c# pdf viewer : Reorder pages in pdf online application Library tool html asp.net windows online what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-11-part1079

XV.  The Buddha—from Sarnath,  India 
Reorder pages in pdf online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; pdf change page order online
Reorder pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf rearrange pages online; how to reverse page order in pdf
XVI.  The Buddha—from Borobudur, Java 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
pdf move pages; reorder pdf pages
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf change page order acrobat; reorder pages in pdf
to  perform.  Buddhism  is  a  way  of  life,  and  what  is  essential  is 
following  the  Noble  Eightfold  Path.  Of  course  there  are  in  all 
Buddhist  countries  simple  and  beautiful  ceremonies  on  religious 
occasions.  There  are  shrines  with  statues  of  the  Buddha,
stupas 
or
ddgabas
and  Bo-trees  in  monasteries  where  Buddhists  worship, 
offer  flowers,  light  lamps  and  burn  incense.  This  should  not  be 
likened  to  prayer  in  theistic  religions;  it  is  only  a  way  of  paying 
homage  to  the  memory  of  the  Master  who  showed  the  way. 
These  traditional  observances,  though  inessential,  have  their 
value  in  satisfying  the  religious  emotions  and  needs  of those  who 
are  less  advanced  intellectually  and  spiritually,  and  helping  them 
gradually  along  the  Path. 
Those  who  think  that  Buddhism  is  interested  only  in  lofty 
ideals,  high  moral  and  philosophical  thought,  and  that  it  ignores 
the  social  and economic welfare of people,  are wrong.  The Buddha 
was  interested  in  the  happiness  of men.  To  him  happiness  was  not 
possible  without  leading  a  pure  life  based  on  moral  and  spiritual 
principles.  But  he  knew  that  leading  such  a  life  was  hard  in 
unfavourable  material  and  social  conditions. 
Buddhism  does  not  consider  material  welfare  as  an  end  in 
itself:  it  is  only  a means  to  an  end—a  higher  and  nobler end.  But 
it  is  a  means  which  is  indispensable,  indispensable  in  achieving 
a higher  purpose for man's happiness.  So  Buddhism recognizes  the 
need  of  certain  minimum  material  conditions  favourable  to 
spiritual  success—even  that  of  a  monk  engaged  in  meditation  in 
some  solitary  place.
The Buddha did  not  take  life  out  of the  context  of its  social  and 
economic  background;  he  looked  at  it as  a  whole,  in  all its  social, 
economic  and  political  aspects.  His  teachings  on  ethical,  spiritual 
and  philosophical  problems  are  fairly  well  known.  But  little  is 
known,  particularly  in  the  West,  about  his  teaching  on  social, 
economic and  political matters.  Yet there are numerous  discourses 
dealing  with  these  scattered  throughout  the  ancient  Buddhist 
texts.  Let  us  take  only  a  few  examples. 
The
Cakkavattisihanada-sutta
of  the
Digha-nikdya
(No.  26)  clearly 
states  that poverty
(daliddiya)
is the cause of immorality and crimes 
1
MA I (PTS), p. 290 f. (Buddhist monks, members of the order of the Sangha, are 
not  expected  to  have  personal property,  but  they  are  allowed  to hold  communal 
Sanghika)  property). 
8l 
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
"This online guide content is Out Dated! Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print PDF as you wish;
how to move pages around in a pdf document; reorder pages in pdf online
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize or re-arrange PDF document files using C#.NET code.
how to reverse pages in pdf; reorder pages in pdf document
such  as  theft,  falsehood,  violence,  hatred,  cruelty,  etc.  Kings  in 
ancient  times,  like  governments  today,  tried  to  suppress  crime 
through  punishment.  The
Kutadanta-sutta
of  the  same
Nikaja 
explains  how  futile  this  is.  It  says  that  this  method  can  never  be 
successful.  Instead  the  Buddha suggests  that,  in  order  to  eradicate 
crime,  the  economic  condition  of the  people  should  be  improved: 
grain  and  other  facilities  for  agriculture  should  be  provided  for 
farmers  and  cultivators;  capital  should  be  provided  for  traders 
and  those  engaged  in  business;  adequate  wages  should  be  paid  to 
those who  are  employed.  When  people  are  thus  provided  for  with 
opportunities  for  earning  a  sufficient  income,  they  will  be  con-
tented,  will have no  fear  or  anxiety,  and  consequently  the  country 
will  be  peaceful  and  free  from  crime.
Because  of this,  the  Buddha  told  lay  people  how  important  it  is 
to  improve  their  economic  condition.  This  does  not  mean  that 
he  approved  of hoarding  wealth  with desire  and  attachment, which 
is  against  his  fundamental  teaching,  nor  did  he  approve  of  each 
and every  way  of earning  one's  livelihood.  There  are  certain trades 
like  the  production  and  sale  of  armaments,  which  he  condemns 
as  evil  means  of livelihood,  as  we  saw  earlier.
 man  named  Dighajanu  once  visited  the  Buddha  and  said: 
'Venerable  Sir,  we  are  ordinary  lay  men,  leading  the  family  life 
with  wife  and  children.  Would  the  Blessed  One  teach  us  some 
doctrines  which  will  be  conducive  to  our  happiness  in  this  world 
and  hereafter.' 
The  Buddha  tells  him  that  there  are  four  things  which  are 
conducive  to  a  man's  happiness  in  this  world:  First:  he  should 
be  skilled,  efficient,  earnest,  and  energetic  in whatever  profession 
he  is  engaged,  and  he  should  know  it  well
(uttbana-sampada); 
second:  he  should  protect  his  income,  which  he  has  thus  earned 
righteously,  with  the  sweat  of his  brow
(arakkba-sampadd);
(This 
refers to  protecting  wealth from  thieves, etc.  All these ideas should 
be  considered  against  the  background  of  the  period.)  third:  he 
should  have  good  friends
(kalyana-mitta)
who  are  faithful, 
learned,  virtuous,  liberal  and  intelligent,  who  will  help  him  along 
the  right  path  away  from  evil;  fourth:  he  should  spend  reason-
ably, in  proportion to  his  income,  neither too  much nor too  little, 
2
See above p. 47. 
82 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pages in pdf file; move pages within pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Online C# class source codes enable the ability to rotate single NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to reorder pages in pdf file; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
i.e.,  he  should  not  hoard  wealth  avariciously,  nor  should  he  be 
extravagant—in  other  words  he  should  live  within  his  means 
(samajivikata). 
Then  the  Buddha  expounds  the  four  virtues  conducive  to  a 
layman's  happiness  hereafter:  (i)
Saddha:
he  should  have  faith 
and  confidence  in  moral,  spiritual  and  intellectual  values;  (2) 
Si /a :  he  should  abstain  from  destroying  and  harming  life,  from 
stealing  and  cheating,  from  adultery,  from  falsehood,  and  from 
intoxicating  drinks;  (3)
Caga:
he  should  practise  charity, 
generosity,  without  attachment  and  craving  for  his  wealth;  (4) 
Patina:
he  should  develop  wisdom  which  leads  to  the  complete 
destruction  of  suffering,  to  the  realization  of  Nirvana.
Sometimes  the  Buddha  even  went  into  details  about  saving 
money  and  spending  it,  as,  for  instance,  when  he  told  the  young 
man  Sigala  that  he  should  spend  one  fourth  of his  income  on  his 
daily  expenses,  invest half in his  business  and put  aside  one  fourth 
for  any  emergency.
Once  the  Buddha  told  Anathapindika,  the  great  banker,  one  of 
his  most  devoted lay disciples  who  founded  for him the celebrated 
Jetavana  monastery  at  Savatthi,  that  a  layman,  who  leads  an 
ordinary  family  life,  has  four  kinds  of  happiness.  The  first 
happiness  is  to  enjoy  economic  security  or  sufficient  wealth 
acquired  by  just  and  righteous  means
(attki-sukha);
the  second  is 
spending  that  wealth  liberally  on  himself,  his  family,  his  friends 
and  relatives,  and  on meritorious  deeds
(bhoga-sukha);
the  third  to 
be  free  from  debts
(anana-sukha);
the  fourth  happiness  is  to  live  a 
faultless,  and a pure  life without committing evil in thought,  word 
or  deed
(anavajja-sukha).
It  must  be  noted here  that  three  of these 
kinds  are  economic,  and  that  the  Buddha  finally  reminded  the 
banker  that  economic  and  material  happiness  is  'not  worth  one 
sixteenth  part'  of the  spiritual  happiness  arising  out  of a  faultless 
and  good  life.
From  the  few  examples  given  above,  one  could  see  that  the 
Buddha  considered  economic  welfare  as  requisite  for  human 
happiness,  but  that he  did  not  recognize  progress  as  real  and  true 
1
A (Colombo, 1929), pp. 786 ff. 
2
D III (Colombo,  1929), p.  115. 
3
A (Colombo,  1929),  pp.  232-2)3. 
83 
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; (Directly see online document viewer demo here.).
rearrange pdf pages in reader; how to reorder pdf pages in
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; how to rearrange pdf pages online
if it was  only  material,  devoid  of a  spiritual  and  moral foundation. 
While  encouraging  material  progress,  Buddhism  always  lays 
great  stress  on  the  development  of  the  moral  and  spiritual 
character  for  a  happy,  peaceful  and  contented  society. 
The  Buddha  was  just  as  clear  on  politics,  on  war  and  peace. 
It is  too well known  to be  repeated  here  that  Buddhism advocates 
and  preaches  non-violence and  peace as  its  universal  message,  and 
does  not  approve  of  any  kind  of  violence  or  destruction  of  life. 
According  to  Buddhism  there  is  nothing  that  can  be  called  a 
'just war'—which  is  only  a  false  term  coined  and  put  into  circula-
tion  to  justify  and  excuse  hatred,  cruelty,  violence  and  massacre. 
Who decides what is just or unjust ?  The mighty and the  victorious 
are  'just',  and  the  weak  and  the  defeated  are  'unjust'.  Our  war  is 
always  'just',  and  your  war  is  always  'unjust'.  Buddhism  does  not 
accept  this  position. 
The  Buddha  not  only  taught  non-violence  and  peace,  but  he 
even  went  to  the  field  of battle  itself  and  intervened  personally, 
and  prevented  war,  as  in  the  case  of  the  dispute  between  the 
Sakyas  and  the  Koliyas,  who  were  prepared  to  fight  over  the 
question  of  the  waters  of  the  Rohini.  And  his  words  once 
prevented  King  Ajatasattu  from  attacking  the  kingdom  of  the 
Vajjis. 
In  the days  of the  Buddha, as  today,  there  were  rulers  who gov-
erned  their  countries  unjustly.  People  were  oppressed  and 
exploited,  tortured  and  persecuted,  excessive  taxes  were  imposed 
and  cruel  punishments  were  inflicted.  The  Buddha  was  deeply 
moved  by  these  inhumanities.  The
Dhammapadatthakatha.
records 
that  he,  therefore,  directed  his  attention  to  the  problem  of good 
government.  His  views  should  be  appreciated  against  the  social, 
economic  and  political  background  of  his  time.  He  had  shown 
how  a  whole  country  could  become  corrupt,  degenerate  and  un-
happy  when  the  heads  of  its  government,  that  is  the  king,  the 
ministers  and  administrative  officers  become  corrupt  and  unjust. 
For  a  country  to  be happy  it  must  have  a  just  government.  How 
this  form  of just government  could  be  realized  is  explained  by  the 
Buddha  in  his  teaching  of the  'Ten  Dudes  of the  King'
(dasa-raja-
dhamma),
as  given  in  the
Jataka
text.
Of course the term 'king'
(Rdja)
of old  should  be replaced  today 
1
Jataka I, 160, 599; II, 400; III, 274, 320; V, 119, 378. 
84 
by the term 'Government'.  'The Ten Duties  of the King',  therefore, 
apply today to all those who  constitute the government, such as the 
head  of  the  state,  ministers,  political  leaders,  legislative  and 
administrative  officers,  etc. 
The first of the 'Ten Duties  of the  King' is  liberality, generosity, 
charity
(dana).
The  ruler  should  not  have  craving  and  attachment 
to  wealth and  property,  but  should  give it  away for the welfare  of 
the  people. 
Second:  A  high  moral  character
(si/a).
He  should  never 
destroy life, cheat,  steal  and exploit  others,  commit  adultery,  utter 
falsehood,  and  take  intoxicating  drinks.  That  is,  he  must  at  least 
observe  the  Five  Precepts  of the  layman. 
Third:  Sacrificing  everything  for  the  good  of  the  people 
(pariccaga),
he  must  be  prepared  to  give  up  all  personal  comfort, 
name  and  fame,  and  even  his  life,  in  the  interest  of  the  people. 
Fourth:  Honesty  and  integrity
(ajjava).
He  must  be  free  from 
fear or favour  in  the  discharge of his  duties,  must be  sincere  in his 
intentions,  and  must  not  deceive  the  public. 
Fifth:  Kindness  and  gentleness
(maddava).
He  must  possess  a 
genial  temperament. 
Sixth:  Austerity in  habits
(tapa).
He  must  lead  a  simple  life,  and 
should not  indulge  in  a  life  of luxury.  He  must  have  self-control. 
Seventh:  Freedom  from  hatred,  ill-will,  enmity
(akkodha).
He 
should  bear  no  grudge  against  anybody. 
Eighth:  Non-violence
(avihimsa),
which  means  not  only  that  he 
should  harm  nobody,  but  also  that  he  should  try  to  promote 
peace  by  avoiding  and  preventing  war,  and  everything  which 
involves  violence  and  destruction  of  life. 
Ninth:  Patience,  forbearance,  tolerance,  understanding
(khanti). 
He  must be  able  to  bear  hardships,  difficulties  and  insults without 
losing  his  temper. 
Tenth:  Non-opposition,  non-obstruction
(avirodha),
that  is  to 
say  that  he  should  not  oppose  the  will  of the  people,  should  not 
obstruct  any  measures  that  are  conducive  to  the  welfare  of  the 
people.  In other words he should rule in harmony with his people.
1
It is interesting to note here that the Five  Principles or Pancba-stla in  India's 
foreign policy are in accordance with the Buddhist principles which Asoka, the great 
Buddhist emperor of India, applied to the administration  of his government in the 
3rd century B.C.  The expression Pancha-sila (Five Precepts or  Virtues),  is  itself a 
Buddhist term. 
85 
If a  country  is  ruled  by  men  endowed  with  such  qualities,  it  is 
needless  to say  that that country must be  happy.  But this was not a 
Utopia,  for  there  were  kings  in  the  past  like  Asoka  of India  who 
had  established  kingdoms  based  on  these  ideas. 
The  world  today  lives  in  constant  fear,  suspicion,  and  tension. 
Science  has  produced  weapons  which  are  capable  of unimaginable 
destruction.  Brandishing  these  new  instruments  of  death,  great 
powers  threaten  and  challenge  one  another,  boasting  shamelessly 
that  one  could  cause  more  destruction  and  misery  in  the  world 
than  the  other. 
They have  gone  along  this  path of madness  to  such  a  point that, 
now,  if  they  take  one  more  step  forward  in  that  direction,  the 
result will  be  nothing  but mutual annihilation  along with  the  total 
destruction  of  humanity. 
Human  beings  in  fear  of  the  situation  they  have  themselves 
created,  want  to  find  a  way  out,  and  seek  some  kind  of solution. 
But there  is none except  that  held out by the Buddha—his  message 
of  non-violence  and  peace,  of love  and  compassion,  of  tolerance 
and  understanding,  of  truth  and  wisdom,  of  respect  and  regard 
for  all  life,  of freedom  from  selfishness,  hatred  and  violence. 
The  Buddha  says:  'Never  by  hatred  is  hatred  appeased,  but  it 
is  appeased  by  kindness.  This  is  an  eternal  truth.'
'One  should  win  anger  through  kindness,  wickedness  through 
goodness,  selfishness  through  charity,  and  falsehood  through 
truthfulness.'
There  can be no peace or happiness for man as long as he desires 
and  thirsts  after  conquering  and  subjugating  his  neighbour.  As 
the  Buddha  says:  'The  victor  breeds  hatred,  and  the  defeated  lies 
down  in  misery.  He  who  renounces  both  victory  and  defeat  is 
happy  and  peaceful.'
3
The  only  conquest  that  brings  peace  and 
happiness  is  self-conquest.  'One  may  conquer  millions  in  battle, 
but  he  who  conquers  himself,  only  one,  is  the  greatest  of  con-
querors.'
You  will  say  this  is  all  very  beautiful,  noble  and  sublime,  but 
impractical.  Is  it  practical  to  hate  one  another?  To  kill  one 
1
Dhp. 15. 
2
Ibid. x v n 5. 
3
Ibid. XV 5. 
4
Ibid.
VIII 4. 
86 
another ?  To live in  eternal  fear and  suspicion  like  wild  animals  in 
 jungle?  Is  this  more  practical  and  comfortable?  Was  hatred 
ever appeased by hatred ? Was evil ever won over by evil ? But there 
are examples,  at least  in  individual  cases,  where hatred is  appeased 
by love  and  kindness,  and evil won  over by goodness.  Y ou will say 
that this may be true, practicable in individual cases, but that it never 
works  in  national  and international  affairs.  People are hypnotized, 
psychologically  puzzled,  blinded  and  deceived  by  the  political 
and  propaganda  usage  of such  terms  as  'national',  'international', 
or  'state'.  What  is  a  nation  but  a  vast  conglomeration  of  indivi-
duals ? A nation or a state does not act, it is the individual who acts. 
What the individual  thinks and  does is  what the nation  or  the state 
thinks  and  does.  What is  applicable  to  the  individual is  applicable 
to  the  nation  or  the  state.  If  hatred  can  be  appeased  by  love  and 
kindness  on  the  individual  scale,  surely  it  can  be  realized  on  the 
national  and  international  scale  too.  Even  in  the  case  of a  single 
person,  to  meet  hatred  with  kindness  one  must  have  tremendous 
courage,  boldness, faith and  confidence in  moral  force.  May it not 
be  even  more  so  with  regard  to  international  affairs ?  If  by  the 
expression  'not  practical'  you  mean  'not  easy',  you  are  right. 
Definitely  it  is  not  easy.  Yet  it  should  be  tried.  Y ou  may  say it  is 
risky trying it.  Surely it cannot  be  more risky than  trying  a nuclear 
war. 
It  is  a  consolation  and  inspiration  to  think  today  that  at  least 
there  was  one  great  ruler,  well  known  in  history,  who  had  the 
courage,  the  confidence  and  the  vision  to  apply  this  teaching  of 
non-violence,  peace  and  love  to  the  administration  of  a  vast 
empire,  in  both  internal  and  external  affairs—Asoka,  the  great 
Buddhist  emperor of India (3 rd  century B.C.)—'the  Beloved  of the 
gods'  as  he  was  called. 
At  first  he  followed  the  example  of his  father  (Bindusara)  and 
grandfather (Chandragupta),  and  wished  to complete the  conquest 
of the  Indian  peninsula.  He  invaded  and  conquered  Kalinga,  and 
annexed  it.  Many  hundreds  of  thousands  were  killed,  wounded, 
tortured  and taken  prisoner in  this war.  But  later,  when he became 
 Buddhist,  he  was  completely  changed  and  transformed  by  the 
Buddha's teachings. In one of his famous Edicts, inscribed  on rock, 
(Rock  Edict  XIII,  as  it  is  now  called),  the  original  of which  one 
may  read  even  today,  referring  to  the  conquest  of  Kalinga,  the 
87 
Emperor  publicly  expressed  his  'repentance',  and  said  how 
'extremely  painful'  it  was  for  him  to  think  of  that  carnage.  He 
publicly  declared  that  he  would  never  draw  his  sword  again  for 
any  conquest,  but  that  he  'wishes  all  living  beings  non-violence, 
self control,  the practice of serenity  and  mildness.  This,  of  course, 
is  considered  the  chief  conquest  by  the  Beloved  of the  gods  (i.e., 
Asoka),  namely  the  conquest  by  piety (dhamma-vijaja).'  Not  only  did 
he renounce war himself, he expressed his  desire that 'my sons  and 
grandsons  will  not think  of a new conquest as  worth  achieving... 
let  them  think  of  that  conquest  only  which  is  the  conquest  by 
piety.  That  is  good  for  this  world  and  the  world  beyond.' 
This  is  the  only  example  in  the  history  of mankind  of a  victor-
ious  conquerer  at  the  zenith  of  his  power,  still  possessing  the 
strength  to  continue  his  territorial  conquests,  yet  renouncing  war 
and  violence  and  turning  to  peace  and  non-violence. 
Here  is  a  lesson  for  the  world  today.  The  ruler  of  an  empire 
publicly  turned  his  back  on  war  and  violence  and  embraced  the 
message of peace and non-violence.  There is no historical evidence 
to  show  that  any  neighbouring  king  took  advantage  of  Asoka's 
piety  to  attack  him  militarily,  or  that  there  was  any  revolt  or 
rebellion  within  his  empire  during  his  lifetime.  On  the  contrary 
there  was  peace  throughout  the  land,  and  even  countries  outside 
his  empire  seem  to  have  accepted  his  benign  leadership. 
To  talk  of maintaining  peace  through  the  balance  of power,  or 
through  the  threat  of nuclear  deterrents,  is  foolish.  The  might  of 
armaments  can  only  produce  fear,  and  not  peace.  It is  impossible 
that there can be genuine and lasting  peace  through fear.  Through 
fear  can  come  only  hatred,  ill-will  and  hostility,  suppressed  per-
haps  for  the  time  being  only,  but  ready  to  erupt  and  become 
violent  at  any  moment.  True  and  genuine  peace  can  prevail  only 
in  an  atmosphere  of  metta,  amity,  free  from  fear,  suspicion  and 
danger. 
Buddhism aims at  creating  a  society where  the  ruinous  struggle 
for  power is  renounced;  where  calm  and  peace prevail  away  from 
conquest  and  defeat;  where  the  persecution  of  the  innocent  is 
vehemently  denounced;  where  one  who  conquers  oneself is  more 
respected  than  those who  conquer  millions  by  military and  econo-
mic  warfare;  where  hatred  is  conquered  by  kindness,  and  evil  by 
goodness;  where  enmity,  jealousy,  ill-will and  greed  do  not  infect 
88 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested