c# pdf viewer : Reorder pages in pdf document application control cloud html azure wpf class what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-4-part1088

jDCtncc
(avijja),
conceit
(mana),
idea  of self
(sakkaya-ditthi)
etc. 
tlml  can  produce  karmic  effects.  There  are  52  such  mental 
llviiics  which  constitute  the  Aggregate  of Mental  Formations. 
The  l ifthis  the  Aggregate  of  Consciousness
(Vinnattakkhandha).
Eonnciousness  is  a  reaction  or  response  which  has  one  of  the  six 
•pultics (eye,  ear,  nose,  tongue,  body  and  mind)  as  its  basis,  and 
One  of  the  six  corresponding  external  phenomena  (visible  form, 
(omul,  odour,  taste,  tangible  things  and  mind-objects,  i.e.,  an 
Idea  or  thought)  as  its  object.  For  instance,  visual  conscious-
ness
(cakkhu-vinnana)
has  the  eye  as  its  basis  and  a  visible  form  as 
lis  object.  Mental  consciousness
(mano-vihhana)
has  the  mind 
(manas)
as  its  basis  and  a  mental  object,  i.e.,  an  idea  or  thought 
[dhamma)
as  its  object.  So  consciousness  is  connected  with  other 
faculties.  Thus,  like sensation,  perception  and volition,  conscious-
ness  also  is  of  six  kinds,  in  relation  to  six  internal  faculties  and 
(1 >1 responding  six external  objects.
It  should  be  clearly  understood  that  consciousness  does  not 
rec ognize  an  object.  It  is  only  a  sort  of awareness—awareness  of 
the  presence  of an  object.  When  the  eye  comes  in  contact  with  a 
colour,  for  instance  blue, visual consciousness  arises which  simply 
is  awareness  of the presence of a  colour;  but it does  not  recognize 
that it is blue.  There is no recognition at this  stage.  It is percepdon 
(the  third  Aggregate  discussed  above)  that  recognizes  that  it  is 
blue.  The term 'visual consciousness'  is  a  philosophical  expression 
denoting  the  same  idea  as  is  conveyed  by  the  ordinary  word 
'seeing'.  Seeing  does  not  mean  recognizing.  So  are  the  other 
forms  of  consciousness. 
It must be  repeated here  that  according  to  Buddhist  philosophy 
there  is  no  permanent,  unchanging  spirit  which  can  be  considered 
'Self',  or  'Soul',  or  'Ego',  as  opposed  to  matter,  and  that  con-
sciousness
(vinnana)
should not be taken  as  'spirit'  in  opposition  to 
matter.  This  point  has  to  be  particularly  emphasized,  because  a 
wrong  notion  that  consciousness  is  a  sort  of  Self  or  Soul  that 
1
According  to  Mahayana  Buddhist  philosophy  the  Aggregate of Consciousness 
has three aspects: citta, manas and vijiidna, and the Alaya-vijnana (popularly translated 
as 'Store-Consciousness') finds its place in this Aggregate. A detailed and comparative 
study of this subject will be found in a forthcoming work on Buddhist philosophy 
by the present writer. 
2
S III (PTS), p. 61. 
2
Reorder pages in pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf reverse page order online; move pages in pdf document
Reorder pages in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pdf pages reader; how to rearrange pdf pages in preview
continues  as  a  permanent  substance  through  life,  has  persisted 
from the  earliest  time  to  the  present  day. 
One  of the  Buddha's  own  disciples,  Sati  by  name,  held  that the 
Master  taught:  'It  is  the  same  consciousness  that  transmigrates 
and  wanders  about.'  The  Buddha  asked  him  what  he  meant  by 
'consciousness'.  Sati's  reply is  classical:  'It is that which expresses, 
which  feels,  which  experiences  the  results  of good  and  bad  deeds 
here  and  there'. 
'To whomever,  you  stupid  one', remonstrated  the  Master,  'have 
you  heard  me  expounding  the  doctrine  in  this  manner ?  Haven't 
 in  many  ways  explained  consciousness  as  arising  out  of  condi-
tions:  that  there  is  no  arising  of  consciousness  without  con-
ditions.'  Then  the  Buddha  went  on  to  explain  consciousness 
in  detail:  'Conciousness  is  named  according  to  whatever  con-
dition  through  which  it  arises:  on  account  of the  eye  and  visible 
forms  arises  a consciousness,  and  it is  called visual  consciousness; 
on  account  of the  ear  and  sounds  arises  a  consciousness,  and  it is 
called  auditory  consciousness;  on  account  of  the  nose  and 
odours  arises  a  consciousness,  and  it  is  called  olfactory  con-
sciousness ;  on account of the tongue  and tastes  arises  a  conscious-
ness,  and  it  is  called  gustatory  consciousness;  on  account  of the 
body  and  tangible  objects  arises  a  consciousness,  and  it  is  called 
tactile  consciousness;  on  account  of  the  mind  and  mind-objects 
(ideas  and thoughts)  arises  a  consciousness,  and it  is called mental 
consciousness.' 
Then  the  Buddha  explained  it  further  by  an  illustration:  A 
fire  is  named  according  to  the  material  on  account  of  which  it 
burns.  A  fire  may  burn  on account  of wood,  and it  is  called  wood-
fire.  It  may  burn  on  account  of straw,  and  then  it is  called  straw-
fire.  So consciousness is  named according to the condition through 
which  it  arises.
Dwelling  on  this  point,  Buddhaghosa,  the  great  commentator, 
explains:  '.  .  .  a  fire  that  burns  on  account  of  wood  burns  only 
when  there  is  a  supply,  but  dies  down  in  that  very  place  when  it 
(the  supply)  is  no  longer  there,  because  then  the  condition  has 
changed,  but  (the  fire)  does  not  cross  over  to  splinters,  etc.,  and 
l
Mabatanhasamkhaya-sulta, M I (PTS), p. 256 ff. 
24 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
how to move pdf pages around; pdf page order reverse
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB.NET amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to move pages around in pdf; reorder pages in a pdf
become  a  splinter-fire  and  so  on;  even  so  the  consciousness  that 
arises  on  account  of the  eye  and  visible  forms  arises  in  that  gate 
of sense organ (i.e.,  in the eye),  only when there is the condition of 
the  eye,  visible  forms,  light  and  attention,  but  ceases  then  and 
there  when  it  (the  condition)  is  no  more  there,  because  then  the 
condition  has  changed,  but  (the  consciousness)  does  not  cross 
over  to  the  ear,  etc.,  and  become  auditory  consciousness  and  so 
on  .  . 
The  Buddha  declared  in  unequivocal  terms  that  consciousness 
depends  on  matter,  sensation,  perception  and  mental  formations, 
and  that  it  cannot  exist  independently  of them.  He  says: 
'Consciousness may exist having matter as its means
(riipupayam), 
matter  as  its  object
(rupdrammanani),
matter  as  its  support
(rupa-
patittham),
and  seeking  delight  it  may  grow,  increase  and  develop; 
or  consciousness  may  exist  having  sensation  as  its  means  . . .  or 
perception  as  its  means  . . .  or  mental  formations  as  its  means, 
mental formations  as  its  object,  mental formations  as  its  support, 
and  seeking  delight  it  may  g row,  increase  and  develop. 
'Were  a  man  to  say:  I  shall  show  the  coming,  the  going,  the 
passing  away,  the  arising,  the  growth,  the  increase  or  the 
development  of  consciousness  apart  from  matter,  sensation, 
perception and mental formations, he would  be  speaking  of some-
thing  that  does  not  exist.'
Very  briefly  these  are  the  five  Aggregates.  What  we  call  a 
'being',  or  an  'individual',  or  T,  is  only  a  convenient  name  or  a 
label  given  to  the  combination  of these  five  groups.  They  are  all 
impermanent,  all  constantly  changing.  'Whatever  is  impermanent 
is
dukkha(Yad  aniccam  tam  dukkham).
This  is  the  true  meaning  of 
the  Buddha's  words:  'In  brief the  five  Aggregates  of Attachment 
are
dukkha.'
They  are  not  the  same  for  two  consecutive  moments. 
Here  A  is  not equal  to  A.  They  are  in  a  flux  of momentary  arising 
and  disappearing. 
'O Brahmana, it is just like a mountain river,  flowing far and swift, 
taking  everything  along  with  it;  there  is  no  moment,  no  instant, 
no  second  when  it  stops  flowing,  but  it  goes  on  flowing  and 
1
MA II (PTS), pp. 306-307. 
2
S III (PTS), p.  58. 
25 
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
C# PDF Page Processing: Sort PDF Pages - online C#.NET tutorial page for how to reorder, sort, reorganize or re-arrange PDF document files using C#.NET code.
how to reorder pdf pages in; rearrange pages in pdf document
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split PDF document in both
change pdf page order preview; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
continuing.  So  Brahmana,  is  human  life,  like  a  mountain  river.'
As  the  Buddha  told  Ratthapala:  'The  world  is  in  continuous  flux 
and  is  impermanent.' 
One  thing  disappears,  conditioning  the  appearance  of the  next 
in  a  series  of  cause  and  effect.  There  is  no  unchanging  substance 
in  them.  There  is  nothing  behind  them  that  can  be  called  a  per-
manent  Self
(Atmari),
individuality,  or  anything  that  can  in  reality 
be  called  T.  Every  one  will  agree  that  neither  matter,  nor  sensa-
tion,  nor  perception,  nor  any  one  of those  mental  activities,  nor 
consciousness  can really be  called  'I'.
2
But when these five physical 
and  mental  aggregates  which  are  interdependent  are  working 
together  in  combination  as  a  physio-psychological  machine,
we  get  the  idea  of T.  But this  is  only a  false  idea,  a  mental  forma-
tion,  which  is  nothing  but  one  of  those  52  mental  formations 
of  the  fourth  Aggregate  which  we  have  just  discussed,  namely, 
it  is  the  idea  of self
(sakkaya-ditthi). 
These  five  Aggregates  together,  which  we  popularly  call  a 
'being',  are
dukkha
itself
(samkhara-dukkha).
There  is  no  other 
'being'  or  'I',  standing  behind  these  five  aggregates,  who  experi-
ences
dukkha.
As  Buddhaghosa  says: 
'Mere  suffering  exists,  but  no  sufferer  is  found; 
The  deeds  are,  but  no  doer  is  found.'
There  is  no  unmoving  mover  behind  the  movement.  It  is  only 
movement.  It  is  not  correct  to  say  that  life  is  moving,  but  life  is 
movement  itself.  Life and  movement  are  not two  different things. 
In  other  words,  there is  no  thinker  behind  the  thought.  Thought 
itself is the thinker.  If you remove  the thought, there is  no thinker 
to  be  found.  Here  we  cannot fail to  notice  how  this  Buddhist  view 
is  diametrically  opposed  to  the  Cartesian
cogito  ergo sum:
'I  think, 
therefore  I  am.' 
Now  a  question  may  be  raised  whether  life  has  a  beginning. 
1
A  (Colombo,  1929),  p.  700.  These  words  are  attributed  by  the  Buddha  to  a 
Teacher (Sattba) named Araka who was free from desires and who lived in the dim 
past. It is interesting to remember here the doctrine of Heraclitus (about 500 B.C.) 
that everything is in a state of flux, and his famous statement: 'You cannot step twice 
into the same river, for fresh waters are ever flowing in upon you.' 
2
The doctrine of Anatta 'No-Self' will be discussed in Chapter VI. 
3
In  fact Buddhaghosa  compares a  'being'  to a wooden  mechanism  (daruyanta). 
Vism. (PTS), pp.  594-595-
4
Vism. (PTS), p.  513. 
26 
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; detailed information for reading and editing PDF in RasterEdge Web Document Viewer
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; reorder pages in pdf preview
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; how to move pages around in pdf file
According  to  the  Buddha's  teaching  the  beginning  of  the  life-
stream of living  beings is  unthinkable.  The  believer in  the  creation 
of life  by  G od  may  be  astonished  at  this  reply.  But  if you  were  to 
ask him  'What is the beginning  of G od ?'  he would answer without 
hesitation  'G od  has  no  beginning',  and he  is  not  astonished  at his 
own reply.  The  Buddha  says:  'O  bhikkhus,  this  cycle of continuity 
(samsara)
is  without  a visible  end,  and the first beginning  of beings 
wandering  and  running  round,  enveloped  in  ignorance
(avijjd) 
and  bound  down by the  fetters  of thirst  (desire,
tanha)
is  not to  be 
perceived.'
1
And further,  referring  to ignorance which is  the  main 
cause  of the  continuity  of life the  Buddha  states:  'The  first  begin-
ning  of ignorance
(avijjd)
is  not to  be  perceived  in  such  a  way  as  to 
postulate  that  there  was  no  ignorance  beyond  a  certain  point.'
Thus  it  is  not  possible  to  say  that  there  was  no  life  beyond  a 
certain  definite  point. 
This  in  short  is  the  meaning  of  the  Noble  Truth  of
Dukkha. 
It  is  extremely  important  to  understand  this  First  N oble  Truth 
clearly  because,  as  the  Buddha  says,  'he  who  sees
dukkha
sees  also 
the  arising  of
dukkha,
sees  also  the  cessation  of
dukkha,
and  sees 
also  the  path  leading  to  the  cessation  of
dukkha.'
This  does  not  at  all  make  the  life  of a  Buddhist  melancholy  or 
sorrowful,  as  some  people  wrongly  imagine.  On  the  contrary, 
 true  Buddhist  is  the  happiest  of  beings.  He  has  no  fears  or 
anxieties.  He  is  always  calm  and  serene,  and  cannot  be  upset  or 
dismayed  by  changes  or calamities,  because  he  sees  things  as  they 
are.  The  Buddha  was  never  melancholy  or  gloomy.  He  was 
described  by  his  contemporaries  as  'ever-smiling'
(mihita-
pubbamgama).
In  Buddhist  painting  and  sculpture  the  Buddha  is 
always  represented  with  a  countenance  happy,  serene,  contented 
and  compassionate.  N ever  a  trace  of suffering  or  agony  or  pain 
is  to  be  seen.
4
Buddhist  art  and  architecture,  Buddhist  temples 
1
S II (PTS), pp. 178-179; HI pp. 149, mi-
3
S V (PTS), p. 437. In fact the Buddha says that he who sees any one of the Four 
Noble  Truths sees  the  other  three  as  well.  These  Four Noble  Truths  are  inter-
connected. 
4
There is a statue from Gandhara, and also one from Fou-Kien, China, depicting 
Gotama as an ascetic, emaciated, with all his ribs showing. But this was before his 
Enlightenment,  when he was  submitting  himself to  the  rigorous  ascetic  practices 
which he condemned after he became Buddha. 
27 
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
how to reorder pages in pdf; reorder pages in pdf reader
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents. View, edit, insert, delete and mark up pages in multi Easily add, modify, reorder and delete TIFF tags; Perfectly
reordering pages in pdf document; reverse page order pdf
never  give  the  impression  of  gloom  or  sorrow,  but  produce  an 
atmosphere  of calm  and  serene  joy. 
Although  there  is  suffering  in  life,  a  Buddhist  should  not  be 
gloomy  over  it,  should  not be  angry  or  impatient  at  it.  One  of the 
principal  evils  in  life,  according  to  Buddhism,  is  'repugnance'  or 
hatred.  Repugnance
(pratigha)
is  explained  as  'ill-will  with  regard 
to living beings,  with regard to suffering and  wit'  regard to things 
pertaining  to  suffering.  Its  function  is  to  produce  a  basis  for  un-
happy states and bad conduct.'
1
Thus it  is wrong to be impatient at 
suffering.  Being impatient or angry  at suffering does not remove it. 
On  the  contrary, it adds  a little  more to  one's troubles,  and aggra-
vates  and  exacerbates  a  situation  already  disagreeable.  What  is 
necessary  is  not  anger  or  impatience,  but  the  understanding  of 
the  question  of  suffering,  how  it  comes  about,  and  how  to  get 
rid  of it,  and  then to  work  accordingly with  patience,  intelligence, 
determination  and  energy. 
There  are  two  ancient  Buddhist  texts  called  the
Theragatha
and 
Therigatha
which  are  full  of the  joyful  utterances  of the  Buddha's 
disciples,  both  male  and  female,  wh o  found  peace  and  happiness 
in  life  through  his  teaching.  The  king  of  Kosala  once  told  the 
Buddha that unlike many  a  disciple  of other  religious  systems  wh o 
looked  haggard,  coarse,  pale,  emaciated  and  unprepossessing,  his 
disciples  were  'joyful  and  elated
(hattha-pahattha),
jubilant  and 
exultant
(udaggudagga),
enjoying  the  spiritual  life
(abhiratariipa), 
with  faculties  pleased
(pinitindrija),
free  from  anxiety
(appossukka), 
serene
(pannaloma),
peaceful
(paradavutta)
and  living  with  a 
gazelle's  mind
(migabhiitena  cetasa),
i.e.,  light-hearted.'  The  king 
added that he  believed that  this  healthy  disposition  was  due to  the 
fact  that  'these  venerable  ones  had  certainly  realized  the  great 
and  full  significance  of the  Blessed  One's  teaching.'
Buddhism  is  quite  opposed  to  the  melancholic,  sorrowful, 
penitent  and  gloomy  attitude  of  mind  which  is  considered  a 
hindrance  to  the  realization  of  Truth.  On  the  other  hand,  it  is 
interesting  to  remember  here  that  joy
(piti)
is  one  of  the  seven 
Bojjbamgas
or  'Factors  of Enlightenment',  the  essential  qualities  to 
be  cultivated  for  the  realization  of Nirvana.
1
Abhisamuc, p. 7. 
2
M II (PTS), p.  121. 
3
For these Seven Factors of Enlightenment see Chapter on Meditation, p. 75. 
28 
CHAPTER  III 
TH E  S E C O N D  N O B L E  T R U T H : 
 AMU  DAY A:
'The  Arising  of
Dukkba' 
Th e  Second  Noble  Truth is  that  of the  arising  or  origin  of
dukkha 
(Dukkhasamudaja-arijasacca).
The  most  popular  and  well-known 
definition  of the  Second  Truth  as  found  in innumerable  places  in 
the  original  texts  runs  as  follows: 
'It  is  this  "thirst"  (craving,
tanha)
which  produces  re-existence 
and  re-becoming
(ponobhavika),
and  which  is  bound  up  with 
passionate  greed
(nandiragasahagata),
and which finds  fresh  delight 
now  here  and  n ow  there
(tatratatrabhinandini),
namely,  (i)  thirst 
for  sense-pleasures
(kama-tanha),
(2)  thirst  for  existence  and  be-
coming
(1bhava-tanha)
and  (3)  thirst  for  non-existence  (self-
annihilation,
vibhava-tanha).'
It  is  this  'thirst',  desire,  greed,  craving,  manifesting  itself  in 
various  ways,  that  gives  rise  to  all  forms  of  suffering  and  the 
continuity  of beings.  But it  should  not be  taken as the  first  cause, 
for  there  is  no  first  cause  possible  as,  according  to  Budd-
hism,  everything  is  relative  and  inter-dependent.  Eve n  this 
'thirst',
tanha,
which  is  considered  as  the  cause  or  origin  of 
dukkha,
depends  for  its  arising
(samudaja)
on  something  else, 
which is sensation
(vedana),
2
and sensation arises depending on con-
tact
(phassa),
and  so  on  and  so  forth  goes  on  the  circle  which  is 
known as  Conditioned Genesis
(Paticca-samuppada),
which we will 
discuss  later.
So
tanha,
'thirst',  is  not the  first  or  the  only  cause  of the  arising 
of
dukkha.
But  it  is  the  most  palpable  and  immediate  cause,  the 
'principal  thing'  and  the  'all-pervading  thing'.
4
Hence  in  certain 
1
Mhvg. (Alutgama, 1922), p. 9; S V (PTS), p. 421 and passim. 
2
Vedanasamudaya  tanhasamudayo.  M I (PTS), p.  51. 
3
See p. 53. 
4
Abhisamuc,  p.  43, pradhanyartha,  sarvatragartha. 
29 
places  of  the  original  Pali  texts  themselves  the  definition  of 
samudaya
or  the  origin  of
dukkha
includes  other  defilements  and 
impurities
(kilesa,  sasava  dhamma),
in  addition  to
tanha
'thirst' 
which  is  always  given  the  first  place.
1
Within  the  necessarily 
limited space  of our  discussion,  it will be  sufficient if we  remember 
that this  'thirst' has  as  its  centre the  false idea of self arising out of 
ignorance. 
Here the term 'thirst' includes not only desire for, and attachment 
to,  sense-pleasures,  wealth  and  power,  but  also  desire  for,  and 
attachment to,  ideas  and  ideals,  views,  opinions, theories,  concep-
tions  and  beliefs
(dhamma-tanha).
2
According  to  the  Buddha's 
analysis,  all  the  troubles  and  strife  in  the  world,  from  little 
personal  quarrels  in  families  to  great  wars  between  nations  and 
countries,  arise  out  of  this  selfish  'thirst'.
3
From  this  point  of 
view,  all  economic,  political and  social problems are  rooted in this 
selfish  'thirst'.  Great  statesmen  who  try  to  settle  international 
disputes  and  talk  of war  and  peace  only  in  economic  and  political 
terms  touch  the  superficialities,  and  never  go  deep  into  the 
real  root  of  the  problem.  As  the  Buddha  told  Rattapala:  'The 
world  lacks  and  hankers,  and  is  enslaved  to  "thirst"
(tanhadaso).' 
Every  one  will admit that all the evils  in the world  are  produced 
by  selfish  desire.  This  is  not  difficult  to  understand.  But  how  this 
desire,  'thirst',  can  produce  re-existence  and  re-becoming
(pono-
bhavika)
is  a  problem  not  so easy  to  grasp.  It is  here  that  we  have 
to discuss  the  deeper philosophical side of the  Second  Noble Truth 
corresponding  to  the  philosophical  side  of the  First  Noble  Truth. 
Here  we  must  have  some  idea  about  the  theory  of
karma
and 
rebirth. 
There  are  four  Nutriments
(ahara)
in  the  sense  of  'cause'  or 
'condition'  necessary  for  the  existence  and  continuity  of  beings: 
(i)  ordinary  material  food
(kabalinkdrahara),  (z)
contact  of  our 
sense-organs (including  mind)  with the  external  world
(phassahara), 
(3)  consciousness
(vinnanahara)
and  (4)  mental  volition  or  will 
(manosancetanahara).
1
See Vibh. (PTS), p. 106  ff. 
I (PTS), p. 51; S II p. 72; Vibh. p. 380. 
3
M I, p.  86. 
4
ibid., p. 48. 
JO 
Of  these  four,  the  last  mentioned  'mental  volition'  is  the  will 
to  live,  to  exist,  to  re-exist,  to  continue,  to  become  more  and 
more.
1
It  creates  the  root  of  existence  and  continuity,  striving 
forward  by  way  of  good  and  bad  actions
(kusalakusalakamma).
It  is  the  same  as  'Volition'
(cetana).
3
We  have  seen  earlier
4
that 
volition is  karma,  as  the  Buddha himself has  defined  it.  Referring 
to  'Mental  volition'  just  mentioned  above  the  Buddha  says: 
'When  one  understands  the  nutriment  of  mental  volition  one 
understands  the  three  forms  of  'thirst'
(tanha).'
6
Thus  the  terms 
'thirst',  'volition',  'mental  volition'  and  'karma'  all  denote  the 
same  thing:  they  denote  the  desire,  the  will  to  be,  to  exist,  to 
re-exist,  to  become  more  and  more,  to  grow  more  and  more,  to 
accumulate  more  and  more.  This  is  the  cause  of  the  arising  of 
dukkha,
and  this  is  found  within  the  Aggregate  of  Mental  For-
mations,  one  of the  Five  Aggregates  which  constitute  a  being.
Here  is  one  of  the  most  important  and  essential  points  in  the 
Buddha's  teaching.  We  must  therefore  clearly  and  carefully  mark 
and  remember  that  the  cause,  the  germ,  of the  arising  of
dukkha 
is  within
dukkha
itself,  and  not  outside;  and  we  must  equally 
well  remember that the  cause,  the  germ,  of the  cessation of
dukkha, 
of  the  destruction  of
dukkha,
is  also  within
dukkha
itself,  and  not 
outside.  This  is  what  is  meant  by  the  well-known  formula 
often  found  in  original  Pali  texts:
Yam  kind  samudajadhammam 
sabbam  tarn  nirodhadhammam
'Whatever  is  of the  nature  of  arising, 
all that  is  of the nature  of cessation.'
7
A being,  a thing, or a system, 
if  it  has  within  itself  the  nature  of arising,  the  nature  of  coming 
into  being,  has  also  within  itself the  nature,  the  germ, of its  own 
cessation  and  destruction.  Thus
dukkha
(Five  Aggregates)  has 
within  itself  the  nature  of  its  own  arising,  and  has  also  within 
1
It is interesting to compare this 'mental volition' with 'libido' in modern psychol-
ogy. 
2
MA I (PTS), p. 210. 
3
Manosancetand'  ti cetana eva vuccati.  MA I (PTS),  p.  209. 
4
See above p.  22. 
5
S II (PTS), p. 100. The three forms of 'thirst' are: (1) Thirst for sense-pleasures, 
(2) Thirst for existence and becoming, and (3) Thirst for non-existence, as given in 
the  definition  of samudaya  'arising of dukkha'  above. 
6
See above p. 22. 
7
 III  (PTS),  p.  280;  S IV, pp.  47,  107; V, p.  423  and passim. 
31 
itself the  nature  of its  own  cessation.  This  point  will  be  taken  up 
again  in  the  discussion  of the  Third  N oble  Truth,
Nirodha. 
Now,  the  Pali  word
kamma
or  the  Sanskrit  word
karma
(from 
the root  kr to do)  literally means  'action',  'doing'.  But in the  Budd-
hist  theory  of  karma  it  has  a  specific  meaning:  it  means  only 
'volitional  action',  not  all  action.  N or  does  it  mean  the  result  of 
karma  as  many  people  wrongly  and  loosely  use  it.  In  Buddhist 
terminology karma never means its  effect; its effect is  known as the 
'fruit'  or  the  'result'  of  karma
(kamma-phala
or
kamma-vipaka). 
Volition  may  relatively  be  good  or  bad,  just  as  a  desire  may 
relatively  be  good  or  bad.  So  karma  may  be  good  or  bad  rela-
tively.  G ood  karma
(kusala)
produces  good  effects,  and  bad 
karma
(akusala)
produces  bad  effects.  'Thirst',  volition,  karma, 
whether  good  or  bad,  has  one  force  as  its  effect:  force  to  con-
tinue—to  continue  in  a  good  or  bad  direction.  Whether  good  or 
bad  it  is  relative,  and  is  within  the  cycle  of  continuity
(samsara). 
An  Arahant,  though  he  acts,  does  not  accumulate  karma,  because 
he  is  free  from  the  false  idea  of  self,  free  from  the  'thirst'  for 
continuity  and  becoming,  free  from  all  other  defilements  and 
impurities
(ktlesa,  sasava  dhamma).
For  him there  is  no rebirth. 
The theory of karma should not be confused with so-called 'moral 
justice'  or  'reward  and  punishment'.  The  idea  of  moral  justice, 
or reward and punishment,  arises out of the conception of a supreme 
being,  a  God,  wh o  sits  in  judgment,  wh o  is  a  law-giver  and  wh o 
decides  what  is  right and  wrong.  The term  'justice'  is  ambiguous 
and  dangerous,  and  in  its  name  more  harm  than  good  is  done  to 
humanity.  Th e  theory  of karma  is  the  theory  of  cause  and  effect, 
of  action  and  reaction;  it  is  a  natural  law,  which  has  nothing  to 
do  with  the  idea  of  justice  or  reward  and  punishment.  Every 
volitional  action  produces  its  effects  or  results.  If  a  good  action 
produces  good effects  and a bad  action bad  effects, it is not justice, 
or  reward,  or  punishment  meted  out  by  anybody  or  any  power 
sitting  in  judgment  on  your  action,  but this  is  in virtue  of its  own 
nature, its  own law. This  is not  difficult to understand.  But what is 
difficult  is  that,  according  to  the  karma  theory,  the  effects  of  a 
volitional action may continue to manifest themselves even in a life 
after  death.  Here  we  have  to  explain  what  death  is  according  to 
Buddhism. 
We  have  seen  earlier that  a  being  is  nothing  but  a  combination 
32 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested