c# pdf viewer component : Reorder pages in a pdf Library software component .net winforms azure mvc who_htm_tb_2008_40221-part1113

187
LEvOFLOxACIn (Lfx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolone
Activity against TB, 
Bactericidal: acts by inhibiting the A subunit of DNA gyrase 
mechanism of action, 
(topoisomerase), which is essential in the reproduction of bacte- 
and metabolism 
rial DNA.
Levofloxacin is generally considered to be about twice as active 
as its isomer, ofloxacin. 
Minimal hepatic metabolism; 87% of dose excreted unchanged 
in the urine within 48 h via glomerular filtration and tubular secre-
tion. 
preparation and dose 
Tablets (250, 500, 750 mg). 
Aqueous solution or solution in 5% dextrose for Iv administration 
– vials (20, 30 ml) 500 or 750 mg and flexible containers (50, 
100, 150 ml) 250; 500 or 750 mg. 
Usual dose: 750 mg/day.
Storage 
Tablets: room temperature (15–25 °C), airtight containers pro-
tected from light. 
Oral absorption 
Levofloxacin is rapidly and essentially completely absorbed after 
oral administration. Orally, should not be administered within 4 h 
of other medications containing divalent cations (iron, magnesi-
um, zinc, vitamins, didanosine, sucralfate). No interaction with 
milk or calcium.
Distribution, 
Distributes  well in blister  fluid and  lung  tissues, also widely  
CSF penetration 
distributed (kidneys, gall bladder, gynaecological tissues, liver,  
lung, prostatic tissue, phagocytic cells, urine, sputum and bile). 
30–50% of serum concentration is attained in CSF with inflamed 
meninges.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. There are no adequate 
and well-controlled  studies  in  pregnant  women.  Levofloxacin 
should be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit  
justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Animal data demonstrat-
ed arthropathy in immature animals, with erosions in joint carti-
lage. Because of the potential for serious adverse effects from 
levofloxacin in nursing infants, a decision should be made wheth-
er to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into 
account the importance of the drug to the mother.
Renal  disease:  doses  of  levofloxacin  should  be  reduced  in  
patients with severe renal impairment. When the creatinine clear-
ance is less than 30 ml/minute, the recommended dosing is 
750–1000 mg 3 times per week. 
hepatic disease: given the limited extent of levofloxacin metabo-
lism, the pharmacokinetics of levofloxacin are not expected to 
be affected by hepatic impairment.
Adverse effects 
Generally well tolerated. 
Occasional: gastrointestinal intolerance; CNS-headache; malaise; 
insomnia; restlessness; dizziness; allergic reactions; diarrhoea; 
photosensitivity. 
Rare: QT prolongation; tendon rupture; peripheral neuropathy.
Drug interactions 
Should not be given to patients receiving class Ia antiarrhythmic 
drugs (such as quinidine and procainamide) or Class III anti- 
arrhythmics (such as amiodarone and sotalol). 
Sucralfate: decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones caused by 
the chelation by aluminium ions contained in the sucralfate.
Antacids (magnesium, aluminium, calcium, Al-Mg buffer found 
in didanosine): antacid binding to fluoroquinolone antibiotics re-
sulting in decreased absorption and loss of therapeutic efficacy.
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
Reorder pages in a pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages in a pdf file; pdf change page order
Reorder pages in a pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
reorder pages in pdf preview; how to reorder pages in pdf preview
188
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
LEvOFLOxACIn (Lfx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolone
Drug interactions 
probenecid: probenecid interferes with renal tubular secretion 
of fluoroquinolones, which may result in 50% increase in serum 
level of levofloxacin.
vitamins and minerals containing divalent and trivalent cations 
such as zinc and iron. Formation of fluoroquinolone-ion complex 
results in decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones.
Mexiletine: fluoroquinolones may inhibit cytochrome P450 1A2 
resulting in increased mexiletine concentration.
Contraindications 
Pregnancy; hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones; prolonged QT.
Monitoring 
No specific laboratory monitoring requirements.
Alerting symptoms 
— Pain, swelling or tearing of a tendon or muscle or joint pain
— Rashes, hives, bruising or blistering, trouble breathing
— Diarrhoea
— yellow skin or eyes
— Anxiety, confusion or dizziness
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
reorder pdf pages in preview; pdf change page order online
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change page order pdf acrobat; move pages in pdf acrobat
189
MOxIFLOxACIn (Mfx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolone
Activity against TB, 
Bactericidal: acts by inhibiting the A subunit of DNA gyrase 
mechanism of action, 
(topoisomerase), which is essential in the reproduction of bacte- 
and metabolism 
rial DNA.
The cytochrome P450 system is not involved in moxifloxacin  
metabolism, and is not affected by moxifloxacin. Approximately 
45% of an oral or intravenous dose of moxifloxacin is excreted as 
unchanged drug (~20% in urine and ~25% in faeces).
preparation and dose 
Tablets 400 mg and intravenous solution 250 ml–400 mg in 
0.8% saline. Usual dose: 400 mg/day.
Storage 
Tablets:  room  temperature  (15–25  °C),  airtight  containers  
protected from light. 
Oral absorption 
Moxifloxacin, given as an oral tablet, is well absorbed from the 
gastro-intestinal  tract.  The  absolute  bioavailability  of  moxi-
floxacin is approximately 90%. Co-administration with a high fat 
meal (e.g. 500 calories from fat) does not affect the absorption 
of moxifloxacin.
Distribution, 
Moxifloxacin has been detected in the saliva, nasal and bron- 
CSF penetration 
chial secretions, mucosa of the sinuses, skin blister fluid, and 
subcutaneous tissue, and skeletal muscle following oral or intra- 
venous administration of 400 mg.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Since there are no 
adequate or well-controlled studies in pregnant women, moxi-
floxacin should be used during pregnancy only if the potential 
benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Because of the  
potential for serious  adverse effects  in infants nursing from 
mothers taking moxifloxacin, a decision should be made whether 
to discontinue nursing or to discontinue the drug, taking into  
account the importance of the drug to the mother.
Renal  disease:  no  dosage adjustment  is required  in  renally  
impaired patients, including those on either haemodialysis or 
continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis.
hepatic disease: no dosage adjustment is required in patients 
with mild or moderate hepatic insufficiency.
Adverse effects 
Generally well tolerated. 
Occasional: gastrointestinal intolerance; CNS-headache; malaise; 
insomnia; restlessness; dizziness; allergic reactions; diarrhoea; 
photosensitivity. Moxifloxacin has been found in isolated cases 
to prolong the QT interval. 
Drug interactions 
Should not be given to patients receiving class Ia antiarrhythmic 
drugs (such as quinidine and procainamide) or class III anti- 
arrhythmics (such as amiodarone and sotalol). 
Sucralfate: decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones caused by 
the chelation by aluminium ions contained in the sucralfate.
Antacids (magnesium, aluminium, calcium, Al-Mg buffer found 
in didanosine): antacid binding to fluoroquinolone antibiotics re-
sulting in decreased absorption and loss of therapeutic efficacy.
vitamins and minerals containing divalent and trivalent cations 
such as zinc and iron: formation of fluoroquinolone-ion complex 
results in decreased absorption of fluoroquinolones.
Contraindications 
Pregnancy; hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones; prolonged QT.
Monitoring 
No specific laboratory monitoring requirements.
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rearrange pdf pages in preview; how to reorder pages in pdf reader
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
page, it is also featured with the functions to merge PDF files using C# .NET, add new PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
rearrange pdf pages; how to move pages in pdf reader
190
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
MOxIFLOxACIn (Mfx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolone
Alerting symptoms 
— Pain, swelling or tearing of a tendon or muscle or joint pain
— Rashes, hives, bruising or blistering, trouble breathing
— Diarrhoea
— yellow skin or eyes
— Anxiety, confusion or dizziness
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
from PDF documents; Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print PDF as you wish; More PDF Reading
rearrange pages in pdf; how to move pages around in pdf file
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
how to move pages within a pdf; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
191
ANNEX 1. DRUG INFORMATION SHEETS
OFLOxACIn (Ofx)
DruG clAss: fluoroquinolones
Activity against TB, 
Bactericidal: acts by inhibiting the A subunit of DNA gyrase 
mechanism of action,   (topoisomerase), which is essential in the reproduction of bacte- 
and metabolism 
rial DNA. 
There is no cross-resistance with other antituberculosis agents, 
but  complete  cross-resistance  between  ofloxacin  and  cipro-
floxacin. There is limited metabolism to desmethyl and N-oxide 
metabolites;  desmethylofloxacin  has  moderate  antibacterial  
activity. Ofloxacin is eliminated mainly by the kidneys. Excretion 
is by tubular secretion and glomerular filtration and 65–80% of a 
dose is excreted unchanged in the urine over 24–48 hours,  
resulting in high urinary concentrations.
preparation and dose 
Tablets (200, 300 or 400 mg). vials (10 ml) or flexible contain-
ers (50 and 100 ml) with aqueous or 5% dextrose Iv solutions 
equivalent to 200 and 400 mg. Usual dose: 400 mg twice daily. 
Storage 
Room  temperature (15–25  °C), airtight containers  protected 
from light. 
Oral absorption 
90–98% oral absorption. 
Distribution, 
About 25% is bound to plasma proteins. Ofloxacin is widely dis- 
CSF penetration 
tributed in body fluids, including the CSF, and tissue penetration 
is good. It crosses the placenta and is distributed into breast 
milk. It also appears in the bile.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: usually compatible with breastfeed-
ing. 
Renal disease: doses of ofloxacin should be reduced in patients 
with severe renal impairment. When the creatinine clearance is 
less than  30 ml/minute, the  recommended dosing is  600–
800 mg 3 times per week.
Adverse effects 
Generally well tolerated. 
Occasional: gastrointestinal intolerance; CNS-headache, malaise, 
insomnia, restlessness, and dizziness. 
Rare: allergic reactions; diarrhoea; photosensitivity; increased 
LFTs; tendon rupture; peripheral neuropathy. 
Drug interactions 
Fluoroquinolones are known to inhibit hepatic drug metabolism 
and may interfere with the clearance of drugs such as theophyl-
line and caffeine that are metabolized by the liver. Cations such 
as aluminium, magnesium or iron reduce the absorption of ofloxacin 
and related drugs when given concomitantly. Changes in the phar-
macokinetics of fluoroquinolones have been reported when given 
with histamine H2 antagonists, possibly due to changes in gastric 
pH, but do not seem to be of much clinical significance. The urinary 
excretion of ofloxacin and some other fluoroquinolones is reduced 
by  probenecid;  plasma  concentrations  are  not  necessarily  
increased. 
Contraindications 
Pregnancy, intolerance of fluoroquinolones.
Monitoring 
No specific laboratory monitoring requirements.
Alerting symptoms 
— Pain, swelling or tearing of a tendon or muscle or joint pain
— Rashes, hives, bruising or blistering, trouble breathing
— Diarrhoea
— yellow skin or eyes
— Anxiety, confusion or dizziness
.NET Multipage TIFF SDK| Process Multipage TIFF Files
SDK, developers are easily to access, extract, swap, reorder, insert, mark up and delete pages in any multi upload to SharePoint and save to PDF documents.
how to move pages in a pdf file; how to reorder pages in pdf
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; pdf reverse page order preview
192
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
P-AMInOSALICyLIC ACID (pAS)
DruG clAss: sAlicylic AciD; Anti-folAte
Activity against TB, 
Bacteriostatic: disrupts folic acid metabolism. Acetylated in the 
mechanism of action, 
liver to N-acetyl-p-aminosalicylic acid and p-aminosalicylic acid, 
and metabolism 
which are excreted via glomerular filtration and tubular secretion. 
preparation and dose 
Tablets, sugar-coated, containing sodium salt: sodium p-amino-
salicylate, 0.5 g of PAS.
Granules of PAS with an acid-resistant outer coating rapidly dis-
solved in neutral media, 4 g per packet.
150 mg/kg or 10–12 g daily in 2 divided doses. 
Children: 200–300 mg/kg daily in 2–4 divided doses.
Storage 
Packets should be kept in the refrigerator or freezer. Other formu-
lations may  not  require  refrigeration  (consult  manufacturer’s  
recommendations).
Oral absorption 
Incomplete absorption (usually 60–65%): sometimes requires  
increased doses to achieve therapeutic levels.
Distribution, 
Distributed in peritoneal fluid, pleural fluid, synovial fluid. Not 
CSF penetration 
well distributed in CSF (10–15%) and bile.
Special circumstances  pregnancy/breastfeeding: safety class C. Congenital defects in 
babies have been reported with exposure to PAS in the first  
trimester. PAS is secreted into human breast milk (1/70th of  
maternal plasma concentration).
Renal disease: no dose adjustment is recommended. However, 
PAS can exacerbate acidosis associated with renal insufficiency 
and if possible should be avoided in patients with severe renal 
impairment  due  to  crystalluria.  Sodium  PAS  should also  be 
avoided in patients with severe renal impairment. 
Adverse effects 
Frequent: gastrointestinal intolerance (anorexia and diarrhoea); 
hypo-thyroidism (increased risk with concomitant use of ethiona-
mide). 
Occasional:  hepatitis  (0.3–0.5%);  allergic  reactions;  thyroid  
enlargement; malabsorption syndrome; increased prothrombin 
time; fever. 
Careful use in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydroge-
nase (G6PD) deficiency. 
Drug interactions 
Digoxin: possible decrease in digoxin absorption; monitor digoxin 
level – may need to be increased.
Ethionamide:  possible increase in liver  toxicity,  monitor liver 
enzymes; hypothyroidism in case of combined administration.
Isoniazid:  decreased  acetylation  of  isoniazid  resulting  in 
increased isoniazid level. Dose may need to be decreased. 
Contraindications 
Allergy to aspirin; severe renal disease; hypersensitivity to the 
drug.
Monitoring 
Monitor TSH, electrolytes, blood counts, and liver function tests.
Alerting symptoms 
— Skin rash, severe itching, or hives
— Severe abdominal pain, nausea or vomiting
— Unusual tiredness or loss of appetite
— Black stools as a result of intestinal bleeding
193
ANNEX 2
weight-based dosing  
of drugs for adults
The table  below shows the  suggested  dosing  of antituberculosis  drugs  for 
adults based on  body weight. For paediatric doses, see Chapter 9, section 
9.5. While antituberculosis drugs are traditionally grouped into first-line and 
second-line drugs, the drugs in the table are divided into five groups based on 
drug efficacy and drug properties (or drug classes). Detailed information on 
drug groups 1–4 is given in Annex 1. 
weight-based dosing of antituberculosis drugs in the treatment of drug-resistant TB
meDicAtion  
weiGht clAss 
(DruG
AbbreviAtion),  
<33 KG  
33–50 KG 
51–70 KG 
>70 KG 
(common  
(Also mAximum 
presentAtion) 
Dose)
GROUp 1: FIRST-LInE ORAL AnTITUBERCULOSIS DRUGS
Isoniazid (H) 
4–6 mg/kg daily  200–300 mg daily  300 mg daily   300 mg daily 
(100, 300 mg) 
or 8–12 mg  
or 450–600 mg 
or 600 mg 
or 600 mg 
3 x wk 
3 x wk 
3 x wk 
3 x wk
Rifampicin (R) 
10–20 mg/kg 
450–600 mg 
600 mg 
600 mg 
(150, 300 mg) 
daily
Ethambutol (E) 
25 mg/kg 
800–1200 mg 
1200– 
1600– 
(100, 400 mg) 
daily 
1600 mg 
2000 mg
Pyrazinamide (Z)  30–40 mg/kg 
1000–1750 mg 
1750– 
2000– 
(500 mg) 
daily 
2000 mg 
2500 mg
GROUp 2: InJECTABLE AnTITUBERCULOSIS DRUGS
Streptomycin (S)  15–20 mg/kg  
500–750 mg 
1000 mg 
1000 mg 
(1 g vial) 
daily
kanamycin (km) 
15–20 mg/kg 
500–750 mg 
1000 mg 
1000 mg 
(1 g vial) 
daily
Amikacin (Am) 
15–20 mg/kg 
500–750 mg 
1000 mg 
1000 mg 
(1 g vial) 
daily
Capreomycin (Cm)  15–20 mg/kg 
500–750 mg 
1000 mg 
1000 mg 
(1 g vial) 
daily
194
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
meDicAtion  
weiGht clAss 
(DruG
AbbreviAtion),  
<33 KG  
33–50 KG 
51–70 KG 
>70 KG 
(common  
(Also mAximum 
presentAtion) 
Dose)
GROUp 3: FLUOROQUInOLOnES
Ofloxacin (Ofx) 
15–20 mg/kg 
800 mg 
800 mg 
800–1000 mg 
(200, 300, 400 mg) 
daily
Levofloxacin (Lfx)  7.5–10 mg/kg 
750 mg 
750 mg 
750–1000 mg 
(250, 500 mg) 
daily
Moxifloxacin (Mfx)  7.5–10 mg/kg 
400 mg 
400 mg 
400 mg 
(400 mg) 
daily
GROUp 4: ORAL BACTERIOSTATIC SECOnD-LInE AnTITUBERCULOSIS DRUGS
Ethionamide (Eto)  15–20 mg/kg 
500 mg 
750 mg 
750–1000 mg 
(250 mg) 
daily
Protionamide  
15–20 mg/kg 
500 mg 
750 mg 
750–1000 mg 
(Pto) (250 mg) 
daily
Cycloserine (Cs) 
15–20 mg/kg 
500 mg 
750 mg 
750–1000 mg 
(250 mg) 
daily
Terizidone (Trd) 
15–20 mg/kg 
600 mg 
600 mg 
900 mg 
(300 mg) 
daily
P-aminosalicylic  
150 mg/kg 
8 g 
8 g 
8–12 g 
acid (PAS) 
daily 
(4 g sachets)
Sodium PAS 
Dosing can vary with manufacture and preparation: check dose rec-
ommended by the manufacturer.
Thioacetazone (Thz) Usual dose is 150 mg for adults
GROUp 5: AGEnTS wITh UnCLEAR ROLE In DR-TB TREATMEnT 
(nOT RECOMMEnDED By whO FOR ROUTInE USE In MDR-TB pATIEnTS). 
OpITMAL DOSES FOR DR-TB ARE nOT ESTABLIShED
Clofazimine (Cfz) 
Usual adult dose is 100 mg to 300 mg daily. Some 
clinicians begin at 300 mg daily and decrease to 100 mg after  
4 to 6 weeks. 
Linezolid (Lzd) 
Usual adult dose is 600 mg twice daily. Most reduce the dose  
to 600 mg once a day after 4 to 6 weeks to decrease adverse  
effects.
Amoxicillin/ 
Dosages for DR-TB not well defined. Normal adult dose 
Clavulanate (Amx/Clv)  875/125 mg twice a day or 500/125 mg three times a day.  
Dosages of 1000/250 have been used but adverse side- 
effects may limit this dosing. 
Thioacetazone (Thz) 
Usual adult dose is 150 mg
Imipenem/cilastatin   Usual adult dose is 500–1000 mg Iv every 6 hours.  
(Ipm/Cln) 
Clarithromycin (Clr) 
Usual adult dose is 500 mg twice daily
High-dose isoniazid  
16–20 mg/kg daily 
(High-dose H) 
195
ANNEX 3
Suggestions for further reading
policy issues
1.  Anti-tuberculosis drug resistance in the world. Third global report. The WHO/
IUATLD  global  project  on  anti-tuberculosis  drug  resistance  surveillance, 
1999–2002. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2004 (WHO/HTM/
TB/2004.343).
2. Espinal M  et al.  Standard short-course chemotherapy for  drug-resistant  
tuberculosis: treatment outcomes in six countries. Journal of the American 
Medical Association, 2000, 283(19), 2537–2545.
3. Program  in  Infectious  Disease  and  Social  Change/Open  Society  Insti-
tute. Global impact of drug resistant tuberculosis. Boston, Harvard Medical 
School, 1999.
4. Kim JY et al. From multidrug-resistant tuberculosis to DOTS expansion 
and  beyond:  making  the  most  of  a paradigm  shift.  Tuberculosis,  2003, 
83:59–65.
Laboratory services
1.  Laboratory services in tuberculosis control. Parts I, II and III. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 1998 (WHO/TB/98.258).
2. Guidelines for surveillance of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Geneva, World 
Health  Organization,  2003  (WHO/CDS/TB/2003/320;  WHO/CDS/
CSR/RMD/2003.3).
3. Guidelines for drug susceptibility testing for second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs 
for DOTS-Plus. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2001 (WHO/CDS/
TB/2001.288).
4. Laszlo A et al. Quality assurance programme for drug susceptibility testing 
of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the WHO/IUATLD Supranational Refer-
ence Laboratory Network: first round of proficiency testing. International 
Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 1997, 1:231–238.
5. The public health  service  national  tuberculosis reference laboratory and  the 
national laboratory network: minimum requirements, roles, and operation in 
low-income countries. Paris, International Union Against Tuberculosis and 
Lung Disease, 1998.
196
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
6. Hong Kong TB Treatment Services/British Medical Research Council In-
vestigation. A study in Hong Kong to evaluate the role of pretreatment sus-
ceptibility tests in the selection of regimens of chemotherapy for pulmonary 
tuberculosis. American Review of Respiratory Disease, 1972, 106(1):1–22.
Diagnosis and treatment
1.  Treatment  of  tuberculosis:  guidelines  for  national  programmes,  3rd  ed.  
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.313).
2. Tuberculosis: a manual for medical students. Geneva, World Health Organi-
zation, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/99.272).
3. The PIH  guide  to  medical management  of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. 
Boston, MA, Partners In Health, Program in Infectious Disease and Social 
Change, Harvard Medical School, Division of Social Medicine and Health 
Inequalities, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, 2003.
4. American Thoracic Society/Centers  for Disease Control  and Prevention/
Infectious Diseases Society of America. Treatment of tuberculosis. American 
Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 2003, 167(4):603–662.
5. Nathanson E et al. Adverse events in the treatment of multidrug-resistant 
tuberculosis: results from the DOTS-Plus initiative. International Journal 
of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2004, 8(11):1382–1384.
6. Bastian I, Portaels F, eds. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. London, Kluwer 
Academic Publishers, 2000.
7.  Tuberculosis and air travel: guidelines for prevention and control, 3rd ed. Ge-
neva, World Health Organization, 2008 (WHO/HTM/TB/2008.399).
hIv and MDR-TB
1.  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American Thoracic Society, 
Infectious Disease Society of America. Treatment of tuberculosis. Morbid-
ity and Mortality Weekly Report, 2003, 52(RR11):1–77.
2. Scaling up antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: treatment guide-
lines  for  a  public  health  approach.  Geneva,  World  Health  Organization, 
2003.
3. The PIH guide to the community-based treatment of HIV in resource-poor  
settings. Boston, Partners In Health, 2004.
4. Bartlett  JG.  The  Johns  Hopkins  Hospital  2003  guide  to  medical  care  of  
patients with HIV infection, 11th ed. Philadelphia, Lippincott Williams & 
Wilkins, 2003.
5. Interim policy  on  collaborative  TB/HIV activities. Geneva, World  Health 
Organization,  2004  (WHO/HTM/TB/2004.330;  WHO/HTM/HIV/ 
2004.1).
6. Strategic  framework  to  decrease  the  burden  of  TB/HIV.  Geneva,  World 
Health  Organization,  2002  (WHO/CDS/TB/2002.296,  WHO/HIV_
AIDS/2002.2).
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested