97
10.5.4  Potential drug toxicity in the treatment of HIv and DR-TB
There  is  limited  evidence  on  the  frequency and  severity of  toxicities  and  
adverse events from ART and second-line antituberculosis therapy. In gener-
al, HIV patients have a higher rate of adverse drug reactions to both TB and 
non-TB medications, and the risk of adverse drug reactions increases with the 
degree of immunosuppression (27, 35, 36, 37). Identifying the source of ad-
verse effects in patients receiving concomitant therapy for DR-TB and HIV is 
difficult. Many of the medications used to treat DR-TB and HIV have over-
lapping, or in some cases additive, toxicities. Often, it may not be possible to 
link adverse effects to a single drug, as the risk of resistance for ART therapy 
precludes the typical medical challenge of stopping all medications and start-
ing them one by one (38). 
Adverse effects that are common to both antiretroviral and antituberculosis 
drugs are listed in Table 10.3. It should be noted that relatively very little is 
known about the rates of adverse effects in the concomitant treatment of DR-
TB and HIV. Table 10.3 is meant to alert the clinician to potentially overlap-
ping and additive toxicities, and as of the writing of these guidelines is based 
on preliminary, non-published data and expert opinion. 
When  possible, avoid  the  use  of  agents  with  shared adverse  effect pro-
files. Often, however, the benefit of using drugs that have overlying toxici-
ties outweighs the risk. Therefore, if two drugs with overlapping toxicities are  
determined to be essential in a patient’s regimen, these guidelines recommend 
increased monitoring of adverse effects rather than disallowing a certain com-
bination. See Chapter 11 and section 10.5.5 for monitoring adverse effects in 
HIV-infected patients. 
10.5.5  Monitoring of DR-TB and HIv therapy in coinfected patients
HIV treatment must be taken daily without exception to prevent the evolution 
of drug resistance. Since DOT is an important component of DR-TB therapy, 
programmes would be  advised to explore the provision of TB medications 
and ARVs through concomitant DOT or other methods of adherence support 
(see Chapter 12). This is particularly important in the setting of second-line  
antituberculosis therapy, since it can result in a large pill burden and numer-
ous adverse effects that make taking ARVs more difficult. 
The complexity of antiretroviral regimens and second-line antituberculo-
sis treatment, each with its own toxicity profiles and some of which may be  
potentiated  by concomitant  therapy, demands rigorous  clinical monitoring 
(39). Chapter 11, Table 11.1 describes the monitoring requirements while on 
DR-TB therapy and indicates where any extra monitoring is required for pa-
tients coinfected with HIV and/or on ART. 
If the patient shows signs of antituberculosis treatment failure, the same 
evaluation described in Chapter 13 is warranted. In addition, the ART regi-
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
Pdf move pages - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pages in pdf; rearrange pages in pdf document
Pdf move pages - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pdf pages; how to reorder pages in pdf
98
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
TABLE 10.3 potential overlying and additive toxicities of ART and antituberculosis therapy
Drugs that are more strongly associated with adverse effects appear in bold. 
toxicity 
AntiretrovirAl  
Antituberculosis 
comments 
AGent 
AGent 
Peripheral  
D4T, ddI,  
Lzd, Cs, h,  
Avoid use of D4T, ddI and ddC in combination with Cs or Lzd because of theoretically 
neuropathy 
ddC 
Amino glycosides, 
increased peripheral neuropathy. 
Eto/Pto, E 
If these agents must be used and peripheral neuropathy develops, replace the ARv agent  
with a less neurotoxic agent and treat according to Chapter 11.
Central nervous 
EFv 
Cs, H, Eto/Pto,  
Efavirenz has a high rate of CNS adverse effects (confusion, impaired concentration,  
system (CNS) 
Fluoroquinolones 
depersonalization, abnormal dreams, insomnia and dizziness) in the first 2–3 weeks,  
toxicity 
which typically resolve on their own. If these effects do not resolve on their own, consider  
substitution of the agent. At present, there are limited data on the use of EFv with Cs;  
concurrent use is accepted practice with frequent monitoring for CNS toxicity. Frank  
psychosis is rare with EFv alone. 
Depression 
EFv 
aCs, Fluoroquinolones, Severe depression can be seen in 2.4% of patients receiving EFv. Consider substituting for 
H, Eto/Pto 
EFv if severe depression develops. The severe socioeconomic circumstances of many 
patients with chronic disease can also contribute to depression. 
Headache 
AZT, EFv 
Cs 
Rule out more serious causes of headache such as bacterial meningitis, cryptococcal  
meningitis, CNS toxoplasmosis, etc. Use of analgesics (ibuprofen, paracetamol) and good  
hydration may help. Headache secondary to AZT, EFv and Cs is usually self-limited. 
Nausea and  
RTv, D4T, NvP,  
Eto/pto, pAS, h,  
Nausea and vomiting are common adverse effects and can be managed with modalities 
vomiting 
and most others 
E, Z and others 
described in Chapter 11. 
Persistent vomiting and abdominal pain may be a result of developing lactic acidosis  
and/or hepatitis secondary to medications.
a (Bristol-Myers Squibb, letter to providers, March 2005).
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
change page order pdf reader; how to reverse pages in pdf
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
pdf reorder pages; how to reorder pages in pdf reader
99
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
Abdominal pain 
All ART treatment  Cfz, Eto/pto, pAS 
Abdominal pain is a common adverse effect and often benign; however, abdominal pain 
has been  
may be an early symptom of severe adverse effects such as pancreatitis, hepatitis or 
associated with  
lactic acidosis.  
abdominal pain 
Pancreatitis 
D4T, ddI, ddC 
Lzd 
Avoid use of these agents together. If an agent causes pancreatitis suspend it permanently  
and do not use any of the pancreatitis producing anti-HIv medications (D4T, ddI, or ddC) in  
the future. 
Also consider gallstones or alcohol as a potential cause of pancreatitis.
Diarrhea 
All protease  
Eto/pto, pAS,  
Diarrhoea is a common adverse effect. Also consider opportunistic infections as a cause of 
inhibitors, ddI  
Fluoroquinolones 
diarrhoea, or clostridium difficile (a cause of pseudomembranous colitis).  
(buffered formula)  
Hepatotoxicity 
nvp, EFv, all  
h, R, E, Z, PAS,  
Follow hepatotoxicity treatment recommendations in Chapter 11.  
protease inhibitors  Eto/Pto,  
Also consider TMP/SMX as a cause of hepatotoxicity if the patient is receiving this 
(RTv > other  
Fluoroquinolones 
medication. 
protease  
Also rule out viral etiologies as cause of hepatitis (Hepatitis A, B, C, and CMv).  
inhibitors), all  
nRTIs 
Skin rash 
ABC, nvp, EFv,  
h, R, Z, pAS,  
Do not re-challenge with ABC (can result in life-threatening anaphylaxis). Do not 
D4T and others 
Fluoroquinolones,  
re-challenge with an agent that caused Stevens-Johnson syndrome.  
and others 
Also consider TMP/SMX as a cause of skin rash if the patient is receiving this medication. 
Thioacetazone is contraindicated in HIv because of life-threatening rash.
Lactic acidosis 
D4T, ddI, AZT,  
Lzd 
If an agent causes lactic acidosis, replace it with an agent less likely to cause lactic 
3TC 
acidosis. 
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
how to change page order in pdf document; reorder pdf pages online
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages. Copying and Pasting Pages.
how to move pages in pdf acrobat; reordering pages in pdf document
100
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
TABLE 10.3 (continued)
Drugs that are more strongly associated with adverse effects appear in bold. 
toxicity 
AntiretrovirAl  
Antituberculosis 
comments 
AGent 
AGent 
Renal toxicity 
TDF (rare) 
Aminoglycosides,  
TDF may cause renal injury with the characteristic features of Fanconi syndrome,  
Cm 
hypophosphataemia, hypouricaemia, proteinuria, normoglycaemic glycosuria and, in  
some cases, acute renal failure. There are no data on the concurrent use of TDF with  
aminoglycosides or Cm. Use TDF with caution in patients receiving aminoglycosides or Cm. 
Even without the concurrent use of TDF, HIv-infected patients have an increased risk of  
renal toxicity secondary to aminoglycosides and Cm. Frequent creatinine and electrolyte  
monitoring every 1 to 3 weeks is recommended (see Chapter 11).  
Many ARv and antituberculosis medications need to be dose adjusted for renal  
insufficiency.
Nephrolithiasis 
IDv 
None 
No overlapping toxicities regarding nephrolithiasis have been documented between ART  
and antituberculosis medications. Adequate hydration prevents nephrolithiasis in patients  
taking IDv. If nephrolithiasis develops while on IDv, substitute with another protease  
inhibitor if possible. 
Electrolyte  
TDF (rare) 
Cm, Aminoglycosides Diarrhoea and/or vomiting can contribute to electrolyte disturbances. 
disturbances 
Even without the concurrent use of TDF, HIv-infected patients have an increased risk of  
both renal toxicity and electrolyte disturbances secondary to aminoglycosides and Cm.
Bone marrow  
AZT 
Lzd, R, Rfb, H 
Monitor blood counts regularly (see Chapter 11). Replace AZT if bone marrow suppression 
suppression 
develops. Consider suspension of Lzd. 
Also consider TMP/SMX as a cause if the patient is receiving this medication. 
Consider adding folinic acid supplements, especially if receiving TMP/SMX.
Optic neuritis 
ddI 
E, Eto/Pto (rare) 
Suspend agent responsible for optic neuritis permanently and replace with an agent that  
does not cause optic neuritis.
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F). String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath);
reorder pages of pdf; pdf page order reverse
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to (400F, 100F). Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save(outputFilePath).
reorder pdf pages; how to move pages around in pdf file
101
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
Hyperlipidemia 
protease  
None 
No overlapping toxicities regarding hyperlipidemia have been documented between ART and 
inhibitors, EFv 
antituberculosis medications. Follow WHO ART guidelines for management of  
hyperlipidemia (23). 
Lipodystrophy 
nRTIs (especially  None 
No overlapping toxicities regarding lipodystrophy have been documented between ART and 
D4T and ddI 
antituberculosis medications. Follow WHO ART guidelines for management of lipdystrophy  
(23).
Dysglycemia  
protease 
Gfx, Eto/Pto 
Protease inhibitors tend to cause insulin resistance and hyperglycaemia. Eto/Pto tend to 
(disturbed blood  
inhibitors 
make insulin control in diabetics more difficult, and can result in hypoglycaemia and poor 
sugar regulation) 
glucose regulation.  
Gatifloxacin is no longer recommended by the GLC for use in treatment of TB because of  
this side-effect.
Hypothyroidism 
D4T 
Eto/pto, pAS 
There is potential for overlying toxicity, but evidence is mixed. Several studies show  
subclinical hypothyroidism associated with HAART, particularly stavudine. PAS and Eto/Pto, 
 especially in combination, can commonly cause hypothyroidism. 
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
move pages in pdf; pdf rearrange pages online
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
moving pages in pdf; change page order pdf preview
102
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
men should be evaluated for possible treatment failure, as described in other 
WHO guidelines (23). 
Given that the regimens together are particularly difficult to take, the stig-
ma of both diseases can result in serious discrimination, and the risk of mor-
tality is very high. Patients with HIV-associated DR-TB may require special 
socioeconomic, nutritional and psychosocial support in order to successfully 
complete treatment. 
10.5.6 Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome
IRIS has emerged as an important complication of ART. It is relatively com-
mon in mild to moderate forms in patients with TB started on ART (seen in 
up to one third of patients in some studies (40, 41)); however, it is relatively 
rare in its severe forms. This syndrome can present as a paradoxical worsening 
of the patient’s clinical status, often due a previously subclinical and unrecog-
nized opportunistic infection (23, 42). These reactions may present as fever, 
enlarging lymph nodes, worsening pulmonary infiltrates, respiratory distress 
or exacerbation of inflammatory changes at other sites. It generally presents 
within three months of the initiation of ART and is more common with a low 
CD4 cell count (<50 cells/mm
3
) (16, 42). 
It is important to note that IRIS is a diagnosis of exclusion. Patients with 
advanced AIDS may show clinical deterioration for a number of other reasons. 
New opportunistic infections or previously subclinical infections may be un-
masked following immune reconstitution and cause clinical worsening (23). 
IRIS can also be confused with TB treatment failure, and coinfected patients 
may be demonstrating progression of TB disease due to drug resistance. 
The management of IRIS is complex and depends on the clinical status of 
the patient and the site and extent of involvement. Various treatment modali-
ties have been employed, including non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in 
mild disease and corticosteroids in moderate-severe disease. Most patients can 
be treated without interruption of ART. 
10.6  xDR-TB and hIv
XDR-TB has been described in a number of countries, including settings with 
a high prevalence of HIV. An algorithm to help diagnose XDR-TB in HIV-
infected individuals is provided in Chapter 5. Treatment strategies for XDR-
TB are outlined in Chapter 7. 
10.7  Implications of hIv for MDR-TB infection control
Delay in recognition of DR-TB, prolonged periods of infectiousness, crowded 
wards, and mixing TB and HIV patients all contribute to nosocomial trans-
mission.  These practices  have  contributed  to DR-TB  outbreaks  that affect 
both HIV-infected and non-infected patients. 
Implementation of adequate infection control precautions at health facili-
103
ties significantly reduces  nosocomial  transmission (43).  Some  community-
based treatment programmes have used home-based measures such as separate 
living quarters, personal respiratory protection for visitors and adequate venti-
lation (44). Infection control measures for DR-TB, including in the setting of 
high HIV prevalence, are described in Chapter 15.
10.8  Coordination of hIv and TB care: involvement  
of the TB/hIv board
The national TB and HIV/AIDS control programmes need a joint strategic 
plan to collaborate successfully and systematically on carrying out the recom-
mended joint activities. Given the high prevalence of TB among patients with 
HIV infection, a joint plan should be made to diagnose TB in such patients, 
to determine the drug susceptibility of the strain, and to provide adequate and 
appropriate treatment. Alternatively, components can be introduced in their 
respective programmes to ensure adequate diagnosis, care, treatment and re-
ferral of patients infected with  both HIV and  DR-TB. Coordinated train-
ing activities should focus on developing a group of providers in a specialized 
multidisciplinary team with adequate expertise in both areas. The roles and 
responsibilities of each programme at the national and district levels must be 
clearly defined, as well as the roles of individual team members. Communities 
and patients should be involved in programme design from an early stage. 
10.9  Summary
DR-TB in  HIV-infected patients is highly lethal and a growing problem in 
many parts of the world. As programmes embark on DR-TB and HIV control 
strategies, the activities described in section 10.3 should be strengthened, and, 
where absent, implemented. Improved case detection, timely and appropriate 
therapy, close clinical monitoring, management of adverse effects and infection 
control measures are the essential components of a successful programme. TB 
and HIV programmes realizing the control strategies put forth in this chapter 
will have the best chance to stem the epidemic of HIV-associated DR-TB. 
References
1.  Park MM et al. Outcome of MDR-TB patients, 1983-1993. Prolonged 
survival  with  appropriate therapy.  American  Journal  of  Respiratory  and 
Critical Care Medicine. 1996, 153(1):317–324.
2.  Finlay AF et al. Treatment outcomes of patients with multidrug resistant 
tuberculosis in South Africa using a standardized regimen, 1999–2000 
(Poster session 58, N_ 2101). In: Infectious Disease Society of America, 
Boston, MA, September 2004.
3.  Gandhi  NR et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis  as a cause  of 
death in patients co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV in a rural area of 
South Africa. Lancet, 2006, 368(9547):1575–1580.
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
104
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
4.  Anti-tuberculosis  drug  resistance  in  the  world.  Fourth  global  report.  The 
WHO/IUATLD global project on anti-tuberculosis drug resistance surveil-
lance, 2002–2007. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2008 (WHO/
HTM/TB/2008.394).
5.  Shah NS et al. Worldwide emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuber-
culosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2007, 13(3):380–387.
6.  Masjedi MR et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis: 2 years of sur-
veillance in Iran. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2006, 43:841–847.
7.  Wells CD et al. HIV infection and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: the 
perfect storm. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2007, 196 Suppl 1:S86–S107.
8.  Burgos  M  et  al.  Treatment  of  multidrug-resistant  tuberculosis  in  San 
Francisco:  an  outpatient-based  approach.  Clinical  Infectious  Diseases, 
2005, 40(7):968–975. 
9.  Waisman JL et al. [Improved prognosis in HIV/AIDS related multi-drug 
resistant  tuberculosis  patients  treated  with  highly  active  antiretroviral 
therapy] Medicina (B Aires), 2001, 61(6):810–814. 
10.  Interim policy on collaborative TB/HIV activities. Geneva, World Health 
Organization, 2004 (WHO/HTM/TB/2004.330; WHO/HTM/HIV/ 
2004.1).
11.  Strategic  framework  to  decrease  the  burden of  TB/HIV.  Geneva,  World 
Health Organization, 2002 (WHO/CDS/TB/2002.296; WHO/HIV_
AIDS/2002.2).
12. Guidelines for implementing collaborative TB and HIV programme activities. 
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDSTB/2003.319; 
WHO/HIV/2003.01).
13.  UNAIDS/WHO policy statement on HIV testing. Geneva, World Health 
Organization and Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS, 2004 
(available at http://www.who.int/hiv/pub/vct/en/hivtestingpolicy04.pdf; 
accessed May 2008). 
14.  Guidance on provider-initiated HIV testing and counseling in health facili-
ties. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2007.
15.  Tuberculosis  care  with  TB-HIV  co-management. Geneva,  World  Health 
Organization, 2007 (WHO/HTM/HIV/2007.01). 
16.  Improving the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative pulmonary and ex-
trapulmonary tuberculosis among adults and adolescents: Recommendations for 
HIV-prevalent and resource-constrained settings. Geneva, World Health Or-
ganization, 2007 (WHO/HTM/TB/2007.379; WHO/HIV/2007.01).
17.  Wilson D et al. Diagnosing smear-negative tuberculosis using case defini-
tions and treatment response in HIV-infected adults. International Jour-
nal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2006, 10(1):31–38.
18.  Moore DA et al. Microscopic-observation drug susceptibility assay for the 
diagnosis of TB. New England Journal of Medicine, 2006, 355(15):1539–
1550. 
105
19.  Fischl  MA  et  al.  Clinical  presentation  and  outcome  of  patients  with 
HIV infection and tuberculosis caused by multiple-drug-resistant bacilli.  
Annals of Internal Medicine. 1992, 117(3):184–190. 
20. Telzak  EE et al.  Predictors  for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among 
HIV-infected patients and response to specific drug regimens. Terry Beirn 
Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS (CPCRA) and the 
AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG), National Institutes for Health. In-
ternational Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 1999, 3(4):337–343. 
21.  Turett GS et al. Improved outcomes for patients with multidrug-resistant 
tuberculosis. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 1995, 21(5):1238–1244.
22. Guidelines for surveillance of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.312).
23. Antiretroviral therapy for HIV infection in adults and adolescents: rec-
ommendations for a public health approach – 2006 rev. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2006 (available at http://www.who.int/entity/hiv/
pub/guidelines/adult/en/index.html; accessed May 2008).
24. WHO Expert Consultation on cotrimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV infection. 
Geneva,  World Health Organization, 2006: (WHO  Technical  Report 
Series, WHO/HIV/2006.01).
25.  The PIH guide to the community-based treatment of HIV in resource-poor 
settings, 2nd ed. Boston, Partners In Health, 2006.
26. Tuberculosis infection control in the era of expanding HIV care and treat-
ment.  Addendum  to  WHO  guidelines  for  the  prevention  of  tuberculosis 
in health care facilities in resource-limited settings,  1999.  Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2007. 
27.  TB/HIV: a clinical manual. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2004 
(WHO/HTM/TB/2004.329).
28. Wilson D et al. Diagnosing smear-negative tuberculosis using case defini-
tions and treatment response in HIV-infected adults. International Jour-
nal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2006, 10(1):31–38.
29.  Nunn PP  et al.  Thiacetazone  commonly causes cutaneous  hypersensi-
tivity reactions in HIV positive patients treated for tuberculosis. Lancet, 
1991, 337:627–630.
30. Whalen C et al. Accelerated course of human immunodeficiency virus 
infection after tuberculosis. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical 
Care Medicine, 1995, 151(1):129–135. 
31.  Long R, Ellis E, eds. Canadian tuberculosis standards, 6th ed. Canadian 
Minister of Health, 2007. 
32. Updated guidelines for the use of rifamycins for the treatment of tuber-
culosis among HIV-infected patients taking protease inhibitors or nonnu-
cleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly 
Report, 2004, 53(2):37. 
10. DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS AND HIv
106
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
33.  Sahai J et al. Cations in the didanosine tablet reduce ciprofloxacin bio-
availability. Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 1993, 53:292–297.
34. Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention  (CDC).  Managing  drug  
interactions in  the treatment  of  HIV-related  tuberculosis  [online].  2007 
(available  at  http://www.cdc.gov/tb/TB_HIV_Drugs/default.htm;  ac-
cessed May 2008).
35.  Hoffmann CJ et al. Hepatotoxicity in an African antiretroviral therapy  
cohort: the effect of tuberculosis and hepatitis B. AIDS, 2007, 21(10):1301–
1308. 
36. Dean GL et al. Treatment of tuberculosis in HIV-infected persons in the 
era of highly active antiretroviral therapy. AIDS, 2002, 16(1):75–83. 
37.  McIlleron  H  et  al.  Complications of  antiretroviral therapy  in patients 
with tuberculosis: drug interactions, toxicity, and immune reconstitution 
inflammatory syndrome. Journal of Infectious Diseases, 2007, 196 Suppl 
1:S63–S75.
38. Dia-Jeanette T. Mycobacterial Disease in HIV positive patients. Journal of 
Pharmacy Practice, 2006, 19(1):10–16.
39.  Guidelines for using antiretroviral agents among HIV-infected adults and 
adolescents. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2002, 51(RR07).
40. Navas E et al. Paradoxical reactions of tuberculosis in patients with the 
acquired immunodeficiency syndrome who are treated with highly active 
antiretroviral therapy. Archives of Internal Medicine, 2002, 162:97–99.
41.  Narita M et al. Paradoxical worsening of tuberculosis following antiretro-
viral therapy in patients with AIDS. American Journal of Respiratory and 
Critical Care Medicine, 1998, 158:157–161.
42. Lawn SD et al. Tuberculosis-associated immune reconstitution disease: 
incidence, risk factors and impact in an antiretroviral treatment service in 
South Africa. AIDS, 2007, 21(3):335–341. 
43. Basu S et al. Prevention of nosocomial transmission of extensively drug-
resistant tuberculosis in rural South African district hospitals: an epide-
miological modelling study. Lancet, 2007, 370:1500–1507.
44. Shin SY et al. Community-based treatment of multidrug-resistant tuber-
culosis in Lima, Peru: 7 years of experience. Social Science and Medicine, 
2004 ,59(7):1529–1539.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested