c# pdf viewer : How to reorder pages in pdf reader software control project winforms web page html UWP what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-8-part1092

Will  is  basically  connected  with  the  ideas  of  God,  Soul,  justice, 
reward  and  punishment.  Not  only  is  so-called  free  will not  free, 
but  even  the  very  idea  of  Free  Will  is  not  free  from  conditions. 
According  to  the  doctrine  of  Conditioned  Genesis,  as  well  as 
according  to  the  analysis  of  being  into  F ive  Aggregates,  the  idea 
of an  abiding,  immortal  substance  in  man  or  outside,  whether  it 
is  called  Atman,  T,  Soul,  Self,  or  Eg o,  is  considered  only  a  false 
belief,  a  mental  projection.  This  is  the  Buddhist  doctrine  of 
Anatta,
N o- Soul  or  No-Self. 
In  order  to  avoid  a  confusion  it  should  be  mentioned  here  that 
there  are  two  kinds  of  truths:  conventional  truth
(sammuti-sacca, 
Skt.
samvrti-satja)
and  ultimate  truth
(paramattha-sacca,
Skt. 
paramartha-satya).
1 When we use such expressions in our daily 
life  as  T,  'you',  'being',  'individual',  etc.,  we  do  not  lie  because 
there  is  no  self or  being as  such,  but  we  speak  a truth conforming 
to the convention of the world.  But the  ultimate  truth is  that there 
is  no  T  or  'being'  in  reality.  As  the  Mahayana-sutrdlahkdra  says: 
'A  person
(pudgala)
should  be  mentioned  as  existing  only  in 
designation
(prajnapti)
(i.e.,  conventionally  there  is  a  being), 
but  not  in  reality  (or  substance
dravya)'.
'The  negation  of  an  imperishable  Atman  is  the  common 
characteristic  of all  dogmatic  systems  of the  Lesser  as  well  as  the 
Great  Vehicle,  and,  there  is,  therefore,  no  reason  to  assume  that 
Buddhist  tradition  which  is  in  complete  agreement  on  this  point 
has  deviated  from  the  Buddha's  original  teaching.'
It  is  therefore  curious  that  recently  there  should  have  been  a 
vain  attempt  by  a few scholars
4
to  smuggle  the  idea  of self into  the 
teaching  of the  Buddha,  quite  contrary  to  the  spirit  of Buddhism. 
These  scholars  respect,  admire,  and  venerate  the  Buddha  and  his 
teaching.  They  look  up  to  Buddhism.  B ut  they  cannot  imagine 
that the  Buddha, whom  they consider  the most clear and profound 
thinker,  could  have  denied  the  existence  of  an  Atman  or  Self 
which  they need  so  much.  They unconsciously  seek the support of 
the  Buddha  for  this  need  for  eternal  existence—of course  not  in  a 
1
Sarattha II (PTS), p. 77. 
2
Mh. sutralankara, XVIII 92. 
3
H.  von  Glasenapp,  in  an  article  'Vedanta  and  Buddhism'  on the question  of 
Anatta, The Middle Way, February, 1957, p. 154. 
4
The late Mrs. Rhys Davids and others. See Mrs. Rhys Davids' Gotama the Man, 
Sdkya or Buddhist  Origins,  A  Manual of Buddhism,  What  was the  Original Buddhism,  etc. 
55 
How to reorder pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; how to rearrange pdf pages online
How to reorder pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to change page order in pdf acrobat; reverse page order pdf
petty individual  self with  small  s,  but  in  the  big  Self with  a  capital 
S. 
It  is  better  to  say  frankly  that  one  believes  in  an
Atman
or  Self. 
Or  one  may  even  say  that  the  Buddha  was  totally  wrong  in  deny-
ing  the  existence  of an  Atman.  But  certainly  it  will  not  do  for  any 
one  to  try  to  introduce into  Buddhism  an  idea which  the  Buddha 
never  accepted,  as  far as  we  can  see  from the extant original  texts. 
Religions which believe in G od and  Soul make no  secret of these 
two  ideas;  on  the  contrary,  they  proclaim  them,  constantly  and 
repeatedly,  in the most eloquent terms.  If the Buddha had  accepted 
these  two  ideas,  so  important  in  all  religions,  he  certainly  would 
have declared  them  publicly,  as he  had  spoken  about other  things, 
and  would  not  have  left  them  hidden  to  be  discovered  only  25 
centuries  after  his  death. 
People  become  nervous  at  the  idea  that  through  the  Buddha's 
teaching  of
Anatta,
the  self they  imagine  they  have  is  going  to  be 
destroyed.  The  Buddha  was  not  unaware  of  this. 
 bhikkhu  once  asked  him:  'Sir,  is  there  a  case  where  one  is 
tormented  when  something  permanent  within  oneself  is  not 
found?' 
'Yes,  bhikkhu,  there  is,'  answered  the  Buddha.  'A  man  has  the 
following  view:  " Th e  universe  is  that  Atman,  I  shall  be  that 
after  death,  permanent,  abiding,  ever-lasting,  unchanging,  and  I 
shall  exist  as  such  for  eternity".  He  hears  the  Tathagata  or  a 
disciple  of  his,  preaching  the  doctrine  aiming  at  the  complete 
destruction  of all  speculative  views  . . .  aiming  at  the extinction  of 
"thirst",  aiming  at  detachment,  cessation,  Nirvana.  Then  that 
man  thinks:  "I  will  be  annihilated,  I  will  be  destroyed,  I  will  be 
no  more."  So he  mourns,  worries himself, laments,  weeps,  beating 
his  breast,  and  becomes  bewildered.  Thus,  O  bhikkhu,  there  is  a 
case  where  one  is  tormented  when  something  permanent  within 
oneself is  not  found.'
Elsewhere  the  Buddha  says:  'O  bhikkhus,  this  idea  that  I  may 
not  be,  I  may  not  have,  is  frightening  to  the  uninstructed  world-
ling.'
Those  who  want  to  find  a  'Self' in  Buddhism  argue  as  follows: 
It  is  true  that  the  Buddha  analyses  being  into  matter,  sensation, 
1
MI(PTS), pp. 136-137. 
2
Quoted in MA II (PTS), p. 112. 
56 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
change page order pdf reader; how to change page order in pdf document
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
move pdf pages online; reorder pages pdf file
perception,  mental  formations,  and  consciousness,  and  says  that 
none  of  these  things  is  self.  But  he  does  not  say  that  there  is  no 
self at  all  in  man  or  anywhere  else,  apart  from  these  aggregates. 
This  position  is  untenable  for  two  reasons: 
One  is  that,  according  to  the  Buddha's  teaching,  a  being  is 
composed  only  of  these  Five  Aggregates,  and  nothing  more. 
Nowhere  has  he  said  that  there  was  anything  more  than  these 
Five  Aggregates  in  a  being. 
The  second  reason  is  that  the  Buddha  denied  categorically,  in 
unequivocal  terms,  in  more  than  one  place,  the  existence  of 
Atman,
Soul,  Self,  or  Eg o  within  man  or  without,  or  anywhere 
else  in  the  universe.  Let  us  take  some  examples. 
In  the
Dhammapada
there  are  three  verses  extremely  important 
and  essential in the Buddha's  teaching.  They are  nos.  5,  6  and  7  of 
chapter  XX  (or  verses  27 7,  278,  279). 
The  first two  verses  say: 
'All  conditioned  things  are  impermanent'
(Sabbe  SAMKHARA 
anicca),
and  'All  conditioned  things  are
dukkha'  (Sabbe  SAM-
KHARA 
dukkha). 
The  third  verse  says: 
'All
dhammas
are  without  self'
(Sabbe  DHAMMA  anatta).^ 
Here  it  should  be  carefully observed  that  in  the first two  verses 
the  word
samkhara
'conditioned  things'  is  used.  But  in  its  place 
in  the  third  verse  the  word
dhamma
is  used.  Wh y  didn't  the 
third  verse  use  the  word
samkhara
'conditioned  things'  as  the 
previous  two verses,  and  why  did  it  use  the  term
dhamma
instead ? 
Here  lies  the  crux  of the  whole  matter. 
The  term
samkhara
2 denotes the Five Aggregates, all con-
ditioned,  interdependent,  relative  things  and  states,  both physical 
and  mental.  If  the  third  verse  said:  'All
samkhara
(conditioned 
things)  are  without  self',  then  one  might  think  that,  although 
conditioned  things  are  without  self,  yet  there  may  be  a  Self 
outside  conditioned  things,  outside  the  Five  Aggregates.  It  is  in 
1
F.L. Woodward's translation of the word dhamma here by "AH states compounded' 
is quite wrong. (The Buddha's Path of Virtue, Adyar, Madras, India,  1929, p.  69.) 
'All states compounded' means only samkhara, but not dhamma. 
2
Samkhara in the list of the Five Aggregates means 'Mental Formations' or 'Mental 
Activities'  producing  karmic  effects.  But  here  it  means  all  conditioned  or  com-
pounded things, including all the Five Aggregates. The term samkhara has different 
connotations in different contexts. 
57 
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print Document Viewer, make sure that you have install RasterEdge PDF Reader Add-on
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; change page order pdf preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
reorder pdf pages online; rearrange pdf pages in reader
order  to  avoid  misunderstanding  that  the  term
dhamma
is  used  in 
the  third  verse. 
The  term  dhamma  is  much  wider  than  samkhara.  There  is  no 
term in  Buddhist  terminology  wider  than  dhamma.  It  includes  not 
only  the  conditioned  things  and  states,  but  also  the  non-condi-
tioned,  the Absolute,  Nirvana.  There is nothing in the universe  or 
outside,  good  or  bad,  conditioned  or  non-conditioned,  relative 
or  absolute,  which  is  not  included  in  this  term.  Therefore,  it  is 
quite  clear  that,  according  to  this  statement:  'All  dhammas  are 
without  Self',  there  is  no  Self,  no  Atman,  not  only  in  the  Five 
Aggregates,  but  nowhere  else  too  outside  them  or  apart  from 
them.
This  means,  according  to  the  Theravada  teaching,  that  there 
is  no  self  either  in  the  individual  (puggala)  or  in  dhammas.  Th e 
Mahayana  Buddhist  philosophy  maintains  exactly  the  same  posi-
tion,  without  the  slightest  difference,  on  this  point,  putting 
emphasis on dharma-nairatmya as well as on pudgala-nairatmya. 
In  the
Alagaddupama-sutta
of  the
Majjhima-nikaya,
addressing 
his  disciples,  the  Buddha  said:  'O  bhikkhus,  accept  a  soul-
theory
(Attavada)
in  the  acceptance  of  which  there  would  not 
arise  grief,  lamentation,  suffering,  distress  and  tribulation.  But, 
do  you  see,  O  bhikkhus,  such  a  soul-theory  in  the  acceptance  of 
which  there would  not  arise  grief,  lamentation,  suffering,  distress 
and  tribulation ?' 
'Certainly  not,  Sir.' 
'Good,  O  bhikkhus.  I,  too,  O  bhikkhus,  do  not  see  a  soul-
theory,  in  the  acceptance  of  which  there  would  not  arise  grief, 
lamentation,  suffering,  distress  and  tribulation.'
If  there  had  been  any  soul-theory  which  the  Buddha  had 
accepted,  he  would  certainly  have  explained  it  here,  because  he 
asked  the  bhikkhus  to  accept  that  soul-theory  which  did  not 
produce  suffering.  But  in  the  Buddha's  view,  there  is  no  such 
soul- theory,  and  any  soul-theory,  whatever  it  may  be,  however 
subtle  and  sublime,  is  false  and  imaginary,  creating  all  kinds  of 
problems,  producing  in  its  train  grief,  lamentation,  suffering, 
distress,  tribulation  and  trouble. 
1
Cf . also Sabbe samkhara anicca 'All conditioned things are impermanent', Sabbe 
dhamma anatta 'All dhammas are without self'. M I (PTS), p. 228; S III pp. 132,133. 
2
M  I (PTS), p.  137. 
58 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pages in pdf reader; pdf reorder pages
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
change page order pdf acrobat; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
Continuing  the  discourse  the  Buddha  said  in  the  same
sutta-. 
'O  bhikkhus,  when  neither  self nor  anything  pertaining  to  self 
can  truly  and  really  be  found,  this  speculative  view:  " Th e 
universe  is  that  Atman  (Soul);  I  shall  be  that  after  death,  per-
manent,  abiding,  ever-lasting,  unchanging,  and  I  shall  exist  as 
such  for  eternity"—is  it  not  wholly  and  completely  foolish?'
Here  the  Buddha  explicitly  states  that  an  Atman,  or  Soul,  or 
Self,  is  nowhere  to  be  found  in  reality,  and  it is  foolish  to  believe 
that  there  is  such  a  thing. 
Those  who  seek  a  self  in  the  Buddha's  teaching  quote  a  few 
examples which they first translate wrongly,  and then misinterpret. 
One  of  them  is  the  well-known  line
Atta  hi attano  natho
from  the 
Dhammapada
(XII,  4,  or  verse  160),  which  is  translated  as  'Self 
is  the  lord  of self',  and  then  interpreted  to  mean  that  the  big  Self 
is  the  lord  of the  small  self. 
First  of all,  this  translation is incorrect.
Atta
here  does  not mean 
self  in  the  sense  of  soul.  In  Pali  the  word
atta
is  generally  used 
as  a  reflexive  or  indefinite  pronoun,  except  in  a  few  cases 
where it  specifically  and  philosophically  refers  to  the  soul-theory, 
as  we  have  seen  above.  But  in  general  usage,  as  in  the  XII 
chapter  in  the
Dhammapada
where  this  line  occurs,  and  in  many 
other places, it is used as  a reflexive or indefinite pronoun meaning 
'myself',  'yourself',  'himself',  'one',  'oneself',  etc.
Next,  the  word
natho
does  not  mean  'lord',  but  'refuge', 
'support',  'help',  'protection'.
3
Therefore,
Atta  hi  attano  natho 
1
Ibid.,  p.  138.  Referring  to  this  passage,  S.  Radbakrishnan  (Indian  Philosophy, 
Vol.  I,  London,  1940,  p.  485),  says:  'It is  the false  view  that  clamours  for  the 
perpetual continuance of the small self that Buddha refutes'. We cannot agree with 
this remark. On the contrary, the Buddha, in fact, refutes here the Universal Atman 
or soul. As we saw just now, in the earlier passage, the Buddha did not accept any 
self, great or small. In his view, all theories of Atman were false, mental projections. 
2
In his article  'Vedanta and  Buddhism'  (The Middle Way, February,  1957), H. 
von Glasenapp explains this point clearly. 
3
The  commentary  on  the  Dhp.  says:  Natho'ti patittha  'Natho  means  support, 
(refuge, help, protection),' (Dhp. A III (PTS), p. 148.) The old Sinhalese Sannaya of 
the Dhp. paraphrases the word natho as pihifa vanneya 'is a support (refuge, help)'. 
(Dhammapada Purdnasannaya, Colombo, 1926, p. 77). If we take the negative form 
of natho, this meaning becomes further confirmed: Anatha does not mean 'without 
a  lord'  or  'lordless',  but  it  means  'helpless',  'supportless',  'unprotected',  'poor'. 
Even  the  PTS  Pali  Dictionary  explains  the  word  natha  as  'protector',  'refuge', 
'help', but not as 'lord'. The translation of the word Lokanatha (s.v.) by 'Saviour of 
the world', just using a popular Christian expression, is not quite correct, because the 
Buddha is not a saviour. This epithet really means 'Refuge of the World'. 
59 
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; rearrange pdf pages online
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
change page order in pdf online; pdf move pages
really means  'One is  one's  own refuge'  or 'One is  one's own  help' 
or  'support'.  It  has  nothing  to  do  with  any  metaphysical  soul  or 
self.  It  simply means  that  you have to  rely  on  yourself,  and  not  on 
others. 
Another  example  of the attempt to introduce the idea of self into 
the  Buddha's  teaching  is  in  the  well-known  words
Attadipa 
viharatha,  attasarana  anannasarana,
which  are  taken  out  of  context 
in  the
Mahaparinibbana-sutta.
1 This phrase literally means: 'Dwell 
making  yourselves  your island  (support),  making yourselves  your 
refuge,  and  not  anyone  else  as  your  refuge.'
2
Those  who  wish  to 
see  a  self  in  Buddhism  interpret  the  words
attadipa
and
attasarana 
'taking  self as  a  lamp',  'taking  self as  a  refuge'.
We  cannot  understand  the  full  meaning  and  significance  of the 
advice  of the  Buddha  to  Ananda,  unless  we  take  into  considera-
tion  the  background  and  the  context  in  which  these  words  were 
spoken. 
The  Buddha  was  at  the  time  staying  at  a  village  called  Beluva. 
It  was  just  three  months  before his  death,
Parinirvana.
At  this  time 
he  was  eighty  years  old,  and  was  suffering  from  a  very  serious 
illness,  almost  dying
(maranantikd).
But  he  thought  it  was  not 
proper for him to die without breaking it to his  disciples who were 
near  and  dear  to  him.  So  with  courage  and  determination he  bore 
all  his  pains,  got  the  better  of his  illness,  and  recovered.  But  his 
health was  still  poor.  After his  recovery,  he  was  seated  one  day in 
the  shade  outside  his  residence.  Ananda,  the  most  devoted  atten-
dant of the  Buddha, went to  his  beloved  Master,  sat near him,  and 
said:  'Sir,  I  have  looked  after  the  health  of  the  Blessed  One,  I 
have  looked  after  him  in his  illness.  But  at  the  sight  of the  illness 
of  the  Blessed  One  the  horizon  became  dim  to  me,  and  my 
faculties  were no longer  clear.  Yet there was  one little consolation: 
1
D II (Colombo, 1929), p. 62. 
2
Rhys Davids (Digha-nikaya Translation II, p.  108) 'Be ye lamps unto yourselves. 
Be ye a refuge to yourselves. Betake yourselves to no external refuge.' 
3
Dipa here does not mean lamp, but it definitely means 'island'. The Digha-nikaya 
Commentary (DA Colombo ed. p.  380), commenting on the word dipa here says: 
Mahasamuddagatam  dipam  viya  attanam dipam patit/ham  katvd viharatha.  'Dwell  making 
yourselves an island, a support (resting place) even as an island in the great ocean.' 
Samsdra,  the  continuity of existence,  is  usually  compared  to  an  ocean,  samsara-
sdgara, and what is required in the ocean for safety is an island, a solid land, and not 
a lamp. 
60 
 thought  that  the  Blessed  One  would  not  pass  away  until  he  had 
left  instructions  touching  the  Order  of  the  Sangha.' 
Then  the  Buddha,  full  of  compassion  and  human  feeling, 
gently  spoke  to  his  devoted  and  beloved  attendant:  'Ananda, 
what does  the  Order of the  Sangha expect from me ?  I have  taught 
the
Dhamma
(Truth)  without  making  any  distinction  as  exoteric 
and  esoteric.  With  regard  to  the  truth,  the  Tathagata  has  nothing 
like  the  closed  fist  of  a  teacher
(dcariya-mutthi).
Surely,  Ananda, 
if  there  is  anyone  who  thinks  that  he  will  lead  the  Sangha,  and 
that  the  Sangha  should  depend  on  him,  let  him  set  down  his 
instructions.  But  the  Tathagata  has  no  such idea.  Why  should  he 
then  leave  instructions  concerning  the  Sangha?  I  am  now  old, 
Ananda,  eighty years  old.  As  a  worn-out cart  has  to  be  kept going 
by  repairs,  so,  it  seems  to  me,  the  body  of the  Tathagata  can  only 
be  kept  going  by  repairs.
Therefore,  Ananda,  dwell makingyourselves 
your  island  (support),  making yourselves,  not  anyone  else,  your  refuge; 
making  the  Dhamma your  island  (support),  the  Dhamma your  refuge, 
nothing  else your  refuge.
What  the  Buddha  wanted  to  convey  to  Ananda  is  quite  clear. 
The  latter  was  sad  and  depressed.  He  thought that  they  would  all 
be  lonely,  helpless,  without  a  refuge,  without  a  leader  after  their 
great  Teacher's  death.  So  the  Buddha  gave  him  consolation, 
courage,  and  confidence,  saying that  they  should  depend on them-
selves,  and  on  the
Dhamma
he  taught,  and  not  on  anyone  else,  or 
on  anything  else.  Here  the  question  of  a  metaphysical  Atman,  or 
Self,  is  quite  beside  the  point. 
Further,  the  Buddha  explained  to  Ananda  how  one  could  be 
one's  own  island  or  refuge,  how  one  could  make  the
Dhamma 
one's  own  island  or  refuge:  through  the  cultivation  of  mindful-
ness  or awareness  of the  body,  sensations,  mind  and  mind-objects 
(the  four
Satipatthanas).
2 There is no talk at all here about an 
Atman  or  Self. 
Another  reference,  oft-quoted,  is  used  by  those  who  try  to 
find  Atman  in  the  Buddha's  teaching.  The  Buddha  was  once 
seated  under  a  tree  in  a  forest  on  the  way  to  Uruvela  from 
Benares.  On  that  day,  thirty  friends  all  of  them  young  princes, 
1
D II (Colombo,  1929), pp.  61-62.  Only the  last  sentence is  literally  translated. 
The rest of the story is given briefly according to the Mahaparinibbana-sutta. 
2
Ibid., p. 62. For Satipa/thdna see Chapter VII on Meditation. 
6l 
went  out  on  a  picnic  with  their  young  wives  into  the  same  forest. 
One  of the  princes  who  was  unmarried  brought  a  prosdtute  with 
him.  While  the  others  were  amusing  themselves,  she  purloined 
some  objects  of value  and  disappeared.  In  their  search  for  her  in 
the  forest,  they  saw  the  Buddha  seated  under  a  tree  and  asked 
him  whether  he  had  seen  a  woman.  He  enquired  what  was  the 
matter.  When  they  explained,  the  Buddha  asked  them:  'What  do 
you  think,  young  men ?  Which  is  better for  you ?  To  search  after 
 woman,  or  to  search  after  yourselves P'
Here  again  it  is  a  simple  and  natural  question,  and  there  is  no 
justification  for  introducing  far-fetched  ideas  of  a  metaphysical 
Atman
or  Self  into  the  business.  They  answered  that  it  was 
better  for  them  to  search  after  themselves.  Th e  Buddha  then 
asked  them  to  sit  down  and  explained  the
Dhamma
to  them.  In 
the  available  account,  in  the  original  text  of what  he  preached  to 
them,  not  a  word  is  mentioned  about  an
Atman. 
Much  has  been  written  on  the  subject  of the  Buddha's  silence 
when  a  certain  Parivrajaka  (Wanderer)  named  Vacchagotta  asked 
him  whether  there  was  an
Atman
or  not.  The  story  is  as  follows: 
Vacchagotta  comes  to  the  Buddha  and  asks: 
'Venerable  Gotama,  is  there  an
Atman ?' 
The  Buddha  is  silent. 
'Then  Venerable  Gotama,  is  there  no
Atman ?' 
Again  the  Buddha  is  silent. 
Vacchagotta  gets  up  and  goes  away. 
After  the  Parivrajaka  had  left,
Ananda
asks  the Buddha  why he 
did  not  answer  Vacchagotta's  quesdon.  The  Buddha  explains  his 
position: 
'Ananda,
when  asked  by  Vacchagotta  the  Wanderer:  " Is  there 
 self?",  if I  had  answered:  "There  is  a  self",  then,
Ananda,
that 
would  be  siding  with  those  recluses  and  brahmanas  wh o  hold  the 
eternalist  theory
(sassata-vada). 
'And,
Ananda,
when  asked  by the Wanderer:  " Is  there no self? " 
if  I  h a d  answered:  "There  is  no  self",  then  that  would  be  siding 
with  those  recluses  and  brahmanas  who  hold  the  annihilationist 
theory
(uccheda-vada).
1
Mhvg.
]
(Alutgama,  1929), pp. 21-22. 
2
On another occasion the Buddha had told this same Vacchagotta that the Tatha-
gata had no theories, because he had seen the nature of things. (M I (PTS), p. 486.) 
Here too he does not want to associate himself with any theorists. 
62 
'Again,  Ananda,  when  asked  by  Vacchagotta:  " Is  there  a 
self?",  if  I  had  answered:  "There  is  a  self",  would  that  be  in 
accordance with  my knowledge  that all
dhammas
are without  self?'
'Surely  not,  Sir.' 
'And  again,  Ananda,  when  asked  by  the  Wanderer:  "Is  there 
no  self?",  if  I  had  answered:  " Th ere  is  no  self",  then  that  would 
have  been  a  greater  confusion  to  the  already  confused  Vaccha-
gotta.
2
For  he  would  have  thought:  Formerly  indeed  I  had  an 
Atman
(self),  but  now  I  haven't  got  one.'
It  should  now  be  quite  clear  why  the  Buddha  was  silent.  But it 
will  be  still  clearer  if we  take  into  consideration  the  whole  back-
ground, and  the way the Buddha treated questions  and questioners 
—which  is  altogether  ignored  by  those  wh o  have  discussed  this 
problem. 
The  Buddha  was  not  a  computing  machine  giving  answers  to 
whatever  questions  were  put to him by anyone  at  all,  without  any 
consideration.  He  was  a  practical  teacher,  full  of  compassion  and 
wisdom.  He  did  not  answer  questions  to show his  knowledge and 
intelligence,  but  to  help  the  questioner  on  the  way  to  realization. 
He  always  spoke  to  people  bearing  in  mind  their  standard  of 
development,  their  tendencies,  their  mental  make-up,  their 
character,  their  capacity  to  understand  a  particular  question.
1
Sabbe dhamma anatta. (Exactly the same words as in the first line of Dhp. XX, 7 
which we discussed  above.)  Woodward's translation of these  words by  'all  things 
are  impermanent'  (Kindred  Sayings  IV,  p.  282)  is  completely  wrong,  probably 
due to an oversight. But this is a very serious mistake. This, perhaps, is one of the 
reasons for so much unnecessary talk on the Buddha's silence. The most important 
word in this context, anatta 'without a self', has been translated as 'impermanent'. 
The English translations of Pali texts contain major and minor errors of this kind— 
some due  to carelessness  or oversight, some to lack  of proficiency  in  the  original 
language. Whatever the cause may be, it is useful to mention here, with the deference 
due to those great pioneers in this field, that these errors have been responsible for a 
number of wrong ideas about  Buddhism among people who have no access to the 
original texts. It is good to know therefore that Miss I. B. Horner, the Secretary of 
the  Pali Text Society, plans to bring out revised and new translations. 
2
In fact on another occasion, evidently earlier, when the Buddha had explained a 
certain deep and subtle question—the question as to what happened to an Arahant 
after  death—Vacchagotta  said:  'Venerable  Gotama,  here  I  fall  into  ignorance,  I 
get into confusion. Whatever little faith I had at the beginning of this conversation 
with  the  Venerable  Gotama, that  too is  gone now.'  (M I (PTS), p.  487).  So  the 
Buddha did not want to confuse him again. 
3
S IV (PTS), pp. 400-401. 
4
This knowledge of the Buddha is called Indriyaparopariyattaiiana. MI (PTS), p. 70; 
Vibh. (PTS), p.  340. 
6j 
According  to  the  Buddha,  there  are  four  ways  of  treating 
questions:  (i)  Some  should  be  answered  directly;  ( z )  others 
should  be  answered  by  way  of  analysing  them;  (3)  yet  others 
should  be  answered  by  counter-questions;  (4)  and  lastly,  there are 
questions  which  should  be  put  aside.
There  may  be  several  ways  of  putting  aside  a  question.  One  is 
to  say  that  a  particular  question  is  not  answered  or  explained,  as 
the  Buddha  had  told  this  very  same  Vacchagotta  on  more  than 
one  occasion,  when  those  famous  questions  whether  the  universe 
is  eternal  or  not,  etc.,  were  put  to  him.
2
In  the  same  way  he  had 
replied  to  Malunkyaputta  and  others.  But  he  could  not  say  the 
same  thing  with  regard  to  the  question  whether  there  is  an 
Atman
(Self)  or  not,  because  he  had  always  discussed  and 
explained  it.  He  could not  say  'there is  self', because  it  is  contrary 
to  his  knowledge  that  'all
dhammas
are  without  self'.  Then  he  did 
not  want to  say 'there is no self', because that would unnecessarily, 
without  any  purpose,  have  confused  and  disturbed  poor  Vaccha-
gotta  who  was  already  confused  on  a  similar  question,  as  he  had 
himself  admitted  earlier.
3
He  was  not  yet  in  a  position  to  under-
stand  the  idea  of
Anatta.
Therefore,  to  put  aside  this  quesdon  by 
silence  was  the  wisest  thing  in  this  particular  case. 
We  must  not  forget  too  that  the  Buddha  had  known  Vaccha-
gotta quite  well for a long  time.  This  was  not  the  first occasion on 
which this  inquiring Wanderer  had  come to  see him.  The wise  and 
compassionate  Teacher  gave  much  thought  and  showed  great 
consideration for this  confused  seeker.  There  are  many  references 
in  the Pali  texts  to  this  same  Vacchagotta  the Wanderer,  his  going 
round  quite  often  to  see  the  Buddha and  his  disciples  and  putting 
the  same  kind  of  question  again  and  again,  evidently  very  much 
worried,  almost  obsessed  by  these  problems.
4
The  Buddha's 
silence  seems  to  have  had  much  more  effect  on Vacchagotta  than 
any  eloquent  answer  or  discussion.
1
A (Colombo, 1929), p. 216. 
2
E.g., S IV (PTS), pp. 593, 395; M I (PTS), p. 484. 
3
See p. 63 n. 2. 
4
E.g., see S III (PTS), pp. 257-263; IV pp. 391 f., 395 f., 398 f., 400; M I, pp. 481 f., 
483 f., 489 f-, A V p.  193. 
5
For, we see that after some time Vacchagotta came again to see the Buddha, but 
this time did not ask any questions as usual, but said: "It is long since I had a talk with 
64 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested