c# pdf viewer : How to move pages in pdf converter professional control SDK platform web page .net asp.net web browser who_htm_tb_2008_40211-part1102

87
psychiatric conditions. (Adequate measures to prevent infection risk should be 
in place for the group therapy.)
The use of cycloserine is not absolutely contraindicated for the psychiatric 
patient. Adverse effects from cycloserine may be more prevalent in the psychi-
atric patient, but the benefits of using this drug may outweigh the potentially 
higher risk of adverse effects. Close monitoring is recommended if cycloserine 
is used in patients with psychiatric disorders. 
All health-care workers treating DR-TB should work closely with a mental 
health specialist and have an organized system for psychiatric emergencies. 
Psychiatric emergencies include psychosis, suicidal ideation and any situation 
involving the patient’s being a danger to him or herself or others. Additional 
information on psychiatric adverse effects is provided in Chapter 11, Table 
11.3. 
9.11  Substance dependence 
Patients with substance dependence disorders should be offered treatment for 
their addiction. Complete abstinence from alcohol or other substances should 
be strongly encouraged, although active consumption is not a contraindica-
tion for antituberculosis treatment. If the treatment is repeatedly interrupt-
ed because of the patient’s  dependence,  therapy should be suspended until 
successful treatment or measures to ensure adherence have been established. 
Good DOT gives the patient contact with and support from health-care pro-
viders, which often allows complete treatment even in patients with substance 
dependence.
Cycloserine will have a higher incidence of adverse effects (as in the psychi-
atric patient) in patients dependent on alcohol or other substances, including 
a higher incidence of seizures. However, if cycloserine is considered important 
to the regimen, it should be used and the patient closely observed for adverse 
effects, which are then adequately treated. 
9.12  hIv-infected patients 
Given the important interaction between HIV infection and drug-susceptible 
and DR-TB, a full chapter (Chapter 10) is devoted to this subject. 
References
1.  Figueroa-Damián R, Arredondo-García JL. Neonatal outcome  of  chil-
dren born to women with tuberculosis. Archives of Medical Research, 2001, 
32(1):66–69.
2.  Brost  BC,  Newman  RB.  The  maternal  and  fetal  effects  of  tubercu-
losis therapy. Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of  North America, 1997, 
24(3):659–673.
3.  Duff P. Antibiotic selection in obstetric patients. Infectious Disease Clinics 
of North America, 1997, 11(1):1–12.
9. TREATMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS IN SPECIAL CONDITIONS AND SITUATIONS
How to move pages in pdf converter professional - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf reverse page order online; how to move pages around in pdf
How to move pages in pdf converter professional - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
rearrange pdf pages in reader; move pdf pages online
88
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
4.  Swanson DS, Starke JR. Drug resistant tuberculosis in pediatrics. Pediat-
ric Clinics of North America, 1995, 42(3):553–581.
5.  Mukherjee JS et al. Clinical and programmatic considerations in the treat-
ment of MDR-TB in children: a series of 16 patients from Lima, Peru. 
International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung  Disease, 2003, 7(7):637–
644.
6.  Takizawa T  et al. The comparative arthropathy  of fluoroquinolones in 
dogs. Human and Experimental Toxicology, 1999, 18(6):392–329.
7.  Warren RW. Rheumatologic aspects of pediatric cystic fibrosis patients 
treated with fluoroquinolones. Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 1997, 
16(1):118–122.
8.  Hampel B, Hullmann R, Schmidt H. Ciprofloxacin in pediatrics: world-
wide clinical experience based on compassionate use – safety report. Pedi-
atric Infectious Disease Journal, 1997, 16(1):127–129.
9.  Loebstein R, Koren G. Clinical pharmacology and therapeutic drug mon-
itoring  in neonates  and children. Pediatric  Review, 1998, 19(12):423–
428.
10.  Siberry GK, Iannone R, eds. The Harriet Lane handbook, 15th ed. Balti-
more, Mosby, 2000.
11.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Thoracic Society, 
Infectious Diseases Society of America. Treatment of tuberculosis. Mor-
bidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2003, 52(RR11):1–77.
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
PDF to Word converter control is a professional and mature RasterEdge VB.NET PDF to Word converter library has All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word
reverse pdf page order online; how to move pages in pdf files
C# PDF Converter Library SDK to convert PDF to other file formats
This C#.NET PDF converting library is a professional and advanced PDF document manipulating Remarkably, this PDF document converter control for C#.NET
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; pdf change page order
89
CHAPTER 10
DR-TB and hIv
10.1  Chapter objectives 
89
10.2  General considerations 
90
10.3  Recommended collaborative TB/HIv activities 
91
10.4  Clinical features and diagnosis of DR-TB in HIv-infected patients 
94
10.5  Concomitant treatment of DR-TB and HIv 
94
10.5.1  Initiating ART treatment in patients with DR-TB 
95
10.5.2  DR-TB in patients already receiving ART 
95
10.5.3  Important drug–drug interactions in the treatment of HIv  
and DR-TB 
96
10.5.4  Potential drug toxicity in the treatment of HIv and DR-TB 
97
10.5.5  Monitoring of DR-TB and HIv therapy in coinfected patients  97
10.5.6  Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome 
102
10.6  XDR-TB and HIv 
102
10.7  Implications of HIv for MDR-TB infection control 
102
10.8  Coordination of HIv and TB care: involvement of the TB/HIv board  103
10.9  Summary 
103
Table 10.1  WHO-recommended collaborative TB/HIv activities 
91
Table 10.2  Timing of ART in the ART-naive patient starting  
antituberculosis therapy for DR-TB 
95
Table 10.3  Potential overlying and additive toxicities of ART and  
antituberculosis therapy 
98
10.1  Chapter objectives 
This chapter aims to illustrate where the management of DR-TB differs in the 
presence of known or suspected HIV infection and to provide guidance on  
recent developments in the approach to TB/HIV.
1
The chapter outlines: 
1 TB/HIV is the term used in the context of the overlapping of the two epidemics of TB and HIV/
AIDS, and is often used to describe joint TB and HIV/AIDS activities. Patients with HIV-asso-
ciated TB should be referred to as such.
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy Offer professional PDF document metadata editing APIs, using
move pages in pdf file; how to move pages in pdf
C# PDF File Split Library: Split, seperate PDF into multiple files
can not only offer C# developers a professional .NET solution using which C# developers can split target PDF document file by specifying a page or pages.
move pages within pdf; pdf rearrange pages
90
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
 recommended collaborative TB/HIV activities that may be used along-
side specific activities to mitigate the problem of DR-TB in HIV-infected  
persons;
 diagnostic and clinical guidelines for management of DR-TB in HIV- 
infected patients;
 potential drug interactions, toxicities and monitoring requirements in the 
concomitant treatment of DR-TB and HIV;
 infection control implications in the context of HIV and TB. 
Key recommendations (* indicates updated recommendation)
 Perform provider-initiated HIv testing and counselling in all TB suspects.*
 Use standard algorithms to diagnose pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB.
 Use mycobacterial cultures and, where available, newer more rapid meth-
ods of diagnosis.
 Perform DST at the start of antituberculosis therapy to avoid mortality due 
to unrecognized DR-TB in HIv-infected individuals.*
 Determine the extent (or prevalence) of antituberculosis drug resistance in 
patients with HIv.
 Introduce antiretroviral therapy promptly in DR-TB/HIv patients. 
 Consider empirical therapy with second-line antituberculosis drugs.*
 Provide co-trimoxazole preventive therapy as part of a comprehensive pack-
age of HIv care to patients with active TB and HIv.*
 Arrange treatment follow-up by a specialized team. 
 Implement additional nutritional and socioeconomic support.
 Ensure effective infection control.
 Involve key stakeholders in DR-TB/HIv control activities. 
 Monitor for overlying toxicity with ART and DR-TB therapy.
10.2  General considerations
HIV coinfection is a significant challenge for the prevention, diagnosis and 
treatment of DR-TB, especially in the case of MDR-TB and XDR-TB. Re-
ports have shown high mortality rates among HIV-infected patients with DR-
TB (1, 2), and alarming mortality rates in patients coinfected with XDR-TB 
and HIV (3). Early diagnosis of DR-TB and HIV, prompt treatment with ad-
equate regimens, sound patient support and strong infection control measures 
are all essential components in the management of DR-TB in HIV-infected 
people. 
Recent global drug resistance surveillance suggests an association between 
HIV and MDR-TB in some parts of the world, although specific factors in-
volved in this association have not been determined  HIV is a powerful risk 
factor for all forms of TB, and DR-TB outbreaks, including XDR-TB out-
breaks in HIV-infected patients, appear to be common (3–7). DR-TB is often 
associated with higher mortality rates in the HIV-infected compared with the 
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Professional .NET PDF control for inserting PDF page in Visual Basic .NET class application. Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF
reorder pdf pages in preview; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
C# PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in C#.net
Guide C# Users to Insert (Empty) PDF Page or Pages from a Supported File Format. Professional adobe PDF page creator SDK for Visual Studio .NET.
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; how to move pages within a pdf document
91
non-infected; however, the use of ART in addition to treatment of DR-TB has 
been reported to improve outcomes of DR-TB in the HIV-infected (8, 9). 
10.3  Recommended collaborative TB/hIv activities 
WHO  recommends  that  certain  collaborative  activities  are  carried  out  to  
decrease the joint burden of TB and HIV (see Table 10.1) (10–12).
These  activities  are  the  backbone  of  the  WHO  TB/HIV  collabora-
tive strategy that, along with the implementation of effective  DOTS pro-
grammes, will strengthen and increase the success of DR-TB/HIV control 
and treatment activities. 
These guidelines recommend  whenever  possible the  highest standard  of 
care. The activities described below are based on the TB/HIV activities listed 
in Table 10.1 and are adapted to be specifically applicable to DR-TB. 
 Perform provider-initiated HIV testing and counselling in all TB sus-
pects. Given the high levels of HIV and TB coinfection in many settings, 
provider-initiated HIV counselling and testing is recommended for all TB 
suspects (13, 14). Provider-initiated testing can be done at the same time 
the sputum is sent for smear microscopy (or culture). This is more efficient 
and more likely to be successful than referring patients elsewhere for HIV 
testing and counseling (15). Provider-initiated counselling and testing can 
serve as a gateway to lifesaving prevention, care and treatment interven-
tions.
 Use standard algorithms to diagnose pulmonary and extrapulmonary 
TB. New recommendations for improving the diagnosis and treatment of 
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
TABLE 10.1  whO-recommended collaborative TB/hIv activitiesa 
A. ESTABLISh ThE MEChAnISMS FOR COLLABORATIOn
A.1  Set up a coordinating body for TB/HIv activities effective at all levels
A.2 Conduct surveillance of HIv prevalence among TB patients
A.3 Carry out joint TB/HIv planning
A.4  Conduct monitoring and evaluation
B. DECREASE ThE BURDEn OF TB In pEOpLE LIvInG wITh hIv/AIDS
B.1 Establish intensified TB case-finding and contact tracing
B.2 Introduce isoniazid preventive therapy
B.3 Ensure TB infection control in health-care and congregate settings
C. DECREASE ThE BURDEn OF hIv In TB pATIEnTS
C.1 Provide HIv testing and counselling
C.2 Introduce HIv prevention methods
C.3 Introduce co-trimoxazole preventive therapy
C.4 Ensure HIv/AIDS care and support
C.5 Introduce antiretroviral therapy
a A detailed description of each of the activities listed in Table 10.1 can be found in the WHO docu-
ment Interim policy on collaborative TB/HIV activities (10).
C# PDF metadata Library: add, remove, update PDF metadata in C#.
Update and Delete PDF Metadata in .NET Project. Professional PDF SDK for adobe PDF document metadata editing in C# .NET framework.
reorder pages pdf file; reverse page order pdf online
C# Create PDF Library SDK to convert PDF from other file formats
NET applications, C# developers can easily use this professional PDF document generating will tell you how to create a PDF document with 2 empty pages.
switch page order pdf; rearrange pdf pages reader
92
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB have been put forth by 
WHO (16). Also see section 10.4 below. 
 Use mycobacterial cultures and, where available, newer more rapid 
methods of diagnosis. Mycobacterial cultures of sputum or other fluids 
and tissues are recommended to help in the diagnosis of sputum smear-
negative and extrapulmonary TB (16). The heavy reliance on smear mi-
croscopy has significant limitations and is insufficient to reliably diagnose a 
significant proportion of HIV-coinfected patients, especially as the degree 
of immunosuppression advances (17). Rapid methods such as liquid cul-
ture or molecular techniques should be considered (18). See Chapter 6 for 
more information on culture methods. 
 Perform DST at the start of antituberculosis therapy. Unrecognized 
DR-TB carries a high risk of mortality in patients with HIV (19). Prompt 
initiation of appropriate antituberculosis treatment (and subsequent initia-
tion of ART) can reduce mortality among HIV-infected patients infected 
with DR-TB (29, 21). Because unrecognized MDR-TB and XDR-TB are 
associated with such high mortality  in HIV-infected patients, many  in-
ternational protocols dictate the performance of DST and/or rapid drug-
resistance testing for all HIV-infected patients with established active TB. 
(See Chapter 5 and section 10.4 below for more discussion on rapid tests 
and diagnosing DR-TB in HIV patients.) While performing DST for all 
TB/HIV coinfected patients is the standard of care for many areas, these 
guidelines recognize that this may be difficult or impossible in many re-
source-limited settings. Alternative strategies are provided in section 10.4 
for programmes with resource constraints. However,  universal  access to 
DST is the long-term goal for all settings. 
 Determine the extent (or prevalence) of TB drug resistance in patients 
with HIV. Programmes should determine the extent of the overlap of the 
DR-TB and HIV epidemics. This can be done in two ways: (i) data from 
population-based TB DRS can be linked with HIV testing of those TB 
patients included (22); and/or (ii) when implementing HIV surveillance 
among TB patients  (or  provider-initiated testing  and counselling  for all 
TB patients), DST can be included in all, or an unbiased sub-set of, HIV-
infected patients. The latter technique is more complex if rates of DR-TB in 
HIV-infected and negative patients are to be compared, as a control group 
of HIV-negative TB infected patients would also need to be established. 
 Introduce ART promptly in DR-TB/HIV patients. These guidelines 
recommend the prompt initiation of ART in HIV-infected patients with 
DR-TB according to WHO  guidelines (23) (see section 10.5 and Table 
10.2 on when to initiate HIV treatment in DR-TB). Where indicated, pro-
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view, annotate, create and convert PDF
Help C# users to erase PDF text content, images and pages online in ASP.NET. RasterEdge C#.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer and HTML5 PDF Editor are professional online PDF
how to rearrange pages in a pdf document; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
C# PDF File Merge Library: Merge, append PDF files in C#.net, ASP.
Professional C#.NET PDF SDK for merging PDF file merging in Visual Studio .NET. Free online C#.NET source code for combining multiple PDF pages together in .NET
change pdf page order reader; rearrange pages in pdf file
93
tocols to manage immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) 
should be followed (see section 10.5.6 for more information on IRIS). 
 Consider empirical therapy with second-line antituberculosis drugs. 
Patients with a very high risk of DR-TB can be empirically started on Cat-
egory IV regimens. This strategy can be applied to all patients regardless of 
HIV status but is especially important in those with HIV. (Note: empirical 
use of Category IV is reserved for patients who have an extremely high rate 
of MDR-TB, such as failures of Category II or very close contacts of DR-TB. 
See Chapter 5 for more information on the use of empirical Category IV). 
 Provide CPT for patients with active TB and HIV. CPT should be pro-
vided to all patients with HIV according to WHO recommendations (24). 
This therapy is not known to interact significantly with any of the second-
line antituberculosis agents. There are overlapping toxicities between ART, 
antituberculosis therapy and CPT, and vigilance in terms of monitoring 
adverse effects is required (see Table 10.3 below and Chapter 11). 
 Arrange treatment follow-up by a specialized team. The team of care 
providers should be familiar with the treatment of both DR-TB and HIV, 
with close monitoring of potential additive adverse effects and nutritional 
status as well as periodic assessments of therapeutic response for both in-
fections. 
 Implement additional nutritional and socioeconomic support. Patients 
with DR-TB and HIV may suffer from severe wasting, diarrhoeal diseas-
es,  and malabsorption syndromes. Coinfected patients often  come  from  
socially marginalized groups or from families with low economic resourc-
es. Additionally, DR-TB therapy with second-line antituberculosis medi-
cations may result in adverse effects that affect treatment adherence and 
require more frequent visits to health facilities. Wherever possible, patients 
with DR-TB/HIV and limited means should be offered socioeconomic and  
nutritional support (25) (also see Chapter 12 for more information on treat-
ment support). 
 Ensure effective infection control. Infection control procedures can re-
duce the risk of M. tuberculosis transmission in HIV/AIDS care facilities. 
Infection  control  issues  concerning  DR-TB,  including  issues  regarding 
HIV, are discussed in Chapter 15 and in other documents published by 
WHO (26).
 Involve key stakeholders in DR-TB/HIV activities. The local/nation-
al TB/HIV coordinating bodies, community groups and key stakeholders 
should be involved in the planning and monitoring of DR-TB/HIV activi-
ties and programmes. 
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
94
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
10.4  Clinical features and diagnosis of DR-TB  
in hIv-infected patients
The diagnosis of TB (including MDR-TB and XDR-TB) in HIV-infected peo-
ple is more difficult and may be confused with other pulmonary or systemic 
infections. The presentation is more likely to be extrapulmonary or sputum 
smear-negative than in HIV-uninfected TB patients, especially as immunosup-
pression advances (27). This can result in misdiagnosis or delays in diagnosis, 
and in turn, higher morbidity and mortality. Algorithms have recently been 
published by the WHO with the aim of improving the diagnosis of smear-neg-
ative pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB (16). The new algorithms emphasize 
the use of clinical criteria first and, if needed, the use of additional laborato-
ry data (culture) and radiography to diagnose TB. Clinical criteria have been 
shown  to have  an  89–96%  positive  predictive  value  of  smear-negative  and  
extrapulmonary  TB  when  compared  with  culture  (28).  For  patients  with  
advanced HIV disease, mycobacterial culture of other fluids (e.g. blood, pleural 
fluid, ascitic fluid, cerebrospinal fluid and bone-marrow aspirates) and histopa-
thology (e.g. lymph node biopsies) may be helpful in diagnosis. 
In many programmes and areas, all HIV patients with TB are screened for 
drug- resistance with DST. Rapid drug-resistance testing  is the DST tech-
nique of choice since this allows prompt diagnosis of MDR-TB, decreasing 
the time the patient may be on an inadequate regimen and the period during 
which the patient may be spreading DR-TB. 
Programmes without facilities or resources to screen all HIV-infected pa-
tients for DR-TB should put significant efforts into obtaining them, especially 
if DR-TB rates are moderate or high. Some programmes may adopt a strategy 
of targeted DST for patients with increased risk of DR-TB (such as those in 
whom treatment has failed or who are contacts of DR-TB cases (see Chapter 
5)). Programmes may also choose to use targeted DST for those with lower 
CD4 counts (e.g. less than 200 cells/mm
3
) since these patents are at a very 
high risk of death due to unrecognized DR-TB. 
10.5  Concomitant treatment of DR-TB and hIv
The treatment of DR-TB in patients with HIV is very similar to that in patients 
without HIV and is described in Chapter 7, with the following exceptions:
 ART plays a crucial role, as mortality in MDR-TB/HIV patients without 
the use of ART is extremely high (91–100% as reported in one analysis of 
MDR-TB outbreaks in 9 different institutions) (7). 
 Adverse effects are more common in patients with HIV. The multiple 
medicines  involved in DR-TB with recognized high  toxicity risks, often 
combined with ART, results in a high incidence of adverse effects. Some 
toxicities are common to both antituberculosis treatment and ART, which 
may result in added rates of adverse events.
95
 Monitoring needs to be more intense for both response to therapy and  
adverse effects. 
 The use of thioacetazone is not recommended for patients with HIV (29) 
or for routine use in populations with high rates of HIV.
 IRIS may complicate therapy.
10.5.1  Initiating ART treatment in patients with DR-TB
The use of ART in HIV-infected patients with TB improves survival for both 
drug-resistant and susceptible disease (9, 16, 30). As stated above, cohorts of 
patients treated for DR-TB without the benefit of ART have experienced mor-
tality rates often exceeding 90% (3, 7). However, the likelihood of adverse 
effects could compromise the treatment of either HIV or DR-TB if both treat-
ments are started simultaneously. On the other hand, undue delay in the start 
of ART could result in significant risk of HIV-related death among patients 
with advanced disease (31). The optimal timing for the introduction of ART 
in patients receiving TB treatment is unknown. Table 10.2, based on WHO 
guidelines for the treatment of HIV infection in adults and adolescents (23), 
provides recommendations for initiating ART in relationship to starting ther-
apy for DR-TB. 
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
TABLE 10.2  Timing of ART in the ART-naive patient starting antituberculosis  
therapy for DR-TB
cD4 cell count 
Art 
timinG of Art in relAtion 
recommenDAtions 
to stArt of Dr-tb treAtment
CD4 <200 cells/mm3  Recommend ART 
At two weeks or as soon as DR-TB  
treatment is tolerated
CD4 between 200 
Recommend ART 
After eight weeks
a
and 350 cells/mm3
CD4 >350 cells/mm
3
Defer ART
b
Re-evaluate patient monthly for  
consideration of ART start. CD4 testing  
is recommended every three months  
during DR-TB treatment. 
Not available 
Recommend ART
c
Between two and eight weeks
a Clinical evaluation may prompt earlier initiation of ART. 
b ART should be started if other non-TB stage 3 or 4 events are present.
c This recognizes that some patients may be prematurely placed on life-long ART.
10.5.2  DR-TB in patients already receiving ART
There are two issues to consider in patients who are diagnosed with DR-TB 
while on  ART. The first is whether modification of ART is needed due to 
drug–drug interactions or to decrease the potential of overlapping toxicities. 
These concerns are discussed below.
96
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
The second issue is whether the presentation of active DR-TB in a patient 
on ART constitutes ART failure. The principles of determining failure in such 
cases are described in other WHO documents (23). If ART failure has been 
diagnosed, it is not recommended to begin a new second-line ART regimen at 
the same time as initiation of a DR-TB regimen. Instead, continue the present 
ART regimen and switch to the second-line ART regimen 2–8 weeks after the 
start of DR-TB treatment. 
10.5.3  Important drug–drug interactions in the treatment  
of HIv and DR-TB 
Currently, little is known about drug–drug interactions between second-line 
antituberculosis agents  and antiretroviral therapy. There are  several  known 
inter actions between drugs used to treat HIV and TB, which are summarized 
below.
 Rifamycin derivatives. While rifamycin derivatives are not routinely used 
in DR-TB treatment, they are used in the treatment of rifampicin-sensitive 
poly- and  mono-resistant  TB. Guidance  on  use  of  rifamycin derivative-
based regimens and ART (including with PI-based regimens) is available 
elsewhere (23, 32).
 Quinolones and didanosine. Buffered didanosine contains an alumini-
um/magnesium-based antacid and, if given jointly with fluoroquinolones, 
may result in decreased fluoroquinolone absorption (33); it should be avoid-
ed, but if it is necessary it should be given six hours before or two hours after 
fluoroquinolone administration.  The  enteric  coated (EC) formulation  of 
didanosine can be used concomitantly without this precaution. 
 Ethionamide/protionamide. Based on limited existing information of the 
metabolisim of the thiamides (ethionamide and protionamide), this drug 
class may  have interactions  with  antiretroviral drugs.  Ethionamide/pro-
tionamide is thought to be metabolized by the CYP450 system, although 
it is not know which of the CYP enzymes are responsible. Whether doses 
of ethionamide/protionamide and/or certain antiretroviral drugs should be 
modified during the concomitant treatment of DR-TB and HIV is com-
pletely unknown (34).
 Clarithromycin. Clarithromycin is a substrate and inhibitor of CYP3A 
and has multiple drug interactions with protease inhibitors and NNRTIs. 
If possible, the use of clarithromycin should be avoided in patients coinfect-
ed with DR-TB and HIV because of both its weak efficacy against DR-TB 
and multiple drug interactions. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested