c# pdf viewer : Move pages within pdf control application system azure web page asp.net console what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-6-part1090

Sphere  of Nothingness  . . .  or  on  the  Sphere of Neither-perception 
nor  Non-perception  and  develop  a  mind  conforming  thereto, 
that  is  a  mental  creation.'  Then  he  neither  mentally  creates  nor 
wills  continuity  and  becoming
(bhava)
or  annihilation
(vibhava).
As  he does not  construct or does  not will continuity and  becoming 
or  annihilation,  he  does  not  cling  to  anything  in  the  world;  as  he 
does  not  cling,  he  is  not  anxious;  as  he  is  not  anxious,  he  is 
completely  calmed  within  (fully  blown  out  within
paccattamyeva 
parinibbayati).
And  he  knows :  'Finished  is  birth,  lived  is  pure 
life, what should be done is  done, nothing more is left to be done.'
Now,  when  he  experiences  a  pleasant,  unpleasant  or  neutral 
sensation,  he  knows  that  it  is  impermanent,  that  it  does  not  bind 
him,  that  it is  not  experienced  with  passion.  Whatever  may be  the 
sensation, he  experiences it without being  bound  to it
(yisamyutto). 
He  knows  that  all  those  sensations  will  be  pacified  with  the 
dissolution  of the body,  just  as  the  flame  of a  lamp  goes  out  when 
oil  and  wick  give  out. 
'Therefore,  O  bhikkhu,  a  person  so  endowed  is  endowed  with 
the  absolute  wisdom,  for  the  knowledge  of  the  extinction  of  all 
dukkha
is  the  absolute  noble  wisdom. 
'This  his  deliverance,  founded  on  Truth,  is  unshakable.  O 
bhikkhu,  that  which is  unreality
(mosadhamma)
is  false;  that which 
is  reality
(amosadhamma),
Nibbana,  is  Truth
(Sacca).
Therefore,  O 
bhikkhu,  a  person  so  endowed  is  endowed  with  this  Absolute 
Truth.  For,  the  Absolute  Noble  Truth
(paramam  ariyasaccam)
is 
Nibbana,  which  is  Reality.' 
Elsewhere  the  Buddha  unequivocally  uses  the  word  Truth  in 
place  of  Nibbana:  'I  will  teach  you  the  Truth  and  the  Path 
leading  to  the  Truth.'
3
Here  Truth  definitely  means  Nirvana. 
Now,  what  is  Absolute  Truth?  According  to  Buddhism,  the 
Absolute Truth  is  that  there  is nothing absolute in the  world,  that 
everything  is  relative,  conditioned  and  impermanent,  and  that 
there  is  no  unchanging,  everlasting,  absolute  substance  like 
Self,  Soul  or
Atman
within  or  without.  This  is  the  Absolute 
1
This means that he does not produce new  karma, because now he is free from 
'thirst', will, volition. 
2
This expression means that now he is an Arahant. 
3
S V (PTS), p.  369. 
39 
Move pages within pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pages in pdf reader; change page order in pdf reader
Move pages within pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reverse pages in pdf; reordering pages in pdf document
Truth.  Truth  is  never  negative,  though  there  is  a  popular  expres-
sion  as  negative  truth.  The  realization  of  this  Truth,  i.e.,  to  see 
things  as  they  are
{jathdbhiitam)
without  illusion  or  ignorance 
(avijja),
1
is  the  extinction  of  craving  'thirst'
(Tanhakkhaya),
and 
the  cessation
(Nirodha)
of
dukkha,
which  is  Nirvana.  It  is  interest-
ing  and  useful  to  remember  here  the  Mahayana  view  of Nirvana 
as  not  being  different  from
Samsara,
2 The same thing is Samsara 
or  Nirvana  according  to  the  way  you  look  at  it—subjectively  or 
objectively.  This  Mahayana  view  was  probably  developed  out  of 
the  ideas  found  in  the  original  Theravada  Pali  texts,  to  which  we 
have  just  referred  in  our  brief discussion. 
It  is  incorrect to  think  that  Nirvana  is  the  natural  result  of the 
extinction  of craving.  Nirvana  is  not  the  result  of  anything.  If it 
would  be  a  result,  then  it would  be  an  effect  produced  by a cause. 
It  would  be
samkhata
'produced'  and  'conditioned'.  Nirvana  is 
neither cause nor effect. It is beyond cause and effect. Truth is not a 
result  nor  an  effect.  It  is  not  produced  like  a  mystic,  spiritual, 
mental state,  such as
dhyana
or
samadhi.
T R U T H IS.  N I R V A N A IS . 
The  only  thing  you  can  do  is  to  see  it,  to  realize  it.  There  is  a 
path  leading  to  the  realization  of Nirvana.  But  Nirvana  is  not the 
result  of this  path.
3
Y ou  may  get  to  the  mountain  along  a  path, 
but  the  mountain  is  not the  result,  not  an  effect  of the  path.  You 
may  see  a  light,  but  the  light  is  not  the  result  of  your  eyesight. 
People  often  ask:  What  is  there  after  Nirvana?  This  question 
cannot  arise,  because  Nirvana  is  the  Ultimate  Truth.  If  it  is 
Ultimate,  there  can  be  nothing  after  it.  If there  is  anything  after 
Nirvana,  then  that  will  be  the  Ultimate  Truth  and  not  Nirvana. 
 monk  named  Radha  put  this  question  to  the  Buddha  in  a 
different  form:  'For  what  purpose  (or  end)  is  Nirvana?'  This 
question  presupposes  something after Nirvana,  when  it postulates 
some  purpose  or  end  for  it.  So  the  Buddha  answered:  'O 
Radha,  this  question  could  not catch its  limit (i.e.,  it is  beside  the 
1
Cf. Lanka, p. 200; 'O Mahamati, Nirvana means to see the state of things as they 
are.' 
2
Nagarjuna clearly says that 'Samsara has  no difference whatever  from  Nirvana 
and Nirvana has no difference whatever from Samsara.' (Madbya. Kari XXV, 19). 
3
It is useful to remember here that among nine supra-mundane dharmas (navalo-
kuttara-dbamma) Nirvana is beyond magga (path) and pbala (fruition). 
40 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF of adding and inserting a new blank page to the existing PDF document within a well
how to move pages in a pdf document; how to rearrange pages in pdf document
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides order within C#.NET
how to move pages in pdf acrobat; how to reorder pages in pdf file
point).  One  lives  the  holy  life  with  Nirvana  as  its  final  plunge 
(into  the  Absolute  Truth),  as  its  goal,  as  its  ultimate  end.'
Some  popular  inaccurately  phrased  expressions  like  'The 
Buddha  entered  into  Nirvana  or  Parinirvana  after  his  death' 
have  given  rise  to  many  imaginary  speculations  about  Nirvana.
The  moment  you  hear  the  phrase  that  'the  Buddha  entered  into 
Nirvana  or  Parinirvana',  you  take  Nirvana  to  be  a  state,  or  a 
realm,  or  a  position  in  which  there  is  some  sort  of existence,  and 
try  to  imagine  it  in  terms  of the  senses  of the  word  'existence'  as 
it is known to  you.  This popular expression  'entered into Nirvana' 
has  no  equivalent  in  the  original  texts.  There  is  no  such  thing  as 
'entering  into  Nirvana  after  death'.  There  is  a  word
parinibbuto 
used  to  denote  the  death  of the  Buddha  or  an  Arahant  who  has 
realized  Nirvana,  but  it  does  not  mean  'entering  into  N irvana'. 
Parinibbuto
simply  means  'fully  passed  away',  'fully  blown  out'  or 
'fully  extinct',  because  the  Buddha  or  an  Arahant  has  no  re-exis-
tence  after  his  death. 
Now  another  question  arises:  What  happens  to  the  Buddha  or 
an  Arahant  after  his  death,
parinirvana?
This  comes  under  the 
category  of  unanswered  questions
(avjakata).
3
Even  when  the 
Buddha  spoke  about  this,  he  indicated  that  no  words  in  our 
vocabulary  could  express  what  happens  to  an  Arahant  after  his 
death.  In  reply  to  a  Parivrajaka  named  Vaccha,  the  Buddha  said 
that  terms  like  'born'  or  'not  born'  do  not  apply  in the  case  of an 
Arahant,  because  those  things—matter,  sensation,  perception, 
mental  activities,  consciousness—with  which the terms  like  'born' 
and  'not  born'  are  associated,  are  completely  destroyed  and  up-
rooted,  never  to  rise  again  after  his  death.
An  Arahant  after  his  death  is  often  compared  to  a  fire  gone 
out  when  the  supply  of  wood  is  over,  or  to  the  flame  of  a 
lamp gone  out  when the  wick  and  oil are  finished.
5
Here  it  should 
1
S III (PTS), p. 189. 
2
There are some who write  'after the  Nirvana of the  Buddha' instead  of  'after 
the Parinirvana of the Buddha'. 'After the Nirvana of the Buddha' has no meaning, 
and the expression is unknown  in Buddhist literature.  It is always 'after the  Pari-
nirvana of the Buddha'. 
3
S iv (PTS), p. 375  f. 
4
M I (PTS), p. 486. 
5
Ibid. I, p. 487; III, p. 245; Sn (PTS), v. 232 (p. 41). 
4
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
Our supported image and document formats are: TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and DICOM. It represents a high-level model of the pages within a Tiff file.
move pdf pages in preview; reverse pdf page order online
C# TIFF: How to Delete Page(s) from Multi-page TIFF File Using
Word, Excel, PowerPoint to Tiff. Convert PDF to Tiff. Page Edit. Insert Pages into Tiff File. Delete Tiff Pages. Move Tiff Page Position. Rotate a Tiff Page. Extract
how to move pages within a pdf document; move pages in pdf acrobat
be  clearly  and  distinctly  understood,  without  any  confusion,  that 
what  is  compared  to  a  flame  or  a  fire  gone  out  is  not  Nirvana, 
but  the  'being'  composed  of  the  Five  Aggregates  who  realized 
Nirvana.  This  point  has  to  be  emphasized  because  many  people, 
even  some  great  scholars,  have  misunderstood  and  misinterpreted 
this simile as  referring to  Nirvana.  Nirvana is  never compared  to a 
fire  or  a  lamp  gone  out. 
There  is  another  popular  question:  If  there  is  no  Self,  no 
Atman,
who  realizes  Nirvana?  Before  we  g o  on  to  Nirvana,  let 
us  ask  the  question:  Wh o  thinks  now,  if  there  is  no  Self?  We 
have  seen earlier  that  it is  the  thought  that  thinks,  that  there  is  no 
thinker  behind  the  thought.  In  the  same  way,  it  is  wisdom 
(patina),
realization,  that  realizes.  There  is  no  other  self behind  the 
realization.  In  the  discussion  of  the  origin  of
dukkha
we  saw  that 
whatever it  may  be—whether  being,  or thing,  or  system—if it is  of 
the  nature  of  arising,  it  has  within  itself  the  nature,  the  germ,  of 
its  cessation,  its  destruction.  N o w
dukkha,  samsara,
the  cycle  of 
continuity,  is  of the  nature  of arising;  it  must also  be  of the  nature 
of  cessation.
Dukkha
arises  because  of  'thirst'
(tanha),
and  it 
ceases  because  of wisdom
(panha).
'Thirst'  and  wisdom  are  both 
within  the  Five  Aggregates,  as  we  saw  earlier.
Thus,  the  germ  of their  arising  as  well  as  that  of their  cessation 
are  both  within  the  Five  Aggregates.  This  is  the  real  meaning  of 
the  Buddha's  well-known  statement:  'Within  this  fathom-long 
sentient  body  itself,  I  postulate  the  world,  the  arising  of  the 
world, the cessation  of the world,  and the  path leading to the  cessa-
tion  of the  world.'
2
This  means  that  all  the  Four Noble  Truths  are 
found within the Five  Aggregates,  i.e.,  within  ourselves. (Here the 
word  'world'
(loka)
is  used  in  place  of
dukkha).
This  also  means 
that  there  is  no  external  power  that  produces  the  arising  and  the 
cessation  of
dukkha. 
When  wisdom  is  developed  and  cultivated  according  to  the 
Fourth  Noble Truth (the  next  to  be  taken  up),  it  sees  the  secret  of 
life,  the reality of things as  they are.  When the  secret is  discovered, 
when  the  Truth  is  seen,  all the forces  which feverishly produce the 
continuity  of
samsara
in  illusion  become  calm  and  incapable  of 
1
See Aggregate of Formations above pp.  22,  31. 
2
A (Colombo,  1929)  p.  218. 
42 
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
images codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; RasterEdge JBIG2 codec SDK controls within C# project Move license text to the new project folder
reorder pages of pdf; how to reorder pages in pdf online
C# PDF Convert to Jpeg SDK: Convert PDF to JPEG images in C#.net
Thumbnails can be created from PDF pages. quickly convert a large-size multi-page PDF document to of high-quality separate JPEG image files within .NET projects
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; reorder pdf pages in preview
producing  any  more  karma-formations,  because  there  is  no  more 
illusion,  no  more  'thirst'  for  continuity.  It  is  like  a  mental  disease 
which  is  cured  when  the  cause  or  the  secret  of  the  malady  is 
discovered  and  seen  by  the  patient. 
In  almost  all  religions  the  summum  bonum  can  be  attained  only 
after  death.  But  Nirvana  can  be  realized  in  this  very  life;  it  is  not 
necessary  to  wait  till  you  die  to  'attain'  it. 
He  who  has  realized  the  Truth,  Nirvana,  is  the  happiest  being 
in the  world.  He  is  free  from  all  'complexes'  and  obsessions,  the 
worries  and  troubles  that  torment  others.  His  mental  health  is 
perfect.  He  does  not  repent  the  past,  nor  does  he  brood  over  the 
future.  He  lives  fully  in  the  present.
1
Therefore  he  appreciates 
and  enjoys  things  in  the  purest  sense  without  self-projections.  He 
is  joyful,  exultant,  enjoying  the  pure  life,  his  faculties  pleased, 
free  from  anxiety,  serene  and  peaceful.
2
As  he  is  free  from  selfish 
desire, hatred, ignorance,  conceit,  pride,  and all  such  'defilements', 
he  is pure and gentle,  full of universal love,  compassion,  kindness, 
sympathy,  understanding and  tolerance.  His  service to  others  is  of 
the  purest,  for  he  has  no  thought  of  self.  He  gains  nothing, 
accumulates  nothing,  not  even  anything  spiritual,  because  he  is 
free  from  the  illusion  of  Self,  and  the  'thirst'  for  becoming. 
Nirvana  is  beyond  all  terms  of  duality  and  relativity.  It  is 
therefore  beyond  our  conceptions  of  good  and  evil,  right  and 
wrong,  existence  and  non-existence.  Even  the  word  'happiness' 
(sukha)  which  is  used  to  describe  Nirvana  has  an  entirely  different 
sense  here.  Sariputta  once  said:  'O  friend,  Nirvana  is  happiness! 
Nirvana  is  happiness!'  Then  Udayi  asked:  'But,  friend  Sariputta, 
what happiness  can it be if there is  no  sensation ?'  Sariputta's  reply 
was  highly  philosophical  and  beyond  ordinary  comprehension: 
'That  there  is  no  sensation  itself is  happiness'. 
Nirvana  is  beyond  logic  and  reasoning (atakkavacara).  However 
much  we  may  engage,  often  as  a  vain  intellectual  pastime,  in 
highly  speculative  discussions  regarding  Nirvana  or  Ultimate 
Truth  or  Reality,  we  shall  never  understand  it  that  way.  A  child 
in  the  kindergarten  should  not  quarrel  about  the  theory  of 
relativity.  Instead,  if he follows his studies patiently and diligently, 
'SI(PTS),
P
.
5
2
M II (PTS), p.  121. 
43 
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract View PDF document in continuous pages display mode Search text within file by using Ignore case or
reorder pages in pdf; reorder pages in pdf preview
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
It enables you to move out useless Word document pages simply with a You are capable of extracting pages from Microsoft Word document within C#.NET
change pdf page order online; pdf reverse page order
one  day  he  may  understand  it.  Nirvana  is  'to  be  realized  by  the 
wise  within  themselves'  (paccattam  veditabbo  vinnuhi).  If we  follow 
the  Path  patiently  and  with  diligence,  train  and  purify  ourselves 
earnestly,  and  attain  the  necessary  spiritual  development,  we  may 
one  day  realize  it  within  ourselves—without taxing  ourselves  with 
puzzling  and  high-sounding  words. 
Let  us  therefore  now  turn  to  the  Path  which  leads  to  the 
realization  of  Nirvana. 
44 
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy View PDF document in continuous pages display mode. Search text within file by using Ignore case or
how to move pages around in a pdf document; pdf rearrange pages
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET code. All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a short time in VB.NET class application. In addition, texts
change pdf page order reader; move pages in pdf document
CHAPTER  V 
TH E  F O U R T H  N O B L E  T R U T H : 
MAGGA:  'The  Path' 
The  F ourth  Noble  Truth  is  that  of  the  Way  leading  to  the 
Cessation  of  Dukkha  (J)ukkhanirodhagaminlpatipada-ariyasaccd). 
This  is  known  as  the  'Middle  Path' (Majjhima Patipada),  because it 
avoids  two  extremes:  one  extreme  being  the  search  for happiness 
through  the  pleasures  of  the  senses,  which  is  'low,  common, 
unprofitable  and  the  way  of the  ordinary  people';  the  other  being 
the  search  for  happiness  through  self-mortification  in  different 
forms  of asceticism,  which is  'painful,  unworthy and unprofitable'. 
Having  himself first  tried  these  two  extremes,  and  having  found 
them  to  be  useless,  the  Buddha  discovered  through  personal 
experience  the  Middle  Path  'which  gives  vision  and  knowledge, 
which  leads  to  Calm,  Insight,  Enlightenment,  Nirvana'.  This 
Middle  Path  is  generally  referred  to  as  the  Noble  Eightfold  Path 
(Ariya-Atthangika-Magga),  because  it  is  composed  of  eight 
categories  or  divisions:  namely, 
1.  Right  Understanding  (Samma  ditthi), 
2.  Right  Thought  (Samma  sankappa), 
3.  Right  Speech  (Samma  vaca), 
4.  Right  Action  (Samma  kammanta), 
5.  Right  Livelihood  (Samma  ajiva), 
6.  Right  Effort  (Samma  vayama), 
7.  Right  Mindfulness  (Samma  sati), 
8.  Right  Concentration  (Samma  samadhi). 
Practically  the  whole  teaching  of  the  Buddha,  to  which  he 
devoted  himself  during  45  years,  deals  in  some  way  or  other  with 
this  Path.  He  explained  it  in  different  ways  and  in  different words 
to  different  people,  according  to  the  stage  of  their  development 
and  their  capacity  to  understand  and  follow him.  But  the  essence 
45 
of  those  many  thousand  discourses  scattered  in  the  Buddhist 
Scriptures  is  found  in  the  Noble  Eightfold  Path. 
It  should  not  be  thought  that  the  eight  categories  or  divisions 
of the  Path  should  be  followed  and  practised  one after  the  other in 
the  numerical  order  as  given  in  the  usual  list  above.  But  they  are 
to  be  developed  more  or  less  simultaneously,  as  far  as  possible 
according  to  the  capacity  of  each  individual.  They  are  all  linked 
together  and  each  helps  the  cultivation  of the  others. 
These  eight  factors  aim  at  promoting  and  perfecting  the  three 
essentials  of  Buddhist  training  and  discipline:  namely:  (a) 
Ethical  Conduct  (Silo),  (b)  Mental  Discipline  (Samadhi)  and  (c) 
Wisdom  (Panna).
1
It  will  therefore  be  more  helpful  for  a  coherent 
and  better  understanding  of the  eight  divisions  of the  Path,  if  we 
group  them  and  explain  them  according  to  these  three  heads. 
Ethical  Conduct (Si/a)  is  built  on  the  vast  conception  of univer-
sal  love  and  compassion  for  all  living  beings,  on  which  the 
Buddha's  teaching  is  based.  It  is  regrettable  that  many  scholars 
forget this  great ideal of the Buddha's  teaching, and indulge in only 
dry  philosophical  and  metaphysical  divagations  when  they  talk 
and  write  about  Buddhism.  The  Buddha  gave  his  teaching  'for 
the  good  of  the  many,  for  the  happiness  of  the  many,  out  of 
compassion  for  the  world'  (bahujanahitaya  bahujanasukhdya  lokanu-
kampaya). 
According  to  Buddhism  for  a  man  to  be  perfect  there  are  two 
qualities  that  he  should  develop  equally:  compassion  {karuna) 
on  one  side,  and  wisdom  (panna) on  the  other.  Here  compassion 
represents love, charity, kindness, tolerance and such noble qualities 
on  the emotional  side,  or qualities of the heart, while wisdom would 
stand  for  the  intellectual  side  or  the  qualities  of the  mind.  If one 
develops  only  the  emotional  neglecting  the  intellectual,  one  may 
become  a  good-hearted  fool;  while  to  develop  only  the  intellec-
tual  side  neglecting  the  emotional  may  turn  one  into  a  hard-
hearted  intellect  without  feeling  for  others.  Therefore,  to  be 
perfect  one  has  to  develop  both  equally.  That  is  the  aim  of  the 
Buddhist way  of life:  in it wisdom  and  compassion are  inseparably 
linked  together,  as  we  shall  see  later. 
Now,  in  Ethical  Conduct  (Sila),  based  on  love  and  compassion, 
1
MI(PTS), p. 501. 
46 
are  included  three  factors  of  the  Noble  Eightfold  Path:  namely, 
Right  Speech,  Right  Action  and  Right  Livelihood.  (Nos.  3,  4  and 
 in  the  list). 
Right  speech  means  abstention  (1)  from  telling  lies,  (2)  from 
backbiting  and  slander  and  talk  that  may  bring  about  hatred, 
enmity,  disunity  and  disharmony  among  individuals  or  groups  of 
people,  (3)  from  harsh,  rude,  impolite,  malicious  and  abusive 
language,  and  (4)  from idle,  useless  and  foolish  babble  and  gossip. 
When  one  abstains  from  these  forms  of wrong and harmful speech 
one  naturally  has  to  speak  the  truth,  has  to  use  words  that  are 
friendly  and  benevolent,  pleasant  and  gentle,  meaningful  and  use-
ful.  One  should  not  speak  carelessly:  speech  should  be  at  the 
right  time  and  place.  If  one  cannot  say  something  useful,  one 
should  keep  'noble  silence'. 
Right  Action  aims  at  promoting  moral,  honourable  and  peace-
ful conduct.  It admonishes  us  that we should abstain from destroy-
ing  life,  from  stealing,  from  dishonest  dealings,  from  illegitimate 
sexual  intercourse,  and  that  we  should  also  help  others  to  lead  a 
peaceful  and  honourable  life  in  the  right  way. 
Right  Livelihood  means  that  one  should  abstain  from  making 
one's  living  through  a  profession  that  brings  harm  to  others, 
such  as  trading  in  arms  and  lethal  weapons,  intoxicating  drinks, 
poisons,  killing  animals,  cheating,  etc.,  and  should  live  by  a 
profession  which  is  honourable,  blameless  and  innocent  of  harm 
to  others.  One  can  clearly  see  here  that  Buddhism  is  strongly 
opposed  to  any  kind  of war,  when  it  lays  down  that  trade  in  arms 
and  lethal  weapons  is  an  evil  and  unjust  means  of livelihood. 
These  three  factors  (Right  Speech,  Right  Action  and  Right 
Livelihood)  of  the  Eightfold  Path  constitute  Ethical  Conduct. 
It  should  be  realized  that  the  Buddhist  ethical  and  moral  conduct 
aims  at  promoting  a  happy  and  harmonious  life  both  for  the 
individual  and  for  society.  This  moral  conduct  is  considered  as 
the  indispensable  foundation  for  all  higher  spiritual  attainments. 
No spiritual  development is  possible  without this  moral basis. 
Next comes  Mental Discipline,  in  which are included three other 
factors  of the  Eightfold  Path:  namely,  Right  Effort,  Right  Mind-
fulness  (or  Attentiveness)  and  Right  Concentration.  (Nos.  6,  7 
and  8  in  the  list). 
47 
Right  Effort  is  the  energetic  will  (i)  to  prevent  evil  and  un-
wholesome  states  of mind  from  arising,  and  (2)  to  get  rid  of such 
evil  and  unwholesome  states  that  have  already  arisen  within  a 
man, and also (3) to produce, to cause to arise, good and wholesome 
states  of  mind  not  yet  arisen,  and  (4)  to  develop  and  bring  to 
perfection  the  good  and  wholesome  states  of  mind  already 
present  in  a  man. 
Right  Mindfulness  (or  Attentiveness)  is  to  be  diligently  aware, 
mindful  and  attentive  with  regard  to  (1)  the  activities  of the  body 
(kaya),
(2)  sensations  or  feelings
(vedana),
{3)  the  activities  of the 
mind
(citta)
and  (4)  ideas,  thoughts,  conceptions  and  things 
(dhamma). 
The  practice  of concentration  on  breathing
(anapanasati)
is  one 
of the  well-known  exercises,  connected  with  the  body,  for  mental 
development.  There  are  several  other  ways  of  developing  atten-
tiveness  in  relation  to  the  body—as  modes  of meditation. 
With  regard  to  sensations  and  feelings,  one  should  be  clearly 
aware  of all  forms  of feelings  and  sensations,  pleasant,  unpleasant 
and  neutral,  of  how  they  appear  and  disappear  within  oneself. 
Concerning the  activities  of mind,  one  should be aware  whether 
one's  mind  is  lustful  or  not,  given  to  hatred  or  not,  deluded  or 
not,  distracted  or  concentrated,  etc.  In  this  way  one  should  be 
aware  of  all  movements  of  mind,  how  they  arise  and  disappear. 
As  regards  ideas,  thoughts,  conceptions  and things,  one  should 
know  their  nature,  h ow  they  appear  and  disappear,  how  they  are 
developed,  h ow  they  are  suppressed,  and  destroyed,  and  so  on. 
These  four  forms  of mental  culture  or  meditation  are  treated  in 
detail  in  the
Satipatthana-sutta
(Setting-up  of  Mindfulness).
The  third  and  last  factor  of  Mental  Discipline  is  Right 
Concentration  leading  to  the  four  stages  of
Dhjana,
generally 
called trance  or
recueillement.
In  the  first  stage  of
Dhjana,
passionate 
desires  and  certain  unwholesome  thoughts  like  sensuous  lust, 
ill-will,  languor,  worry,  restlessness,  and  sceptical  doubt  are 
discarded,  and  feelings  of joy  and happiness  are  maintained,  along 
with  certain  mental  activities.  In  the  second  stage,  all  intellectual 
activities  are  suppressed,  tranquillity  and  'one-pointedness'  of 
mind  developed,  and  the  feelings  of  joy  and  happiness  are  still 
1
See Chapter VII on Meditation. 
48 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested