c# pdf viewer component : Reorder pages in pdf reader software Library project winforms asp.net windows UWP who_htm_tb_2008_40220-part1112

177
CIpROFLOxACIn (Cfx)
DRUG CLASS: fluoroquinolone
Activity against TB, 
Bactericidal: acts by inhibiting the A subunit of DNA gyrase 
mechanism of action, 
(topoisomerase),  which  is  essential  in  the  reproduction  of  
and metabolism 
bacterial DNA. There is no cross-resistance with other antituber- 
culosis agents, but  near  complete cross-resistance  between 
ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin and high in vitro  cross-resistance  
with moxifloxacin and gatifloxacin. Ciprofloxacin  is eliminated 
principally by  urinary excretion,  but non-renal clearance may  
account for about one-third of elimination and includes hepatic 
metabolism, biliary excretion, and possibly transluminal secre- 
tion across the intestinal mucosa.
preparation and dose 
Tablets (250, 500, 1000 mg). vials (20 and 40 ml) or flexible 
containers (200 and 400 ml) with aqueous or 5% dextrose Iv  
solutions equivalent to 200 and 400 mg. Usual dose: 1000–
1500 mg/day.
Storage 
Room temperature (15–25 °C), airtight containers protected 
from light. 
Oral absorption 
Well absorbed (70–85%) from the gastrointestinal tract and may 
be taken with meals or on an empty stomach. Should not be ad-
ministered within 2 hours of ingestion of milk-based products, 
antacids, or other medications containing divalent cations (iron, 
magnesium, zinc, vitamins, didanosine, sucralfate).
Distribution,  
Widely distributed to most body fluids and tissues; high concen- 
CSF penetration 
trations are  attained in  kidneys, gall bladder, gynaecological 
tract,  liver,  lung,  prostatic  tissue,  phagocytic  cells,  urine,  
sputum, and bile, skin, fat, muscle, bone and cartilage. CSF  
penetration is 5–10% and with inflamed meninges 50–90%.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Ciprofloxacin levels 
in amniotic fluid and breast milk almost as high as in serum. 
Fluoroquinolones are not recommended during breastfeeding 
because of the potential for arthropathy. Animal data demon-
strated arthropathy in immature animals, with erosions in joint 
cartilage.
Renal disease: doses of ciprofloxacin should be reduced in pa-
tients with severe renal impairment. When the creatinine clear-
ance  is  less  than  30  ml/min,  the  recommended  dosing  is 
1000–1500 mg 3 times per week. 
Adverse effects 
Generally well tolerated. 
Occasional: gastrointestinal intolerance; CNS-headache, ma-
laise, insomnia, restlessness, and dizziness. 
Rare: allergic reactions; diarrhoea; photosensitivity; increased 
liver function tests (LFTs); tendon rupture; peripheral neuropathy.
Drug interactions 
Sucralfate: decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones caused by 
the chelation by aluminium ions contained in the sucralfate.
Antacids (magnesium, aluminium, calcium, Al-Mg buffer found in 
didanosine): binding to fluoroquinolone antibiotics resulting in de-
creased  absorption and loss of therapeutic efficacy.
probenecid: interferes with  renal  tubular  secretion  of  cipro-
floxacin; this may result in 50% increase in serum level of cipro-
floxacin.
Milk or dairy products: decrease the gastrointestinal absorption 
of ciprofloxacin by 36–47%.
vitamins and minerals containing divalent and trivalent cations 
such as zinc and iron: formation of fluoroquinolone-ion complex  
results in decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones.
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
Reorder pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
rearrange pdf pages in reader; how to rearrange pdf pages online
Reorder pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages within pdf; reorder pages of pdf
178
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
CIpROFLOxACIn (Cfx)
DRUG CLASS: fluoroquinolone
Drug interactions 
Mexiletine: fluoroquinolones may inhibit cytochrome P450 1A2 
resulting in increased mexiletine concentration.
warfarin: case reports of ciprofloxacin enhancing anticoagula-
tion effect of warfarin. 
Contraindications 
Pregnancy, intolerance of fluoroquinolones.
Monitoring 
No specific laboratory monitoring requirements. 
Alerting symptoms 
— Pain, swelling or tearing of a tendon or muscle or joint pain
— Rashes, hives, bruising or blistering, trouble breathing
— Diarrhoea
— yellow skin or eyes
— Anxiety, confusion or dizziness
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
move pages in pdf reader; change pdf page order
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to reorder pages in pdf file; pdf rearrange pages online
179
CLOFAZIMInE (Cfz)
DruG clAss: phenAzine DerivAtive
Activity against TB, 
Bacteriostatic against M. leprae, active in vitro against M. tuber- 
mechanism of action, 
culosis. Clinical effectiveness against M. tuberculosis not well  
and metabolism 
established.
Clofazimine appears to bind preferentially to mycobacterial DNA 
(principally at base sequences containing guanine) and inhibit 
mycobacterial replication and growth. 
Excreted in faeces as unabsorbed drug and via biliary elimina-
tion. Little urinary excretion.
preparation and dose 
Capsules (50 and 100 mg). 
Storage 
Store below 30 °C, in airtight containers. 
Oral absorption 
20–70% absorbed from from gastrointestinal tract. 
Distribution, 
Widely distributed principally to fatty tissue, reticuloendothelial 
CSF penetration 
system  and  macrophages.  High  concentrations  found  in  
mesenteric lymph nodes, adipose tissue, adrenals, liver, lungs, 
in gall bladder, bile and spleen.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Animal studies dem-
onstrated teratogenicity (retardation of fetal skull ossification). 
Crosses placenta and is excreted in milk. Not recommended  
during breastfeeding. 
Renal disease: usual dose. 
hepatic disease: dose adjustments should be considered in pa-
tients with severe hepatic insufficiency.
Adverse effects 
Frequent: ichthyosis, and dry skin; pink to brownish-black dis-
coloration of skin, cornea, retina and urine; anorexia and abdomi-
nal pain. 
Drug interactions 
May decrease absorption rate of rifampicin. 
Isoniazid increases clofazimine serum and urine concentrations 
and decreases skin concentrations. 
Ingestion of clofazimine with orange juice resulted in a modest 
reduction in clofazimine bioavailability.
Contraindications 
Pregnancy, severe hepatic insufficiency, hypersensitivity to Cfz.
Monitoring 
No specific laboratory monitoring requirements.
Alerting symptoms 
— Nausea and vomiting
— Abdominal pain/distress (caused by crystal depositions and 
can present as an acute abdomen)
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print Document Viewer, make sure that you have install RasterEdge PDF Reader Add-on
how to move pages within a pdf document; pdf reverse page order online
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to move pages in pdf files; how to move pdf pages around
180
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
CyCLOSERInE (Cs) [AnD TERIZIDOnE (Trd)]
DruG clAss: AnAloG of D-AlAnine
Activity against TB, 
Bacteriostatic:  competitively  blocks  the  enzyme  that  incor- 
mechanism of action, 
porates alanine into an alanyl-alanine dipeptide, an essential 
and metabolism 
component of the mycobacterial cell wall. No cross-resistance 
with other antituberculosis drugs. 60–70% excreted unchanged 
in the urine via glomerular filtration; small amount excreted in 
faeces; small amount metabolized. 
preparation and dose 
Capsules (250 mg). 10–15 mg/kg daily (max. 1000 mg), usually 
500–750 mg per day given in two divided doses. (Some produc-
ers  of terizidone make 300 mg  capsule  preparations,  while  
others make 250 mg.)
Storage 
Room temperature (15–25 °C) in airtight containers. 
Oral absorption 
Modestly decreased by food (best to take on an empty stom-
ach); 70–90% absorbed. 
Distribution, 
Widely distributed into body tissue and fluids such as lung, bile, 
CSF penetration 
ascitic fluid, pleural fluid, synovial fluid, lymph, sputum. 
very good CSF penetration (80–100% of serum concentration 
attained in the CSF, higher level with inflamed meninges)
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Breastfeeding with 
B
6
supplement to the infant. 
Renal disease: doses of cycloserine should be reduced in patients 
with severe renal impairment. When the creatinine clearance is less 
than 30 ml/minute, the recommended dosing is 250 mg/day, or 
500 mg/dose 3 times per week. The appropriateness of 250 mg/
day doses has not been established. There should be careful 
monitoring for evidence of neurotoxicity; if possible, measure se-
rum concentrations and adjust regimen accordingly.
Adverse effects 
Frequent:  neurological  and  psychiatric  disturbances,  including 
headaches, irritability, sleep disturbances, aggression, and trem-
ors, gum inflammation, pale skin, depression, confusion, dizziness, 
restlessness, anxiety, nightmares, severe headache, drowsiness.
Occasional: visual changes; skin  rash; numbness, tingling or 
burning  in hands and feet; jaundice; eye pain. 
Rare: seizures, suicidal thoughts. 
Drug interactions 
Ethionamide: additive nervous system side-effects.
Isoniazid: additive nervous system side-effects.
phenytoin: may increase phenytoin levels. 
Toxic effect if combined with alcohol, increases risk of seizures. 
vitamin B
6
decreases CNS effect.
Contraindications 
Hypersensitivity to cycloserine. 
Epilepsy. 
Depression, severe anxiety or psychosis. 
Severe renal insufficiency. 
Excessive concurrent use of alcohol. 
Monitoring 
When available, serum drug monitoring to establish optimal dos-
ing (not higher than 30 µg/ml). 
Alerting symptoms 
— Seizures
— Shakiness or trouble talking
— Depression or thoughts of intentional self-harm
— Anxiety, confusion or loss of memory
— Personality changes, such as aggressive behaviour
— Rash or hives
— Headache
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reverse pdf page order online; move pdf pages online
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
rearrange pages in pdf file; how to rearrange pdf pages reader
181
EThIOnAMIDE (Eto)
pROTIOnAMIDE (pto)
DruG clAss: cArbothionAmiDes Group, DerivAtives of isonicotinic AciD
Activity against TB, 
Bacteriostatic: the mechanism of action of thionamides has not 
mechanism of action, 
been fully elucidated, but they appear to inhibit mycolic acid syn- 
and metabolism 
thesis. Resistance develops rapidly if used alone and there is 
complete cross-resistance between ethionamide and protiona- 
mide (partial cross-resistance with thioacetazone). Ethionamide 
is extensively metabolized, probably in the liver, to the active  
sulfoxide and other inactive metabolites and less than 1% of a 
dose appears in the urine as unchanged drug.
preparation and dose 
Ethionamide and protionamide are normally administered in the 
form of tablets containing 125 mg or 250 mg of active drug. The 
maximum optimum daily dose is 15–20 mg/kg/day (max. 1 g/
day), usually 500–750 mg.
Storage 
Room temperature (15–25 °C), in airtight containers.
Oral absorption 
100% absorbed but sometimes erratic absorption caused by 
gastrointestinal disturbances associated with the medication.
Distribution, 
Rapidly and widely distributed into body tissues and fluids, with 
CSF penetration 
concentrations  in plasma  and  various  organs  being  approxi- 
mately equal. Significant concentrations also are present in CSF.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Animal studies have 
shown ethionamide to be teratogenic. Newborns who are breast-
fed by mothers who are taking ethionamide should be monitored 
for adverse effects.
Renal disease: doses of the thionamides are only slightly modi-
fied for patients with severe renal impairment. When the creati-
nine clearance is less than 30 ml/minute, the recommended 
dosing is 250–500 mg daily.
hepatic disease: thionamides should  not  be used in severe  
hepatic impairment.
porphyria: ethionamide is considered to be unsafe in patients 
with porphyria because it has been shown to be porphyrinogenic 
in animals and in vitro systems. 
Adverse effects 
Frequent: severe gastrointestinal intolerance (nausea, vomiting, 
diarrhoea, abdominal pain, excessive salivation, metallic taste, 
stomatitis, anorexia and weight loss). Adverse gastrointestinal 
effects appear to be dose-related, with approximately 50% of pa-
tients unable to tolerate 1 g as a single dose. Gastrointestinal 
effects may be minimized by decreasing dosage, by changing the 
time of drug administration, or by the concurrent administration 
of an antiemetic agent.
Occasional: allergic reactions; psychotic disturbances (including 
depression), drowsiness, dizziness, restlessness, headache, and 
postural hypotension. Neurotoxicity (administration of pyridoxine 
has been recommended to prevent or relieve neurotoxic effects); 
transient increases in serum bilirubin; reversible hepatitis (2%) 
with  jaundice  (1–3%);  gynaecomastia;  menstrual  irregularity,  
arthralgias,  leukopenia,  hypothyroidism  especially  when  com-
bined with PAS. 
Rare:  reports  of  peripheral  neuritis,  optic  neuritis,  diplopia, 
blurred vision, and a pellagra-like syndrome, reactions including 
rash, photosensitivity, thrombocytopenia and purpura. 
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf; moving pages in pdf
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
rearrange pages in pdf document; reverse page order pdf online
182
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
EThIOnAMIDE (Eto)
pROTIOnAMIDE (pto)
DruG clAss: cArbothionAmiDes Group, DerivAtives of isonicotinic AciD
Drug interactions 
Cycloserine: potential increase incidence of neurotoxicity.
Ethionamide has been found to temporarily raise serum concen-
trations of isoniazid. Thionamides may potentiate the adverse 
effects of other antituberculosis drugs administered concomi-
tantly.  In  particular,  convulsions  have  been  reported  when 
ethionamide is administered with cycloserine. Excessive ethanol 
ingestion should be avoided because of possible psychotic reac-
tion.
pAS: possible increase in liver toxicity, monitor liver enzymes; 
hypothyroidism in case of combined administration.
Contraindications 
Thionamides are contraindicated in patients with severe hepatic  
impairment and in patients who are hypersensitive to these 
drugs. 
Monitoring 
Ophthalmological examinations should be performed before and 
periodically during therapy. Periodic monitoring of blood glucose 
and thyroid function is desirable. Diabetic patients should be 
particularly alert for episodes of hypoglycaemia. Liver function 
tests should be carried out before and during treatment with 
ethionamide.
Alerting symptoms 
— Any problems with eyes: eye pain, blurred vision, color blind- 
ness, or trouble seeing 
— Numbness, tingling, or pain in hands and feet
— Unusual bruising or bleeding
— Personality  changes  such  as  depression,  confusion  or  
aggression
— yellowing of skin
— Dark-coloured urine 
— Nausea and vomiting
— Dizziness
183
GATIFLOxACIn (Gfx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolone
Activity against TB, 
Bactericidal: acts by inhibiting the A subunit of DNA gyrase 
mechanism of action, 
(topoisomerase),  which  is  essential  in  the  reproduction  of  
and metabolism 
bacterial DNA. It undergoes limited metabolism and is excreted 
largely unchanged in the urine with less than 1% as metabolites. 
A small amount (5%) is also excreted unchanged in the faeces.
preparation and dose 
Tablets, 200 or 400 mg. vials (20 and 40 ml) or flexible contain-
ers (200 and 400 ml) with aqueous or 5% dextrose Iv solutions 
equivalent to 200 and 400 mg. Usual dose: 400 mg/day.
Storage 
Room  temperature (15–25  °C), airtight containers  protected 
from light. 
Oral absorption 
Gatifloxacin is readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract 
with an absolute bioavailability of 96%. Should not be adminis-
tered within 4 h of other medications containing divalent cations 
(iron, magnesium, zinc, vitamins, didanosine, sucralfate). No in-
teraction with milk or calcium.
Distribution, 
Widely  distributed  in  body  fluids,  including  the  CSF;  tissue  
CSF penetration 
penetration is good and approximately 20% appears to be bound 
to plasma proteins. It crosses the placenta and is distributed 
into breast milk. It also appears in the bile. kidney and lung  
tissue levels exceeded those in serum. 
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Fluoroquinolones are 
not recommended during breastfeeding due to the potential for 
arthropathy. Animal data demonstrated arthropathy in immature 
animals, with erosions in joint cartilage.
Renal  disease:  doses  of  gatifloxacin  should  be  reduced  in  
patients with renal impairment; When the creatinine clearance is 
less than 30 ml/min, the recommended dosing is 400 mg 3 
times per week.
Adverse effects 
Generally well tolerated. 
Occasional:  gastrointestinal  intolerance;  CNS-headache;  
malaise; insomnia; restlessness; dizziness; allergic reactions; 
diarrhoea; photosensitivity; increased LFTs; tendon rupture (in-
creased incidence seen in older men with concurrent use of  
corticosteroids). 
Drug interactions 
As gatifloxacin may have the potential to prolong the QT interval, 
it should not be given to patients receiving class Ia antiarrhyth-
mic drugs (such as quinidine and procainamide)  or Class III  
antiarrhythmics (such as amiodarone and sotalol). In addition, 
caution should be exercised when gatifloxacin is used with other 
drugs known to have this effect (such as the antihistamines 
astemizole and terfenadine, cisapride, erythromycin, pentami-
dine, phenothiazines, or tricyclic antidepressants).
Sucralfate: decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones caused by 
the chelation by aluminium ions contained in the sucralfate.
Antacids (magnesium, aluminium, calcium, Al-Mg buffer found 
in didanosine): antacid binding to fluoroquinolone antibiotics re-
sulting in decreased absorption and loss of therapeutic efficacy.
probenecid: probenecid interferes with renal tubular secretion 
of ciprofloxacin; this may result in 50% increase in serum level of 
ciprofloxacin.
vitamins and minerals containing divalent and trivalent cations 
such as zinc and iron: formation of fluoroquinolone-ion complex 
results in decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones.
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
184
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
GATIFLOxACIn (Gfx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolone
Drug interactions 
Mexiletine: fluoroquinolones may inhibit cytochrome P450 1A2, 
resulting in increased mexiletine concentration.
warfarin: case reports of gatifloxacin enhancing anticoagulation 
effect of warfarin. 
Contraindications 
Pregnancy, intolerance of fluoroquinolones.
Monitoring 
No laboratory monitoring requirements.
Alerting symptoms 
— Pain, swelling or tearing of a tendon or muscle or joint pain
— Rashes, hives, bruising or blistering, trouble breathing
— Diarrhoea
— yellow skin or eyes
— Anxiety, confusion or dizziness
185
KAnAMyCIn (Km)
DruG clAss: AminoGlycosiDe
Activity against TB, 
Bactericidal:  aminoglycosides  inhibit  protein  synthesis  by  
mechanism of action, 
irreversibly binding to 30S ribosomal subunit; aminoglycosides 
and metabolism 
are not metabolized in the liver, they are excreted unchanged in 
the urine. 
Distribution 
0.2–0.4 l/kg; distributed in extracellular fluid, abscesses, ascit-
ic fluid, pericardial fluid, pleural fluid, synovial fluid, lymphatic 
fluid and peritoneal fluid. Not well distributed into bile, aqueous 
humour, bronchial secretions, sputum and CSF.
preparation and dose 
kanamycin sulfate, sterile powder for intramuscular injection in 
sealed vials. The powder needs to be dissolved in water for injec-
tions before use. The optimal dose is 15 mg/kg body weight, 
usually 750 mg to 1 g given daily or 5–6 days per week, by deep 
intramuscular injection. Rotation of injection sites avoids local 
discomfort. When necessary, it is possible to give the drug at the 
same total dose 2 or 3 times weekly during the continuation 
phase, under close monitoring for adverse effects.
Storage 
Powder stable at room temperature (15–25 °C), diluted solution 
should be used the same day. 
Oral absorption 
There is no significant oral absorption. 
CSF penetration 
Penetrates inflamed meninges only.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class D. Eighth cranial nerve 
damage  has  been  reported  following  in  utero  exposure  to  
kanamycin. Excreted in breast milk. The American Academy of 
Paediatrics considers kanamycin to be compatible with breast-
feeding.
Renal disease: use with caution. Levels should be monitored for 
patients with impaired renal function. Interval adjustment (12–
15 mg/kg 2 or 3 times per week) is recommended for creatinine 
clearance <30 ml/minute or haemodialysis. 
hepatic disease: drug levels not affected by hepatic disease  
(except  a  larger volume of distribution for alcoholic  cirrhotic  
patients with ascites). Presumed to be safe in severe liver dis-
ease; however, use with caution – some patients with severe  
liver disease may progress rapidly to hepatorenal syndrome.
Adverse effects 
Frequent: pain at injection site, renal failure (usually reversible).
Occasional: vestibular and auditory damage – usually irreversi-
ble; genetic predisposition possible (check family for aminogly-
coside ototoxicity), nephrotoxicity (dose-related to cumulative 
and peak concentrations, increased risk with renal insufficiency, 
often irreversible), peripheral neuropathy, rash. 
Ototoxicity  potentiated  by  certain  diuretics  (especially  loop  
diuretics), advanced age, and prolonged use. The effect of non-
depolarizing muscle relaxants may be increased. 
Penicillins: in vitro antagonism.
Drug interactions 
Loop  diuretics  (bumetanide,  furosemide,  etacrynic  acid,  to-
rasemide). Co-administration of aminoglycosides with loop diu-
retics may have an additive or synergistic auditory ototoxicity. 
Ototoxicity appears to be dose-dependent and may be increased 
with renal dysfunction. Irreversible ototoxicity has been report-
ed. Avoid concomitant administration; if used together, careful 
dose adjustments in patients with renal failure and close moni-
toring for ototoxicity are required.
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
186
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
KAnAMyCIn (Km)
DruG clAss: AminoGlycosiDe
Drug interactions 
non-depolarizing muscle relaxants (atracurium, pancuronium, 
tubocurarine, gallamine triethiodide): possible enhanced action 
of non-depolarizing muscle relaxant resulting in possible respira-
tory depression. Avoid co-administration; if concurrent adminis-
tration is needed, titrate the non-depolarizing muscle relaxant 
slowly and monitor neuromuscular function closely.
nephrotoxic agents (amphotericin B, foscarnet, cidofovir): addi-
tive nephrotoxicity. Avoid  co-administration;  if  used together, 
monitor renal function closely and discontinue if warranted.
penicillins: in vitro inactivation (possible). Do not mix together 
before administration. 
Contraindications 
Pregnancy  (congenital  deafness seen  with streptomycin  and 
kanamycin use in pregnancy). Hypersensitivity to aminoglyco-
sides. Caution with renal, hepatic, vestibular or auditory impair-
ment.
Monitoring 
Monthly creatinine and serum potassium in low-risk patients 
(young  with  no  co-morbidities),  more  frequently  in  high-risk  
patients (elderly, diabetic, or HIv-positive patients, or patients 
with renal insufficiency). If potassium is low, check magnesium 
and calcium. Baseline audiometry and monthly monitoring in 
high-risk patients. For problems with balance, consider increas-
ing dosing interval.
Alerting symptoms 
— Problems with hearing; dizziness
— Rash 
— Trouble breathing
— Decreased urination
— Swelling, pain or redness at injection site
— Muscle twitching or weakness
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested