holding  it  sacred,  rise early and,  leaving  Rajagaha,  worship  in this 
way.' 
'But  in  the  Discipline  of  the  Arya  (Noble  One),  young  house-
holder,  the  six  quarters  should  not  be  worshipped  in  this  way.' 
'How  then,  sir,  in  the  Discipline  of  the  Arya,  should  the  six 
quarters  be  worshipped ?  It  would  be  an  excellent  thing,  if  the 
Blessed  One  would  so  teach  me  the  way  in  which  according  to 
the Discipline  of the  Arya,  the  six quarters  should  be worshipped.' 
'Hear  then,  young  householder,  reflect  carefully  and  I  will 
tell  you.' 
'Yes ,  sir,'  responded  young  Sigala.  An d  the  Blessed  One  said: 
'Just  as,  young  householder,  the  Aryan  disciple  has  put  away 
the four  vices  in  conduct;  just  as  he  does  no  evil  actions  from  the 
four  motives;  just  as  he  does  not  make  towards  the  six  doors  of 
dissipating  wealth;  avoiding  these  fourteen  evil  things,  he  is  a 
guardian of the  six  quarters,  is  on  his  way  to conquer  both  worlds, 
is  successful  both in  this  world  and in  the  next.  At  the  dissolution 
of the body,  after death,  he  is  reborn to  a happy destiny in heaven. 
'What  are  the  four  vices  of  conduct  that  he  has  put  away? 
The  destruction  of  life,  stealing,  adultery,  and  lying.  These 
are  the  four  vices  of conduct  that  he  has  put  away. 
'By  which  four  motives  does  he  do  no  evil  actions?  Evil 
actions  are  done  from  motives  of  partiality,  enmity,  stupidity 
and fear. But as the Aryan disciple  is not led away by these motives 
he  does  no  evil  actions  through  them. 
'An d  which  are  the  six  doors  of  dissipating  wealth?  Drink; 
frequenting  the  streets  at  unseemly  hours;  haunting  fairs; 
gambling;  associating  with  evil  friends;  idleness. 
'There  are,  young  householder,  these  six  dangers  of  drink: 
the  actual  loss  of  wealth;  increase  of  quarrels;  susceptibility  to 
disease;  an  evil  reputation;  indecent  exposure;  ruining  one's 
intelligence. 
'Six,  young  householder,  are  the  perils  a  man  runs  through 
frequenting  the  streets  at  unseemly  hours:  he  himself  is  un-
guarded  or  unprotected  and  so  too  are  his  wife  and  children; 
so  also  is  his  property  (wealth);  in  addition  he  falls  under  the 
suspicion  of  being  responsible  for  undetected  crimes;  false 
120 
Pdf reverse page order online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pages in pdf reader; change page order pdf reader
Pdf reverse page order online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pdf pages; how to move pages in a pdf
rumours  are  attached  to  his  name;  he  goes  out  to  meet  many 
troubles. 
'There  are  six  perils  in  haunting  fairs:  A  man  keeps  looking 
about  to  see  where  is  there  dancing?  where  is  there  singing? 
music ?  recitation ?  cymbal  playing ?  the  beating  of tam-tams ? 
'Six,  young  householder,  are  the  perils  of gambling:  if the  man 
wins,  he  is  hated;  if  he  loses,  he  mourns  his  lost  wealth;  waste 
of wealth;  his  word  has  no  weight  in  an assembly (a  court of law); 
he  is  despised  by  his  friends  and  companions;  he  is  not  sought 
in  marriage,  for  people  will  say  that  a  man  who  is  a  gambler 
will  never  make  a  good  husband. 
'There  are  six  perils  of  associating  with  evil  friends:  any 
gambler,  any  libertine,  any  tippler,  any  cheat,  any  swindler, 
any  man  of violence  becomes  his  friend  and  companion. 
'There  are  six  perils  in  idleness:  A  man  says,  it  is  too  cold, 
and  does  no  work.  He  says,  it  is  too  hot,  and  does  no  work; 
he  says,  it  is  too  early  .  .  .  too  late,  and  does  no  work.  He  says, 
I am too hungry,  and does  no  wo rk . . .  too full, and  does no work. 
And  while  all  that  he  should  do  remains  undone,  he  makes  no 
money,  and  such  wealth  as  he  has  dwindles  away. 
'Four  persons  should  be  reckoned  as  foes  in  the  likeness  of 
friends:  the  rapacious  person;  the  man  wh o  pays  lip-service  only 
to  a  friend;  the  flatterer;  the  wastrel. 
'Of these  the  first  is  to  be  reckoned  as  a  foe in  the likeness  of a 
friend  on  four  grounds:  he  is  rapacious;  he  gives  little  and 
expects  much;  he  does  what  he  has  to  do  out  of fear;  he  pursues 
his  own  interests. 
'O n  four grounds  the  man  who  pays lip-service only to a  friend 
is  to  be  reckoned  as  a  foe  in  the  likeness  of  a  friend:  he  makes 
friendly  professions  as  regards  the  past;  he  makes  friendly 
professions  as  regards  the  future;  the  only  service  he  renders  is 
by  his  empty  sayings;  when  the  opportunity  for  service  arises 
he  shows  his  unreliability. 
'On  four  grounds  the  flatterer  is  to  be  reckoned  as  a  foe 
in  the  likeness  of a  friend:  he  approves  your  bad  deeds,  as  well 
as  your  good  deeds;  he  praises  you  to  your  face,  and  in  your 
absence  he  speaks  ill  of  you. 
'On  four  grounds  the  wastrel  is  to  be  reckoned  as  a  foe  in  the 
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reverse pages in pdf; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
likeness  of a friend:  he  is  your  companion  when  you  go  drinking; 
when  you  frequent  the  streets  at  untimely  hours;  when  you 
haunt  shows  and  fairs;  when  you  gamble. 
'The  friends  who  should  be  reckoned  as  good-hearted  (friends) 
are  four:  the  helper;  the  friend  who  is  constant  in  happiness  and 
adversity;  the  friend  of  good  counsel;  the  sympathetic  friend. 
'The  friend  wh o  is  a  helper  is  to  be  reckoned  as  good-hearted 
on  four  grounds:  he  protects  you  when  you  are  taken  unawares; 
he  protects  your  property  when  you  are  not  there  to  protect  it; 
he  is  a  refuge  to  you  when  you  are  afraid;  when  you  have  tasks 
to  perform  he  provides  twice  as  much  help  as  you  may  need. 
'The  friend  wh o  is  constant  in  happiness  and  adversity  is  to 
be  reckoned  as  good-hearted  on  four  grounds:  he  tells  you  his 
secrets;  he  does  not  betray  your  secrets;  in  your  troubles  he  does 
not  forsake  you;  for  your  sake  he  will  even  lay  down  his  life. 
'The  friend  of  good  counsel  is  .  .  .  good-hearted  on  four 
grounds:  he  restrains  you  from  doing  wron g;  he  enjoins  you  to 
(do  what  is)  right;  from  him  you  learn  what  you  had  not  learnt 
before;  he  shows  you  the  way  to  heaven. 
'The  friend  who  is  sympathetic  is  to  be  reckoned  as  good-
hearted  on  four  grounds:  he  does  not  rejoice  over  your  mis-
fortunes;  he  rejoices  with  you  in  your  prosperity;  he  restrains 
those who  speak  ill  of you;  he  commends  those who  speak well  of 
you. 
'And  how,  young  householder,  does  the  Aryan  disciple 
protect  (guard)  the  six  quarters?
1
The  following  should  be 
looked  upon  as  the  six  quarters:  parents  as  the  east;  teachers 
as  the  south;  wife  and  children  as  the  west;  friends  and  com-
panions  as  the  north;  servants  and  employees  as  the  nadir; 
recluses  and  brahmins  (the
religieux)
as  the  zenith. 
'A  child  should  minister  to  his  parents  as  the  eastern  quarter 
1
Now the Buddha explains to Sigala what the six quarters are and how to 'worship' 
them according to the 'Discipline of the Arya (Noble One)' by  way of performing 
one's duties and obligations towards them, instead of performing the ritual worship 
according to the old Brahmanic tradition. If the 'six quarters' are 'protected' in this 
way, they are made safe and secure, and no danger would come from there. Brahmins 
too  worshipped  the quarters of the external world to  prevent  any danger  coming 
from the spirits or gods inhabiting them. 
122 
in  five  ways  (saying  to  himself):  Once  I  was  supported  by  them, 
now  I  will  be their  support;  I will  perform  those  dudes  they have 
to  perform;  I  will  maintain  the  lineage  and  tradition  of  my 
family;  I  will  look  after  my  inheritance;  and  I  will  give  alms 
(perform  religious  rites)  on  behalf  of them  (when  they  are  dead). 
'Parents  thus  ministered  to  by  their  children  as  the  eastern 
quarter,  show  their  love  for  them  in  five  ways:  they  restrain 
them  from  evil;  they  direct  them  towards  the  good;  they  train 
them  to  a  profession;  they  arrange  suitable  marriages  for  them; 
and  in  due  time,  they  hand  over  the  inheritance  to  them. 
'In  this  way  the  eastern  quarter is  protected  and  made  safe  and 
secure  for  him. 
'A  pupil  should  minister  to  his  teachers  as  the  southern 
quarter  in  five  ways:  by  rising  (from  his  seat,  to  salute  them); 
by  waiting  upon  them;  by  his  eagerness  to  learn;  by  personal 
service;  and  by  respectfully  accepting  their  teaching. 
Teachers,  thus  ministered  to  as  the  southern  quarter  by  their 
pupil,  show  their  love  for  their  pupil in  five  ways:  they  train  him 
well;  they  make  him  grasp  what  he  has  learnt;  they  instruct  him 
thoroughly  in  the  lore  of  every  art;  they  introduce  him  to  their 
friends  and  companions;  they provide for his  security everywhere. 
'In  this  way  the  southern  quarter  is  protected  and  made  safe 
and  secure  for  him. 
'A  wife  as  western  quarter  should  be  ministered  to  by  her 
husband  in  five  ways:  by  respecting  her;  by  his  courtesy;  by 
being  faithful  to  her;  by  handing  over  authority  to  her;  by 
providing  her  with  adornment  (jewellery,  etc.). 
'The wife,  ministered  to  by her  husband  as  the  western  quarter, 
loves him in these five ways:  by doing her duty well;  by hospitality 
to  attendants,  etc.;  by  her  fidelity;  by  looking  after  his  earnings; 
and  by  skill  and  industry  in  all  her  business  dealings. 
'In  this  way  the  western  quarter  is  protected  and  made  safe 
and  secure  for  him. 
'In  five  ways  a  member  of  a  family  should  minister  to  his 
friends  and  companions  as  the  northern  quarter:  by  generosity; 
by  courtesy;  by  benevolence;  by  equality  (treating  them  as  he 
treats  himself);  and  by  being  true  to  his  word. 
'Thus  ministered  to  as  the  northern  quarter,  his  friends  and 
123 
companions  love him in  these five  ways:  they protect him when he 
is  in  need  of  protection;  they  look  after  his  property  when  he  is 
unable  to;  they  become  a  refuge  in  danger;  they  do  not  forsake 
him  in  his  troubles;  and  they  respect  even  others  related  to  him. 
'In  this  way  the  northern  quarter  is  protected  and  made  safe 
and  secure  for  him. 
'A  master  ministers  to  his  servants  and  employees  as  the 
nadir  in  five  ways:  by  assigning  them  work  according  to  their 
capacity  and  strength;  by  supplying  them  with  food  and  wages; 
by  tending  them  in  sickness;  by  sharing  with  them  unusual 
delicacies;  and  by  giving  them  leave  and  gifts  at  suitable  times. 
'In  these  ways  ministered  to  by  their  master,  servants  and 
employees  love  their  master  in  five  ways:  they  wake  up  before 
him;  they  go  to  bed  after  him;  they  take  what  is  given  to  them; 
they  do  their  work  well;  and  they  speak  well  of  him  and  give 
him  a  good  reputation. 
'In  this  way  is  the  nadir  protected  and  made  safe  and  secure 
for  him. 
'A  member  of  a  family  (a  layman)  should  minister  to  recluses 
and  brahmins (the
religieux)
as  the  zenith  in  five  ways:  by  affec-
tionate  acts;  by  affectionate  words;  by  affectionate  thoughts; 
by  keeping  open  house  for  them;  by  supplying  them  with  their 
wordly  needs. 
'In  this  wa y  ministered  to  as  the  zenith,  recluses  and  brahmins 
show  their  love  for  the  members  of  the  family  (laymen)  in  six 
ways:  they  keep  them  from  evil;  they  exhort  them  to  do  good; 
they  love  them  with  kindly  thoughts;  they  teach  them  what  they 
have  not  learnt;  they  correct  and  refine  what  they  have  learnt; 
they  reveal  to  them  the  way  to  heaven. 
'In  this  way  is  the  zenith  protected  and  made  safe  and  secure 
for  him.' 
When  the  Blessed  One  had  thus  spoken,  Sigala  the  young 
householder  said  this:  'Excellent,  Sir,  excellent!  It  is  as  if  one 
should  set  upright  what  had  been  turned  upside  down,  or  reveal 
what  had  been  hidden  away,  or  show  the  way  to  a  man  gone 
astray,  or  bring  a  lamp  into  darkness  so  that  those  with  eyes 
124 
might  see  things  there.  In  this  manner  the  Dhamma is  expounded 
by the Blessed One  in many ways.  And I  take refuge in  the Blessed 
One,  in  the  Dhamma  and  in  the  Community  of  Bhikkhus. 
May  the  Blessed  One  receive  me  as  his  lay-disciple,  as  one  who 
has  taken  his  refuge  in  him  from  this  day  forth  as  long  as  life 
endures.' 
(Digha-Nikaya,  No.  31) 
TH E  W O R D S  O F  T R U T H 
Selections  from 
THE 
DHAMMAPADA 
All  (mental)  states  have  mind  as  their forerunner,  mind  is  their 
chief,  and  they  are  mind-made.  If  one  speaks  or  acts,  with  a 
defiled  mind,  then  suffering  follows  one  even  as  the  wheel 
follows  the  hoof  of  the  draught-ox. 
All  (mental)  states  have  mind  as  their  forerunner,  mind  is 
their  chief,  and  they  are  mind-made.  If one  speaks  or  acts,  with  a 
pure  mind,  happiness  follows  one  as  one's  shadow  that  does  not 
leave  one. 
'He  abused  me,  he  beat  me,  he  defeated  me,  he  robbed  me': 
the  hatred  of  those  who  harbour  such  thoughts  is  not  appeased. 
Hatred  is  never  appeased  by hatred  in this  world;  it is appeased 
by  love.  This  is  an  eternal  Law. 
24 
Whosoever  is  energetic,  mindful,  pure in  conduct,  discriminat-
ing,  self-restrained,  right-living,  vigilant,  his  fame  steadily 
increases. 
125 
222 
By  endeavour,  diligence,  discipline,  and  self-mastery,  let  the 
wise  man make (of himself) an island that no  flood can overwhelm. 
26 
Fools,  men  of  litde  intelligence,  give  themselves  over  to 
negligence,  but  the  wise  man  protects  his  diligence  as  a  supreme 
treasure. 
27 
Give  not  yourselves  unto  negligence;  have  no  intimacy  with 
sense  pleasures.  The  man  w ho  meditates  with  diligence  attains 
much  happiness. 
33 
This  fickle,  unsteady  mind,  difficult  to  guard,  difficult  to 
control,  the  wise  man  makes  straight,  as  the  fletcher  the  arrow. 
35 
Hard  to  restrain,  unstable  is  this  mind;  it  flits wherever  it  lists. 
Good  it  is  to  control  the  mind.  A  controlled  mind  brings  happi-
ness. 
38 
He  whose  mind  is  unsteady,  he  w ho  knows  not  the  Good 
Teaching,  he  whose  confidence  wavers,  the  wisdom  of  such  a 
person  does  not  attain  fullness. 
42 
Whatever  harm  a  foe  may  do  to  a  foe,  or  a  hater  to  another 
hater,  a  wrongly-directed  mind  may  do  one  harm  far  exceeding 
these. 
43 
Neither  mother,  nor  father,  nor  any  other  relative  can  do  a 
man  such  good  as  is  wrought  by  a  rightly-directed  mind. 
47 
The  man  w ho  gathers  only  the  flowers  (of  sense  pleasures), 
126 
whose  mind is  entangled,  death carries him away  as  a great  flood  a 
sleeping  village. 
5° 
One  should  not  pry  into  the  faults  of  others,  into  things  done 
and  left  undone  by  others.  One  should  rather  consider  what  by 
oneself is  done  and  left  undone. 
5
As  a  beautiful  flower  that  is  full  of  hue  but  lacks  fragrance, 
even  so  fruitless  is  the  well-spoken  word  of  one  who  does  not 
practise  it. 
6i 
If,  as  one fares,  one does  not find a  companion  w ho  is  better or 
equal,  let  one  resolutely pursue  the  solitary  course;  there  can  be  no 
fellowship  with  the  fool. 
62 
'I  have  sons,  I  have  wealth':  thinking  thus  the  fool  is  troubled. 
Indeed,  he  himself is  not  his  own.  How  can  sons  or  wealth be his ? 
64 
Even if  all  his  life  a  fool  associates  with a  wise  man,  he will  not 
understand  the  Truth,  even  as  the  spoon  (does  not  understand) 
the  flavour  of the  soup. 
67 
That  deed  is  not  well  done,  which  one  regrets  when  it  is  done 
and  the  result  of  which  one  experiences  weeping  with  a  tearful 
face. 
69 
The  fool  thinks  an  evil  deed  as  sweet  as  honey,  so  long  as  it 
does  not  ripen  (does  not  produce  results).  But  when  it  ripens, 
the  fool  comes  to  grief. 
81 
Even  as  a  solid  rock  is  unshaken  by  the  wind,  so  are  the  wise 
unshaken  by  praise  or  blame. 
127 
222 
Even  as  a  lake,  deep,  extremely  clear  and  tranquil,  so  do 
the  wise  become  tranquil  having  heard  the  Teaching. 
85 
Few  among  men  are  they  who  cross  to  the  further  shore.  The 
others  merely  run  up  and  down  the  bank  on  this  side. 
90 
For  him,  who  has  completed  the  journey,  w ho  is  sorrowless, 
wholly  set  free,  and  rid  of  all  bonds,  for  such  a  one  there  is  no 
burning  (of  the  passions). 
94 
He  whose  senses  are  mastered  like  horses  well  under  the 
charioteer's control,  he w ho  is purged of pride, free from passions, 
such  a  steadfast  one  even  the  gods  envy  (hold  dear). 
96 
Calm  is  the  thought,  calm  the  word  and  deed  of  him  who, 
rightly  knowing,  is  wholly  freed,  perfectly  peaceful  and  equi-
poised. 
97 
The  man  who  is  not  credulous,  who  knows  the  'uncreated', 
who  has  severed  all  ties,  who  has  put  an  end  to  the  occasion 
(of  good  and  evil),  who  has  vomited  all  desires,  verily  he  is 
supreme  among  men. 
103 
One  may  conquer  in  battle  a  thousand  times  a  thousand  men, 
yet  he  is  the  best  of  conquerors  who  conquers  himself. 
104-105 
Better  is  it  truly  to  conquer  oneself  than  to  conquer  others. 
Neither  a  god,  nor  an  'angel'
1
 nor  Mara,  nor  Brahma  could  turn 
1
Gandhabba,  freely  rendered  as  'angel',  refers  to a  class  of semi-divine  beings: 
heavenly musicians. 
128 
into  defeat  the  victory  of  a  person  such  as  this  who  is  self-
mastered  and  ever  restrained  in  conduct. 
111 
Though  one  may  live  a  hundred  years  with  no  true  insight 
and  self-control,  yet  better,  indeed,  is  a  life  of one  day  for  a  man 
who  meditates  in  wisdom. 
116 
Make  haste  in  doing  good;  restrain  your  mind  from  evil. 
Whosoever  is  slow  in  doing  good,  his  mind  delights  in  evil. 
119 
It  is  well  with  the  evil-doer  until  his  evil  (deed)  ripens.  But 
when  his  evil  (deed)  bears  fruit,  he  then  sees  its  ill  effects. 
120 
It  is  ill,  perhaps,  with  the  doer  of  good  until  his  good  deed 
ripens.  But  when  it  bears  fruit,  then  he  sees  the  happy  results. 
121 
Do  not  think  lightly  of  evil,  saying:  'It  will  not  come  to  me'. 
Even  a  water-pot  is  filled  by  the  falling  of  drops.  Likewise  the 
fool,  gathering  it  drop  by  drop, fills himself with  evil. 
122 
Do  not  think  lightly  of  good,  saying:  'It  will  not  come  to  me'. 
Even  as  a  water-pot  is  filled  by  the  falling  of drops,  so  the  wise 
man,  gathering  it  drop  by  drop, fills  himself  with  good. 
125 
Whosoever  offends  an  innocent  person,  pure  and  guiltless, 
his  evil  comes  back  on  that  fool  himself  like  fine  dust  thrown 
against  the  wind. 
129 
All  tremble  at  weapons;  all  fear  death.  Comparing  others  with 
oneself,  one  should  not  slay,  nor  cause  to  slay. 
129 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested