c# pdf viewer : Change page order pdf preview Library control class asp.net web page azure ajax who_htm_tb_2008_40215-part1106

127
compensation for the amount of time that they spend each day participat-
ing in community-based care. The added cost of a strong CHW network is 
often cost effective because it contributes to lower rates of failure and pre-
vention of further drug resistance. 
 Monitoring the CHW. As stated, the CHW is often the backbone of the 
community-based network. Monitoring of the CHW can involve super-
visors who perform unannounced or ad hoc visits to the patient. At these 
visits, they can perform pill counts, examinations of the treatment card and 
assess how activities are being carried out. Whenever a patient is doing poor-
ly, a home visit and assessment of DOT should be performed. It is impor-
tant to monitor the health status of CHWs and teach them how to protect 
themselves against TB transmission as well to ensure that they themselves 
do not develop disease. Weekly/monthly reports from the CHWs or those 
providing care in the community should be required. A communication 
network should be clear and in place, making sure that community volun-
teers have easy access to professional health staff should there be problems 
that arise in the community, e.g. adverse events or questions asked by pa-
tients that the CHWs cannot answer.
12.5  Conclusion
Treatment delivery to patients with DR-TB can be accomplished in even the 
most resource-poor settings. It may be carried out using a hospital-, clinic- 
or community-based approach, depending on the programme’s organization 
and resources. Trained community members who are closely supervised on 
an ongoing basis can play an important role in the management of DR-TB in 
the NTP. Therefore, NTPs should be encouraged to incorporate communi-
ty-based care and support into their national plans. Non-adherence to treat-
ment is one of the primary factors leading to poor outcomes for patients with 
DR-TB. There are many reasons why patients may not adhere to therapy, and 
many of these stem from socioeconomic constraints. Higher rates of adher-
ence can be achieved if patients are offered a comprehensive package of serv-
ices,  including disease  education, DOT,  socioeconomic support, emotional 
support, management of adverse effects and monitoring systems to improve 
adherence. The human resources required to deliver the proper support should 
not be underestimated (see Chapter 16). Provision of the services and strate-
gies discussed in this chapter should be viewed as an essential part of DR-TB 
treatment programmes worldwide, not only as a method of improving clini-
cal and epidemiological outcomes but also in solidarity with each member of 
the community, especially those in greatest need. The political will needed 
to  ensure  integration of community initiatives  with local and  national TB 
programme activities demonstrates a commitment to the right to health and 
promotes participation in activities promoting the common good. Empower-
CHAPTER 12. TREATMENT DELIvERy AND COMMUNITy-BASED DR-TB SUPPORT
Change page order pdf preview - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pages in pdf reader; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
Change page order pdf preview - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages in pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
128
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
ing the community and the individual recognizes and reinforces the dignity 
of each person.
References
1.  Mitnick C et al. Community-based therapy for multidrug-resistant tu-
berculosis  in  Lima,  Peru.  New  England  Journal  of  Medicine,  2003, 
348(2):119–128. 
2.  Leimane V et al. Clinical outcome of individualized treatment of multi-
drug-resistant tuberculosis in Latvia: a retrospective cohort study. Lancet, 
2005, 365:318–326.
3.  Tuberculosis control in prisons: a manual for programme managers. Geneva, 
World Health Organization, 2001 (WHO/ CDS/TB/2001/281).
4.  Mitchison DA. How drug resistance emerges  as a result of poor  com-
pliance during short course chemotherapy for tuberculosis. International 
Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 1998, 2(1):10–5. 
5.  Chaulk  CP  et  al.  Treating  multidrug-resistant  tuberculosis:  compli-
ance and side effects. Journal of the American Medical Association, 1994, 
271(2):103–104.
6.  Espinal MA et al. Rational ‘DOTS plus’ for the control of DR-TB. Inter-
national Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 1999, 3(7):561–563.
7.  Kim JY et al. From multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to DOTS expansion 
and beyond: making the most of a paradigm  shift. Tuberculosis, 2003, 
83:59–65.
8.  Furin JJ et al. Occurrence of serious adverse effects in patients receiving 
community-based  therapy for  multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Interna-
tional Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2001, 5:648–655.
9.  Maher  D.  The role of  the  community  in  the  control  of tuberculosis. 
Tuber culosis, 2003, 83:177–182.
10.  Palacios  E et al. The role  of  the nurse in the community-based treat-
ment of multidrug- resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB). International Journal 
of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2003 7(4):343–346. 
11.  El papel de la red de trabajadores de salud comunitarios en la Estrategia 
DOTS-Plus [The role of a community health worker’s network in the 
DOTS-Plus strategy]. In: Construyendo alianzas estratégicas´para detener 
la tuberculosis: la  experiencia  peruana  [Constructing strategic  alliances to 
Stop Tuberculosis: the Peru experience]. Lima, Ministry of Health of Peru, 
2006:129–134.
12. Guía de enfermería SES en TB-MDR y DOTS-Plus [The PIH nursing guide 
for MDR-TB and DOTS-Plus]. Lima, Socios En Salud, 2006.
13.  Revised manual of operations of the national TB program. Manila, Depart-
ment of Health, 2005. 
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
reorder pages in pdf reader; move pages in a pdf
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
reorder pages in pdf online; move pages in pdf online
129
14.  Advocacy,  communication  and social mobilization  to  fight TB: a  10-year 
framework for action. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2006 (WHO/
HTM/STB/2006.37).
15.  Advocacy, communication and social mobilization (ACSM) for tuberculosis 
control: a handbook for country programmes. Geneva, World Health Or-
ganization, 2008.
16.  Advocacy, communication and social mobilization for TB control: a guide to 
developing knowledge, attitude and practice surveys. Geneva, World Health 
Organization, 2008 (WHO/HTM/STB/2008.46).
17.  Patients’ charter for tuberculosis care. Geneva, World Care Council, 2006 
(available  at  http://www.who.int/tb/publications/2006/istc_report.pdf; 
accessed May 2008).
CHAPTER 12. TREATMENT DELIvERy AND COMMUNITy-BASED DR-TB SUPPORT
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
change page order in pdf file; pdf reorder pages online
C# Image: View & Operate Web Page Using .NET Doc Image Web Viewer
Support multiple document and image formats, like PDF and TIFF; Thumbnail images will be automatically created once the Change Web Document Page Order.
how to rearrange pages in a pdf file; reordering pdf pages
130
CHAPTER 13
Management of patients  
after MDR-TB treatment failure
13.1  Chapter objectives 
130
13.2  Assessment of patients at risk for treatment failure 
130
13.3  Indications for suspending treatment 
131
13.4  Suspending therapy 
132
13.5  Approach to suspending therapy 
132
13.6  Supportive care for patients in whom all the possibilities of  
MDR-TB treatment have failed 
133
13.7  Conclusion 
134
Box 13.1 
End-of-life supportive measures 
133
13.1  Chapter objectives
The objectives of this chapter are:
 To describe the clinical approach in suspected MDR-TB treatment failure.
 To discuss indications for suspending treatment for patients in whom a 
Category IV regimen has failed.
 To outline the supportive care options for patients in whom all the possi-
bilities of MDR-TB treatment have failed.
13.2  Assessment of patients at risk for treatment failure
Patients who do not show signs of improvement after four months of treatment 
are at risk for treatment failure. All patients who show clinical, radiographi-
cal or bacteriological evidence of progressive active disease, or reappearance of 
disease after month 4 of treatment, should be considered as being at high risk 
for treatment failure. 
The following steps are recommended in such patients:
 The treatment card should be reviewed to confirm that the patient has  
adhered to treatment.
 The treatment regimen should be reviewed in relation to medical history, 
contacts and all DST reports. If the regimen is deemed inadequate, a new 
regimen should be designed. 
C# Excel - Sort Excel Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Excel document pages, or just change the position of certain one Excel page in an
how to move pages in a pdf; move pages in pdf document
C# PDF insert text Library: insert text into PDF content in C#.net
Ability to change text font, color, size and location and string to a certain position of PDF document page. In order to run the sample code, the following
pdf change page order; how to move pages around in pdf
131
13. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS AFTER MDR-TB TREATMENT FAILURE
 The bacteriological data should be reviewed. Often, the smear and culture 
data are the strongest evidence that a patient is not responding to therapy. 
One single positive culture in the presence of an otherwise good clinical 
response can be caused by a laboratory contaminant or error. In this case, 
subsequent cultures that are negative, or in which the number of colo-
nies is decreasing, may help prove that the apparently positive result did 
not reflect treatment failure. Positive smears with negative cultures may 
be caused by the presence of dead bacilli and therefore may not indicate 
treatment failure. Repeated culture- and smear-negative results in a pa-
tient with clinical and radiographical deterioration may indicate that the 
patient has a disease other than MDR-TB.
 The health-care worker should confirm that the patient has taken all the 
prescribed medicines. A non-confrontational  interview should be  under-
taken without the DOT worker present. 
 A non-confrontational interview of the DOT worker alone should also be 
carried out. Questions should be asked to rule out the possible manipula-
tion of the DOT worker by the patient. If manipulation is suspected, the 
DOT worker should be switched to another patient, and the patient with 
suspected treatment failure should be assigned to a new DOT worker. 
 Other illnesses that may decrease absorption of medicines (e.g. chronic di-
arrhoea) or may result in immune suppression (e.g. HIV infection) should 
be excluded.
 If surgical resection is feasible, it should be considered. 
MDR-TB treatment often consists of a treatment cycle; if no response is seen, 
reassessment of the regimen and treatment plan and formulation of a new 
plan of action are necessary. Patients who have persistent positive smears or 
cultures at month 4 but who are doing well clinically and radiographically 
may not require a regimen change. Whenever a regimen change is indicat-
ed because of treatment failure, a new regimen is started (with at least four  
effective  drugs)  and  options  for  adjunctive  treatment  –  most  commonly 
surgery – can be considered. Adding one or two drugs to a failing regimen 
should be avoided. Changes in treatment can be made as early as 4–6 months 
if conversion is not seen and if there is clinical deterioration. 
13.3  Indications for suspending treatment
It takes 3–4 months to evaluate whether a change in treatment plan has been 
effective. If the patient continues to deteriorate despite the measures described 
in the previous section, treatment failure should be considered. There is no 
single indicator to determine whether a treatment regimen is failing. Although 
there is no simple definition for treatment failure, there often comes a point 
C# PDF: How to Create PDF Document Viewer in C#.NET with
image and outline preview for quick PDF document page navigation; requirement of this C#.NET PDF document viewer that should be installed in order to implement
pdf page order reverse; switch page order pdf
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
For developers who want to delete unnecessary page from PowerPoint document, this C#.NET PowerPoint processing control is quite C# Codes to Sort Slides Order.
reverse page order pdf; move pdf pages online
132
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
during the treatment when it becomes clear that the patient is not going to 
improve. Signs indicating treatment failure include: 
 persistent positive smears or cultures past month 8–10 of treatment;
 progressive extensive and bilateral lung disease on chest X-ray, with no  
option for surgery;
 high-grade resistance (often XDR-TB), with no option to add two addi-
tional agents;
 overall deteriorating clinical condition that usually includes weight loss and 
respiratory insufficiency.
It is  not necessary  for all of these  signs to be present  to identify failure  of 
the treatment regimen. However, a cure is highly unlikely when they are all 
present.
The epidemiological definition of treatment failure for recording outcomes 
(see Chapter 4) is often different from that used in the process of suspending 
therapy in a patient when the therapy is failing. The epidemiological defini-
tion is an outcome to account for the patient in a treatment cohort analysis, 
while the clinical decision to suspend therapy is made after the clinical search 
for all other options has been exhausted and cure of the patient is considered 
to be highly unlikely. 
13.4  Suspending therapy
Treatment can be considered to have failed and suspension of therapy is rec-
ommended in cases where the medical personnel involved are confident that 
all the drugs have been ingested and there is no possibility of adding other 
drugs or carrying out surgery. 
There are two important considerations in suspending therapy or chang-
ing it to a supportive care regimen. The first is the patient’s quality of life: the 
drugs used in MDR-TB treatment have significant adverse effects, and con-
tinuing them while the treatment is failing may cause additional suffering. 
The second is the public health concern: continuing a treatment that is fail-
ing can amplify resistance in the patient’s strain, resulting in highly resistant 
strains such as XDR-TB that may cause subsequent infection of others. 
13.5  Approach to suspending therapy
The approach to suspending therapy should start with discussions among the 
clinical team, including all physicians, nurses and DOT workers involved in 
the patient’s care. Once the clinical team decides that treatment should be sus-
pended, a clear plan should be prepared for approaching the patient and the 
family. This process usually requires a number of visits and takes place over 
several weeks. Home visits during the process offer an excellent opportunity to 
talk with family members and the patient in a familiar environment. It is not 
133
recommended to suspend therapy before the patient understands and accepts 
the reasons to do so, and agrees with the supportive care offered. 
13.6  Supportive care for patients in whom all the possibilities 
of MDR-TB treatment have failed
A number of supportive measures can be used once the therapy has been sus-
pended. It is very important that medical visits continue and that the patient 
is not abandoned. The supportive measures are described in detail in the In-
tegrated Management of Adolescent and Adult Illness guidelines produced by 
WHO in a booklet titled Palliative care: symptom management and end-of-life 
care (1). The supportive measures are summarized in Box 13.1. 
13. MANAGEMENT OF PATIENTS AFTER MDR-TB TREATMENT FAILURE
BOx 13.1   EnD-OF-LIFE SUppORTIvE MEASURES
 pain control and symptom relief. Paracetamol, or codeine with paraceta-
mol, gives relief from moderate pain. Codeine also helps control cough. 
Other cough suppressants can be added. If possible, stronger analgesics, 
including morphine, should be used when appropriate to keep the patient 
adequately comfortable.
 Relief of respiratory insufficiency. Oxygen can be used to alleviate short-
ness of breath. Morphine also provides significant relief from respiratory 
insufficiency and should be offered if available. 
 nutritional support. Small and frequent meals are often best for a per-
son at the end of life. It should be accepted that the intake will reduce 
as the patient’s condition deteriorates and during end-of-life care. Nausea 
and vomiting or any other conditions that interfere with nutritional support 
should be treated.
 Regular medical visits. When therapy stops, regular visits by the treating 
physician and support team should not be discontinued. 
 Continuation of ancillary medicines. All necessary ancillary medications 
should be continued as needed. Depression and anxiety, if present, should 
be addressed.
 hospitalization, hospice care or nursing home care. Having a patient die 
at home can be difficult for the family. Hospice-like care should be offered 
to families who want to keep the patient at home. Inpatient end-of-life care 
should be available to those for whom home care is not available.
 preventive measures. Oral care, prevention of bedsores, bathing and pre-
vention of muscle contractures are indicated in all patients. Regular sched-
uled movement of the bedridden patient is very important. 
 Infection control measures. The patient who is taken off antituberculosis 
treatment because of failure often remains infectious for long periods of 
time. Infection control measures should be continued (see Chapter 15). 
134
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
13.7  Conclusion
Suspension of therapy should be considered only after all other options for 
treatment have been explored. Suspending therapy in a patient who has failed 
MDR-TB treatment is a delicate situation and difficult for family members 
and caregivers; but it is especially difficult for the patient as treatment is often 
viewed as his or her only hope. Strong support, care and sympathy must be 
given to the patient and family.
Reference
1.  Palliative care: symptom management and end-of-life care. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2004 (WHO/CDS/IMAI/2004.4). 
135
CHAPTER 14
Management of contacts  
of MDR-TB patients
14.1  Chapter objective 
135
14.2  General considerations 
135
14.3  Management of symptomatic adult contacts of patients  
with MDR-TB 
136
14.4  Management of symptomatic paediatric contacts of patients  
with MDR-TB 
136
14.5  Chemoprophylaxis of contacts of MDR-TB index cases 
138
14.1  Chapter objective
This chapter outlines the management of symptomatic adults and children 
who have or have had a known contact with an MDR-TB patient. 
Key recommendations (* indicates updated recommendation)
 DR-TB contact investigation should be given high priority, and NTPs should 
consider contact investigation of XDR-TB as an emergency situation.*
 Close contacts of DR-TB patients should receive careful clinical follow-up.
14.2  General considerations
Opportunities to halt the transmission of resistant mycobacteria in communi-
ties and to treat MDR-TB in a timely fashion are often squandered. The main 
reasons are lack of investigation of contacts of MDR-TB patients, failure to 
ask patients presenting with active TB disease about any history of exposure 
to MDR-TB, and lack of access by national treatment programmes to second-
line regimens and/or DST.
Close contacts of MDR-TB patients are defined as people living in the same 
household, or spending many hours a  day  together with  the patient in the 
same indoor living space. The available data indicate that close contacts of 
MDR-TB patients who develop active TB most commonly have drug-resistant 
disease (1–5).
While all contacts of TB require investigation, DR-TB requires the most 
136
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
vigilance. Because of the severe risk of morbidity and mortality of XDR-TB, 
contact tracing of cases of XDR-TB should be given the highest level of alert-
ness and priority. NTPs should consider contact investigation of XDR-TB 
as an emergency situation. 
14.3  Management of symptomatic adult contacts of patients 
with MDR-TB
All close contacts of MDR-TB cases should be identified through contact trac-
ing and evaluated for active TB by a health-care provider. If the contact ap-
pears to have active TB disease, culture and DST should be  performed. If 
DST is not available, or while DST results are awaited, an empirical regimen 
based either on the resistance pattern of the index case or on the most com-
mon resistance pattern in the community may be started. Delay in the diag-
nosis of MDR-TB and start of appropriate treatment can lead to increased 
morbidity and mortality as well as unchecked amplification and transmission 
of drug-resistant strains of TB. 
When investigation of a symptomatic adult contact yields no evidence of 
TB, a trial  of  a  broad-spectrum antibiotic, particularly  one that is not ac-
tive against TB, such as trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, can be used. If the 
patient  continues  to  have  symptoms,  chest  computed  tomography  and/or  
directed bronchoscopy for smear and culture should be considered if available. 
Where these diagnostic tools are not available or the results are not conclusive, 
a diagnosis should be based on the clinical information at hand. If the initial 
investigation is not suggestive of active TB but the contact remains symptom-
atic, repeat physical examinations, smears and cultures should be performed 
monthly with repeat chest X-ray as needed. 
14.4  Management of symptomatic paediatric contacts of 
patients with MDR-TB
MDR-TB should be suspected in children with active TB in the following 
situations:
 A child who is a close contact of an MDR-TB patient. 
 A child who is a contact of a TB patient who died while on treatment when 
there are reasons to suspect that the disease was MDR-TB (i.e. the deceased 
patient had been a contact of another MDR-TB case, had poor adherence 
to treatment  or had  received  more  than two courses of antituberculosis 
treatment).
 Children with bacteriologically proven TB who are not responding to first-
line drugs given with direct observation. 
The diagnosis of TB is more difficult in children than in adults. Symptoms of 
TB in young children can be nonspecific, e.g. chronic cough or wheeze, failure 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested