c# pdf viewer : Move pages in a pdf SDK software service wpf windows html dnn who_htm_tb_2008_40213-part1104

107
CHAPTER 11
Initial evaluation, monitoring  
of treatment and management  
of adverse effects
11.1  Chapter objectives 
107
11.2  Pretreatment screening and evaluation 
107
11.3  Monitoring progress of treatment 
108
11.4  Monitoring for adverse effects during treatment 
109
11.5  Management of adverse effects 
110
11.6  Summary 
113
Table 11.1  Monitoring during treatment of DR-TB 
111
Table 11.2  Frequency of common adverse effects among 818  
patients in five DR-TB control programme sites 
112
Table 11.3  Common adverse effects, suspected agent(s) and  
management strategies 
114
Table 11.4  Commonly used ancillary medications 
118
11.1  Chapter objectives
This chapter provides information on the identification and management of 
adverse effects caused by second-line antituberculosis drugs. It addresses the 
following: 
 monitoring requirements for the treatment of DR-TB; 
 monitoring actions for early detection of adverse effects;
 adverse effects associated with different second-line drugs;
 strategies for the treatment of adverse effects; 
 adverse effects in HIV-coinfected patients.
11.2  pretreatment screening and evaluation
The required initial pretreatment clinical investigation includes a thorough 
medical history and physical examination. The recommended initial labora-
tory evaluations are shown in Table 11.1. The initial evaluation serves to estab-
lish a baseline and may identify patients who are at increased risk for adverse 
effects or poor outcomes. The monitoring of treatment and the management 
of adverse effects may have to be more intensive in patients with pre-existing 
conditions or conditions identified at the initial evaluation (diabetes mellitus, 
Move pages in a pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
how to reorder pages in pdf online; how to rearrange pages in pdf document
Move pages in a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages pdf; reorder pages in pdf preview
108
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
renal insufficiency, acute or chronic liver disease, thyroid disease, mental ill-
ness, drug or alcohol  dependence, HIV infection, pregnancy, lactation and 
others). The management of DR-TB when these conditions exist is described 
in Chapter 9. Methods of avoiding pregnancy during treatment for women of 
childbearing age should be discussed. 
11.3  Monitoring progress of treatment
Patients should be monitored closely for signs of treatment failure. Clinically, 
the most  important way  to  monitor  response to  treatment is through  reg-
ular history-taking and physical examination. The classic symptoms of TB 
– cough, sputum production, fever and weight loss – generally improve with-
in the first few months of treatment and should be monitored frequently by 
health-care providers. The recurrence of TB symptoms after sputum conver-
sion,  for  example,  may be the  first  sign of treatment  failure. For children, 
height and weight should be measured regularly to ensure that they are grow-
ing normally. A normal growth rate should resume after a few months of suc-
cessful treatment. 
Objective laboratory evidence of improvement  often  lags behind clinical  
improvement. The chest radiograph may be unchanged or show only slight im-
provement, especially in re-treatment patients with chronic pulmonary lesions. 
Chest radiographs should be taken at least every six months, when a surgical 
intervention is being considered, or whenever the patient’s clinical situation has 
worsened. The most important objective evidence of improvement is conver-
sion of the sputum smear and culture to negative. While sputum smear is still 
useful clinically because of its much shorter turnaround time, sputum culture 
is much more sensitive and is necessary to monitor the progress of treatment. 
Sputum examinations are also dependent on the quality of the sputum pro-
duced, so care should be taken to obtain adequate specimens. 
Persistently positive sputums and cultures for AFB should be assessed for 
NTM, as overgrowth with NTM in lung damage secondary to TB is not un-
common. In such cases, although DR-TB may be adequately treated, treat-
ment may need to be directed towards the NTM as well.
Key recommendations (* indicates updated recommendation)
 Implement standard monitoring for all patients DR-TB treatment as per  
Table 11.1.
 Monitor both smear and culture monthly to evaluate treatment response.* 
 Increase monitoring for HIv coinfected patients and for those on ART.*
 Health-care workers in DR-TB control programmes should be familiar with 
the management of common adverse effects of MDR-TB therapy.
 Ancillary drugs for the management of adverse effects should be available 
to the patient.
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Using this C#.NET Tiff image management library, you can easily change and move the position of any two or more Tiff file pages or make a totally new order for
how to rearrange pdf pages online; how to rearrange pdf pages
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
page reorganizing library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just C# DLLs: Move Word Page Position.
change page order in pdf online; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
109
11. INITIAL EvALUATION, MONITORING OF TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ADvERSE EFFECTS
Sputum conversion is slower in DR-TB than in drug-susceptible TB. Pauci-
bacillary culture results should not be automatically regarded as negative when 
treating DR-TB. Acquired drug resistance and treatment failure often begin 
with the growth of one or two colonies on a sputum culture. Culture conver-
sion should not be considered to be equivalent to cure. A certain proportion of 
patients may initially convert and later revert to positive sputum culture. The 
factors associated with this reconversion and its implications are under study.
Sputum smears and cultures should be monitored closely throughout treat-
ment.  These  guidelines  recommend  that  the  tests  be  performed  monthly  
before smear and culture conversion, with conversion defined as two consecu-
tive negative smears and cultures taken 30 days apart. After conversion, the 
minimum period recommended for bacteriological monitoring is monthly for 
smears and quarterly for cultures (Table 11.1). Programmes with adequate cul-
ture capacity may choose to do cultures more frequently, every 1–2 months, 
after conversion. 
Specimens for monitoring do not need to be examined in duplicate, but  
doing so can increase the sensitivity of the monitoring. 
For patients who remain smear- and culture-positive during treatment or 
who are suspects for treatment failure, DST can be repeated. It is usually not 
necessary to repeat DST within less than three months of completion of treat-
ment. 
11.4  Monitoring for adverse effects during treatment
Close monitoring of patients is necessary to ensure that the adverse effects of 
second-line drugs are recognized quickly by health-care personnel. The ability 
to monitor patients for adverse effects daily is one of the major advantages of 
DOT over self-administration of DR-TB treatment.
The majority of adverse effects are easy to recognize. Commonly, patients 
will volunteer that they are experiencing adverse effects. However, it is impor-
tant to have a systematic method of patient interviewing since some patients 
may be reticent about reporting even  severe adverse effects. Other patients 
may be distracted by one adverse effect and forget to tell the health-care pro-
vider about others. DOT workers should be trained to screen patients regular-
ly for symptoms of common adverse effects: rashes, gastrointestinal symptoms 
(nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea), psychiatric symptoms (psychosis, depression, 
anxiety, suicidal ideation), jaundice, ototoxicity, peripheral neuropathy and 
symptoms of electrolyte wasting (muscle cramping, palpitations). DOT work-
ers should also be trained in simple adverse effect management and when to 
refer patients to a nurse or physician. 
Laboratory screening is invaluable for detecting certain adverse effects that 
are more occult (not obviously noted by taking the history of the patient or 
by  physical examination).  The recommendations in Table 11.1 are an  esti-
mate of the minimal frequency of essential laboratory screening based on the  
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the C# DLLs: Move PowerPoint Page Position.
change pdf page order online; move pages in pdf reader
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
RasterEdge XDoc.PDF allows you to easily move PDF document pages position, including sorting pages and swapping two pages. Copying and Pasting Pages.
how to move pages in a pdf document; rearrange pdf pages online
110
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
experience of several DOTS-Plus projects (1). More frequent screening may be 
advisable, particularly for high-risk patients. Table 11.1 includes monitoring 
recommendations for HIV-infected patients. 
Nephrotoxicity is a known complication of the injectable drugs, both of the 
aminoglycosides and of capreomycin. This adverse effect is occult in onset and 
can be fatal. The optimal timing for checking serum creatinine is unknown, 
but most current treatment programmes for DR-TB check serum creatinine at 
least monthly. In addition, patients with a history of renal disease (including 
co-morbidities such as HIV and diabetes), advanced age or any renal symp-
toms should be monitored more closely, particularly at the start of treatment. 
An estimate of the glomerular filtration rate may help to further stratify the 
risk of nephrotoxicity in these patients (see Chapter 9, section 9.7). 
Electrolyte wasting  is a  known  complication  of the  antituberculosis  in-
jectable drugs, most frequently with capreomycin. It is generally a late effect  
occurring after months of treatment, and is reversible once the injectable drug 
is suspended. Since electrolyte wasting is often occult in the early stages and 
can be easily managed with electrolyte replacement, serum potassium should 
be  checked  at least  monthly  in  high-risk  patients,  and  in all those taking 
capreomycin (2).
Hypothyroidism is a late effect provoked by PAS and ethionamide. It is 
suspected by clinical assessment and confirmed by testing the serum level of 
thyroid stimulating hormone  (TSH). The use of these agents together can 
produce hypothyroidism in up to 10% of patients (3). Since the symptoms 
can be subtle, it is recommended that patients are screened for hypothyroidism 
with a serum TSH at 6–9 months, and then tested again every 6 months or 
sooner if symptoms arise. The dosing of thyroid replacement therapy should 
be guided using serum levels of TSH. Goitres can develop due to the toxic  
effects of PAS, ethionamide or protionamide. In areas where iodine-deficiency 
goitres are endemic, treatment with iodine is indicated, in addition to assess-
ment and treatment for hypothyroidism.
11.5  Management of adverse effects
Second-line drugs have many more adverse effects than the first-line antitu-
berculosis drugs. Management of adverse effects is possible even in resource-
poor settings (3). Proper management of adverse effects begins with patient 
education. Before starting treatment, the patient should be instructed in detail 
about the potential adverse effects that could be produced by the prescribed 
drug regimen, and if and when to notify a health-care provider. 
Table 11.2 reports the number and percentage of patients who had a par-
ticular adverse event, observed in the first five GLC-approved projects. The 
percentage of events may vary depending on the regimens used (for example, 
among patients using both ethionamide and PAS, a high proportion may de-
velop a rate of hypothyroidism above 3.5%). Nonetheless, Table 11.2 provides 
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
int pageIndex = 0; // Move cursor to (400F, 100F). String outputFilePath = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf"; doc.Save(outputFilePath);
change page order pdf acrobat; pdf reverse page order
C# PDF Image Extract Library: Select, copy, paste PDF images in C#
Get image information, such as its location, zonal information, metadata, and so on. Able to edit, add, delete, move, and output PDF document image.
reorder pdf page; how to move pages around in a pdf document
111
11. INITIAL EvALUATION, MONITORING OF TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ADvERSE EFFECTS
TABLE 11.1  Monitoring during treatment of DR-TB
monitorinG evAluAtion 
recommenDeD frequency 
Evaluation by clinician 
At baseline, and at least monthly until conversion, then  
every 2–3 months
Screening by DOT worker  At every DOT encounter
Sputum smears and  
Monitor smears and cultures monthly throughout treatment.  
cultures 
(Note: programmes with limited resources may choose to  
do smears monthly but cultures only every other month)
Weight 
At baseline and then monthly
Drug susceptibility 
At baseline in programmes doing individualized treatment 
testing (DST) or in programmes doing standardized treat- 
ments that need to confirm MDR-TB. For patients who  
remain culture-positive, it is not necessary to repeat DST  
within less than 3 months of treatment 
Chest radiograph 
At baseline, and then every 6 months
Serum creatinine 
At baseline, then monthly if possible while receiving an  
injectable drug. Every 1–3 weeks in HIv-infected patients,  
diabetics and other high-risk patients 
Serum potassium 
Monthly while receiving an injectable agent. Every  
1–3 weeks in HIv-infected patients, diabetics and other  
high-risk patients 
Thyroid stimulating 
Every 6 months if receiving ethionamide/protionamide 
hormone (TSH) 
hormone and/or PAS; and monitor monthly for signs/ 
symptoms of hypothyroidism. TSH is sufficient for screening 
for hypothyroidism; it is not necessary to measure hormone  
thyroid levels 
Liver serum enzymes 
Periodic monitoring (every 1–3 months) in patients receiving  
pyrazinamide for extended periods or for patients at risk for  
or with symptoms of hepatitis. For HIv-infected patients,  
do monthly monitoring
HIv screening 
At baseline, and repeat if clinically indicated
Pregnancy tests 
At baseline for women of childbearing age, and repeat if  
indicated
Haemoglobin and  
If on linezolid, monitor weekly at first, then monthly or as 
white blood count 
needed based on symptoms; there is little clinical  
experience with prolonged use 
For HIv-positive patients on an ART regimen that includes  
AZT, monitor monthly initially and then as needed based on  
symptoms
Lipase 
Indicated for work up of abdominal pain to rule out  
pancreatitis in patients on linezolid, D4T, ddI, ddc.
Lactic acidosis 
Indicated for work up of lactic acidosis in patients on  
linezolid or ART 
Serum glucose 
If receiving gatifloxacin, monitor glucose frequently (weekly)  
and educate patient on signs and symptoms of  
hypoglycaemia and hyperglcycaemia
VB.NET PDF insert text library: insert text into PDF content in vb
Dim pageIndex As Integer = 0 ' Move cursor to (400F, 100F). Dim outputFilePath As String = Program.RootPath + "\\" output.pdf" doc.Save(outputFilePath).
how to move pages in a pdf file; how to reorder pdf pages in
VB.NET PDF Library SDK to view, edit, convert, process PDF file
Rapidly and multiple PDF document (pages) creation and edit methods file formats; merge, append, and split PDF files; insert, delete, move, rotate, copy
reorder pdf pages reader; reorder pages in a pdf
112
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
DR-TB control programmes with an indication of the expected prevalence of 
adverse effects. Complete discontinuation of therapy because of adverse effects 
is rare and applied to only 2% of the patients in this report. The data presented 
in Table 11.2 are for patients not infected with HIV. It is likely that the inci-
dents of adverse effects are much higher in the HIV-infected; however, data at 
this time are very limited. 
Prompt evaluation, diagnosis and treatment of adverse effects are extremely 
important, even if the adverse effect is not particularly dangerous. Patients 
may have significant fear and anxiety about an adverse effect if they do not 
understand why it is happening. These emotions in turn may augment the  
severity of the adverse effect, as in the case of nausea and vomiting. Long peri-
ods of time without medical evaluation also promote feelings of isolation and 
abandonment by the health-care system. 
If the adverse effect is mild and not dangerous, continuing the treatment 
regimen, with the help of ancillary drugs if needed, is often the best option. In 
patients with highly resistant TB, a satisfactory replacement drug may not be 
available, so that suspending a drug will make the treatment regimen less po-
tent. Some adverse effects may disappear or diminish with time, and patients 
may be able to continue receiving the drug if sufficiently motivated. 
The  adverse  effects  of  a  number  of  second-line  drugs  are  highly  dose- 
dependent.
TABLE 11.2  Frequency of common adverse effects among 818 patients in five DR-TB 
control programme sites (1)
ADverse event 
no. of pAtients AffecteD (%)
Nausea/vomiting 
268 (32.8)
Diarrhoea 
173 (21.1)
Arthralgia 
134 (16.4)
Dizziness/vertigo 
117 (14.3)
Hearing disturbances 
98 (12.0)
Headache 
96 (11.7)
Sleep disturbances 
95 (11.6)
Electrolyte disturbances 
94 (11.5)
Abdominal pain 
88 (10.8)
Anorexia 
75 (9.2)
Gastritis 
70 (8.6)
Peripheral neuropathy 
65 (7.9)
Depression 
51 (6.2)
Tinnitus 
42 (5.1)
Allergic reaction 
42 (5.1)
Rash 
38 (4.6)
visual disturbances 
36 (4.4)
Seizures 
33 (4.0)
Hypothyroidism 
29 (3.5)
Psychosis 
28 (3.4)
Hepatitis 
18 (2.2)
Renal failure/nephrotoxicity 
9 (1.1)
113
Reducing the dosage of the offending drug is another method of managing 
adverse effects, but only in cases where the reduced dose is still expected to 
produce adequate serum levels and not compromise the regimen. With cyclo-
serine and ethionamide, for example, a patient may be completely intolerant at 
one dose and completely tolerant at a slightly lower dose. Unfortunately, given 
the narrow therapeutic margins of these drugs, lowering the dose may also 
affect efficacy, so every effort should be made to maintain an adequate dose 
of the drug according to body weight. Lowering the dose by more than one 
weight class should be avoided (see Annex 2 for weight classes and dosing).
Pyridoxine (vitamin B
6
) should be given to all patients receiving cycloserine 
or terizidone to help prevent neurological adverse effects. The recommended 
dose is 50 mg for every 250 mg of cycloserine (or terizidone) prescribed.
Psychosocial support is an  important  component  of the  management  of 
adverse effects. This is one of the most important roles played by DOT work-
ers, who educate patients about their adverse effects and encourage them to 
continue treatment. Patient support groups are another means of providing 
psychosocial support to patients. 
Table 11.3 summarizes the common adverse effects, the likely responsible 
antituberculosis agents and  the suggested management strategies. Overlap-
ping toxicities for HIV-infected patients on ART and DR-TB treatment are 
addressed in Chapter 10. 
Management often requires the use of ancillary medications to eliminate 
or lessen the adverse effects. DR-TB control programmes should, if at all pos-
sible, have a stock of ancillary medications available for health-care provid-
ers to prescribe to patients free of charge. Table 11.4 lists the indications and 
commonly used medications for the management of adverse reactions. The 
list is an example of a formulary that programmes may want to have avail-
able and will assist programmes in planning the respective drug management 
and budgeting. However, programmes may choose to have available alterna-
tive medications in the same class as those in the list, or other medications not 
listed here, depending on the treatment methods in a particular country. 
In addition, it is recommended that all laboratory testing for the monitor-
ing of therapy, pregnancy testing, HIV screening and contraceptive methods 
be offered free of charge. 
11.6  Summary
The timely and intensive monitoring for, and management of, adverse effects 
caused by second-line drugs are essential components of DR-TB control pro-
grammes. Poor management of adverse effects increases the risk of default or 
irregular adherence to treatment, and may result in death or permanent mor-
bidity. The health-care worker of the control programme should be familiar 
with the common adverse effects of MDR-TB therapy. Patients experiencing 
adverse effects should be referred to health-care workers who have experience 
11. INITIAL EvALUATION, MONITORING OF TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ADvERSE EFFECTS
114
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
TABLE 11.3 Common adverse effects, suspected agent(s) and management strategies
ADverse  
suspecteD  
suGGesteD mAnAGement strAteGies 
comments 
effect 
aAGent(s) 
Seizures 
Cs, H, fluoro- 
1. Suspend suspected agent pending resolution of 
1. Anticonvulsant is generally continued until MDR-TB 
quinolones 
seizures.  
treatment is completed or suspected agent discontinued. 
2. Initiate anticonvulsant therapy (e.g. phenytoin,  
2. History of previous seizure disorder is not a contraindication 
valproic acid).  
to the use of agents listed here if a patient’s seizures are
3. Increase pyridoxine to maximum daily dose  
well controlled and/or the patient is receiving anticonvulsant 
(200 mg per day).  
therapy.
4. Restart suspected agent or reinitiate suspected agent  3. Patients with history of previous seizures may be at 
at lower dose, if essential to the regimen.  
increased risk for development of seizures during MDR-TB
5. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
therapy.  
without compromising regimen. 
Peripheral  
Cs, Lzd, h, S,  
1. Increase pyridoxine to maximum daily dose 
1. Patients with co-morbid disease (e.g. diabetes, HIv, alcohol 
neuropathy km, Am, Cm,  
(200 mg per day). 
dependence) may be more likely to develop peripheral 
vi, Eto/Pto,  
2. Change injectable to capreomycin if patient has 
neuropathy, but these conditions are not contraindications 
fluoro- 
documented susceptibility to capreomycin.  
to the use of the agents listed here.  
quinolones 
3. Initiate therapy with tricyclic antidepressants such as  
2. Neuropathy may be irreversible; however, some patients 
amitriptyline. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs  
may experience improvement when offending agents are 
or acetaminophen may help alleviate symptoms.  
suspended. 
4. Lower dose of suspected agent if this can be done  
without compromising regimen. 
5. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
without compromising regimen. 
Hearing 
S, Km, Am,  
1. Document hearing loss and compare with baseline 
1. Patients with previous exposure to aminoglycosides may
loss and 
Cm, Clr 
audiometry if available.  
have baseline hearing loss. In such patients, audiometry
vestibular  
2. Change parenteral treatment to capreomycin if patient  
may be helpful at the start of MDR-TB therapy.  
disturbances  
has documented susceptibility to capreomycin.  
2. Hearing loss is generally not reversible. 
3. Decrease frequency and/or lower dose of suspected  
3. The risk of further hearing loss must be weighed against the 
agent if this can be done without compromising the  
risks of stopping the injectable in the treatment regimen.  
regimen (consider administration three times per week).  4. While the benefit of hearing aids is minimal to moderate in
4. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
auditory toxicity, consider a trial use to determine if a 
without compromising the regimen. 
patient with hearing loss can benefit from their use.
115
11. INITIAL EvALUATION, MONITORING OF TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ADvERSE EFFECTS
Psychotic  
Cs, h, fluoro- 
1. Stop suspected agent for a short period of time 
1. Some patients will need to continue antipsychotic treatment 
symptoms 
quinolones,  
(1–4 weeks) while psychotic symptoms are brought 
throughout MDR-TB therapy.  
Eto/Pto 
under control.  
2. Previous history of psychiatric disease is not a contra-
2. Initiate antipsychotic therapy.  
indication to the use of agents listed here but may increase
3. Lower dose of suspected agent if this can be done  
the likelihood of psychotic symptoms developing during 
without compromising regimen.  
treatment. 
4. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
3. Psychotic symptoms are generally reversible upon 
without compromising regimen. 
completion of MDR-TB treatment or cessation of the  
offending agent. 
Depression Socio-economic  1. Improve socioeconomic conditions.  
1. Socioeconomic conditions and chronic illness should not be 
circumstances,  2. Offer group or individual counselling.  
underestimated as contributing factors to depression.  
chronic disease,  3. Initiate antidepressant therapy.  
2. Depressive symptoms may fluctuate during therapy and may 
Cs, fluoro- 
4. Lower dose of suspected agent if this can be done 
improve as illness is successfully treated.  
quinolones H,  
without compromising the regimen.  
3. History of previous depression is not a contraindication to 
Eto/Pto 
5. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
the use of the agents listed but may increase the likelihood 
without compromising regimen. 
of depression developing during treatment. 
Hypo- 
pAS, Eto/pto 
1. Initiate thyroxine therapy. 
1. Completely reversible upon discontinuation of PAS or
thyroidism 
ethionamide/protionamide. 
2. The combination of ethionamide/protionamide with PAS is  
more frequently associated with hypothyroidism than the  
individual use of each drug. 
Nausea  
Eto/pto, pAS,  
1. Assess for dehydration; initiate dehydration if 
1. Nausea and vomiting universal in early weeks of therapy and
and  
H, E, Z 
indicated.  
usually abate with time on treatment and adjunctive therapy.
vomiting 
2. Initiate antiemetic therapy.  
2. Electrolytes should be monitored and repleted if vomiting is
3. Lower dose of suspected agent if this can be done  
severe.  
without compromising regimen.  
3. Reversible upon discontinuation of suspected agent. 
4. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
4. Severe abdominal distress and acute abdomen have been 
without compromising regimen – rarely necessary. 
reported with the use of clofazimine. Although these reports  
are rare, if this effect occurs, clofazimine should be  
suspended. 
116
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
TABLE 11.3 (continued)
ADverse  
suspecteD  
suGGesteD mAnAGement strAteGies 
comments 
effect 
aAGent(s) 
Gastritis 
pAS, Eto/pto 
1. H2-blockers, proton-pump inhibitors, or antacids.  
1. Severe gastritis, as manifested by haematemesis, melaena
2. Stop suspected agent(s) for short periods of time  
or haematechezia, is rare.  
(e.g, one to seven days).  
2. Dosing of antacids should be carefully timed so as to not
3. Lower dose of suspected agent, if this can be done  
interfere with the absorption of antituberculosis drugs (take 
without compromising regimen.  
2 hours before or 3 hours after antituberculosis
4. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
medications).  
without compromising regimen. 
3. Reversible upon discontinuation of suspected agent(s). 
Hepatitis 
Z, h, R,  
1. Stop all therapy pending resolution of hepatitis.  
1. History of previous hepatitis should be carefully analysed to 
Eto/Pto, PAS,  
2. Eliminate other potential causes of hepatitis.  
determine most likely causative agent(s); these should be 
E, fluoro- 
3. Consider suspending most likely agent permanently.  
avoided in future regimens.  
quinolones 
Reintroduce remaining drugs, one at a time with the  
2. Generally reversible upon discontinuation of suspected 
most hepatotoxic agents first, while monitoring liver  
agent.  
function. 
Renal  
S, Km, Am,  
1. Discontinue suspected agent.  
1. History of diabetes or renal disease is not a contraindication 
toxicity 
Cm, vm 
2. Consider using capreomycin if an aminoglycoside  
to the use of the agents listed here, although patients with 
had been the prior injectable in regimen.  
these co-morbidities may be at increased risk for developing
3. Consider dosing 2–3 times a week if drug is essential   
renal failure.  
to the regimen and patient can tolerate (close  
2. Renal impairment may be permanent. 
monitoring of creatinine). 
4. Adjust all antituberculosis medications according to  
the creatinine clearance. 
Electrolyte  Cm, vm, km,  
1. Check potassium.  
1. If severe hypokalaemia is present, consider hospitalization.  
disturbances  Am, S 
2. If potassium is low, also check magnesium (and 
2. Amiloride 5–10 mg QD or spironolactone 25 mg QD may 
(hypoka- 
calcium if hypocalcaemia is suspected). 
decrease potassium and magnesium wasting and is useful 
laemia and   
3. Replace electrolytes as needed. 
in refractory cases.  
hypomagne-  
3. Oral potassium replacements can cause significant nausea 
saemia) 
and vomiting. Oral magnesium may cause diarrhoea. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested