c# pdf viewer : Change page order pdf preview software control project winforms web page windows UWP what_the_buddha_taught_bhante_walpola_rahula-9-part1093

XI.  Sujata  offering  mUK-rice  to  tne  ouaana—trom  Borobudur,  Java 
Change page order pdf preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in a pdf; pdf rearrange pages online
Change page order pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf change page order acrobat; move pages within pdf
XII.  The head  of the Buddha—from Borobudur,  Java 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
reorder pdf pages; how to reorder pdf pages
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
pdf page order reverse; move pages in pdf
XIII.  The  Buddha—from Borobudur,  Java 
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
change page order pdf acrobat; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
C# Image: View & Operate Web Page Using .NET Doc Image Web Viewer
Support multiple document and image formats, like PDF and TIFF; Thumbnail images will be automatically created once the Change Web Document Page Order.
change page order pdf reader; reorder pdf pages in preview
X
I
V
.
T
h
e
P
a
r
i
m
r
v
a
n
a
o
f
t
h
e
B
u
d
d
h
a
t
r
o
m
A
j
a
n
t
a
,
I
n
d
i
a
C# Excel - Sort Excel Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Excel document pages, or just change the position of certain one Excel page in an
move pages within pdf; rearrange pdf pages reader
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Ability to change text font, color, size and location and string to a certain position of PDF document page. In order to run the sample code, the following
change page order in pdf reader; move pdf pages
Some  people  take  'self'  to  mean  what  is  generally  known  as 
'mind'  or  'consciousness'.  But the Buddha  says  that  it is  better for 
a  man to  take  his  physical  body as  self rather  than  mind,  thought, 
or  consciousness,  because  the  former  seems  to  be  more  solid  than 
the  latter,  because  mind,  thought,  or  consciousness
{citta,  mano, 
vinnana)
changes  constantly  day  and  night  even  faster  than  the 
body  (kdja).
It  is  the  vague  feeling  'I  AM '  that  creates  the  idea  of self which 
has  no  corresponding  reality,  and  to  see  this  truth  is  to  realize 
Nirvana,  which  is  not  very  easy.  In  the
Samjutta-nikaya
2 there is an 
enlightening  conversation  on  this  point  between  a  bhikkhu 
named  Khemaka  and  a  group  of  bhikkhus. 
These  bhikkhus  ask  Khemaka  whether  he  sees  in  the  Five 
Aggregates  any  self  or  anything  pertaining  to  a  self.  Khemaka 
replies  'No'.  Then  the  bhikkhus  say  that,  if  so,  he  should  be  an 
Arahant  free  from  all  impurities.  But  Khemaka  confesses  that 
though  he  does  not  find in the  Five Aggregates  a self,  or anything 
pertaining  to  a  self,  'I  am  not an  Arahant free from all impurities. 
 friends,  with  regard  to  the  Five  Aggregates  of  Attachment,  I 
have  a  feeling  "I  A M" ,  but  I  do  not  clearly  see  "This  is  I  A M" . ' 
Then  Khemaka explains  that what he calls  'I AM ' is neither matter, 
sensation,  perception,  mental  formations,  nor  consciousness,  nor 
anything  without  them.  But  he  has  the  feeling  'I  AM'  with  regard 
to  the  Five  Aggregates,  though he  could  not  see  clearly  'This  is  I 
AM'.
He  says  it  is  like the  smell  of a  flower:  it  is  neither  the  smell  of 
the  petals,  nor  of  the  colour,  nor  of  the  pollen,  but  the  smell  of 
the  flower. 
the Venerable Gotama. It would be good if the Venerable Gotama would preach to 
me on good and bad (kusalakusalam) in brief." The Buddha said that he would explain 
to him good and bad, in brief as well as in detail; and so he did. Ultimately Vaccha-
gotta became a disciple of the Buddha, and following his teaching attained Arahant-
ship,  realized  Truth,  Nirvana,  and  the  problems  of  Atman  and  other  questions 
obsessed him no more. (M I (PTS), pp. 489 ff.) 
1
S  II (PTS), p.  94.  Some people think  that  Alayavijndna 'Store-Consciousness' 
(Tathagatagarbha)  of  Mahayana  Buddhism  is  something  like  a  self.  But  the 
Lankavatara-siitra categorically says that it is not Atman (Lanka, p. 78-79.) 
2
S III (PTS), pp.  126  ff. 
3
This is what most people say about self even today. 
65 
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; requirement of this C#.NET PDF document viewer that should be installed in order to implement
change page order pdf; change page order in pdf online
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
For developers who want to delete unnecessary page from PowerPoint document, this C#.NET PowerPoint processing control is quite C# Codes to Sort Slides Order.
how to move pages around in pdf; pdf reverse page order
Khemaka  further  explains  that  even  a  person  wh o  has  attained 
the  early  stages  of realization  still  retains  this  feeling  'I  AM'.  But 
later  on,  when  he  progresses  further,  this  feeling  of  'I  A M'  alto-
gether  disappears,  just  as  the  chemical  smell  of  a  freshly  washed 
cloth  disappears  after  a  time  when  it  is  kept in  a  box. 
This  discussion  was  so  useful  and  enlightening  to  them  that 
at  the  end  of  it,  the  text  says,  all  of  them,  including  Khemaka 
himself,  became  Arahants  free  from  all  impurities,  thus  finally 
getting  rid  of  'I  AM'. 
According  to  the Buddha's  teaching,  it is  as  wron g  to  hold  the 
opinion  'I  have  no  self'  (which  is  the  annihilationist  theory)  as  to 
hold  the  opinion  'I  have  self'  (which  is  the  eternalist  theory), 
because  both  are  fetters,  both  arising  out  of the false  idea  T  AM'. 
The  correct  position  with  regard  to  the  question  of
Anatta
is  not 
to  take  hold  of  any  opinions  or  views,  but  to  try  to  see  things 
objectively as they are without  mental  projections,  to see  that what 
we  call  T,  or  'being',  is  only a  combination  of physical  and  mental 
aggregates,  which  are working  together interdependently in  a  flux 
of momentary  change  within  the  law  of cause  and  effect,  and  that 
there  is  nothing  permanent,  everlasting,  unchanging  and  eternal 
in  the  whole  of existence. 
Here  naturally  a  question  arises:  If  there  is  no
Atman
or  Self, 
who  gets  the  results  of  karma  (actions) ?  No  one  can  answer  this 
question  better  than  the  Buddha  himself.  When  this  question  was 
raised  by  a  bhikkhu  the  Buddha  said:  'I  have  taught  you,  O 
bhikkhus,  to  see  conditionality  everywhere  in  all  things.'
The  Buddha's  teaching  on
Anatta,
No-Soul,  or  No-Self,  should 
not  be  considered  as  negative  or  annihilistic.  Like  Nirvana,  it  is 
Truth,  Reality;  and  Reality  cannot  be  negative.  It  is  the  false 
belief in a non-existing imaginary self that is negative.  The teaching 
on
Anatta
dispels  the  darkness  of  false  beliefs,  and  produces  the 
light  of  wisdom.  It  is  not  negative:  as  Asanga  very  aptly  says: 
'There  is  the  fact  of No-selfness'
(nairatmyastita).
1
M III (PTS), p. 19; S III, p. 103. 
2
Abhisamuc, p. 31. 
66 
CHAPTER  VII 
• M E D I T A T I O N '  O R  M E N T A L  C U L T U R E : 
BHAVANA 
The  Buddha  said:  'O  bhikkhus,  there  are  two  kinds  of  illness. 
What  are  those  two?  Physical  illness  and  mental  illness.  There 
seem  to  be  people  who  enjoy  freedom  from  physical  illness  even 
for  a  year  or  two  .  .  .  even  for  a  hundred  years  or  more.  But,  O 
bhikkhus,  rare  in  this  world  are  those  who  enjoy  freedom  from 
mental  illness  even  for  one  moment,  except  those  who  are  free 
from  mental  defilements'  (i.e.,  except  arahants).
The  Buddha's  teaching,  particularly  his  way  of  'meditation', 
aims  at  producing a state  of perfect mental health,  equilibrium and 
tranquility.  It  is  unfortunate  that  hardly  any  other  section  of  the 
Buddha's teaching is  so much misunderstood  as  'meditation',  both 
by  Buddhists  and  non-Buddhists.  Th e  moment  the  word  'medita-
tion'  is  mentioned,  one  thinks  of  an  escape  from  the  daily  activi-
ties  of life; assuming a particular posture,  like a statue in  some cave 
or  cell  in  a  monastery,  in  some  remote  place  cut  off from  society; 
and  musing  on,  or  being  absorbed  in,  some  kind  of  mystic  or 
mysterious  thought or trance.  True Buddhist 'meditation'  does not 
mean  this  kind  of  escape  at  all.  The  Buddha's  teaching  on  this 
subject was  so  wrongly,  or  so  little  understood,  that in later times 
the  way  of  'meditation'  deteriorated  and  degenerated  into  a  kind 
of ritual  or  ceremony  almost  technical  in  its  routine.
Most people are interested in meditation
oryoga
in order to  gain 
some  spiritual  or mystic  powers  like  the  'third  eye',  which  others 
do  not  possess.  There  was  some  time  ago  a  Buddhist  nun  in 
India  who  was  trying to develop  a power  to  see through  her ears, 
1
A (Colombo,  1929), p.  276. 
2
Tbe Yogavacara's Manual (edited by T. W. Rhys Davids, London, 1896), a text on 
meditation written in Ceylon probably about the  18th century, shows how medita-
tion at the time had degenerated into a ritual of reciting formulas, burning candles, etc. 
See also Chapter XII on the Ascetic Ideal, History of Buddhism in Ceylon by Walpola 
Rahula, (Colombo,  1956), pp.  199 ff. 
67 
while  she  was  still  in  the  possession  of the  'power'  of perfect  eye-
sight !  This  kind  of idea  is  nothing  but  'spiritual perversion'.  It is 
always  a  question  of  desire,  'thirst'  for  power. 
The  word  meditation  is  a  very  poor  substitute  for  the  original 
term
bhavana,
which  means  'culture'  or  'development',  i.e., 
mental  culture  or  mental  development.  Th e  Buddhist
bhavana, 
properly  speaking,  is  mental  culture  in  the  full  sense  of the  term. 
It  aims  at  cleansing  the  mind  of impurities  and  disturbances,  such 
as  lustful  desires,  hatred,  ill-will,  indolence,  worries  and  restless-
ness,  sceptical  doubts,  and  cultivating  such  qualities  as  concentra-
tion,  awareness,  intelligence,  will,  energy,  the  analytical  faculty, 
confidence,  joy,  tranquility,  leading  finally  to  the  attainment  of 
highest  wisdom  which  sees  the  nature  of  things  as  they  are,  and 
realizes  the  Ultimate  Truth,  Nirvana. 
There  are  two  forms  of meditation.  One  is  the  development  of 
mental  concentration
(samatha
or
samadhi),
of  one-pointedness  of 
mind
(cittekaggata,
Skt.
cittaikagrata),
by  various  methods  pre-
scribed in  the  texts,  leading up  to  the  highest mystic  states  such  as 
'the  Sphere  of Nothingness'  or  'the  Sphere  of Neither-Perception-
nor-Non-Perception'.  All  these  mystic  states,  according  to  the 
Buddha, 
are 
mind-created, 
mind-produced, 
conditioned 
(samkhata).
1
They  have  nothing  to  do  with  Reality,  Truth, 
Nirvana.  This  form  of  meditation  existed  before  the  Buddha. 
Hence  it  is  not  purely  Buddhist,  but  it  is  not  excluded  from  the 
field of  Buddhist  meditation.  However  it  is  not  essential  for  the 
realization  of Nirvana.  The  Buddha himself,  before  his  Enlighten-
ment,  studied  these  yogic  practices  under  different  teachers  and 
attained  to  the  highest  mystic  states;  but  he  was  not  satisfied 
with  them,  because  they  did  not  give  complete  liberation,  they 
did  not  give  insight  into  the  Ultimate  Reality.  He  considered 
these  mystic  states  only  as  'happy  living  in  this  existence' 
(ditthadhammasukhavihara),
or  'peaceful  living'
(santavihara),
and 
nothing  more.
He  therefore  discovered  the  other  form  of  'meditation'  known 
as
vipassana
(Skt.
vipasjana
or
vidarsana),
'Insight'  into  the  nature  of 
things,  leading  to  the  complete  liberation  of  mind,  to  the  realiza-
tion  of  the  Ultimate  Truth,  Nirvana.  This  is  essentially  Buddhist 
1
See above p.  38. 
2
See Sallekba-sutta (no.  8),  of M. 
68 
'meditation',  Buddhist  mental  culture.  It  is  an  analytical  method 
based  on  mindfulness,  awareness,  vigilance,  observation. 
It  is  impossible  to  do  justice  to  such  a  vast  subject  in  a  few 
pages.  However  an  attempt is  made  here  to  give  a  very  brief and 
rough  idea  of  the  true  Buddhist  'meditation',  mental  culture  or 
mental  development,  in  a  practical  way. 
The  most  important  discourse  ever  given  by  the  Buddha  on 
mental  development  ('meditation')  is  called  the
Satipatthana-sutta 
'Th e  Setting-up  of Mindfulness' (No.  22  of the
Digha-nikaya,
or No. 
10  of  the
Majjhima-nikaya).
This  discourse  is  so  highly  venerated 
in  tradition  that  it  is  regularly  recited  not  only  in  Buddhist 
monasteries,  but  also  in  Buddhist  homes  with  members  of  the 
family  sitting  round  and  listening with deep  devotion.  Ve ry  often 
bhikkhus  recite  this
sutta
by  the  bed-side  of a  dying  man  to  purify 
his  last  thoughts. 
The  ways  of 'meditation'  given  in  this  discourse  are  not  cut  off 
from  life,  nor  do  they  avoid  life;  on  the  contrary,  they  are  all 
connected  with our  life,  our  daily  activities,  our  sorrows  and  joys, 
our  words  and  thoughts,  our  moral  and  intellectual  occupations. 
The  discourse  is  divided  into  four  main  sections:  the  first 
section  deals  with  our  body
(kaya),
the  second  with  our  feelings 
and  sensations
(1vedana),
the  third  with  the  mind
(citta),
and  the 
fourth  with  various  moral  and  intellectual  subjects
(dhamma). 
It  should  be  clearly  borne  in  mind  that  whatever  the  form  of 
'meditation'  may  be,  the  essential  thing  is  mindfulness  or  aware-
ness
(sati),
attention  or  observation
(anupassana). 
One  of the  most  well-known,  popular  and  practical  examples of 
'meditation' connected with the body is called  'The Mindfulness  or 
Awareness of in-and-out breathing'
(anapanasati).
It is for this 'medi-
tation'  only  that  a  particular  and  definite  posture  is  prescribed  in 
the  text.  For  other  forms  of 'meditation'  given  in  this
sutta,
you 
may  sit,  stand,  walk,  or  lie  down,  as  you like.  But,  for  cultivating 
mindfulness  of  in-and-out  breathing,  one  should  sit,  according 
to  the  text,  'cross-legged,  keeping the body erect and  mindfulness 
alert'.  But  sitting  cross-legged  is  not practical  and  easy  for people 
of all  countries,  particularly  for  Westerners.  Therefore,  those  who 
find it  difficult to  sit  cross-legged,  may sit  on  a chair,  'keeping the 
body  erect  and  mindfulness  alert'.  It  is  very  necessary  for  this 
exercise that the meditator should  sit erect,  but not  stiff; his hands 
69 
placed  comfortably  on  his  lap.  Thus  seated,  you  may  close  your 
eyes,  or  you  may  gaze  at  the  tip  of your  nose,  as  it  may  be  con-
venient  to  you. 
You  breathe  in  and  out  all  day  and  night,  but  you  are  never 
mindful  of it,  you  never for  a  second  concentrate  your  mind  on  it. 
Now  you  are  going  to  do  just  this.  Breathe  in  and  out  as  usual, 
without any effort or  strain.  Now,  bring your  mind  to  concentrate 
on  your breathing-in  and  breathing-out;  let  your  mind  watch  and 
observe  your  breathing  in  and  out;  let  your  mind  be  aware  and 
vigilant of your breathing in and  out. When you breathe, you some-
times take deep breaths, sometimes not. This does not matter at all. 
Breathe  normally  and  naturally.  The  only  thing  is  that  when  you 
take deep  breaths  you  should  be  aware  that they  are  deep  breaths, 
and so on. In other words, your mind should be so fully concentrated 
on  your  breathing  that  you  are  aware  of  its  movements  and 
changes.  Forget all other things,  your surroundings,  your  environ-
ment;  do  not  raise  your  eyes  and  look  at  anything.  T ry  to  do  this 
for  five  or  ten  minutes. 
At  the  beginning  you  will  find  it  extremely  difficult  to  bring 
your  mind  to  concentrate  on  your  breathing.  You  will  be  aston-
ished  how  your  mind  runs  away.  It  does  not  stay.  You  begin  to 
think  of various  things.  Y ou  hear  sounds  outside.  Y ou r  mind  is 
disturbed  and  distracted.  You  may  be  dismayed  and  disappointed. 
But  if you  continue  to  practise  this  exercise  twice  daily,  morning 
and  evening,  for  about  five  or  ten  minutes  at  a  time,  you  will 
gradually,  by  and  by,  begin  to  concentrate  your  mind  on  your 
breathing.  After  a  certain  period,  you  will  experience  just  that 
split  second when  your mind  is  fully concentrated  on  your  breath-
ing,  when  you  will  not  hear  even  sounds  nearby,  when  no 
external  world  exists  for  you.  This  slight  moment  is  such  a 
tremendous  experience  for  you,  full  of  joy,  happiness  and  tran-
quility,  that  you  would  like  to  continue  it.  But  still  you  cannot. 
Ye t  if  you  go  on  practising  this  regularly,  you  may  repeat  the 
experience  again  and  again  for  longer  and longer periods.  That is 
the  moment  when  you  lose  yourself completely  in  your  mindful-
ness  of  breathing.  As  long  as  you  are  conscious  of  yourself  you 
can  never  concentrate  on  anything. 
This  exercise  of  mindfulness  of  breathing,  which  is  one  of  the 
simplest  and  easiest  practices,  is  meant  to  develop  concentration 
70 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested