c# pdf viewer : Reverse page order pdf SDK application project winforms windows asp.net UWP what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-16-part1084

IJI 
He  who,  seeking  his  own  happiness,  torments  with  the  rod 
creatures  that are desirous of happiness, shall  not  obtain happiness 
hereafter. 
152 
The  man  of  little  learning  (ignorant)  grows  like  a  bull;  his 
flesh  grows,  but  not his wisdom. 
155 
Not  having  lived  the  Holy  Life,  not having  obtained  wealth in 
their youth, men pine away like old herons in  a lake without  fish. 
If  a  man  practises  himself  what  he  admonishes  others  to  do, 
he  himself,  being  well-controlled,  will  have  control  over  others. 
It  is  difficult, indeed,  to  control oneself. 
160 
Oneself is  one's  own  protector  (refuge);  what  other  protector 
(refuge) can  there be ? With oneself fully controlled, one obtains  a 
protection (refuge)  which  is  hard  to  gain. 
165 
By  oneself  indeed  is  evil  done  and  by  oneself  is  one  defiled. 
By  oneself is  evil  left  undone  and  by  oneself indeed  is  one  puri-
fied.  Purity  and  impurity  depend  on  oneself.  No  one  can  purify 
another. 
167 
Do  not  follow  mean  things.  Do  not  dwell  in  negligence. 
Do  not  embrace  false  views.  So  the  world  (i.e.  Samsara,  the  cycle 
of existence  and  continuity)  is  not  prolonged. 
Come,  behold  this  world,  how  it  resembles  an  ornamented 
royal chariot, in which fools  flounder,  but for the wise there is no 
attachment  to  it. 
130 
Reverse page order pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pdf pages online; reorder pages in pdf file
Reverse page order pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages in pdf file; reorder pages pdf file
i
7
Better  is  the  gain  of Entering  the  Stream than  sole sovereignty 
over  the  earth,  than  going  to  heaven,  than  rule  supreme over the 
entire  universe. 
183 
Not  to  do  any  evil,  to  cultivate  good,  to  purify  one's  mind, 
this  is  the  Teaching  of the  Buddhas. 
184 
The  most excellent ascetic  practice  is  patience and  forbearance. 
'Nibbana  is  supreme',  say  the  Buddhas.  He  indeed  is  no  recluse 
who  harms  another;  nor  is  he  an  ascetic  who hurts  others. 
185 
To  speak no ill, to do no harm,  to practise restraint according to 
the  fundamental  precepts,  to  be  moderate  in  eating,  to  live  in 
seclusion,  to  devote  oneself  to  higher  consciousness,  this  is  the 
Teaching  of the  Buddhas. 
19 7 
Happy  indeed  we  live without hate  among  the hateful.  We live 
free  from  hatred  amidst  hateful  men. 
201 
The conqueror begets enmity;  the defeated  lie down in distress. 
The peaceful  rest in  happiness,  giving up both victory  and defeat. 
204 
Health is  the best gain; contentment is the best wealth.  A trusty 
friend  is  the  best kinsman;  Nibbana is the  supreme bliss. 
205 
Having  tasted  of  the  flavour  of  solitude  and  tranquillity,  one 
becomes  woeless  and  stainless,  drinking  the  essence  of the  joy  of 
Truth. 
From  lust  arises  grief;  from  lust  arises  fear.  For  him  who  is 
free  from  lust  there is no  grief,  much less fear. 
131 
C# Word: How to Use C# Code to Print Word Document for .NET
document pages in original or reverse order within entire C# Class Code to Print Certain Page(s) of powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pages in pdf online; reorder pages of pdf
222 
He  w ho  holds  back  arisen  anger  as  one  checks  a  whirling 
chariot, him I  call a  charioteer;  other folk  only hold  the  reins. 
223 
Conquer  anger  by  love,  evil  by  good;  conquer  the  miser 
with  liberality,  and  the  liar  with  truth. 
231 
Be  on  your  guard  against  physical  agitation;  be  controlled  in 
body. Forsaking bodily misconduct, follow right conduct in body. 
232 
Be  on  your  guard  against  verbal  agitation;  be  controlled  in 
words.  Forsaking  w rong  speech,  follow  right  ways  in  words. 
233 
Be  on  your  guard  against  mental  agitadon;  be  controlled  in 
thoughts.  Forsaking evil thoughts, follow right ways  in thoughts. 
234 
The wise are controlled in deed, controlled in words, controlled 
in thoughts, verily,  they are fully  controlled. 
239 
By degrees, little by little, from moment to moment,  a wise  man 
removes  his  own  impurities,  as  a  smith  removes  the  dross  of 
silver. 
240 
As  rust,  arisen  out  of  iron,  eats  itself away,  even  so  his  ow n 
deeds  lead  the  transgressor  to  the  states  of woe. 
248 
Know  this,  O  good  man,  that  evil  things  are  uncontrollable. 
Let  not  greed  and  wickedness  drag  you  to  suffering  for  a  long 
time. 
132 
2JI 
There is no fire like lust.  There is  no grip like hate.  There is no 
net like  delusion.  There is  no  river like  craving. 
252 
The fault  of others  is  easily  seen;  but  one's  own  is hard  to  see. 
Like  chaff  one  winnows  other's  faults;  but  one's  own  one 
conceals  as  a crafty fowler  disguises  himself. 
267 
He  w ho  has  transcended  both  merit  (good)  and  demerit  (evil), 
he  who leads  a  pure  life,  he w ho  lives  with  understanding in  this 
world,  he,  indeed,  is  called  a bhikkhu. 
268/269 
Not  by  silence  does  one become  a sage {muni)  if one  be  foolish 
and untaught. But the wise man who,  as  if holding a pair of scales, 
takes  what  is  good  and  leaves  out  what  is  evil,  is  indeed  a  sage. 
For  that  reason  he  is  a  sage.  He  w ho  understands  both  sides  in 
this  world is  called  a sage. 
273 
Of  paths  the  Eightfold  Path  is  the  best;  of  truths  the  Four 
Words  (Noble  Truths);  Detachment  is  the  best  of  states  and  of 
bipeds  the  Seeing  O ne  (the  Man  of Vision). 
274 
This  is  the  only Way.  There is  no  other  for  the  purification  of 
Vision.  Follow  this  Way:  this  is  the  bewilderment  of  Mara 
(Evil). 
275 
Following  this  Way  you  shall  make  an  end  of  suffering.  This 
verily  is  the  Way  declared  by  me  when  I  had  learnt  to  remove 
the  arrow  (of suffering). 
276 
You  yourselves  should  make  the  effort;  the  Awakened  Ones 
are  only  teachers.  Those  w ho  enter  this  Path  and  who  are  medi-
tative,  are  delivered from  the  bonds  of Mara  (Evil). 
iJ3 
2
77 
'All  conditioned  things are impermanent', when one sees this in 
wisdom,  then  one  becomes  dispassionate  towards  the  painful. 
This  is  the  Path  to  Purity. 
278 
'All  conditioned  things  are  dukkha  (111)',  when  one  sees  this 
in  wisdom,  then  he  becomes  dispassionate  towards  the  painful. 
This  is  the  Path  to  Purity. 
279 
'All  states  (dhamma)  are  without  self',  when  one  sees  this  in 
wisdom,  then  he  becomes  dispassionate  towards  the  painful. 
This  is  the  Path  to  Purity. 
280 
Who strives  not when he should strive, who,  though young and 
strong,  is  given  to  idleness,  who  is  loose  in  his  purpose  and 
thoughts,  and  who  is  lazy—that idler never  finds  the  way to wis-
dom. 
281 
Watchful  of  speech,  well  restrained  in  mind,  let  him  do  no 
evil with  the body;  let  him  purify  these  three ways  of action,  and 
attain  the  Path  made  known  by  the  Sages. 
334 
The craving  of the  man  addicted  to  careless  living grows like a 
Maluva  creeper.  He  jumps  hither  and  thither,  like  a  monkey  in 
the forest looking  for  fruit. 
335 
Whosoever in  this world is  overcome by this wretched  clinging 
thirst,  his  sorrows  grow  like  Birana  grass  after  rain. 
336 
But  whosoever  in  this  world  overcomes  this  wretched  craving 
so  difficult  to  overcome,  his  sorrows  fall  away  from  him  like 
water-drops  from a lotus (leaf). 
134 
2
77 
As  a  tree  cut  down  sprouts  forth  again  if  its  roots  remain 
uninjured  and  strong,  even  so  when  the  propensity  to  craving 
is not  destroyed,  this  suffering arises  again and  again. 
343 
Led  by  craving  men  run  this  way  and  that  like  an  ensnared 
hare.  Therefore  let  the  bhikkhu,  who  wishes  his  detachment, 
discard  craving. 
348 
Free  thyself  from  the  past,  free  thyself  from  the  future,  free 
thyself from the present.  Crossing to the farther shore of existence, 
with  mind  released  everywhere,  no  more  shalt  thou  come  to 
birth  and  decay. 
360 
Good is  restraint  of the eye.  Good is restraint  of the ear.  Good 
is  restraint  of the  nose.  Good  is  restraint  of the  tongue. 
361 
Good  is  restraint  of  the  body.  Good  is  restraint  of  speech. 
Good  is  restraint  of  the  mind.  Restraint  everywhere  is  good. 
The  bhikkhu  restrained  in  every  way  is  freed  from  all  suffering. 
362 
He  who  is  controlled  in  hand, controlled in foot,  controlled in 
speech,  and  possessing  the  highest  control  (of  mind),  delighted 
within, composed,  solitary and contented, him they call a bhikkhu. 
365 
One  should  not  despise  what  one  receives,  and  one  should  not 
envy (the gain of) others. The bhikkhu who envies others does not 
attain  concentration. 
367 
He  w ho  has  no  attachment  whatsoever  to  Name  and  Form 
(mind  and  body),  and  he  who  does  not  grieve  over  what  there  is 
not,  he indeed  is  called  a  bhikkhu. 
135 
}68 
The bhikkhu,  who abides  in  loving-kindness,  who is  delighted 
in  the  Teaching  of  the  Buddha,  attains  the  State  of  Calm,  the 
happiness  of stilling  the  conditioned  things. 
385 
He  for  whom  there  exists  neither  this  shore  nor  the  other, 
nor  both,  he  w ho  is  undistressed  and  unbound,  him  I  call  a 
brahman. 
387 
The  sun  glows by day; the moon shines by night;  in his  armour 
the  warrior  glows.  In  meditation  shines  the  brahman. But all day 
and  night,  shines  with  radiance  the  Awakened  One. 
420 
He  whose  destiny  neither  the  gods  nor  demigods  nor  men  do 
know,  he  who  has  destroyed  defilements  and  become  worthy, 
him  I  call  a  brahman. 
423 
He  w ho  knows  former  lives,  who  sees  heaven  and  hell,  who 
has  reached  the  end  of  births  and  attained  to  super-knowledge, 
the  sage,  accomplished  with  all  accomplishments,  him  I  call  a 
brahman. 
TH E  L A S T  W O R D S  O F  T H E  B U D D H A 
Then  the  Blessed  One  addressed  the  Venerable  Ananda:  'It 
may  be,  Ananda,  that  to  some  of  you  the  thought  may  come: 
"Here are (we  have)  the Words  of the  Teacher  who  is  gone
1
 our 
Teacher  we  have  with  us  no  more" .  But  Ananda,  it  should  not 
be  considered  in  this  light.  What  I  have  taught  and  laid  down, 
Ananda,  as  Doctrine  (Dhamma)  and  Discipline  (Vinaya),  this  will 
be  your  teacher  when  I  am  gone. 
1
atitasatthukam pavacanam.  Rhys Davids' translation:  'The word of the master is 
ended',  does not convey the sense of the original words. 
136 
'Just  as,  Ananda,  the  bhikkhus  now  address  one  another  with 
the  w ord  " Friend"  (Avuso),  they  should  not  do  so  when  I  am 
gone.  A  senior  bhikkhu,  Ananda,  may  address  a  junior  by  his 
name,  his  family  name  or  with  the  word  "Friend" ;  a  junior 
bhikkhu  should address  a senior as " Sir" ('Bhante)  or  "Venerable" 
(Ayasma). 
'If  the  Sangha  (the  Community,  the  Order)  should  wish  it, 
Ananda,  let  them,  when  I  am  gone,  abolish  the  lesser  and  minor 
precepts  (rules). 
'When  I  am  gone,  Ananda,  the  highest  penalty
1
should  be 
imposed  on  the  Bhikkhu  Channa.' 
'But,  Sir,  what is  the  highest  penalty?' 
'Let  the  Bhikkhu  Channa  say  what  he  likes,  Ananda;  the 
bhikkhus  should  neither  speak  to  him,  nor  advise  him,  nor 
exhort  him.'
Then  the  Blessed  O ne  addressed  the  bhikkhus:  'It  may  be, 
Bhikkhus,  that  there  may  be  doubt  or  perplexity  in  the  mind  of 
even  one  bhikkhu  about  the  Buddha,  or  the  Dhamma,  or  the 
Sangha,  or  the  Path,  or  the  Pracdce.  Ask  Bhikkhus.  Do  not 
reproach  yourselves  afterwards  with  the  thought:  "O ur  Teacher 
was  face  to  face  with  us;  we  could  not  ask  the  Blessed  One 
when  we  were  face  to  face  with  him " .' 
When  this  was  said,  the  bhikkhus  remained  silent. 
 second  time  and  a  third  dme  too  the Blessed  One  addressed 
the  bhikkhus  . . .  as  above. 
The  bhikkhus  remained  silent  even  for  the  third  time. 
Then  the  Blessed  One  addressed  them  and  said:  'It  may  be, 
Bhikkhus,  that  you  put  no  questions  out  of  reverence  for  your 
Teacher.  Then,  Bhikkhus,  let friend  speak to friend.'
1
Literally: 'Divine penalty', Brahma-danda. 
2
Channa was the close companion and charioteer of Prince  Siddhartha before he 
became  the  Buddha.  Later  he  entered  the  Order  of the  Sangha,  was  egoistically 
proud because  of his  close association with  the Master.  He tended  to be obstinate 
and self-willed,  lacking  in proper  esprit de  corps and  often  behaving perversely. 
After  the  Parinirana  (death)  of  the  Buddha,  when  Ananda  visited  Channa  and 
pronounced on him this penalty of a complete social boycott, even his proud spirit 
was  tamed,  he  became  humble, his  eyes were opened.  Later he mended his ways 
and became an Arahant,  and the penalty automatically lapsed. 
3
The idea  is that if they  did not  like to put any question  directly to the Buddha 
out  of  respect  for  their  Teacher,  a  bhikkhu  should  whisper  the  question  to  his 
friend, and then the latter could ask it on his behalf. 
137 
Even  at  this,  those  bhikkhus  remained  silent. 
Then  the  Venerable  Ananda  said  to  the  Blessed  One:  'It  is 
wonderful,  Sir.  It is  marvellous,  Sir.  I  have this  faith,  Sir,  in  the 
community  of bhikkhus  here,  that  not  even  one  of them  has  any 
doubt  or  perplexity  about  the  Buddha,  or  the  Dhamma,  or  the 
Sangha,  or  the  Path,  or  the  Practice.' 
'You  speak  out  of  faith,  Ananda.  But  in  this  matter, Ananda, 
the  Tathagata  (i.e.  Buddha)  knows,  and  knows  for  certain, 
that in  this  community of bhikkhus  there is not even  one bhikkhu 
who  has  any  doubt  or  perplexity  about  the  Buddha,  or  the 
Dhamma,  or  the  Sangha,  or  the  Path,  or  the  Pracdce.  Indeed, 
Ananda,  even  the  lowest  in  spiritual  attainments  among  these 
five  hundred  bhikkhus  is  a  Stream-entrant  (Sotapanna),  not  liable 
to  fall (into  lower  states),  is  assured,  and is  bound  for  Enlighten-
ment.' 
Then  the  Blessed  One  addressed  the  bhikkhus,  saying:  'Then, 
Bhikkhus,  I  address  you  now:  Transient  are  condidoned  things. 
Try  to  accomplish  your  aim  with  diligence.' 
These  were  the  last  words  of the  Tathagata. 
(From  the  Mahaparinibbana-sutta  of the  Digha-nikaya,  Sutta  No.  16) 
138 
Abbreviations 
A:  Ahguttara-nikaya,  ed.  Devamitta  Thera  (Colombo,  1929)  and  PTS 
edition. 
Abhisamuc:  Abbidharma-samuccaya  of  Asanga,  ed.  Pradhan  (Vis-
vabharati,  Santiniketan,  1950). 
D:  Digha-nikaya, ed. Nanavasa Thera (Colombo,  1929). 
DA:  Digha-nikdyatthakathd,  Sumangalavilasini  (Simon  Hewavitarne 
Bequest  Series,  Colombo). 
Dhp:  Dhammapada, ed.  K.  Dhammaratana Thera (Colombo,  1926). 
DhpA:  Dhammapadatthakatha (PTS edition). 
Dhs: Dhammasangani, (PTS ed.) 
Lanka:  The Cankavatara-sutra, ed. Nanjio (Kyoto,  192}). 
M:  Majjhima-nikaya (PTS edition). 
MA: Majjhima-nikdyatthakatha, Papancasudani (PTS edition). 
Madhyakari:  Madhyamika-Karika  of Nagarjuna,  ed.  L.  de  La  Vallee 
Poussin (Bib.  Budd. IV). 
Mh-Sutralankara:  Mahayana-sutralankara  of Asanga,  ed.  Sylvain Levi 
(Paris,  1907). 
Mhvg:  Mahavagga  (of the  Vinaya),  ed.  Saddhatissa  Thera (Alutgama, 
1922). 
PTS:  Pali Text  Society  of London. 
Prmj:  Paramatthajotikd (PTS edition). 
S: Samyutta-nikaya (PTS edition). 
Sarattha:  Saratthappakdsini (PTS edition). 
Sn: Suttanipata (PTS edition). 
Ud:
Uddna (Colombo,
1929). 
Vibh:  Vibhanga (PTS edition). 
Vism:  Visuddhimagga (PTS edition). 
39 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested