c# pdf viewer : Move pdf pages online control SDK utility azure wpf .net visual studio what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-2-part1086

So  concord  is  good:  Let  all  listen,  and  be  willing  to  listen  to  the 
doctrines  professed  by  others'.
We  should add here that this  spirit of sympathetic understanding 
should  be  applied  today  not  only  in  the  matter  of religious  doc-
trine,  but  elsewhere  as  well. 
This  spirit  of tolerance  and  understanding  has  been  from  the 
beginning  one  of the most cherished ideals  of Buddhist culture and 
civilization.  That is  why  there  is  not  a  single  example  of persecu-
tion  or  the  shedding  of a  drop  of  blood  in  converting  people  to 
Buddhism,  or  in  its  propagation  during  its  long  history  of  2500 
years.  It  spread  peacefully  all  over  the  continent  of  Asia,  having 
more  than  500  million  adherents  today.  Violence  in  any  form, 
under any pretext whatsoever, is  absolutely against the teaching of 
the  Buddha. 
The question has  often  been  asked:  Is  Buddhism a  religion  or  a 
philosophy?  It  does  not  matter  what  you  call  it.  Buddhism  re-
mains  what  it  is  whatever  label  you  may  put  on  it.  The  label  is 
immaterial.  Even  the  label  'Buddhism'  which  we  give  to  the 
teaching of the  Buddha  is  of little importance.  Th e name  one  gives 
it  is  inessential. 
What's  in  a  name ?  That  which  we  call  a  rose, 
By  any  other  name  would  smell  as  sweet. 
In  the  same  way  Truth  needs  no  label:  it  is  neither  Buddhist, 
Christian,  Hindu nor Moslem.  It is  not the  monopoly of anybody. 
Sectarian labels  are a  hindrance  to  the  independent understanding 
of  Truth,  and  they  produce  harmful  prejudices  in  men's  minds. 
This  is  true  not  only  in  intellectual  and  spiritual  matters,  but 
also  in  human  relations.  When,  for  instance,  we  meet  a  man,  we 
do  not  look  on him  as  a  human being,  but we  put  a label  on  him, 
such  as  English,  French,  German,  American,  or  Jew,  and  regard 
him with  all  the  prejudices  associated with  that  label  in our  mind. 
Yet  he  may  be  completely  free  from  those  attributes  which  we 
have  put  on  him. 
People  are  so  fond  of  discriminative  labels  that  they  even  go 
to  the  length  of  putting  them  on  human  qualities  and  emotions 
common  to  all.  So  they  talk  of different  'brands'  of charity,  as  for 
example,  of Buddhist  charity  or  Christian  charity,  and  look  down 
1
Rock Edict, XII. 
Move pdf pages online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pages in pdf online; pdf reverse page order
Move pdf pages online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader; reorder pages in pdf document
upon
other  'brands'  of  charity.  But  charity  cannot  be  sectarian; 
it  is  neither  Christian,  Buddhist,  Hindu  nor  Moslem.  The  love  of 
 mother  for  her  child  is  neither  Buddhist  nor  Christian:  it  is 
mother  love.  Human  qualities  and  emotions  like  love,  charity, 
compassion, tolerance,  patience, friendship,  desire,  hatred,  ill-will, 
ignorance,  conceit,  etc.,  need  no  sectarian  labels;  they  belong  to 
no  particular  religions. 
To  the  seeker  after  Truth  it  is  immaterial  from  where  an  idea 
comes.  The  source  and  development  of an idea  is  a  matter for the 
academic.  In fact, in order to  understand  Truth,  it is  not necessary 
even  to  know  whether  the  teaching  comes  from  the  Buddha,  or 
from  anyone  else.  What  is  essential  is  seeing  the  thing,  under-
standing  it.  There  is  an  important  story  in  the
Majjhima-nikaya 
(sutta
no.  140)  which  illustrates  this. 
The  Buddha  once  spent  a  night  in  a  potter's  shed.  In  the  same 
shed  there  was  a  young  recluse  who  had  arrived  there  earlier.
They  did  not  know  each  other.  The  Buddha  observed  the 
recluse,  and  thought  to  himself:  'Pleasant  are  the  ways  of  this 
young  man.  It  would  be  good  if  I  should  ask  about  him'.  So  the 
Buddha  asked  him:  'O  bhikkhu,
2
in  whose  name  have  you  left 
home ?  Or  who  is  your  master ?  Or  whose  doctrine  do  you  like ?' 
'O  friend,'  answered  the  young  man,  'there  is  the  recluse 
Gotama,  a  Sakyan  scion,  who  left  the  Sakya-family  to  become  a 
recluse.  There is  high  repute  abroad  of him  that he  is  an  Arahant, 
 Fully-Enlightened  One.  In  the  name  of that  Blessed  One  I  have 
become  a  recluse.  He  is  my  Master,  and  I  like  his  doctrine'. 
'Where  does  that  Blessed  One,  the  Arahant,  the Fully-Enlight-
ened  One  live  at  the  present  time ?' 
'In  the  countries  to  the  north,  friend,  there  is  a  city  called 
1
In India potters' sheds are spacious, and quiet.  References are made in the Pali 
texts to ascetics and recluses, as well as to the Buddha himself, spending a night in a 
potter's shed during their wanderings. 
2
It  is interesting to note here that  the  Buddha addresses this recluse as bhikkhu, 
which term is used for Buddhist monks. In the sequel it will be seen that he was not a 
bhikkhu, not a  member of the Order of the  Sangha,  for  he asked  the  Buddha to 
admit him into the Order. Perhaps in the days of the Buddha the term 'bhikkhu' was 
used at times even for other ascetics indiscriminately, or the Buddha  was not very 
strict in the use of the term. Bhikkhu means 'mendicant' 'one who begs food', and 
perhaps it was used here in its literal and original sense. But today the term 'bhikkhu' 
is  used  only  of Buddhist  monks,  especially  in  Theravada  countries  like  Ceylon, 
Burma, Thailand, Cambodia, and in Chittagong. 
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Sorting Pages. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages.
pdf change page order; rearrange pdf pages in preview
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
how to reverse page order in pdf; change page order pdf acrobat
Savatthi.  It is  there  that that Blessed  One,  the Arahant, the  Fully-
Enlightened  One,  is  now  living.' 
'Have  you  ever  seen  him,  that Blessed  One ?  Would  you  recog-
nize  him  if  you  saw  him ?' 
'I  have  never  seen  that  Blessed  One.  N or  should  I  recognize 
him  if  I  saw  him.' 
The  Buddha  realized  that it was  in  his  name  that this  unknown 
young  man  had  left  home  and  become  a  recluse.  But  without 
divulging  his  own  identity,  he  said:  'O  bhikkhu,  I  will  teach  you 
the  doctrine.  Listen  and  pay  attention.  I  will  speak.' 
'V ery  well,  friend,'  said  the  young  man  in  assent. 
Then  the  Buddha  delivered  to  this  young  man  a  most  remark-
able  discourse  explaining  Truth (the  gist  of which  is  given  later).
It  was  only  at  the  end  of the  discourse  that  this  young  recluse, 
whose  name  was  Pukkusati,  realized  that  the  person  who  spoke 
to  him  was  the  Buddha  himself.  So  he  got  up,  went  before  the 
Buddha,  bowed  down  at  the  feet  of  the  Master,  and  apologized 
to  him for  calling  him  'friend'
2
unknowingly.  He then  begged  the 
Buddha  to  ordain  him  and  admit  him  into  the  Order  of  the 
Sangha. 
The  Buddha  asked  him  whether  he  had  the  alms-bowl  and  the 
robes  ready.  (A  bhikkhu must have  three  robes  and  the  alms-bowl 
for  begging  food.)  When  Pukkusati  replied  in  the  negative,  the 
Buddha  said  that  the  Tathagatas  would  not ordain  a  person unless 
the alms-bowl and the robes were  ready.  So Pukkusati went out in 
search  of an  alms-bowl  and  robes,  but  was  unfortunately  savaged 
by  a  cow  and  died.
Later,  when  this  sad  news  reached  the  Buddha,  he  announced 
that  Pukkusati  was  a  wise  man,  who  had  already  seen  Truth,  and 
1
In the chapter on the third Noble Truth, see p.  38. 
2
The term used is Avuso which means friend.  It is a respectful term  of address 
among equals. But disciples never used this term addressing the Buddha. Instead they 
use the term Bhante which approximately means 'Sir' or 'Lord'. At the time of the 
Buddha,  the  members of his Order of Monks (Sangha)  addressed one another  as 
Avuso 'Friend'. But before his death the Buddha instructed younger monks to address 
their elders as Bhante 'Sir'  or Ayasma 'Venerable'. But elders should address  the 
younger  members  by  name,  or  as  Avuso  'Friend'.  (D  II  Colombo,  1929,  p.  95). 
This practice is continued up to the present day in the Sangha. 
3
It is well-known that cows in India roam about the streets. From this reference 
it seems that the tradition is very old.  But generally these cows are docile and not 
savage or dangerous. 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
move pages in pdf acrobat; change pdf page order reader
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
move pages in a pdf; pdf move pages
attained  the  penultimate  stage  in  the  realization  of Nirvana,  and 
that he  was  born  in  a  realm  where  he  would  become  an  Arahant
and  finally  pass  away,  never  to  return  to  this  world  again
2
From this  story  it  is  quite  clear that when  Pukkusati  listened to 
the  Buddha  and  understood  his  teaching,  he  did  not  know  who 
was  speaking  to  him,  or  whose  teaching  it  was.  He  saw  Truth. 
If the  medicine  is  good,  the  disease will  be  cured.  It  is  not  neces-
sary  to  know  who  prepared  it,  or  where  it  came  from. 
Almost  all  religions  are  built  on  faith—rather  'blind'  faith  it 
would  seem.  But  in  Buddhism  emphasis  is  laid  on  'seeing', 
knowing,  understanding,  and  not  on  faith,  or  belief.  In  Buddhist 
texts  there  is  a  word
saddha
(Skt.
sraddha)
which  is  usually 
translated as  'faith'  or  'belief'.  But
saddha
is not  'faith'  as  such,  but 
rather  'confidence'  born  out  of conviction.  In  popular  Buddhism 
and  also in  ordinary  usage  in the texts  the word
saddha,
it must be 
admitted,  has  an  element  of  'faith'  in  the  sense  that  it  signifies 
devotion  to  the  Buddha,  the
Dhamma
(Teaching)  and  the
Sangha 
(The  Order). 
According  to  Asanga,  the  great  Buddhist  philosopher  of  the 
4th  century  A.C .,
sraddha
has  three  aspects:  (i)  full  and  firm 
conviction that  a thing  is,  (2)  serene  joy  at  good  qualities,  and  (3) 
aspiration  or  wish  to  achieve  an  object  in  view.
However  you  put  it,  faith  or  belief  as  understood  by  most 
religions  has  little  to  do  with  Buddhism.
The  question  of  belief  arises  when  there  is  no  seeing—seeing 
in  every  sense  of the  word.  The  moment you  see,  the  question  of 
belief  disappears.  If  I  tell  you  that  I  have  a  gem  hidden  in  the 
folded  palm  of my  hand,  the  question  of belief arises  because  you 
1
An Arahant is a person who has liberated himself from all defilements and impuri-
ties such as desire, hatred, ill-will, ignorance, pride, conceit, etc. He has attained the 
fourth or the highest and ultimate stage in the realization of Nirvana, and is full of 
wisdom, compassion and such pure and noble qualities. Pukkusati had attained at the 
moment only the third stage which is technically called Anagami 'Never-Returner'. 
The second stage is called Sakadagami 'Once-Returner' and the first stage is called 
Sotapanna 'Stream-Entrant'. 
2
Karl Gjellerup's The Pi/grim Kamanita seems to have been inspired by this story 
of Pukkusati. 
3
Abhisamuc, p. 6. 
4
The Role  of the Miracle  in Early  Pali Literature  by  Edith Ludowyk-Gyomroi  takes 
up this subject. Unfortunately this Ph.D.  thesis is not yet published.  On the same 
subject see an article by the same author in the University of Ceylon Review, Vol. 1, 
No. 1 (April, 1943), p. 74 ff-
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
Certainly, random pages can be deleted from PDF file as well. PDF Page sorting. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position
pdf change page order online; change page order in pdf reader
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
string to PDF files using online source codes int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
how to move pages in pdf; move pdf pages
do  not  see  it  yourself.  But  if I  unclench  my  fist  and  show  you the 
gem,  then  you  see  it  for  yourself,  and  the  question  of belief does 
not  arise.  So  the  phrase  in  ancient  Buddhist  texts  reads:  'Realiz-
ing,  as  one  sees  a  gem (or  a  myrobalan  fruit)  in  the  palm'. 
 disciple  of  the  Buddha  named  Musila  tells  another  monk: 
'Friend  Savittha,  without  devotion,  faith  or  belief,
1
without 
liking  or  inclination,  without  hearsay  or  tradition,  without 
considering  apparent  reasons,  without  delight  in  the  speculations 
of  opinions,  I  know  and  see  that  the  cessation  of  becoming  is 
Nirvana.'
And  the  Buddha  says:  'O  bhikkhus,  I  say  that  the  destruction 
of defilement and impurities is (meant) for a person who knows  and 
who  sees,  and  not  for  a  person  who  does  not  know  and  does  not 
see.'
It  is  always  a  question  of knowing  and  seeing,  and  not  that  of 
believing.  The  teaching  of  the  Buddha  is  qualified  as
ehi-passika, 
inviting  you  to  'come  and  see',  but  not  to  come  and  believe. 
The  expressions  used  everywhere  in  Buddhist texts  referring  to 
persons  who  realized  Truth  are:  'The  dustless  and  stainless  Eye 
of  Truth
(Dhamma-cakkbu)
has  arisen.'  'He  has  seen  Truth,  has 
attained  Truth,  has  known  Truth,  has  penetrated  into  Truth,  has 
crossed  over  doubt,  is  without  wavering.'  'Thus  with  right 
wisdom  he  sees  it  as  it  is
{ yatha  bhutam)'A
With  reference  to  his 
own  Enlightenment  the  Buddha  said:  'The  eye  was  born, 
knowledge  was  born,  wisdom  was  born,  science  was  born,  light 
was  born.'
5
It  is  always  seeing  through  knowledge  or  wisdom 
(nana-dassana),
and  not  believing  through  faith. 
This  was  more  and  more  appreciated  at  a  time  when Brahmanic 
orthodoxy  intolerantly  insisted  on  believing  and  accepting  their 
tradition  and  authority  as  the  only  Truth  without  question. 
Once  a  group  of  learned  and  well-known  Brahmins  went  to  see 
the  Buddha and  had a long discussion with him.  One  of the  group, 
 Brahmin  youth  of  16  years  of age,  named  Kapathika,  considered 
1
Here the word saddha is used in its ordinary popular sense of 'devotion, faith, 
belief'. 
2
S II (PTS.), p.  117. 
3
Ibid.  Ill,  p.  152. 
4
E.g. S V, (PTS), p. 425; III, p.  103; M III (PTS), p. 19. 
5
S V (PTS), p. 422. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class
reverse pdf page order online; pdf change page order acrobat
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
reorder pdf pages reader; pdf rearrange pages online
by  them  all to  be  an exceptionally brilliant mind,  put a question to 
the  Buddha 
'Venerable  Gotama,  there  are  the  ancient  holy  scriptures  of the 
Brahmins  handed  down  along  the  line  by  unbroken  oral  tradition 
of  texts.  With  regard  to  them,  Brahmins  come  to  the  absolute 
conclusion:  " This  alone  is  Truth,  and  everything  else  is  false". 
Now,  what  does  the  Venerable  Gotama  say  about  this ?' 
The  Buddha  inquired:  'Am ong  Brahmins  is  there  any  one 
single Brahmin wh o  claims that he  personally  knows  and  sees  that 
"This  alone  is  Truth,  and  everything  else  is  false." ?' 
The  young  man  was  frank,  and  said:  'No'. 
'Then, is  there  any one  single  teacher,  or  a teacher  of teachers of 
Brahmins  back  to  the  seventh  generation,  or  even  any  one  of 
those  original  authors  of  those  scriptures,  who  claims  that  he 
knows  and  he  sees:  "Th is  alone  is  Truth,  and  everything  else  is 
false"?' 
'No. ' 
'Then,  it  is  like  a  line  of  blind  men,  each  holding  on  to  the 
preceding  one;  the  first  one  does  not  see,  the  middle  one  also 
does  not  see,  the  last  one  also  does  not  see.  Thus,  it  seems  to  me 
that  the  state  of the  Brahmins  is  like  that  of a  line  of  blind  men.' 
Then  the  Buddha  gave  advice  of  extreme  importance  to  the 
group of Brahmins:  'It is  not proper for a wise  man who  maintains 
(lit.  protects)  truth  to  come  to  the  conclusion:  "This  alone  is 
Truth,  and  everything  else  is  false".' 
Asked  by  the  young  Brahmin  to  explain  the  idea  of maintaining 
or  protecting  truth,  the  Buddha  said:  'A  man  has  a  faith.  If  he 
says  "This  is  my  faith",  so  far  he  maintains  truth.  But  by  that  he 
cannot  proceed  to  the  absolute  conclusion:  "This  alone  is  Truth, 
and  everything  else  is  false".'  In  other  words,  a  man  may  believe 
what  he  likes,  and  he  may  say  'I  believe  this'.  So  far  he  respects 
truth.  But  because  of  his  belief  or  faith,  he  should  not  say  that 
what  he  believes  is  alone  the  Truth,  and  everything  else  is  false. 
The  Buddha  says:  'To  be  attached  to  one  thing  (to  a  certain 
view)  and  to  look  down  upon  other  things  (views)  as  inferior— 
this  the  wise  men  call  a  fetter.'
1
Canki-sutta, no. 95  of M. 
2
Sn (PTS), p.  151 (v. 798). 
1o 
Once  the  Buddha  explained
1
the  doctrine  of cause  and  effect  to 
his  disciples,  and  they  said  that  they  saw  it  and  understood  it 
clearly.  Then  the  Buddha  said: 
'O  bhikkhus,  even  this  view,  which  is  so  pure  and  so  clear, 
if  you  cling  to  it,  if  you  fondle  it,  if  you  treasure  it,  if  you  are 
attached  to  it,  then  you  do  not  understand  that  the  teaching  is 
similar  to  a  raft,  which  is  for  crossing  over,  and  not  for  getting 
hold  of.'2 
Elsewhere  the  Buddha explains  this  famous  simile  in which  his 
teaching  is  compared  to  a  raft  for  crossing  over,  and  not  for 
getting  hold  of  and  carrying  on  one's  back: 
'O  bhikkhus,  a  man  is  on  a  journey.  He  comes  to  a  vast 
stretch  of  water.  On  this  side  the  shore  is  dangerous,  but  on  the 
other  it  is  safe  and  without  danger.  No  boat  goes  to  the  other 
shore  which  is  safe  and  without  danger,  nor  is  there  any  bridge 
for  crossing  over.  He  says  to  himself:  "This  sea  of water  is  vast, 
and  the  shore  on  this  side  is  full  of  danger;  but  on  the  other 
shore  it  is  safe  and  without  danger.  No  boat  goes  to  the  other 
side,  nor  is  there  a  bridge  for  crossing  over.  It  would  be  good 
therefore  if  I  would  gather  grass,  wood,  branches  and  leaves 
to  make  a  raft,  and  with  the  help  of  the  raft  cross  over  safely 
to  the  other  side,  exerting  myself  with  my  hands  and  feet". 
Then  that  man,  O  bhikkhus,  gathers  grass,  wood,  branches  and 
leaves  and  makes  a raft,  and with the help  of that  raft crosses  over 
safely  to  the  other  side,  exerting  himself with  his  hands  and  feet. 
Having  crossed  over  and  got  to  the  other  side,  he  thinks:  " This 
raft  was  of great help  to me.  With  its aid  I have  crossed safely over 
to  this  side,  exerting  myself with  my  hands  and  feet.  It  would  be 
good  if I  carry this  raft on my head  or on my  back  wherever  I  go" . 
'What  do  you  think,  O  bhikkhus,  if he  acted  in this  way  would 
that  man  be  acting  properly  with  regard  to  the  raft ?  " N o ,  Sir" . 
In  which  way  then  would  he  be  acting  properly  with  regard  to 
the  raft ? Having  crossed  and gone  over to the  other  side,  suppose 
that  man  should  think:  " This  raft  was  a  great  help  to  me.  With 
its  aid  I  have  crossed  safely over  to this  side,  exerting myself with 
my  hands  and  feet.  It  would  be  good  if I  beached  this  raft  on  the 
shore,  or  moored  it  and  left  it  afloat,  and  then  went  on  my  way 
1
In the  Mahatanhasankhaya-sutta,  no.  38  of M. 
2
M I (PTS), p. 260. 
wherever  it  may  be".  Acting  in  this  way  would  that  man  act 
properly  with  regard  to  that  raft. 
'In  the  same  manner,  O  bhikkhus,  I  have  taught  a  doctrine 
similar  to a  raft—it  is  for  crossing  over,  and  not for  carrying  (lit. 
getting  hold  of).  Y ou ,  O  bhikkhus,  who  understand  that  the 
teaching  is  similar  to  a  raft,  should  give  up  even  good  things 
(dhamma);
how  much  more  then  should  you  give  up  evil  things 
(adhamma).'
From this  parable it  is  quite  clear that the  Buddha's  teaching  is 
meant  to  carry  man  to  safety,  peace,  happiness,  tranquillity,  the 
attainment  of
Nirvana.
The  whole  doctrine  taught  by  the  Buddha 
leads  to  this  end.  He  did  not  say  things  just  to  satisfy intellectual 
curiosity.  He  was  a  practical teacher  and  taught  only those  things 
which  would  bring  peace  and  happiness  to  man. 
The  Buddha  was  once  staying  in  a  Simsapa  forest  in  Kosambi 
(near Allahabad).  He took a few leaves into his  hand, and asked his 
disciples:  'What  do  you  think,  O  bhikkhus?  Which  is  more? 
These  few  leaves  in  my  hand  or  the  leaves  in  the  forest 
over  here ?' 
'Sir,  very  few  are  the  leaves  in  the  hand  of  the  Blessed  One, 
but  indeed  the  leaves  in  the  Simsapa  forest  over  here  are  very 
much  more  abundant.' 
'Even  so,  bhikkhus,  of what  I  have  known  I  have told  you  only 
 little,  what  I  have  not  told  you  is  very  much  more.  An d  wh y 
have I not  told  you (those  things) ?  Because  that  is  not  useful.  .  . 
not  leading  to
Nirvana.
That  is  why  I  have  not  told  you  those 
things.'
It  is  futile,  as  some  scholars  vainly  try  to  do,  for  us  to  specu-
late  on  what  the  Buddha  knew  but  did  not  tell  us. 
The  Buddha  was  not  interested  in  discussing  unnecessary 
metaphysical  questions  which  are  purely  speculative  and  which 
create  imaginary  problems.  He  considered  them  as  a  'wilderness 
of  opinions'.  It  seems  that  there  were  some  among  his  own 
disciples  who  did  not  appreciate this  attitude  of his.  For,  we  have 
1
MI (PTS), pp. 134-i 3 5. Dhamma here, according to the Commentary, means high 
spiritual  attainments  as well  as  pure views  and ideas.  Attachment  even  to these, 
however high and pure they may be,  should  be given  up; how much more then 
should it be with regard to evil and bad things. MA II (PTS), p.  109. 
2
S V (PTS), p. 457-
the  example  of  one  of  them,  Malunkyaputta  by  name,  who 
put  to  the  Buddha  ten  well-known  classical  questions  on  meta-
physical  problems  and  demanded  answers.
One  day  Malunkyaputta  got  up  from  his  afternoon  meditation, 
went to  the  Buddha,  saluted  him,  sat  on  one  side  and  said: 
'Sir,  when  I  was  all  alone  meditating,  this  thought  occurred  to 
me:  There  are  these problems  unexplained,  put  aside  and  rejected 
by  the  Blessed  One.  Namely,  (i)  is  the  universe  eternal  or  (2) 
is  it  not  eternal,  (3)  is  the  universe  finite  or  (4)  is  it  infinite,  (5) 
is  soul  the  same as  body  or (6)  is  soul one thing  and  body  another 
thing,  (7)  does  the  Tathagata  exist  after  death,  or  (8)  does  he  not 
exist  after  death,  or  (9)  does  he  both  (at  the  same  time)  exist  and 
not  exist  after  death,  or  (10)  does  he  both  (at  the  same  time)  not 
exist  and  not  not-exist.  These  problems  the  Blessed  One  does 
not  explain  to  me.  This  (attitude)  does  not  please  me,  I  do  not 
appreciate it.  I  will  go  to  the  Blessed  One  and  ask  him  about  this 
matter.  If the Blessed One explains them to  me, then I will  continue 
to  follow  the  holy  life  under him.  If he  does  not  explain  them,  I 
will  leave  the  Order  and  go  away.  If the  Blessed  One  knows  that 
the  universe  is  eternal,  let  him  explain  it  to  me  so.  If the  Blessed 
One  knows  that  the  universe  is  not  eternal,  let  him  say  so.  If the 
Blessed  One  does  not  know  whether  the  universe  is  eternal  or 
not,  etc.,  then  for  a  person  who  does  not  know,  it  is  straight-
forward  to  say  "I  do  not  know,  I  do  not  see".' 
The  Buddha's  reply to  Malunkyaputta  should  do  good to  many 
millions in the  world today who  are  wasting valuable time on  such 
metaphysical  questions  and  unnecessarily  disturbing  their  peace 
of  mind: 
'Did  I  ever  tell  you,  Malunkyaputta,  " Come,  Malunkyaputta, 
lead the holy life under me, I will explain these questions to you ?"  ' 
'No,  Sir.' 
'Then,  Malunkyaputta,  even  you,  did  you  tell  me:  "Sir,  I  will 
lead the holy life  under  the  Blessed  One,  and the  Blessed  One will 
explain  these  questions  to  m e" ?' 
'N o,  Sir.' 
'Even  now,  Malunkyaputta,  I  do  not  tell  you:  "C ome  and  lead 
the  holy  life  under  me,  I  will  explain  these  questions  to  you". 
1
Cula-Mdlurikja-sutta,  no.  63  of M. 
13 
An d  you  do  not  tell  me  either:  "Sir,  I  will  lead the holy  life  under 
the  Blessed  One,  and  he  will  explain  these  questions  to  me" . 
Under  these  circumstances,  you  foolish  one,  who  refuses  wh om ?
'Malunkyaputta,  if  anyone  says:  "I  will  not  lead  the  holy  life 
under  the  Blessed  One  until  he  explains  these  questions,"  he  may 
die  with  these  questions  unanswered  by  the  Tathagata.  Suppose 
Malunkyaputta,  a  man  is  wounded  by  a  poisoned  arrow,  and  his 
friends  and  relatives  bring  him  to  a  surgeon.  Suppose  the  man 
should then say:  "I will not let this  arrow be taken out until I  know 
who  shot  me;  whether he  is  a  Ksatriya  (of  the  warrior  caste)  or  a 
Brahmana  (of  the  priestly  caste)  or  a  Vaisya  (of  the  trading  and 
agricultural  caste)  or  a  Sudra  (of  the  low  caste);  what  his  name 
and family  may be;  whether he  is  tall,  short,  or of medium  stature; 
whether  his  complexion  is  black,  brown,  or  golden;  from  which 
village,  town  or  city  he  comes.  I  will  not  let  this  arrow  be  taken 
out  until  I  know  the  kind  of  bow  with  which  I  was  shot;  the 
kind  of  bowstring  used;  the  type  of  arrow;  what  sort  of  feather 
was used  on the arrow  and  with  what  kind  of material  the  point  of 
the  arrow was  made."  Malunkyaputta, that  man would die without 
knowing  any  of these  things.  Even  so,  Malunkyaputta,  if anyone 
says:  "I will  not follow the holy life under the Blessed  One until  he 
answers  these  questions  such  as  whether  the  universe  is  eternal 
or  not,  etc.,"  he  would  die  with  these  questions  unanswered  by 
the  Tathagata.' 
Then  the  Buddha  explains  to  Malunkyaputta  that  the  holy  life 
does  not  depend  on these  views.  Whatever  opinion  one  may  have 
about these problems, there is birth,  old age,  decay,  death,  sorrow, 
lamentation,  pain,  grief,  distress,  "the  Cessation  of  which  (i.e. 
Nirvana)
 declare  in  this  very  life." 
'Therefore,  Malunkyaputta,  bear  in  mind  what  I  have explained 
as  explained,  and  what I  have  not  explained  as  unexplained.  What 
are  the  things  that  I  have  not  explained ?  Whether  the  universe  is 
eternal  or  not,  etc.,  (those  10  opinions)  I  have  not  explained. 
Why,  Malunkyaputta,  have  I  not  explained  them?  Because  it  is 
not  useful,  it  is  not  fundamentally  connected  with  the  spiritual 
holy  life,  is  not  conducive  to  aversion,  detachment,  cessation, 
tranquillity,  deep  penetration,  full  realization,
Nirvana.
That  is 
why  I  have  not  told  you  about  them. 
1
i.e., both are free and neither is under obligation to the other. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested