xix
lished in June  2000 as a partnership among  five categories of participants: 
governments of resource-limited countries; academic institutions; civil-society 
organizations; bilateral donors; and WHO. The GLC has successfully negoti-
ated prices of drugs with producers; solicited creation of, and adopted sound 
policies for, proper management of DR-TB; established strict criteria to review 
proposals for DR-TB management programmes; assisted countries in develop-
ing such proposals and ensured their proper implementation; and, finally, has 
provided access to quality-assured second-line drugs at concessionary prices 
to  those management programmes considered technically and  scientifically 
sound and not at risk of producing additional drug resistance. In brief, the 
GLC rapidly became a model of good practice which, by providing access to 
previously unaffordable drugs, ensured that their use was as safe and ratio-
nal as possible. Demand for technical assistance from the GLC grew rapidly 
and in 2002, the GLC was adopted by the newly established Global Fund to 
Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (the Global Fund) as its mechanism for 
screening proposals for DR-TB programme financing. This was a major his-
toric milestone, and today the Global Fund is the leading financial mechanism 
supporting the management of MDR-TB in resource-constrained settings.
Today, a new threat – that linked to XDR-TB – now requires even more in-
novative thinking (7). In October 2006, the WHO Stop TB and HIV depart-
ments organized a meeting of the Global Task Force on XDR-TB at WHO 
headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, in response to the XDR-TB emergency. 
During this meeting, eight recommendations were put forward to the inter-
national  TB  community,  outlining  key  areas  of  response,  beginning  with 
strengthening of basic TB and HIV/AIDS control and proper management of 
MDR-TB (8). The eight recommendations are: 
 strengthening basic activities to control TB and HIV/AIDS, as detailed in 
the Stop TB Strategy and the Global Plan, to avoid additional emergence 
of MDR-TB and XDR-TB;
 scaling-up the programmatic management of MDR-TB and XDR-TB to 
reach the targets set forth in the Global Plan;
 strengthening laboratory services for adequate and timely diagnosis of 
MDR-TB and XDR-TB;
 expanding surveillance of MDR-TB and XDR-TB to better understand the 
magnitude and trends of drug resistance and the links with HIV;
 fostering sound infection-control measures to avoid MDR-TB and XDR-
TB transmission to  protect  patients,  health  workers,  others  working  in 
congregate  settings and the broader community, especially in high HIV 
prevalence settings;
 strengthening advocacy, communication and social mobilization for sus-
tained  political  commitment  and  a  patient-centered  approach  to  treat-
ment;
FOREWORD TO THE 2008 EMERGENCy UPDATED EDITION
Pdf change page order online - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reverse page order pdf online; pdf reorder pages
Pdf change page order online - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reorder pages in a pdf document; change page order pdf preview
xx
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
 pursuing resource mobilization at global, regional and country levels to en-
sure that necessary resources are available; 
 promoting research and development into new diagnostics, drugs, vaccines, 
and operational research on MDR-TB management to shorten the length 
of treatment.
The ongoing changes in the field combined with new evidence and recom-
mendations mandate a revision of the previous guidelines. This publication 
aims to  underpin  these  recommendations  with  new  or updated  guidelines 
that might provide the guidance on programmatic management necessary to 
achieve many of the eight recommendations from the Global Task Force. We 
are confident that these new guidelines represent the best current knowledge 
regarding the management of DR-TB and MDR-TB and offer programmes 
and providers options for tailoring diagnosis and care to the needs evinced 
in different epidemiological and programmatic contexts. The recommenda-
tions, compiled by leading experts, should be followed by all national TB con-
trol programmes and their partners. With nearly half a million new cases of 
MDR-TB emerging every year, and an estimated global prevalence that may 
be as high as one million cases, the challenge is huge. At the same time, it is 
imperative to stress that the five elements of the DOTS strategy remain the 
cornerstone of TB control and the most effective tool for preventing the onset 
and dissemination of drug resistance. Without the essential elements of TB 
control fully in place, management of MDR-TB will undoubtedly fail in the 
long term, as one cannot control it if the tap is not turned off. These updated 
guidelines focus on care for DR-TB patients, in the hope that the occurrence 
of  massive  numbers  of  new  cases  can  be  prevented  through  sound  TB- 
control practices. While further scientific advances are clearly needed in the 
fight against DR-TB, these guidelines outline the tools we have at our disposal 
to make an immediate impact on this destructive and grave epidemic. 
Dr Mario Raviglione
Director
Stop TB Department
World Health Organization
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order controls, please read this Word reading page which has powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf reorder pages online; pdf change page order acrobat
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
For example, you may change your Word document order from 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 to 3, 5, 4, 2,1 with C# coding. C#.NET: Extracting Page(s) from Word.
how to reorder pages in pdf file; pdf reverse page order preview
xxi
References
1.  Gandhi NR et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis as a cause of 
death in patients co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV in a rural area 
of South Africa. Lancet, 2006, 368(9547):1575–1580.
2.  Shah NS et al. Worldwide emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuber-
culosis. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2007, 13(3):380–387. 
3.  Migliori GB et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, Italy and Ger-
many. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2007, 13(5):780–782. 
4.  Kim HR et al. Impact of extensive drug resistance on treatment outcomes 
in non-HIV-infected patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Clin-
ical Infectious Diseases, 2007, 45(10):1290–1295.
5.  Guidelines  for the  programmatic  management of  drug-resistant tuberculo-
sis. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2006 (WHO/HTM/TB/2006. 
361).
6.  Treatment of tuberculosis: guidelines for national programmes, 3rd ed. Ge-
neva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.313).
7.  Raviglione MC, Smith IM. XDR tuberculosis – Implications for global 
public health. New England Journal of Medicine, 2007, 356(7):656–659.
8.  The  Global  MDR-TB  &  XDR-TB  Response  Plan  2007–2008.  Geneva, 
World Health Organization, 2007 (WHO/HTM/TB/2007.387).
FOREWORD TO THE 2008 EMERGENCy UPDATED EDITION
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
Convert Jpeg to PDF; Merge PDF Files; Split PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. C# File: Split PDF; C# Page: Insert PDF pages
rearrange pdf pages in preview; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
change page order in pdf file; how to reorder pages in pdf reader
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
reorder pages pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf online
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page from PDF file and changing the position, orientation and order of PDF file into two or small files, you may refer to this online guide. PDF Page inserting.
reorder pdf pages; how to reorder pdf pages in
1
CHAPTER 1
Background information  
on DR-TB
1.1  Chapter objectives 
1
1.2  The Stop TB Strategy 
1
1.2.1  Pursuing high-quality DOTS expansion and enhancement 
2
1.2.2  MDR-TB, XDR-TB and other challenges 
2
1.2.3  Contributing to health system strengthening 
2
1.2.4  Engaging all care providers 
2
1.2.5  Empowering people with TB, and communities 
2
1.2.6  Enabling and promoting research 
2
1.3  Integration of diagnostic and treatment services to control TB 
2
1.4  Causes of DR-TB 
3
1.5  Addressing the sources of DR-TB 
3
1.6  Magnitude of the DR-TB problem 
4
1.7  Management of DR-TB, the Green Light Committee and  
the global response to DR-TB 
6
Table 1.1 
Causes of inadequate antituberculosis treatment 
3
1.1  Chapter objectives
This chapter summarizes key information on the emergence of drug-resistant 
TB (DR-TB), its public health impact, experience gained in the management 
of patients and strategies for addressing drug resistance within national TB 
control programmes (NTPs). 
1.2  The Stop TB Strategy 
The goals of the Stop TB Strategy are to reduce dramatically the burden of 
TB by 2015 in line with the Millennium Development Goals and the Stop TB 
Partnership targets and to achieve major progress in the research and devel-
opment needed for TB elimination. The Stop TB Strategy continues to em-
phasize the basic components of the DOTS strategy (See Chapter 2 for how 
the basic DOTS strategy applies to DR-TB) while addressing additional con-
straints and challenges to TB control. The Stop TB Strategy has six principal 
components:
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via password by using Change PDF original password. VB.NET: Necessary DLLs for PDF Password Edit.
change page order pdf; how to move pages within a pdf
C# PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password in C#
Able to change password on adobe PDF document in C# in C# project, XDoc.PDF provides some PDF security settings. On this page, we will talk about how to achieve
reverse page order pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages
2
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
1.2.1  Pursuing high-quality DOTS expansion and enhancement
a. Political commitment with increased and sustained financing
b. Case detection through quality-assured bacteriology 
c. Standardized treatment with supervision and patient support 
d. Effective drug supply and management system 
e. Monitoring and evaluation system and impact measurement 
1.2.2  Addressing TB/HIv, MDR-TB, XDR-TB and other challenges by 
implementing collaborative TB/HIV activities, preventing and controlling 
DR-TB, including XDR-TB, and addressing prisoners, refugees and other 
high-risk groups and situations.
1.2.3  Contributing  to health system strengthening by collaborating 
with other health-care programmes and general services, e.g. by mobilizing 
the necessary human and financial resources for implementation and im-
pact evaluation, and by sharing and applying achievements of TB control 
as well as innovations from other fields.
1.2.4  Engaging  all care providers, including public, nongovernmental 
and private providers, by scaling up public–private mix (PPM) approaches 
to ensure adherence to international standards of TB care, with a focus on 
providers for the poorest and most vulnerable groups. 
1.2.5  Empowering people  with  TB,  and communities by scaling up 
community TB care and creating demand through context-specific advo-
cacy, communication and social mobilization.
1.2.6  Enabling  and  promoting  research to improve programme per-
formance and to develop new drugs, diagnostics and vaccines.
Emphasis on expanding laboratory capacity (sputum smear microscopy first, 
then culture and drug susceptibility testing (DST)) and the use of quality-
assured drugs across all programmes are important aspects of this comprehen-
sive approach to TB control. 
1.3  Integration of diagnostic and treatment services to 
control TB 
Detection and treatment of all forms of TB, including drug-resistant forms, 
should be integrated within NTPs. In the past, many public health authorities 
reasoned that scarce resources should be used for new patients with drug-sus-
ceptible TB because the cost of detecting and treating the disease was 10- to 
100-fold lower than for MDR-TB. However, it has now proved feasible and 
cost effective to treat all forms of TB, even in middle- and low-income coun-
tries. Untreated or improperly treated patients with DR-TB are a source of 
3
1. BACkGROUND INFORMATION ON DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
ongoing transmission of resistant strains, resulting in future added costs and 
mortality. The framework for the management of DR-TB presented in these 
guidelines can be adapted to all NTPs and integrated within the basic DOTS 
strategy. 
1.4  Causes of DR-TB
Although its causes are microbial, clinical and programmatic, DR-TB is essen-
tially a man-made phenomenon. From a microbiological perspective, resist-
ance is caused by a genetic mutation that makes a drug ineffective against the 
mutant bacilli. From a clinical and programmatic perspective, it is an inad-
equate or poorly administered treatment regimen that allows a drug-resistant 
strain to become the dominant strain in a patient infected with TB. Table 1.1 
summarizes the common causes of inadequate treatment.
Short-course chemotherapy (SCC) for patients infected with drug-resistant 
strains may create even more resistance to the drugs in use. This has been 
termed the “amplifier effect” of SCC. 
Ongoing transmission of established drug-resistant strains in a population 
is also a significant source of new drug-resistant cases. 
TABLE 1.1  Causes of inadequate antituberculosis treatment (1)
heAlth-cAre proviDers: 
DruGs: inADequAte supply 
pAtients: inADequAte 
inADequAte reGimens 
or quAlity 
DruG intAKe
Inappropriate guidelines 
Poor quality 
Poor adherence (or poor
Noncompliance with  
Unavailability of certain 
DOT)
guidelines 
drugs (stock-outs or 
Lack of information
Absence of guidelines 
delivery disruptions) 
Lack of money (no treatment
Poor training 
Poor storage conditions 
available free of charge)
No monitoring of  
Wrong dose or  
Lack of transportation
treatment 
combination 
Adverse effects
Poorly organized or funded   
Social barriers
TB control programmes   
Malabsorption
Substance dependency  
disorders
1.5  Addressing the sources of DR-TB 
Any ongoing production of DR-TB should be addressed urgently before em-
barking on any programme designed for its control. The framework approach 
described in these guidelines can help to identify and curtail possible sources 
of DR-TB. Recent  outbreaks of highly  resistant TB underscore the impor-
tance of preventing the development of resistance, as mortality for patients 
infected with highly resistant strains is alarmingly high. 
The possible contributing factors to the development of new drug-resistant 
cases should be reviewed (see Table 1.1 for a list  of possible factors). Well- 
administered first-line treatment for susceptible cases is the best way to pre-
4
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
vent acquisition of resistance. Timely identification of DR-TB and adequate 
treatment regimens (Category IV regimens) administered early in the course 
of the disease are essential to stop primary transmission. Integration of DOTS 
with treatment of DR-TB works synergistically to eliminate all the potential 
sources of TB transmission.
1.6  Magnitude of the DR-TB problem 
The incidence of drug resistance has increased since the first drug treatment for 
TB was introduced in 1943. The emergence of MDR-TB following the wide-
spread use of rifampicin beginning in the 1970s led to the use of second-line 
drugs. Improper use of these drugs has fuelled the generation and subsequent 
transmission of highly resistant strains of TB termed extensively DR-TB, or 
XDR-TB. These strains are resistant to at least  one of the fluoroquinolone 
drugs and an injectable agent in addition to isoniazid and rifampicin. 
The WHO/IUATLD Global Project on Antituberculosis Drug Resistance 
Surveillance gathers data on drug resistance using a standard methodology in 
order to determine the global magnitude of resistance to four first-line antitu-
berculosis drugs: isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol and streptomycin (2). The 
standard methodology includes representative sampling of patients with ad-
equate sample sizes, standardized data collection distinguishing between new 
and previously treated patients and quality-assured laboratory DST supported 
by a network of supranational TB reference laboratories (SRLs). 
Based on available information from the duration of the Global Project (3), 
the most recent data available from 116 countries and settings were weighted 
by the population in areas surveyed, representing 2 509 545 TB cases, with the 
following results: global population weighted proportion of resistance among 
new cases: any resistance 17.0% (95% confidence limits (CLs), 13.6–20.4), 
isoniazid resistance 10.3% (95% CLs, 8.4–12.1) and MDR-TB 2.9% (95% 
CLs, 2.2–3.6). Global population weighted proportion of resistance among 
previously treated cases: any resistance 35.0% (95% CLs, 24.1–45.8), isoni-
azid resistance 27.7%  (95% CLs, 18.7–36.7), MDR-TB 15.3% (95% CLs, 
9.6–21.1). Global population weighted proportion of resistance among all TB 
cases: any resistance 20.0% (95% CLs, 16.1–23.9), isoniazid resistance 13.3% 
(95% CLs, 10.9–15.8) and MDR-TB 5.3% (95% CLs, 3.9–6.6). Based on 
drug resistance information from these 116 countries and settings reporting 
to this project, as well as nine other epidemiological factors, it is estimated 
that 489 139 (95% CLs, 455 093–614 215) cases emerged in 2006. China and  
India carry approximately  50% of the global burden  of MDR-TB and the 
Russian Federation a further 7%.
Data from the most recent collection period showed far greater proportions 
of resistance among new cases than found in previous reports, ranging all the 
way to 16% MDR-TB among new cases in Donetsk, Ukraine, 19.4% in the 
Republic of Moldova and 22.3% in Baku, Azerbaijan. Trends in MDR-TB 
5
among new cases in the Baltic countries appear to have stabilized, but there 
were significant increases reported from the two oblasts of the Russian Federa-
tion that reported data. 
Prevalent  cases  worldwide could  be  two or  three  times higher than the 
number of incident cases (4), as MDR-TB patients often live for several years 
before succumbing to the disease (5).
Drug resistance  is strongly associated with previous treatment. In previ-
ously treated patients, the probability of any resistance was over 4-fold higher, 
and of MDR-TB over 10-fold higher, than for untreated patients. The overall 
prevalence of drug resistance was often related to the number of previously 
treated cases in the country. Among countries with a high burden of TB, pre-
viously treated cases ranged from 4.4% to 26.9% of all patients registered in 
DOTS programmes. In the two largest high-TB burden countries (China and 
India), re-treatment cases accounted for up to 20% of sputum smear-positive 
cases (6). 
In 2006, the  United  States Centers  for Disease Control  and Prevention 
(CDC) and WHO conducted a drug resistance survey to determine the extent 
of resistance to second-line drugs. Surveying the WHO/IUATLD network of 
SRLs, over 17 000 isolates from 49 countries were included, all of which had 
been tested for resistance to at least three classes of second- line drugs. These 
are not population-based data, as second-line drug testing is not routinely car-
ried out in most countries. The survey found that of the isolates tested against 
second-line drugs in the 49 contributing countries, 20% were MDR-TB and 
2% were XDR-TB (7). Strains of XDR-TB have been reported in every region 
of the world, with as many as 19% of MDR-TB strains found to be XDR-TB, 
a proportion that has more than tripled in some areas since 2000 (8). When 
capacity allows, these guidelines recommend testing all MDR-TB isolates for 
resistance to a fluoroquinolone and the second-line injectable agents to define 
the proportion XDR-TB among MDR-TB (see Chapter 5 and 6).
Despite the association with previous treatment, drug-resistant strains in-
cluding XDR-TB are readily transmissible and outbreaks have been reported, 
often in populations with high HIV prevalence. In one outbreak of XDR-TB 
in  KwaZulu-Natal,  half of the patients  had never received antituberculosis 
treatment (9). The overlapping epidemics of HIV and TB are significantly 
worsened by XDR-TB, as outbreaks of these strains appear to cause higher 
and more rapid mortality in HIV-infected patients. Such strains pose a serious 
threat to global TB control, as detection is challenging in settings where labo-
ratory resources and treatment options are severely limited.
1.7  Management of DR-TB, the Green Light Committee and 
the global response to DR-TB 
The  Working  Group  on  DOTS-Plus  for  MDR-TB  (currently  the  Work-
ing Group on MDR-TB) was established in 1999 to lead the global effort to  
1. BACkGROUND INFORMATION ON DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
6
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
control  MDR-TB.  This  working  group,  part  of  the  Stop  TB  Partnership, 
formed the Green Light Committee (GLC) in 2000 to provide technical assist-
ance to DOTS programmes, promote rational use of second-line drugs world-
wide and improve access to concessionally-priced quality-assured second-line 
drugs. As DR-TB has emerged as a growing threat to DOTS programmes, new 
recommendations described in these updated guidelines must become a part of 
routine national TB control activities.
The GLC has developed a mechanism to assist countries in adapting the 
framework described in these guidelines to country-specific contexts. Coun-
tries that meet the framework requirements, with a strong DOTS foundation 
and a solid plan to manage DR-TB, can benefit from quality-assured second-
line drugs at reduced prices. The GLC also offers technical assistance before 
implementation of programmes for control of DR-TB and monitors approved 
projects.
1
A well-functioning DOTS programme is a prerequisite for GLC endorse-
ment and for continuation of GLC support. Experience has shown that im-
plementing a DR-TB control programme substantially strengthens overall TB 
control for both drug-susceptible and drug-resistant cases (10). 
For control of DR-TB worldwide, WHO and its partners recommend inte-
grating management of the disease into essential services for TB control and 
expanding treatment for DR-TB as rapidly as human, financial and technical 
resources will allow.
References
1.  Lambregts-van Wezenbeek CSB, Veen J. Control of drug-resistant tuber-
culosis. Tubercle and Lung Disease, 1995, 76:455–459.
2.  Interim  recommendations for  the surveillance  of  drug  resistance  in tuber-
culosis.  Geneva,  World  Health  Organization,  2007  (WHO/CDS/
TB/2007.385).
3.  Anti-tuberculosis  drug  resistance  in  the  world.  Fourth  global  report.  The 
WHO/IUATLD global project on anti-tuberculosis drug resistance surveil-
lance, 2002–2007. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2008 (WHO/
HTM/TB/2008.394).
4.  Blower SM, Chou T. Modeling the emergence of the “hot zones”: tuber-
culosis and the amplification dynamics of drug resistance. Nature Medi-
cine, 2004, 10(10):1111–1116.
5.  Migliori  GB  et  al.  Frequency  of  recurrence  among  MDR-TB  cases  
“successfully” treated with standardized short-course chemotherapy. Inter-
national Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2002, 6(10):858–864.
1 For more information about the services of the GLC and for technical support or to apply for ac-
cess to concessionally-priced quality-assured second-line antituberculosis drugs, see the GLC web 
page at: http://www.who.int/tb/challenges/mdr/greenlightcommittee/en/index.html
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested