maintain 
their  families  righteously'.
If  one  desires  to  become  a  Buddhist,  there  is  no  initiation 
ceremony (or baptism)  which  one has  to  undergo.  (But to  become 
a
bhikkbu,
 member of the  Order  of the
Sangha,
one has to undergo 
 long  process  of  disciplinary  training  and  education.)  If  one 
understands  the  Buddha's  teaching,  and  if one  is  convinced  that 
his  teaching  is  the  right  Path  and  if  one  tries  to  follow  it,  then 
one  is  a  Buddhist.  But  according  to  the  unbroken  age-old 
tradition  in  Buddhist  countries,  one  is  considered  a  Buddhist  if 
one  takes  the  Buddha,  the
Dhamma
(the  Teaching)  and  the
Sangha 
(the  Order  of  Monks)—generally  called  'the  Triple-Gem'—as 
one's  refuges,  and  undertakes  to  observe  the  Five  Precepts 
(Panea-si
la)—the
minimum  moral  obligations  of a  lay  Buddhist— 
(i)  not  to  destroy life,  (2)  not to  steal, (3)  not to commit adultery, 
(4)  not  to  tell  lies,  (5)  not  to  take  intoxicating  drinks—reciting 
the  formulas  given  in  the  ancient  texts.  On  religious  occasions 
Buddhists in congregation usually  recite these formulas, following 
the  lead  of a  Buddhist  monk. 
There  are  no  external  rites  or  ceremonies  which a Buddhist  has 
1
(PTS), 
p. 
80 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested