c# pdf viewer : Move pages in pdf online SDK software API wpf winforms azure sharepoint who_htm_tb_2008_40210-part1101

77
8. MONO- AND POLy-RESISTANT STRAINS (DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS OTHER THAN MDR-TB)
TABLE 8.1  Suggested regimens for mono- and poly-drug resistance
a
(when further acquired resistance is not a factor and laboratory  
results are highly reliable)
pAttern  
suGGesteD  
minimum 
comments 
of DruG  
reGimen 
DurAtion of 
resistAnce   
of treAtment  
(months) 
H (±  S) 
R, Z and E 
6–9 
A fluoroquinolone may  
strengthen the regimen for  
patients with extensive  
disease.
H and Z 
R, E and fluoro- 
9–12 
A longer duration of treatment 
quinolones 
should be used for patients  
with extensive disease.
H and E 
R, Z and fluoro- 
9–12 
A longer duration of treatment 
quinolones 
should be used for patients  
with extensive disease.
H, E, fluoroquinolones,   12–18 
An injectable agent may 
plus at least 2 months    
strengthen the regimen for 
of Z 
patients with extensive  
disease.
R and E 
H, Z, fluoroquinolones,   18 
A longer course (6 months) of 
(± S) 
plus an injectable agent    
the injectable agent may  
for at least the first  
strengthen the regimen for 
2–3 months 
patients with extensive  
disease.
R and Z 
H, E, fluoroquinolones,   18 
A longer course (6 months) of  
(± S) 
plus an injectable agent    
the injectable agent may 
for at least the first  
strengthen the regimen for  
2–3 months 
patients with extensive  
disease.
H, E, Z 
R, fluoroquinolones,  
18 
A longer course (6 months) of 
(± S) 
plus an oral second-line    
the injectable agent may  
agent, plus an injectable    
strengthen the regimen for 
agent for the first 2–3  
patients with extensive  
months 
disease.
H = isoniazid; R = rifampicin; E = ethambutol; Z = pyrazinamide; S = streptomycin
a Adapted from Drug-resistant tuberculosis: a survival guide for clinicians (3)
TB strain to be resistant should be used. Some clinicians would add pyrazi-
namide to those regimens because a significant percentage of patients could 
benefit from the drug; however, it would not be counted upon as a core drug 
in the regimen. 
The design of regimens for mono- and poly-resistant cases of TB requires 
experience;  it  is  recommended  for  programmes  with  good  infrastructure 
that are capable of treating MDR-TB. Individually designed treatments for 
mono- and poly-resistance are often determined by a review panel that meets  
Move pages in pdf online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Move pages in pdf online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf reverse page order online; pdf change page order online
78
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
periodically. The panel reviews the treatment history, DST patterns and the 
possibility of strains of M. tuberculosis having acquired new resistance, and 
then determines the regimen. 
Box 8.1 provides an example to illustrate the risk of additional acquired  
resistance while awaiting DST results. 
BOx 8.1
Example of regimen design for mono- and poly-resistant strains
This example is from a setting where representative DRS data indicate that 
85% of failures of Category I have MDR-TB. A patient who has received a Cat-
egory I regimen of HRZE has a culture sent for DST at month 3 of treatment 
because of a positive smear. The initial phase is continued for an additional 
month, at which time the smear is negative, and the patient is placed on the 
continuation phase of treatment with HR. The DST returns in month 4 of treat-
ment with resistance to HE and susceptibility to S. DST is not known for Z. The 
patient is sputum smear-positive at month 4. What regimen should be used?
Answer: The patient has been on at least one month of functional monothera-
py with R, and, if resistant to Z, he or she may have been on monotherapy with 
R for four months. In this case, do not use Table 8.1 to design the regimen; 
instead, assume the patient may have now developed resistance to R, and de-
sign a Category Iv regimen based on the principles for MDR-TB regimen design 
described in Chapter 7. 
References
1.  Quy HT et al. Drug resistance among failure and relapse cases of tubercu-
losis: is the standard re-treatment regimen adequate? International Journal 
of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2003, 7(7):631–636.
2.  Tuberculosis Research Centre,  Chennai, India.  Low rate  of  emergence 
of drug resistance in sputum positive patients treated with short-course 
chemotherapy.  International  Journal  of  Tuberculosis  and  Lung  Disease, 
2001, 5(1):40–45.
3.  Drug-resistant tuberculosis: a survival guide for clinicians.  San Francisco, 
Francis J.  Curry National Tuberculosis Center and California  Depart-
ment of Health Services, 2004.
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
reorder pages in pdf; change pdf page order preview
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
reordering pdf pages; how to reorder pages in pdf online
79
CHAPTER 9
Treatment of DR-TB in special 
conditions and situations
9.1  Chapter objectives 
79
9.2  Pregnancy 
80
9.3  Breastfeeding 
80
9.4  Contraception 
81
9.5  Children  
81
9.6  Diabetes mellitus 
83
9.7  Renal insufficiency 
83
9.8  Liver disorders 
83
9.9  Seizure disorders 
86
9.10  Psychiatric disorders 
86
9.11  Substance dependence 
87
9.12  HIv-infected patients 
87
Table 9.1 
Paediatric dosing of second-line antituberculosis drugs 
82
Table 9.2 
Adjustment of antituberculosis medication in renal  
insufficiency 
85
Box 9.1 
Example of regimen design for paediatric cases 
84
9.1  Chapter objectives
This chapter outlines the management of DR-TB in the following special con-
ditions and situations:
 pregnancy,
 breastfeeding,
 contraception,
 children,
 diabetes mellitus,
 renal insufficiency,
 liver disorders,
 seizure disorders,
 psychiatric disorders,
 substance dependence.
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
how to change page order in pdf document; reorder pages in pdf preview
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
file into two or small files, you may refer to this online guide. RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including
how to rearrange pdf pages; change page order pdf preview
80
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
HIV infection is addressed separately in Chapter 10. 
9.2  pregnancy 
All female patients of childbearing age should be tested for pregnancy upon 
initial evaluation. Pregnancy is not a contraindication for treatment of active 
DR-TB, which poses great risks to the lives of both mother and fetus (1, 2). 
However, birth control is strongly recommended for all non-pregnant women 
receiving therapy for DR-TB because of the potential consequences for both 
mother and fetus resulting from frequent and severe adverse drug reactions.
Pregnant patients should be carefully evaluated, taking into consideration 
gestational age and severity of the DR-TB. The risks and benefits of treatment 
should be carefully considered, with the primary goal of smear conversion to 
protect the health of the mother and child, both before and after birth. The 
following are some general guidelines.
 Start treatment of drug resistance in second trimester or sooner if con-
dition of patient is severe. Since the majority of teratogenic effects occur 
in the first trimester, therapy may be delayed until the second trimester. 
The decision to postpone the start of treatment should be agreed by both 
patient and doctor after analysis of the risks and benefits. It is based prima-
rily on the clinical judgment resulting from the analysis of life-threatening 
signs/symptoms and severity/aggressiveness of the disease (usually reflect-
ed in extent of weight loss and lung affection during the previous weeks). 
When therapy is started, three or four oral drugs with demonstrated effi-
cacy against the infecting strain should be used and then reinforced with 
an injectable agent and possibly other drugs immediately postpartum (3). 
 Avoid injectable agents. For the most part, aminoglycosides should not be 
used in the regimens of pregnant patients and can be particularly toxic to the 
developing fetal ear. Capreomycin may also carry a risk of ototoxicity but is 
the injectable drug of choice if an injectable agent cannot be avoided. 
 Avoid ethionamide. Ethionamide can increase the risk of nausea and vom-
iting associated with pregnancy, and teratogenic effects have been observed 
in animal studies. If possible, ethionamide should be avoided in pregnant 
patients.
9.3  Breastfeeding 
A woman who is breastfeeding and has active DR-TB should receive a full 
course  of  antituberculosis  treatment.  Timely  and properly  applied  chemo-
therapy is the best way to prevent transmission of tubercle bacilli to her baby. 
In lactating mothers on treatment, most antituberculosis drugs will be found 
in the breast milk in concentrations that would equal only a small fraction of 
the therapeutic dose used in an infant. However, any effects on infants of such 
exposure during the full course of DR-TB treatment have not been established. 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
string to PDF files using online source codes int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save
reorder pages in pdf reader; rearrange pdf pages online
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image. Extract image from PDF free in .NET framework application with trial SDK components and online C# class
how to reorder pages in pdf file; how to reorder pages in pdf
81
9. TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS IN SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND SITUATIONS
Therefore, when resources and training  are  available, it  is recommended to 
provide infant formula options as an alternative to breastfeeding. When infant 
formula is provided, fuel for boiling water and the necessary apparatus (stove, 
heating pans and bottles) must also be provided, as well as training on how to 
prepare and use the infant formula. All this should be free of charge to poor pa-
tients, and DR-TB control programmes should therefore budget in advance for 
the estimated number of patients who might need this support. 
The mother and her baby should not be completely separated. However, if 
the mother is sputum smear-positive, the care of the infant should be left to 
family members until she becomes sputum smear-negative, if this is feasible. 
When the mother and infant are together, this common time should be spent 
in well-ventilated areas or outdoors. In some settings, the mother may be of-
fered the option of using a surgical mask or an N-95 respirator (see Chapter 
15) until she becomes sputum smear-negative. 
9.4  Contraception
There is no contraindication to the use of oral contraceptives with the non- 
rifamycin containing regimens. Patients who vomit directly after taking an 
oral contraceptive can be at risk of decreased absorption of the drug and there-
fore of decreased efficacy. These patients should be advised to take their con-
traceptives apart from times when they may experience vomiting caused by 
the antituberculosis treatment. Patients who vomit at any time directly after, 
or within the first two hours after, taking the contraceptive tablet, should use 
a barrier method of contraception until a full month of the contraceptive tab-
lets can be tolerated. 
For  patients  with  mono-  and  poly-resistant  TB  that  is  susceptible  to  
rifampicin, the use of rifampicin interacts with the contraceptive drugs result-
ing in decreased efficacy of protection against pregnancy. A woman on oral 
contraception while receiving rifampicin treatment may choose between two 
options: following consultation with a physician, use of an oral contraceptive 
pill containing a higher dose of estrogen (50 µg); or use of another form of 
contraception. 
9.5  Children 
Children with DR-TB generally have primary resistance transmitted from an 
index case with DR-TB. Evaluation of children who are contacts of DR-TB 
patients is discussed in Chapter 14. When DST is available, it should be used 
to guide therapy, although children with paucibacillary TB are often culture-
negative. Nevertheless, every effort should be made to confirm DR-TB bac-
teriologically by the use of DST and to avoid exposing children unnecessarily 
to toxic drugs.
The treatment of culture-negative children with clinical evidence of active 
TB disease and contact with a documented case of DR-TB should be guided 
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
how to move pages around in pdf file; reorder pdf pages reader
VB.NET PDF Page Delete Library: remove PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.
Enable specified pages deleting from PDF in Visual Basic .NET class. Free trial SDK library download for Visual Studio .NET program. Online source codes for
move pdf pages; how to move pages around in pdf
82
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
by the results of DST and the history of the contact’s exposure to antitubercu-
losis drugs (also see Chapter 14) (4).
There is only limited reported experience with the use of second-line drugs 
for extended periods in children. The risks and benefits of each drug should 
be carefully considered in designing a regimen. Frank discussion with family 
members is critical, especially at the outset of therapy. DR-TB is life-threaten-
ing, and no antituberculosis drugs are absolutely contraindicated in children. 
Children who have received treatment for DR-TB have generally tolerated the 
second-line drugs well (4, 5).
Although fluoroquinolones have been shown to retard cartilage develop-
ment in beagle puppies (6), experience with the use of fluoroquinolones has 
not demonstrated similar effects in humans (7, 8). It is considered that the 
benefit of fluoroquinolones in treating DR-TB in children outweighs any risk. 
Additionally, ethionamide, PAS and cycloserine have been used effectively in 
children and are well tolerated. 
In  general,  antituberculosis  drugs  should  be  dosed  according  to  body 
weight (see Table 9.1). Monthly monitoring of body weight is therefore es-
pecially important in paediatric cases, with adjustment of doses as children 
gain weight (9). 
All drugs, including the fluoroquinolones, should be dosed at the higher end 
of the recommended ranges whenever possible, except ethambutol. Ethambutol 
should be dosed at 15 mg/kg, and not at 25 mg/kg as sometimes used in adults 
with DR-TB, as it is more difficult to monitor for optic neuritis in children.
In children who are not culture-positive initially, treatment failure is diffi-
cult to assess. Persistent abnormalities on chest radiograph do not necessarily 
signify a lack of improvement. In children, weight loss or, more commonly, 
failure to gain weight adequately, is of particular concern and often one of the 
first (or only) signs of treatment failure. This is another key reason to monitor 
weight carefully in children.
TABLE 9.1  paediatric dosing of second-line antituberculosis drugs (4, 10)
DruG 
DAily Dose 
frequency 
mAximum  
(mG/KG) 
DAily Dose
streptomycin 
20–40 
Once daily 
1 g
kanamycin 
15–30 
Once daily 
1 g
amikacin 
15–22.5 
Once daily 
1 g
capreomycin 
15–30 
Once daily 
1 g
ofloxacin 
15–20 
Twice daily 
800 mg
levofloxacin 
7.5–10 
Once daily 
750 mg
moxifloxacin 
7.5–10 
Once daily 
400 mg
ethionamide 
15–20 
Twice daily 
1 g
protionamide 
15–20 
Twice daily 
1 g
cycloserine 
10–20 
Once or twice daily 
1 g
p-aminosalicylic acid 
150 
Twice or thrice daily 
12 g
83
Anecdotal evidence suggests that adolescents are at high risk for poor treat-
ment outcomes. Early diagnosis, strong social support, individual and family 
counselling and a close relationship with the medical provider may help to im-
prove outcomes in this group. 
9.6  Diabetes mellitus 
Diabetic patients with MDR-TB are at risk for poor outcomes. In addition, 
the presence of diabetes mellitus may potentiate  the adverse  effects of  an-
tituberculosis drugs, especially renal dysfunction and peripheral neuropathy.  
Diabetes must be managed closely throughout the treatment of DR-TB. The 
health-care  provider  should be in close communication with the  physician 
who manages the patient’s diabetes. Oral hypoglycaemic agents are not con-
traindicated during the treatment of DR-TB but may require the patient to 
increase the dosage. Use of ethionamide or protionamide may make it more 
difficult to control insulin levels. Creatinine and potassium levels should be 
monitored more frequently, often weekly for the first month and then at least 
monthly thereafter. 
9.7  Renal insufficiency 
Renal insufficiency caused by  longstanding TB  infection itself or previous 
use of aminoglycosides is not uncommon. Great care should be taken in the 
administration of second-line drugs in patients with renal insufficiency, and 
the dose and/or the interval between dosing should be adjusted according to 
Table 9.2. 
9.8  Liver disorders 
The  first-line  drugs  isoniazid,  rifampicin  and  pyrazinamide  are  all  asso-
ciated with  hepatotoxicity. Of the three,  rifampicin is least likely to cause 
hepatocellular  damage, although it is  associated with cholestatic  jaundice. 
Pyrazinamide is the most hepatotoxic of the three first-line drugs. Among the 
second-line drugs, ethionamide, protionamide and PAS can also be hepato-
toxic, although less so than any of the first-line drugs. Hepatitis occurs rarely 
with the fluoroquinolones. 
Patients with a history of liver disease can receive the usual DR-TB chemo-
therapy regimens provided there is no clinical evidence of severe chronic liver 
disease, hepatitis virus carriage, recent history of acute hepatitis or excessive al-
cohol consumption. However, hepatotoxic reactions to antituberculosis drugs 
may be more common in these patients and should be anticipated. 
In general, patients with  chronic liver disease should not receive pyrazi-
namide. All other drugs can be used, but close monitoring of liver enzymes 
is advised. If significant aggravation of liver inflammation occurs, the drugs  
responsible may have to be stopped. 
Uncommonly, a patient with TB may have concurrent acute hepatitis that 
9. TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS IN SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND SITUATIONS
84
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
BOx 9.1  ExAMpLE OF REGIMEn DESIGn FOR pAEDIATRIC CASES
A mother who has been on treatment for  MDR-TB for 9 months has been 
smear- and culture-negative for 6 months. She brings her child to the health 
centre for evaluation. The child is 14 months old and weighs 6.9 kg. She had 
BCG at birth and now presents with 4 months of failure to thrive, poor appetite 
and intermittent low grade fever for 3 months. Tuberculin (PPD) skin testing 
is 16 mm, and chest radiography reveals hilar adenopathy but no infiltrates. 
There are no other known TB contacts. TB was first diagnosed in the mother 
shortly after giving birth to the child; she is a patient who had both Category 
I and II treatment failure. Her resistance pattern from the start of treatment 
for DR-TB is: 
Resistance to H,R,Z,E,S
Susceptible to Amk-Cm-Ofx 
DST of PAS, Eto and Cs were not done because the laboratory cannot guar-
antee reproducibility of these agents.
what advice and regimen do you prescribe for the child?
Answer: It should be well explained to the mother that the child very likely has 
TB, most probably MDR-TB. If available, DST should be attempted (see Chap-
ter 14). While waiting for the DST results, or if the diagnostic procedure is not 
available, the child should be started on an empirical regimen based on the 
DST pattern of the mother. The following regimen is indicated: 
injectable agent-fluoroquinolone-Eto(pto)-Cs
or
injectable agent-fluoroquinolone-pAS-Cs
The injectable agent can be any drug except S, in this case km, Cm or Amk. 
To illustrate dose calculation, the example for the regimen of km-Ofx-Pto-Cs is 
given below. Both the low and high doses for the child’s weight are calculated; 
a convenient dosing is then chosen between the two numbers (if necessary a 
pharmacist can mix the exact dose so that any milligram amount can be se-
lected, and dosing is not limited to 1/4 or 1/2 tablets): 
Kanamycin: (15 mg x 6.9 kg = 103 and 30 mg x 6.9 kg = 207). Select a dose 
between the two numbers, e.g. 200 mg per day, single dose.
Ofloxacin: (15 mg x 6.9 kg = 103 and 20 mg x 6.9 kg = 138). A convenient 
dosing is 100 mg/day; this is the full daily dose. Table 9.1 indicates that the 
daily dose is given in divided doses, so the patient would receive 50 mg (1/4 
tablet) in the morning and 50 mg (1/4 tablet) in the evening.
protionamide: (15 mg x 6.9 kg = 103 and 20 mg x 6.9 kg = 138). A conven-
ient dosing is 125 mg/day; this is the full daily dose. Table 9.1 indicates that 
the daily dose is given in divided doses, so the patient would receive 62.5 mg 
(1/4 tablet) in the morning and 62.5 mg (1/4 tablet) in the evening.
Cycloserine: (15 mg x 6.9 kg = 103 and 20 mg x 6.9 kg = 138). A convenient 
dosing is 125 mg/day. This is the full daily dose. Table 9.1 indicates that the 
daily dose is given in divided doses, so the patient would receive 62.5 mg 
(1/4 capsule) in the morning and 62.5 mg (1/4 capsule) in the evening.
AS ThE ChILD GAInS wEIGhT, ThE DOSES wILL hAvE TO BE ADJUSTED 
(ChECK wEIGhT EvERy MOnTh)
85
9. TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS IN SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND SITUATIONS
TABLE 9.2  Adjustment of antituberculosis medication in renal insufficiency
a,b
DruG 
chAnGe in  
recommenDeD Doseb AnD frequency for  
frequency? 
pAtients with creAtinine cleArAnce <30 ml/min 
or for pAtients receivinG hAemoDiAlysis
isoniazid 
No change 
300 mg once daily, or 900 mg three times per week
rifampicin 
No change 
600 mg once daily, or 600 mg three times per week
pyrazinamide 
yes 
25–35 mg/kg per dose three times per week (not daily)
ethambutol 
yes 
15–25 mg/kg per dose three times per week (not daily)
ofloxacin 
yes 
600–800 mg per dose three times per week (not daily)
levofloxacin 
yes 
750–1000 mg per dose three times per week (not daily)
moxifloxacin 
No change 
400 mg once daily
cycloserine 
yes 
250 mg once daily, or 500 mg/dose three times per  
weekd
terizidone 
– 
Recommendations not available
protionamide 
No change 
250–500 mg per dose daily
ethionamide 
No change 
250–500 mg per dose daily
p-aminosalicylic   No change 
4 g/dose, twice daily 
acide 
streptomycin 
yes 
12–15 mg/kg per dose two or three times per week  
(not daily)
f
capreomycin 
yes 
12–15 mg/kg per dose two or three times per week  
(not daily)
f
kanamycin 
yes 
12–15 mg/kg per dose two or three times per week  
(not daily)f
amikacin 
yes 
12–15 mg/kg per dose two or three times per week  
(not daily)e
a Adapted from Treatment of tuberculosis (11). 
b For Group 5 drugs see manufacturers’ recommendations on adjustment in renal insufficiency.
c To take advantage of the concentration-dependent bactericidal effect of many antituberculosis 
drugs, standard doses are given unless there is intolerance.
d The appropriateness of 250 mg daily doses has not been established. There should be careful 
monitoring for evidence of neurotoxicity (if possible measure serum concentrations and adjust 
accordingly).
e Sodium salt formulations of PAS may result in an excessive sodium load and should be avoided 
in patients with renal insufficiency. Formulations of PAS that do not use the sodium salt can be 
used without the hazard of sodium retention. 
 Caution should be used with the injectable agents in patients with renal function impairment be-
cause of the increased risk of both ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity.
86
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
is unrelated to TB or antituberculosis treatment. In this case, clinical judge-
ment is necessary. In some cases, it is possible to defer antituberculosis treat-
ment until  the acute  hepatitis  has  been  resolved.  In other  cases  when it is 
necessary to treat DR-TB during acute hepatitis, the combination of four non-
hepatotoxic drugs is the safest option.
9.9  Seizure disorders 
Some patients requiring treatment for DR-TB will have a previous or current 
medical history of a seizure disorder. The first step in evaluating such patients 
is to determine whether the seizure disorder is under control and whether the 
patient is taking anti-seizure medication. If the seizures are not under control, 
initiation or adjustment of anti-seizure medication will be needed before the 
start of DR-TB therapy. In addition, any other underlying conditions or causes 
of seizures should be corrected.
Cycloserine should be avoided in patients with active seizure disorders that 
are not well controlled with medication. However, in cases where cycloserine 
is a crucial component of the treatment regimen, it can be given and the anti-
seizure medication adjusted as needed to control the seizure disorder. The risks 
and benefits of using cycloserine should be discussed with the patient and the 
decision on whether to use cycloserine made together with the patient. 
In mono- and poly-resistant cases, the use of isoniazid and rifampicin may 
interfere with many of the anti-seizure medications. Drug interactions should 
be checked before their use (see Annex 1 for drug interactions). 
Seizures that present for the first time during antituberculosis therapy are 
likely to be the result of an adverse effect of one of the antituberculosis drugs. 
More information on the specific strategies and protocols to address adverse 
effects is provided in Chapter 11. 
9.10  psychiatric disorders 
It is advisable for psychiatric patients to be evaluated by a health-care worker 
with psychiatric training before the start of treatment for DR-TB. The ini-
tial evaluation documents any existing psychiatric condition and establishes 
a baseline for comparison if new psychiatric symptoms develop while the pa-
tient is on treatment. Any psychiatric illness identified at the start of or dur-
ing treatment should be fully addressed. There is a high baseline incidence of 
depression and anxiety in patients with MDR-TB, often connected with the 
chronicity and socioeconomic stress factors related to the disease. 
Treatment  with  psychiatric  medication,  individual  counselling  and/
or group therapy may be necessary to manage the patient suffering from a 
psychiatric condition or an adverse psychiatric effect caused by medication. 
Group therapy  has been very successful  in providing a  supportive environ-
ment for MDR-TB patients and may be helpful for patients with or without 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested