c# pdf viewer : How to move pages within a pdf document application Library tool html .net azure online who_htm_tb_2008_40214-part1105

117
Optic  
E, Eto/Pto 
1. Stop E.  
1. Usually reverses with cessation of E.
neuritis 
2. Refer patient to an ophthalmologist. 
2. Rare case reports of optic neuritis have been attributed to  
streptomycin. 
Arthralgias 
Z, fluoro- 
1. Initiate therapy with non-steroidal anti-inflammatory 
1. Symptoms of arthralgia generally diminish over time, even 
quinolones 
drugs.  
without intervention. 
2. Lower dose of suspected agent if this can be done  
2. Uric acid levels may be elevated in patients on pyrazinamide.  
without compromising regimen.  
Allopurinol appears not to correct the uric acid levels in such
3. Discontinue suspected agent if this can be done  
cases.  
without compromising regimen. 
a See list of drug abbreviations, page vi. 
Note: Drugs in bold type are more strongly associated with the adverse effect than drugs not in bold. 
11. INITIAL EvALUATION, MONITORING OF TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ADvERSE EFFECTS
How to move pages within a pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reordering pages in pdf; how to reorder pages in pdf file
How to move pages within a pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf move pages; reorder pages in pdf document
118
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
in  treating  the  adverse  effects. It  is  rarely  necessary  to  suspend  antituber-
culosis  drugs  completely.  Ancillary  drugs  for  the  management  of  adverse  
effects should be available to the patient and without charge. Despite the many 
challenges, programmes in resource-poor areas can successfully monitor and 
manage large cohorts of patients when appropriate human and financial re-
sources are available, and DOT workers and health-care workers are properly 
trained.
TABLE 11.4  Commonly used ancillary medications
inDicAtion 
DruG
Nausea, vomiting, upset  
Metoclopramide, dimenhydrinate, prochlorperazine,  
stomach 
promethazine, bismuth subsalicylate
Heartburn, acid indigestion,   H2-blockers (ranitidine, cimetidine, famotidine, etc.),  
sour stomach, ulcer 
proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole, lansoprazole, etc.)  
Avoid antacids because they can decrease absorption  
of flouroquinolones
Oral candidiasis  
Fluconazole, clotrimazole lozenges 
(non-AIDS patient) 
Diarrhoea 
Loperamide
Depression 
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (fluoxetine,  
sertraline), tricyclic antidepressants (amitriptyline)
Severe anxiety 
Lorazepam, diazepam, clonazepam 
Insomnia 
Dimenhydrinate
Psychosis 
Haloperidol, thorazine, risperidone (consider  
benzotropine or biperiden to prevent extrapyramidal  
effects)
Seizures 
Phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid, phenobarbital
Prophylaxis of neurological  
Pyridoxine (vitamin B
6
complications of cycloserine 
Peripheral neuropathy 
Amitriptyline 
vestibular symptoms 
Meclizine, dimenhydrinate, prochlorperazine,  
promethazine
Musculoskeletal pain,  
Ibuprofen, paracetamol, codeine 
arthralgia, headaches 
Cutaneous reactions, itching  Hydrocortisone cream, calamine, caladryl lotions
Systemic hypersensitivity  
Antihistamines (diphenhydramine, chlorpheniramine,  
reactions 
dimenhydrinate), corticosteroids (prednisone, 
dexamethasone)
Bronchospasm 
Inhaled beta-agonists (albuterol, etc.), inhaled  
corticosteroids (beclomethasone, etc.), oral steroids  
(prednisone), injectable steroids (dexamethasone,  
methylprednisolone)
Hypothyroidism 
Levothyroxine 
Electrolyte wasting 
Potassium and magnesium replacement
VB.NET PDF Page Insert Library: insert pages into PDF file in vb.
Able to add and insert one or multiple pages to existing adobe PDF document of adding and inserting a new blank page to the existing PDF document within a well
pdf change page order online; move pdf pages
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides order within C#.NET
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; pdf change page order acrobat
119
11. INITIAL EvALUATION, MONITORING OF TREATMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF ADvERSE EFFECTS
References
1.  Nathanson E et al. Adverse events in the treatment of multidrug-resistant 
tuberculosis: results from the DOTS-Plus initiative. International Journal 
of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2004, 8(11):1382–1384.
2.  Shin S et al. Hypokalaemia among patients receiving treatment for multi-
drug-resistant tuberculosis. Chest, 2004, 125:974–980.
3.  Furin JJ et al. Occurrence of serious adverse effects in patients receiving 
community-based  therapy for  multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Interna-
tional Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2001, 5:648–655.
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
It enables you to move out useless Word document pages simply with a You are capable of extracting pages from Microsoft Word document within C#.NET
rearrange pdf pages in preview; change pdf page order preview
C# TIFF: C#.NET Code to Process TIFF, RasterEdge XDoc.Tiff for .
are: TIFF, JPEG, GIF, BMP, PNG, PDF, Word and to program more personalized TIFF document manipulating solutions & a high-level model of the pages within a Tiff
change page order pdf; move pages in pdf acrobat
120
CHAPTER 12
Treatment delivery and  
community-based DR-TB support
12.1  Chapter objectives 
120
12.2 Treatment delivery settings 
121
12.3  Adherence to therapy 
121
12.3.1  Disease education 
122
12.3.2  Directly observed therapy (DOT) 
122
12.3.3  Socioeconomic interventions 
123
12.3.4  Psychosocial and emotional support 
123
12.3.5  Early and effective management of adverse drug effects 
124
12.3.6  Monitoring and follow-up of the non-adherent patient 
124
12.4  Community-based care and support 
124
12.5  Conclusion 
127
12.1  Chapter objectives 
This chapter outlines the strategies for treatment delivery that will improve 
adherence among patients receiving treatment for DR-TB. The same strategies 
can also be used for any patient with TB, including drug-susceptible TB. The 
main adherence promotion strategies include DOT, socioeconomic support, 
emotional support and management of adverse effects. 
The chapter devotes a section to community-based DR-TB care and sup-
port. It includes examples to illustrate that even in resource-constrained areas, 
engaging the community can contribute substantially to mitigating the prob-
lem of DR-TB. 
Key recommendations (* indicates updated recommendation)
 Use disease education, DOT, socioeconomic support, emotional support, 
management of adverse effects and monitoring systems to improve adher-
ence to treatment.
 NTPs are encouraged to incorporate community-based care and support 
into their national plans.*
C# HTML5 PDF Viewer SDK to view PDF document online in C#.NET
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Extract View PDF document in continuous pages display mode Search text within file by using Ignore case or
rearrange pdf pages; how to rearrange pages in a pdf reader
VB.NET PDF- View PDF Online with VB.NET HTML5 PDF Viewer
Page: Replace PDF Pages. Page: Move Page Position. Page: Copy View PDF document in continuous pages display mode. Search text within file by using Ignore case or
how to move pages within a pdf; change page order in pdf reader
121
CHAPTER 12. TREATMENT DELIvERy AND COMMUNITy-BASED DR-TB SUPPORT
12.2 Treatment delivery settings
There are several strategies for  the delivery of DR-TB treatment, including 
community-based care, clinic-based treatment and hospitalization (1, 2). 
Regardless of the mode of delivery, the management of DR-TB depends on 
a steady supply of medicines provided to patients free of charge through a reli-
able network of educated providers.
 Community-based care. Although early in the history of DR-TB treat-
ment, strict hospitalization of patients was considered necessary, commu-
nity-based  care provided by  trained  lay  and  community health  workers 
(CHWs) can achieve comparable results and, in theory, may result in de-
creased nosocomial spread of the disease (1, 2). In each setting, care should 
be delivered by a multidisciplinary team of providers, including physicians, 
nurses, social workers and CHWs. The roles and responsibilities of each of 
these groups of providers will vary depending on the needs and resources 
available in specific settings. A more detailed description of community-
based care and support is given in section 12.10. 
 Clinic-based treatment. Some DR-TB treatment strategies involve the  
patient travelling to a clinic each day to receive DOT. This system works 
provided there is no barrier to travel or if the patient lives near a facility of-
fering DOT of DR-TB; the patient should be given an enabler for travel in 
situations other than these. The patient should be smear-negative if travel-
ling on public transportation or waiting in common waiting rooms. Some 
facilities have a separate area with infection control measures for smear-
positive patients. Special early morning appointments can be made for pa-
tients who need to get to work. An alternative version of this strategy is to 
have the clinic act as a “day hospital” where patients can rest or get a meal 
as an incentive for coming each day. Special attention must be taken in 
clinic-based programmes so that HIV-infected patients are not exposed to 
smear-positive patients.
 Hospitalization. Hospitals should provide acceptable living conditions, 
sufficient activities so that patients avoid boredom, adequate food, a heat-
ing system in cool areas, fans or cooling systems in hot climates and proper 
infection control measures. Infection control requirements are described in 
Chapter 15. Prisons require specific measures to improve adherence, which 
are described in detail in the WHO guidelines for TB control in prisons 
(3).
12.3  Adherence to therapy
Patients  with  DR-TB  are  more  likely  to  have  had  problems  with  non- 
adherence in the past (4). Adherence to DR-TB therapy is particularly diffi-
cult because of its prolonged treatment regimens with larger numbers of drugs 
VB.NET PDF Convert to Word SDK: Convert PDF to Word library in vb.
NET solution that supports converting each PDF page to Word document file by VB.NET code. All PDF pages can be converted to separate Word files within a short
how to reverse page order in pdf; how to move pages in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF Convert to Tiff SDK: Convert PDF to tiff images in vb.
When converting PDF document to TIFF image using VB.NET program, do you know about a flexible raster image format for handling images and data within a single
pdf reverse page order preview; how to move pdf pages around
122
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
that have more serious adverse effect profiles (5). Thus, DR-TB patients are 
at increased risk of non-adherence to treatment. Adherence is an essential ele-
ment in preventing the generation of pan-resistant strains capable of commu-
nity-wide spread that leave virtually no possibility of cure for the patient (6).
DR-TB treatment can be successful, with high overall rates of adherence, 
when adequate support measures are provided (1). These measures include 
enablers and incentives for delivery of DOT to ensure adherence to treatment 
and may include the following: disease education, DOT, socioeconomic sup-
port, emotional support, management of adverse effects and monitoring sys-
tems to improve adherence.
12.3.1  Disease education 
Patients and their families should receive education about DR-TB, its treat-
ment, potential adverse drug effects and the need for adherence to therapy. 
Educational interventions should begin at the start of therapy and continue 
throughout the course of treatment. Education can be provided by physicians, 
nurses, lay and CHWs and other health-care providers. Materials should be 
appropriate to the literacy levels of the population and should be culturally 
sensitive as well.
12.3.2  Directly observed therapy (DOT)
Because DR-TB treatment is the last therapeutic option for many patients, 
and because there is a serious public health consequence if therapy fails in a 
patient with DR-TB, it is recommended that all patients receiving treatment 
for DR-TB receive DOT either in the community, at health centres or posts, 
or within the hospital setting. DOT should be provided in a way that does not 
place undue burdens on patients and their families. Long transportation times 
and distances, short clinic operation hours and difficulty in accessing services 
may all reduce the efficacy of DOT. 
 Who can deliver DOT? When human and financial resources permit, 
the first choice for DOT delivery is to use health-care workers. Otherwise, 
trained community members can serve as effective DOT workers. With 
appropriate training and support, they can visit patients in their homes or 
workplaces. Receiving DOT from a community member is often a conven-
ient alternative to the health centre and can result in excellent treatment ad-
herence (7). However, community members need more intensive training, 
ongoing supervision by health professionals and support to deliver DOT 
for DR-TB than those who deliver DOT for drug-susceptible TB. It is rec-
ommended that the patient’s DOT worker should not be a family member. 
Family relationships are often complicated for the DR-TB patient, and a 
family observer could be subject to subtle manipulation by the patient, rela-
tives, employers, etc. 
VB.NET Image: VB Code to Read and Recognize EAN-13 Barcode from
Within document management library in VB platform, users can read and EAN-13 from MS Word and PDF document page, in notice, don't forget to move your activated
move pdf pages in preview; rearrange pages in pdf online
C# Image: C# Code to Encode & Decode JBIG2 Images in RasterEdge .
images codec into PDF documents for a better PDF compression; RasterEdge JBIG2 codec SDK controls within C# project Move license text to the new project folder
change pdf page order; reorder pages in pdf file
123
 Maintaining confidentiality. The DOT worker should explore the need 
to maintain strict confidentiality regarding the patient’s disease. In some 
cases, this may entail working out a system whereby the patient can receive 
medication without the knowledge of others. 
12.3.3  Socioeconomic interventions 
Socioeconomic  problems,  including  hunger,  homelessness  and  unemploy-
ment, should be addressed to enable patients and their families to adhere to 
treatment. These problems have been successfully tackled through the provi-
sion of “incentives” and “enablers”. Enablers are goods or services that make 
it easier for patients to adhere to treatment, such as the provision of trans-
portation vouchers. Incentives are goods or services that are used to encour-
age patients to adhere to therapy, such as the provision of clothing. Maximal 
interventions should be given to patients with  the most need. Programmes 
should benefit from professional social workers who can assess the need for 
such socioeconomic interventions and monitor their delivery. Socioeconomic 
interventions have included:
 health care free of charge;
 food parcels for DR-TB patients and their dependents; 
 temporary shelter in a housing facility or in a rented home for DR-TB pa-
tients;
 school fees for dependent children;
 transportation fees;
 advice and assistance in administrative matters relating to the treatment;
 assistance in defending rights and/or reinforcing the responsibilities of  
patients;
 providing skills training and livelihood to patients both while on treatment 
as well as to prepare them with skills that can support them as they reinte-
grate into the community upon treatment completion.
12.3.4  Psychosocial and emotional support
Having DR-TB can be an emotionally devastating experience for patients and 
their families. Considerable stigma is attached to the  disease and this  may 
interfere with adherence to therapy. In addition, the long nature of DR-TB 
therapy combined with the adverse effects of the drugs may contribute to de-
pression, anxiety and further difficulty with treatment adherence. The provi-
sion of emotional support to patients may increase the likelihood of adherence 
to  therapy. This  support may be organized  in the  form of support groups 
or one-to-one counselling by trained providers. Informal support can also be 
provided by physicians, nurses, DOT workers and family members. Most pro-
grammes use a multidisciplinary “support to adherence” team (social worker, 
nurse, health educator, companion and doctor). 
CHAPTER 12. TREATMENT DELIvERy AND COMMUNITy-BASED DR-TB SUPPORT
124
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
12.3.5  Early and effective management of adverse drug effects
Although rarely life-threatening, the adverse effects of second-line drugs can 
be debilitating for patients. Patients experiencing high rates of adverse effects 
may be at increased risk of non-adherence. Therefore, early and effective man-
agement of adverse effects should be part of adherence-promotion strategies in 
the management of DR-TB. In most cases, management of adverse effects can 
be accomplished using relatively  simple and low-cost  interventions without 
compromising the integrity of the DR-TB treatment regimen (8). Manage-
ment of adverse effects is addressed in more detail in Chapter 11.
12.3.6  Monitoring and follow-up of the non-adherent patient
A strong system of monitoring that allows the patient to be followed through-
out treatment must be in place. The forms in Chapter 18 are designed to assist 
the care provider in follow-up. When a patient fails to attend a DOT appoint-
ment, a system should be in place that allows prompt patient follow-up. Most 
often, this involves a DOT worker visiting the patient’s home the same day to 
find out why the patient has missed an appointment and to ensure that treat-
ment is resumed promptly and effectively. The situation should be addressed 
in a sympathetic, friendly and non-judgemental manner. Every effort should 
be made to listen to reasons for the patient missing a dose(s) and to work with 
patient and family to ensure continuation of treatment. Transportation prob-
lems should be addressed. 
12.4  Community-based care and support 
Community-based care and support is any action or help provided by, with or 
from the community, including situations in which patients are receiving am-
bulatory treatment. This support contributes to, and may even be necessary to, 
patient recovery. Political will from the health and local community authori-
ties is vital to these efforts, and in settings with no tradition of community 
participation, it may help to involve organizations that have expertise in social 
mobilization and community organizing (9).
 Community care supporters. There are numerous potential supporters 
who can be brought into the effort to address programmatic needs on a  
local level (9–13). These include local health centre nurses, paid (and in 
some cases volunteer) CHWs, former and current patients, affected fami-
lies, associations, cooperatives, grassroots organizations, local NGOs, com-
munity volunteers and many more. 
 Function of the community care supporters. Community care support-
ers can provide assistance in clinical management, DOT, contact tracing, 
infection control, recording and reporting, training, advocacy and social 
support. 
125
— Clinical management. This can come in the form of: (i) early detection 
of potentially serious adverse reactions and prompt referral of such reac-
tions to health workers; (ii) provision of simple, non-medical measures 
to manage adverse reactions, e.g. oral hydration in mild diarrhoea, or 
counselling on the avoidance of alcohol while taking drugs that have 
hepatic effects, etc; and (iii) psychological encouragement. This can of-
ten be most effective when coming from patients and former patients 
who endured the same adverse effects while on treatment.
— DOT. Community-based support in DOT can be highly effective, es-
pecially if provided by former patients acting as treatment partners for 
daily DOT, who are living proof that adherence to daily DOT pays and 
that there is hope for cure if they persevere with their treatment. Former 
patients also show better understanding, having gone through the same 
treatment themselves.  Even when DOT is  not provided  by a former  
patient but by a local community member, it is a powerful act of soli-
darity. This solidarity is vital to new patients, who often feel isolated 
and vulnerable.
— Contact tracing. New cases can be discovered by community-care sup-
porters  through  contact  tracing.  Early  diagnosis  of  new  cases  may  
improve cure rates and acts as an important infection control measure. 
— Infection  control.  Community-based  support  in  infection  control  
includes providing health education to patients on simple infection con-
trol practices that can be done in the home, such as observing cough 
etiquette (covering the mouth and nose when coughing, or sneezing), 
keeping one’s room well ventilated by opening windows or staying out-
doors as much as possible while visiting others. 
— Recording and reporting. Data obtained within the family and commu-
nity can contribute to better comprehensive management. This can in-
clude documenting processes occurring outside the health centre and 
closer to the patient’s home. Recording certain variables during a home 
visit  can better  assess  risks  for the patient and family (such as leaky 
roofs, insufficient living space or poor sanitary conditions). Commu-
nity-based support in recording and reporting may require close super-
vision and validation by health facility staff, and should be done in a 
manner that underlines “partnership”.
— Training/education.  Community-based  training  and  education  can 
come  in the  form  of  peer  educators  (i.e.  former  patients)  or  trained  
advocates. Topics can include general information on TB, how DR-TB 
develops, the treatment of DR-TB and the importance of adherence and 
infection control. Training and education on DR-TB will be most effec-
CHAPTER 12. TREATMENT DELIvERy AND COMMUNITy-BASED DR-TB SUPPORT
126
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
tive with the aid of materials written in lay language. WHO has issued 
guidelines for the development of teaching materials under strategies re-
ferred to as advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM) 
(14–16). These materials will be more effective if they contain input 
from patients. Patients can become part of a team that designs the text 
and visuals of materials for DR-TB patients. Topics such as the rights 
and responsibilities of patients as stated in the Patients’ charter for tuber-
culosis care (17) should also be included. When former patients and care 
supporters participate in this health education process, it is more cred-
ible locally and serves also to raise awareness of TB in the wider com-
munity, strengthening basic TB control and care.
— Advocacy and decreasing stigma. Community-based supporters, often 
in the form of patients, give a voice and face to TB. The establishment 
of patient peer groups (community care club) and perhaps eventually a 
local organization or association can help reduce stigma and dispel in-
accurate information about the disease. The groups can often influence 
decision-makers for policy change either in the clinics that they attend 
or in the wider community where they live. 
— Social support. Community care supporters help identify socioeconomic 
and psychosocial needs and help channel support in a timely and more 
effective  manner. They  also  help  develop  community  resources  that 
may provide useful support, and encourage patients to contribute to the 
community by upholding their responsibilities (see also sections 12.3.3 
and 12.3.4 above on socioeconomic and psychosocial interventions).
 The relationship of community-based support and hospitalization for 
DR-TB. CHWs and community-based support can facilitate timely access 
to the hospital, as hospitals and emergency services sometime reject DR-TB 
patients, making advocacy necessary. During hospitalization, the commu-
nity-based network can continue to accompany patients and provide addi-
tional support as needed. With an efficient network for community-based 
care, the  patient will be  able to  return to ambulatory  treatment sooner,  
resulting in less nosocomial transmission, reduced hospitalization costs and 
more hospital beds available for other patients. Understanding and compas-
sion are often lacking in hospitals that cater to general diseases because of 
health workers’ fear of contracting DR-TB, as well as lack of experience in 
dealing with DR-TB. 
 Costs and sustainability. When care is rooted in the community, owner-
ship by the community supporters will make the support more sustainable. 
The CHW is often the backbone of a community-based support network. 
These guidelines advocate for trained CHWs who are a certified part of 
the health system and who receive a regular stipend that is a reasonable  
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested