c# pdf viewer : Change page order in pdf reader control application system web page azure html console what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-3-part1087

'Then, what,  Malunkyaputta, have I explained ? I have explained 
dukkha,
the  arising
oi
dukkha,
the  cessation  of
dukkha,
and  the  way 
leading  to  the  cessation  of
dukkha-
1 Why, Malunkyaputta, have I 
explained  them ?  Because  it  is  useful,  is  fundamentally  connected 
with  the  spiritual holy  life,  is  conducive  to  aversion,  detachment, 
cessation,  tranquillity,  deep  penetration,  full  realization,  Nirvana. 
Therefore  I  have  explained  them.'
Let  us  now  examine  the  Four  Noble  Truths  which  the  Buddha 
told  Malunkyaputta  he  had  explained. 
1
These Four Noble Truths are explained in the next four chapters. 
2
It seems that this advice of the Buddha had the desired effect on Malunkyaputta, 
because elsewhere he is reported to have approached the Buddha again for instruc-
tion,  following  which  he  became  an  Arahant.  A  (Colombo,  1929),  pp.  345-346; 
S IV (PTS), p. 72  ff. 
15 
Change page order in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; reordering pages in pdf
Change page order in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages in pdf online; move pages in pdf reader
CHAPTER  II 
The  Four  Noble  Truths 
TH E 
FI R S T 
NO B L E 
TR U T H  :
DUKKHA 
The  heart  of the  Buddha's  teaching  lies  in  the  Four  Noble  Truths 
(Cattdri  Ariyasaccant)
which  he  expounded  in  his  very  first 
sermon
1
to  his  old  colleagues,  the  five  ascetics,  at  Isipatana 
(modern Sarnath) near Benares.  In  this sermon,  as we have it in the 
original  texts,  these  four  Truths  are  given  briefly.  But  there  are 
innumerable  places  in  the  early  Buddhist  scriptures  where  they 
are  explained  again  and  again,  with  greater  detail  and  in  different 
ways.  If we  study  the  Four  Noble  Truths  with  the  help  of  these 
references  and  explanations,  we  get  a  fairly  good  and  accurate 
account  of the  essential  teachings  of the  Buddha  according  to  the 
original  texts. 
The  Four  Noble  Truths  are: 
1.  Dukkha
2.  Samudaya,
the  arising  or  origin  of
dukkha, 
3.
Nirodha,
the  cessation  of
dukkha, 
4.
Magga,
the  way  leading  to  the  cessation  of
dukkha. 
THE  FIRST  N OBLE  TRU TH:  DUKKHA 
The  First  Noble  Truth
(Dukkha-ariyasacca)
is  generally  trans-
lated  by almost all  scholars  as  'The Noble  Truth of Suffering',  and 
it is interpreted  to mean that life according  to Buddhism is nothing 
but  suffering  and  pain.  Both  translation  and  interpretation  are 
highly  unsatisfactory  and  misleading.  It is  because  of this  limited, 
free  and  easy  translation,  and  its  superficial  interpretation,  that 
many  people  have  been  misled  into  regarding  Buddhism  as 
pessimistic. 
1
Dhammacakkappavatlana-sutta 'Setting  in  Motion  the Wheel  of Truth'.  Mhvg. 
(Alutgama, 1922), p. 9 ff; S V (PTS). p. 420  ff. 
2
I do not wish  to give an equivalent in English for this term for  reasons given 
below. 
16 
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
how to move pages around in a pdf document; change pdf page order online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc
change page order pdf preview; how to rearrange pages in a pdf file
I.  The  bust  of the  Buddha—from  Thailand 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
move pdf pages online; how to reorder pdf pages in reader
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
VB.NET PDF - How to Modify PDF Document Page in VB.NET. VB.NET Guide for Processing PDF Document Page and Sorting PDF Pages Order.
reorder pdf page; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
I
I
.
T
h
e
h
e
a
d
o
f
t
h
e
B
u
d
d
h
a
f
r
o
m
P
o
l
o
n
-
n
a
r
u
v
a
,
C
e
y
l
o
n
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
reorder pages pdf; how to move pages in a pdf file
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
moving pages in pdf; pdf reorder pages
First  of  all,  Buddhism  is  neither  pessimistic  nor  optimistic.  If 
anything  at  all,  it  is  realistic,  for  it  takes  a  realistic  view  of  life 
and  of  the  world.  It  looks  at  things  objectively
(yathabhutam). 
It  does  not  falsely  lull  you  into  living  in  a  fool's  paradise,  nor 
does  it  frighten  and  agonize  you  with  all  kinds  of imaginary  fears 
and  sins.  It tells you exactly  and objectively what you are  and what 
the  world  around  you  is,  and  shows  you  the  way  to  perfect 
freedom,  peace,  tranquillity  and  happiness. 
One  physician  may  gravely  exaggerate  an  illness  and  give  up 
hope  altogether.  Another  may  ignorantly  declare  that  there  is  no 
illness and that no treatment is necessary, thus deceiving the patient 
with  a  false  consolation.  You  may  call  the  first  one  pessimistic 
and  the  second  optimistic.  Both  are  equally  dangerous.  But  a 
third physician diagnoses the  symptoms  correctly, understands the 
cause  and the nature of the illness,  sees  clearly that  it can be  cured, 
and  courageously  administers  a  course  of  treatment,  thus  saving 
his  patient.  The  Buddha  is  like  the  last  physician.  He  is  the  wise 
and  scientific  doctor  for  the  ills  of  the  world
(Bhisakka
or 
Bhaisajya-guru). 
It  is  true  that  the  Pali  word
dukkha
(or  Sanskrit
duhkha)
in 
ordinary  usage  means  'suffering',  'pain',  'sorrow'  or  'misery',  as 
opposed  to  the  word
sukha
meaning  'happiness',  'comfort'  or 
'ease'.  But  the  term
dukkha
as  the  First  Noble  Truth,  which  re-
presents  the  Buddha's  view  of  life  and  the  world,  has  a  deeper 
philosophical  meaning  and  connotes  enormously  wider  senses. 
It  is  admitted  that  the  term
dukkha
in  the  First  Noble  Truth  con-
tains,  quite  obviously,  the  ordinary  meaning  of 'suffering',  but  in 
addition  it  also  includes  deeper  ideas  such  as  'imperfection', 
'impermanence',  'emptiness',  'insubstantiality'.  It is  difficult there-
fore  to  find  one  word  to  embrace  the  whole  conception  of  the 
term
dukkha
as  the  First  N oble  Truth,  and  so  it  is  better  to  leave 
it  untranslated,  than  to  give  an  inadequate  and  wrong  idea  of it 
by  conveniently  translating  it  as  'suffering'  or  'pain'. 
The  Buddha  does  not  deny  happiness  in  life when he  says  there 
is suffering. On the contrary he admits different forms of happiness, 
both  material  and  spiritual,  for  laymen  as  well  as  for  monks.  In 
the
Anguttara-nikaya,
one  of the  five  original  Collections  in  Pali 
containing  the  Buddha's  discourses,  there  is  a  list  of happinesses 
(sukhdni),
such as  the  happiness  of family  life  and  the happiness  of 
17 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
Enable C#.NET developers to change the page order of source PDF document file; Allow C#.NET developers to add image to specified area of source PDF document
how to reorder pages in pdf file; change page order pdf
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project. In order to run the sample code, the following steps
how to move pages in pdf reader; how to move pages within a pdf
the  life  of  a  recluse,  the  happiness  of  sense  pleasures  and  the 
happiness  of  renunciation,  the  happiness  of  attachment  and  the 
happiness of detachment,  physical happiness and mental happiness 
etc.
1
But  all  these  are  included  in
dukkha.
Eve n  the  very  pure 
spiritual  states  of
dhyana  (recueillement
or  trance)  attained  by  the 
practice  of higher  meditation,  free  from  even  a  shadow  of  suffer-
ing  in  the  accepted  sense  of  the  word,  states  which  may  be 
described  as  unmixed  happiness,  as  well  as  the  state  of
dhjana 
which is  free from  sensations both pleasant
(sukha)
and unpleasant' 
(dukkha)
and  is  only  pure  equanimity  and  awareness—even  these 
very  high  spiritual  states  are  included  in
dukkha.
In  one  of  the 
suttas
of  the
Majjhima-nikdya,
(again  one  of  the  five  original 
Collections), after praising  the  spiritual  happiness  of these
dhyanas, 
the Buddha says  that they are  'impermanent,
dukkha,
and  subject to 
change'
(anicca
dukkha
viparinamadbamma).
2 Notice that the word 
dukkha
is  explicitly used.  It is
dukkha,
not because there is 'suffering' 
in  the  ordinary sense  of the word,  but because  'whatever  is  imper-
manent  is
dukkha'  (yad  aniccam  tam  dukkham). 
Th e  Buddha was  realistic  and  objective.  He  says,  with  regard  to 
life  and  the  enjoyment  of  sense-pleasures,  that  one  should 
clearly  understand  three  things:  (I)  attraction  or  enjoyment 
(assada),
(2)  evil  consequence  or  danger  or  unsatisfactoriness 
(adinava),
and  (3)  freedom  or  liberation
(nissarana).
3 When you 
see  a  pleasant,  charming  and  beautiful  person,  you  like  him  (or 
her),  you  are  attracted,  you  enjoy  seeing  that  person  again  and 
again,  you  derive  pleasure  and  satisfaction from  that  person.  This 
is enjoyment
(assada).
It  is  a  fact  of experience.  But  this  enjoyment 
is not permanent, just as  that person and all his (or her)  attractions 
are  not  permanent  either.  When  the  situation  changes,  when  you 
cannot  see  that  person,  when you  are  deprived  of this  enjoyment, 
you  become  sad,  you  may  become  unreasonable  and  un-
balanced,  you  may  even  behave foolishly.  This  is  the  evil, unsatis-
factory  and  dangerous  side  of the  picture
(adinava).
This,  too,  is  a 
fact  of experience.  N ow  if you have  no  attachment  to  the  person, 
if  you  are  completely  detached,  that  is  freedom,  liberation 
1
A (Colombo, 1929), p. 49. 
2
Mahadukkhakkhandha-sutta, M I (PTS), p. 90. 
3
M I (PTS), p.  85 ff; S HI (PTS), p. 27 S. 
18 
(nissarana).
These  three  things  are  true  with  regard  to  all  enjoy-
ment  in  life. 
From  this  it  is  evident  that  it  is  no  question  of  pessimism  or 
optimism,  but  that  we  must  take  account  of  the  pleasures  of  life 
as  well as  of its pains  and  sorrows,  and also of freedom from them, 
in  order  to  understand  life  completely  and  objectively.  Only  then 
is  true  liberation  possible.  Regarding  this  question  the  Buddha 
says: 
'O  bhikkhus,  if  any  recluses  or  brahmanas  do  not  understand 
objectively  in  this  way  that  the  enjoyment  of  sense-pleasures  is 
enjoyment,  that  their  unsatisfactoriness  is  unsatisfactoriness,  that 
liberation from  them is  liberation,  then  it is  not possible  that they 
themselves  will  certainly understand  the  desire  for  sense-pleasures 
completely,  or  that they  will  be  able  to  instruct  another  person  to 
that end,  or that  the  person following  their  instruction will  comp-
letely understand the desire for sense-pleasures.  But,  O bhikkhus, if 
any  recluses  or  brahmanas  understand  objectively  in  this  way that 
the  enjoyment  of sense-pleasures  is  enjoyment,  that  their  unsatis-
factoriness is unsatisfactoriness, that liberation from them is libera-
tion,  then  it is  possible  that  they  themselves  will  certainly  under-
stand  the  desire  for  sense-pleasures  completely,  and  that  they  will 
be  able  to instruct another person  to  that end, and that that person 
following  their  instruction  will  completely  understand  the  desire 
for  sense-pleasures.'
The  conception  of
dukkha
may  be  viewed  from  three  aspects: 
(i)
dukkha
as  ordinary  suffering
(dukkha-dukkha),  (2)  dukkha
as 
produced  by  change
(viparinama-dukkha)
and  (3)
dukkha
as  con-
ditioned  states
(samkhara-dukkha).
All  kinds  of suffering in  life  like  birth,  old  age,  sickness,  death, 
association  with  unpleasant  persons  and  conditions,  separation 
from  beloved  ones  and  pleasant conditions,  not  getting  what  one 
desires,  grief,  lamentation,  distress—all  such  forms  of  physical 
and  mental  suffering,  which  are  universally  accepted  as  suffering 
or  pain,  are  included  in
dukkha
as  ordinary  suffering
(dukkha-
dukkha). 
1
M I (PTS), p. 87. 
2
Vism (PTS), p. 499; Abhisamuc, p. 38. 
A happy feeling,  a happy  condition in life, is  not permanent, not 
everlasting.  It  changes  sooner  or  later.  When  it  changes,  it  pro-
duces  pain,  suffering,  unhappiness.  This  vicissitude  is  included  in 
dukkha
as  suffering  produced  by  change
(viparinama-dukkha). 
It  is  easy  to  understand  the  two  forms  of  suffering
(dukkha) 
mentioned  above.  No  one  will  dispute  them.  This  aspect  of the 
First  Noble  Truth  is  more  popularly  known  because  it  is  easy  to 
understand.  It  is  common  experience  in  our  daily  life. 
But  the  third  form  of
dukkha
as  conditioned  states
(samkhara-
dukkha)
is  the  most  important  philosophical  aspect  of  the  First 
Noble  Truth,  and  it  requires  some  analytical  explanation  of what 
we  consider  as  a  'being',  as  an  'individual',  or  as  'I'. 
What  we  call  a  'being',  or  an  'individual',  or  T,  according  to 
Buddhist  philosophy,  is  only  a  combination  of  ever-changing 
physical and  mental  forces  or  energies, which may be  divided  into 
five  groups  or  aggregates
(pancakkhandha).
The  Buddha  says:  'In 
short  these  five  aggregates  of  attachment  are
dukkha\
1
Elsewhere 
he  distinctly  defines
dukkha
as  the  five  aggregates:  'O  bhikkhus, 
what  is
dukkha
 It  should  be  said  that  it  is  the  five  aggregates  of 
attachment'.
2
Here  it  should  be clearly understood that
dukkha
and 
the  five  aggregates  are  not  two  different  things;  the  five  aggre-
gates  themselves  are
dukkha.
We  will  understand  this  point  better 
when we  have  some  notion  of the five  aggregates  which  constitute 
the  so-called  'being'.  No w,  what  are  these five ? 
The  Five  Aggregates 
The  first  is the Aggregate of Matter
("Mpakkhandha).
In  this term 
'Aggregate  of  Matter'  are  included  the  traditional  Four  Great 
Elements
(cattari  mahdbhutani),
namely,  solidity,  fluidity,  heat  and 
motion,  and  also  the  Derivatives
(upadaja-riipa)
of the  Four  Great 
Elements.
3
In  the  term  'Derivatives  of F our  Great  Elements'  are 
included  our  five  material  sense-organs,  i.e.,  the  faculties  of 
eye,  ear,  nose,  tongue,  and  body,  and  their  corresponding 
objects in the external world, i.e., visible form, sound, odour, taste, 
1
Samkhittena pancupadanakkhandha dukkha.  S V  (PTS), p.  421. 
3
S III (PTS), p. 59. 
20 
and  tangible  things,  and  also  some  thoughts  or  ideas  or  concep-
tions  which  are  in the  sphere  of mind-objects
(dharmdyatana)
1
.
Thus 
the  whole  realm  of matter,  both  internal  and  external,  is  included 
in  the  Aggregate  of  Matter. 
The  second  is  the  Aggregate  of  Sensations
(Vedanakkhandhd). 
In this  group  are  included  all  our  sensations,  pleasant or unplea-
sant  or  neutral,  experienced  through  the  contact  of  physical  and 
mental  organs  with  the  external  world.  They  are  of  six  kinds: 
the  sensations  experienced  through  the  contact  of  the  eye  with 
visible  forms,  ear  with  sounds,  nose  with  odour,  tongue  with 
taste,  body  with  tangible  objects,  and  mind  (which  is  the  sixth 
faculty  in Buddhist  Philosophy)  with  mind-objects  or  thoughts  or 
ideas.
2
All  our  physical  and  mental  sensations  are  included in this 
group. 
 word  about  what  is  meant  by  the  term  'Mind'
(manas)
in 
Buddhist  philosophy  may  be  useful  here.  It  should  clearly  be 
understood  that  mind  is  not spirit as  opposed to  matter.  It  should 
always  be  remembered  that Buddhism  does  not  recognize  a  spirit 
opposed  to  matter,  as  is  accepted  by  most  other  systems  of 
philosophies  and  religions.  Mind  is  only  a  faculty  or  organ 
(indriya)
like  the  eye  or the ear.  It can be  controlled  and  developed 
like  any  other  faculty,  and  the  Buddha  speaks  quite  often  of  the 
value  of  controlling  and  disciplining  these  six  faculties.  The 
difference  between  the  eye  and  the  mind  as  faculties  is  that  the 
former  senses  the  world  of  colours  and  visible  forms,  while  the 
latter  senses  the  world  of ideas  and  thoughts  and  mental  objects. 
We  experience  different  fields  of the  world  with  different  senses. 
We  cannot  hear  colours,  but  we  can  see  them.  N or  can  we  see 
sounds,  but we  can  hear  them.  Thus  with  our  five  physical  sense-
organs—eye,  ear,  nose,  tongue,  body—we  experience  only  the 
world  of  visible  forms,  sounds,  odours,  tastes  and  tangible 
objects.  But these represent only a part of the world, not the whole 
world.  What  of ideas  and  thoughts ?  They  are  also  a  part  of the 
world.  But  they  cannot  be  sensed,  they  cannot  be  conceived  by 
the  faculty  of the  eye,  ear,  nose,  tongue  or  body.  Yet  they  can  be 
conceived  by  another  faculty,  which  is  mind.  N ow  ideas  and 
1
Abhisamuc, p. 4. Vibh. p. 72. Dhs. p. 133 § 594. 
2
S III (PTS), p.  59. 
21 
thoughts  are  not  independent  of  the  world  experienced  by  these 
five  physical  sense  faculties.  In  fact  they  depend  on,  and  are 
conditioned  by,  physical  experiences.  Hence  a  person  born  blind 
cannot have  ideas  of colour,  except  through  the  analogy  of sounds 
or  some  other  things  experienced  through  his  other  faculties. 
Ideas  and  thoughts  which  form  a  part  of  the  world  are  thus 
produced  and  conditioned  by  physical  experiences  and  are  con-
ceived  by  the  mind.  Hence  mind
(manas)
is  considered  a  sense 
faculty or  organ
(indriya),
like  the  eye  or  the  ear. 
The  third  is  the  Aggregate  of  Perceptions
(Sannakkhandha). 
Like sensations,  perceptions also  are of six  kinds,  in relation  to  six 
internal  faculties  and  the  corresponding  six  external  objects.  Like 
sensations,  they  are  produced  through  the  contact  of  our  six 
faculties  with  the  external  world.  It  is  the  perceptions  that  recog-
nize  objects  whether  physical  or  mental.
Th e fourth is  the Aggregate of Mental Formations
2
(Samkharak-
khandha).
In  this  group  are  included  all  volitional  activities  both 
good  and  bad.  What  is  generally  known  as
karma
(or
kamma) 
comes  under  this  group.  The  Buddha's  own  definition  of
karma 
should  be  remembered  here:  'O  bhikkhus,  it  is  volition
(cetana) 
that  I  call
karma.
Having  willed,  one  acts  through  body,  speech 
and  mind.'
3
Volition  is  'mental  construction,  mental  activity. 
Its  function  is  to  direct  the  mind  in  the  sphere  of  good,  bad  or 
neutral  activities.'
4
Just  like  sensations  and  perceptions,  volition 
is  of  six  kinds,  connected  with  the  six  internal  faculties  and  the 
corresponding six objects (both physical and mental) in the external 
world.
5
Sensations  and  perceptions  are  not  volitional  actions. 
They  do  not produce  karmic  effects.  It is  only volitional  actions— 
such  as  attention
(manasikdra),
will
(chanda),
determination 
(adhimokkha),
confidence
(saddha),
concentration
(samadhi),
wisdom 
(pahha),
energy
(viriya),
desire
(raga),
repugnance  or  hate
(patigha) 
1
III  (PTS),  p.  60. 
2
'MentaI Formations' is a term now generally used to represent the wide meaning 
of the word samkhara in the list of Five Aggregates. Samkhara in other contexts may 
mean  anything  conditioned,  anything  in  the  world,  in  which  sense  all  the  Five 
Aggregates are samkhara. 
3
 (Colombo,  1929),  p-  590—Cetana ham  hhikkhave  kammam  vadami.  Cetayitva 
kammam  karoti kayena  vaca manasa. 
4
Abhisamuc, p. 6. 
5
S III (PTS),  p.  60. 
22 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested