c# pdf viewer component : Change page order pdf reader software Library project winforms asp.net .net UWP who_htm_tb_2008_4024-part1120

17
 Community level. Community involvement and communication with 
community leaders can greatly facilitate implementation of treatment and 
respond to needs that cannot be met by medical services alone. Commu-
nity education, involvement and organization around TB issues can foster 
community ownership of control programmes and reduce stigma. In some 
circumstances, communities have helped to address the interim needs of 
patients, including the provision of DOT, food and/or housing. Commu-
nity health workers often play a critical role in ambulatory care of DR-TB 
patients. 
 Coordination with prisons (1). Transmission in prisons is an important 
source of spread of DR-TB in some countries, and infection control meas-
ures can reduce incidence substantially. In many cases, inmates are released 
from prison before they finish treatment. Close coordination and commu-
nication with the civilian TB control programme, advance planning, tar-
geted social support and specific procedures for transferring care will help 
ensure that patients complete treatment after release from prison. 
 All health-care providers (both public and private) (2). In some coun-
tries, private practitioners manage most cases of DR-TB. In these settings, 
it is important to involve the private sector in the design and technical as-
pects of the programme. Many PPM programmes have demonstrated effec-
tive and mutually beneficial cooperation (3). In PPM systems, patients and 
information move in both directions. For example, private providers can be 
compensated fairly through negotiated systems of reimbursement, and the 
public health system may provide clinic- or community-based DOT as well 
as registering patients and their treatment outcomes. Similar PPM mixes 
can be established for treatment of patients with DR-TB, but they require 
exceptional coordination. The public health system may also get involved 
in training on national guidelines for DR-TB. 
 International level. International technical support through WHO, the 
GLC,  SRLs  and  other  technical  agencies  is  recommended.  The  NTP 
should set up and lead an interagency body that ensures clear division of 
tasks and responsibilities. 
3.5  proposed checklist
From the earliest planning phase, the full range of issues encompassed in po-
litical commitment needs to be addressed. These include adequate financial 
support, an enabling regulatory environment, sufficient human resources, ad-
equate physical infrastructure and good coordination. In addition, a communi-
cation strategy should be established to ensure that information is disseminated 
effectively from the central level to the periphery and that reports from the peri-
pheral level are received centrally. Box 3.2 provides a checklist for programme 
managers, summarizing the key aspects of a DR-TB control programme. 
3. POLITICAL COMMITMENT AND COORDINATION
Change page order pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf reverse page order preview; reorder pages in pdf preview
Change page order pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change page order pdf; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
18
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
References
1.  Bone  A  et  al.  Tuberculosis  control  in  prisons:  a  manual  for  programme 
managers.  Geneva,  World  Health  Organization,  2000  (WHO/CDS/
TB/2000.281).
2.  Involving private  practitioners  in tuberculosis  control:  issues, interventions 
and  emerging  policy  framework.  Geneva,  World  Health  Organization, 
2001 (WHO/CDS/TB/2001.285).
3.  Towards scaling up. Report of the Third Meeting of the PPM Subgroup for 
DOTS Expansion. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2005 (WHO/
CDS/TB/2005.356).
BOx 3.2 SUMMARy ChECKLIST FOR DR-TB COnTROL pROGRAMME MAnAGERS
prevention
  Sound implementation of DOTS programme 
  Infection control measures taken where all DR-TB patients will be treated
  Contact tracing for MDR-TB cases in place 
Laboratory
  Testing and maintenance of equipment
  Biosafety measures in place
  Reagents supply
  Supervision and quality assurance system (relationship with SRL estab-
lished)
  System for reporting laboratory results to the treatment centre
  Laboratory for monitoring of electrolytes, creatinine, lipase, thyroid func-
tion, liver enzymes, and hematocrit in place
  Point-of-care HIv testing, with counselling and referral available
  Pregnancy testing
patient care
  Council of experts or steering committee set up
  Adequate  capacity  and  trained  staff  at  the  health  centre  for  DOT  and   
patient support
  DOT in place and plan to ensure case holding
  System to detect and treat adverse effects, including supply of appropriate 
medications
  Patient and family support to increase adherence to treatment, such as 
support group, psychological counselling, transportation subsidy, food bas-
kets
  Patient, family and community health education, including stigma reduc-
tion
programme strategy
  Integration with DOTS programme
  Sources of DR-TB identified and corrected
  Legislation for treatment protocols accepted
  Project manual published and disseminated 
  Agreement of criteria for prioritization of patient waiting lists
  Location of care defined and functional (ambulatory vs hospitalization)
  Integration of MDR-TB services with HIv care
  Integration of all health-care providers into the DR-TB control programme
VB.NET Word: Change Word Page Order & Sort Word Document Pages
Note: if you are trying to change the order of a you want to see other VB.NET Word document editing controls, please read this Word reading page which has
move pages in pdf reader; change page order in pdf reader
C# Word - Process Word Document in C#
various Word document processing implementations using C# demo codes, such as add or delete Word document page, change Word document pages order, merge or
reorder pdf pages reader; reorder pages of pdf
19
CHAPTER 4
Definitions:  
case registration, bacteriology  
and treatment outcomes
4.1  Chapter objectives 
19
4.2  Definitions of drug resistance and diagnostic Category Iv 
20
4.3  Site of DR-TB disease (pulmonary and extrapulmonary) 
20
4.4  Bacteriology and sputum conversion 
21
4.5  Category Iv patient registration group based on previous  
antituberculosis treatment 
21
4.6  Definitions for diagnostic Category Iv treatment outcomes 
23
Box 4.1 
Helpful hints on registrations and definitions 
25
4.1  Chapter objectives
This chapter establishes case definitions, patient registration categories, bac-
teriological terms, treatment outcome definitions and cohort analysis proce-
dures for patients who meet WHO Category IV diagnostic criteria.
1
It is an 
extension of the basic DOTS information system (1, 2). 
The  categories,  definitions  and  procedures  defined  in  this  chapter  will  
facilitate the following:
 standardized patient registration and case notification;
 assignment to appropriate treatment regimens;
 case evaluation according to disease site, bacteriology and history of treat-
ment;
 cohort analysis of registered Category IV patients and Category IV treat-
ment outcomes.
1 Treatment of tuberculosis: guidelines for national programmes (1) recommends treatment regimens 
based on different TB diagnostic categories. The diagnostic categories are:
Category I – New smear-positive patients; new smear-negative pulmonary TB (PTB) with exten-
sive parenchymal involvement; severe concomitant HIV disease or severe forms of extrapulmo-
nary TB.
Category II – Previously treated sputum smear-positive PTB: relapse; treatment after interrup-
tion; failures.
Category III – New smear-negative PTB (other than in Cat I) and less severe forms of extra- 
pulmonary TB.
Category IV – Chronic cases (still sputum-positive after supervised re-treatment) and MDR-
TB.
C# PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC
PDF Document; Remove Password from PDF; Change PDF Permission Settings. Page: Insert PDF pages; VB.NET Page: Delete PDF VB.NET Annotate: PDF Markup & Drawing. XDoc
rearrange pdf pages online; how to move pages in pdf files
C# PowerPoint - Sort PowerPoint Pages Order in C#.NET
control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several PowerPoint document pages, or just change the position of certain one PowerPoint page in an
how to move pages in pdf reader; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
20
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
4.2  Definitions of drug resistance and diagnostic Category Iv
DR-TB is confirmed through laboratory tests that show that the infecting 
isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis grow in vitro in the presence of one or 
more antituberculosis drugs (see Chapter 6 for further information on labo-
ratory requirements). Four different categories of drug resistance have been 
established:
 Mono-resistance: resistance to one antituberculosis drug. 
 Poly-resistance: resistance to more than one antituberculosis drug, other 
than both isoniazid and rifampicin. 
 Multidrug-resistance: resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin. 
 Extensive drug-resistance: resistance to any fluoroquinolone, and at least 
one of  three  injectable  second-line  drugs  (capreomycin,  kanamycin  and 
amikacin), in addition to multidrug-resistance.
Diagnostic Category IV includes patients with:
 Confirmed MDR-TB.
 Suspected MDR-TB. This requires that the relevant health authority (such 
as a review panel) recommends that the patient should receive Category IV 
treatment. Patients may be entered in the Category IV register and started 
on Category IV treatment before MDR-TB is confirmed only if representa-
tive DST surveys or other epidemiologic data indicate a very high probabil-
ity of MDR-TB (see Chapter 5). 
 Poly-resistant TB. Some cases of poly-resistant TB will require Category 
IV treatments. These patients require prolonged treatment (18 months or 
more) with first-line drugs combined with two or more second-line drugs 
(see Chapter 8, Table 8.1) and should be entered into the Category IV reg-
ister. (Most programmes choose to keep cases of mono- and poly-resistance 
that do not require second-line drugs or require only one second-line drug, 
in the District TB Register). 
4.3  Site of drug-resistant TB disease  
(pulmonary and extrapulmonary)
In general, recommended treatment regimens for drug-resistant forms of TB 
are similar, irrespective of site. The importance of defining site is primarily for 
recording and reporting purposes.
 Pulmonary TB. Tuberculosis involving only the lung parenchyma.
 Extrapulmonary TB. Tuberculosis of organs other than the lungs, e.g. 
pleura, lymph nodes, abdomen, genitourinary tract, skin, joints and bones, 
meninges. Tuberculous intrathoracic lymphadenopathy (mediastinal and/
or hilar) or tuberculous pleural effusion, without radiographic abnormali-
C# Word - Sort Word Pages Order in C#.NET
library control, developers can swap or adjust the order of all or several Word document pages, or just change the position of certain one Word page in an
reorder pages in pdf file; rearrange pages in pdf file
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
VB.NET PDF - How to Modify PDF Document Page in VB.NET. VB.NET Guide for Processing PDF Document Page and Sorting PDF Pages Order.
how to move pages in pdf acrobat; change pdf page order reader
21
4. DEFINITIONS: CASE REGISTRATION, BACTERIOLOGy AND TREATMENT OUTCOMES
ties in the lungs, therefore constitutes a case of extrapulmonary TB. The 
definition of an extrapulmonary case with several sites affected depends on 
the site representing the most severe form of disease.
Patients with both pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB should be classified as 
a case of pulmonary TB.
4.4  Bacteriology and sputum conversion
Bacteriological examinations used in patients with DR-TB  include sputum 
smear microscopy and culture. Sputum smear microscopy and culture should 
be performed and results reported according to international standards (3). 
These examinations should be done at the start of treatment to confirm TB 
disease and to group the patients according to infectiousness, sputum smear-
positive being most infectious. 
At least one sputum sample for smear and culture should always be taken 
at the time of Category IV treatment start. In order for a patient to be consid-
ered culture- or sputum smear-positive at the start of Category IV treatment, 
the following criteria must be met: at least one pre-treatment culture or smear 
was positive; the collection date of the sample on which the culture or smear 
was performed was less than 30 days before, or 7 days after, initiation of Cat-
egory IV treatment. 
Sputum conversion is defined as two sets of consecutive negative smears 
and cultures, from samples collected at least 30 days apart.  Both  bacterio-
logical techniques (smear  and culture)  should  be  used  to monitor patients 
throughout therapy (see Chapter 11). The date of the first set of negative cul-
tures and smears is used as the date of conversion (and the date to determine 
the length of the initial phase and treatment). 
The recording and reporting system assesses the smear- and culture-status 
6  months after  the start of treatment as an interim outcome. Programmes  
often  use the smear and culture conversion rate at 6 months to assess pro-
gramme performance (see Chapter 18).
4.5  Category Iv patient registration group based on history of 
previous antituberculosis treatment
Category IV patients should be assigned a registration group based on their 
treatment history, which is useful in assessing the risk for MDR-TB. 
The registration groups describe the history of previous treatment and do 
not purport to explain the reason(s) for drug resistance.
1
1
These guidelines do not use the terms “primary” and “acquired” resistance because these types of 
resistance cannot be distinguished in most DR-TB control programmes. If DST is done before 
the start of the patient’s first antituberculosis treatment, any resistance documented is primary 
resistance. If new resistance is found when DST is later repeated and genetic testing confirms that 
it is the same strain, only then can it be concluded that the strain has acquired resistance. Other-
wise, it may be caused by re-infection with a new strain.
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Empower C# Users to Change the Rotation Angle of PDF File DLLs for PDF Page Rotation in C#.NET Project. In order to run the sample code, the following steps
pdf page order reverse; how to rearrange pdf pages online
VB.NET PDF Password Library: add, remove, edit PDF file password
On this page, we will illustrate how to protect PDF document via Change PDF original password. In order to run the sample code, the following steps would be
change page order pdf preview; reorder pages in pdf
22
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
Each Category IV patient should be classified in two different ways: 
I. Classification according to history of previous drug use, mainly to as-
sign the appropriate treatment regimen. 
 New. A patient who has received no or less than one month of antitubercu-
losis treatment. Patients are placed in this group if they had sputum collect-
ed for DST at the start of a Category I regimen and were then switched to a 
Category IV regimen because MDR-TB was later confirmed. They should 
be considered “new” if DST was performed within one month of the start 
of treatment (even if they had received more than one month of Category I 
treatment by the time the results of DST returned and they were registered 
as Category IV).
 Previously treated with first-line drugs only. A patient who has been 
treated for one month or more for TB with only first-line drugs.
 Previously treated with second-line drugs. A patient who has been treat-
ed for one month or more for TB with one or more second-line drugs, with 
or without first-line drugs.
II. Classification  according  to  the  history  of  their  previous  treatment 
(commonly  referred  to as the patient’s  “registration  group”). The  reg-
istration groups are the established groups used in the DOTS recording and 
reporting system, with additional subgrouping of patients treated after failure. 
The number of groups will depend on the country policy on target groups 
for DST. This grouping allows analysis of the target groups for DST, epide-
miological monitoring and projection of future numbers of MDR-TB cases. 
Again, classification is determined by treatment history at the time of collec-
tion of the sputum sample that was used to confirm MDR-TB. The groups 
are as follows:
 New. (Same definition as in classification according to previous drug use). 
A patient who has received no or less than one month of antituberculosis 
treatment.
 Relapse. A patient whose most recent treatment outcome was “cured” or 
“treatment completed”, and who is subsequently diagnosed with bacterio-
logically positive TB by sputum smear microscopy or culture.
 Treatment after default. A patient who returns to treatment, bacteriologi-
cally positive by sputum smear microscopy or culture, following interrup-
tion of treatment for two or more consecutive months.
 Treatment after failure of Category I. A patient who has received Catego-
ry I treatment for TB and in whom treatment has failed. Failure is defined 
as sputum smear positive at five months or later during treatment.
23
 Treatment after failure of Category II. A patient who has received Cat-
egory II treatment  for TB and in whom treatment has failed. Failure is  
defined as sputum smear positive at five months or later during treatment. 
 Transfer in. A patient who has transferred in from another register for 
treatment of DR-TB to continue Category IV treatment. 
 Other. There are several types of patients who may not fit into any of the 
above categories. Programmes are encouraged to classify these patients into 
groups that are meaningful according to the local epidemiology of disease. 
Examples include the following: sputum smear positive patients with un-
known previous treatment outcome; sputum smear positive patients who 
received treatment other than Category I or II (possibly in the private sec-
tor); previously treated  patients with extrapulmonary TB; patients who 
have received several unsuccessful treatments, were considered incurable 
by health staff and who have lived with active TB disease with no or inad-
equate treatment for a period of time (duration depends on country situa-
tion) until Category IV treatment became available (so-called “back-log” 
patients; see also Chapter 18.5).
While persistently positive smears at month five constitute the definition of 
failure, many programmes may want to perform culture and DST earlier based 
on the overall clinical picture. Patients found to have MDR-TB will need to be 
switched to Category IV regimens before they meet the traditional diagnosis 
of failure. When possible, these patients should be classified separately. This 
will allow assessment of the value of these end-points to predict MDR-TB, and 
thereby the utility of routine DST in these groups. Otherwise, they should be 
classified together with the failures of the regimens they received. 
HIV status is also recorded at the start of treatment and, if unknown, point-
of-care testing is encouraged (see Chapter 18). 
4.6  Definitions for diagnostic Category Iv treatment outcomes
The  following are mutually exclusive Category  IV outcome definitions  (4) 
that rely on the use of laboratory smear and culture as a monitoring tool and 
will be reported in Forms 01, 02 and 07 (see Chapter 18). They have been 
constructed to parallel the six DOTS outcomes for drug-susceptible TB (1, 4). 
All patients should be assigned the first outcome they experience for the treat-
ment being evaluated for recording and reporting purposes.
 Cured. A Category IV patient who has completed treatment according to 
programme protocol and has at least five consecutive negative cultures from 
samples collected at least 30 days apart in the final 12 months of treatment. 
If only one positive culture is reported during that time, and there is no 
concomitant clinical evidence of deterioration, a patient may still be con-
sidered cured, provided that this positive culture is followed by a minimum 
of three consecutive negative cultures taken at least 30 days apart. 
4. DEFINITIONS: CASE REGISTRATION, BACTERIOLOGy AND TREATMENT OUTCOMES
24
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
 Treatment completed. A Category IV patient who has completed treat-
ment according to programme protocol but does not meet the definition for 
cure because of lack of bacteriological results (i.e. fewer than five cultures 
were performed in the final 12 months of treatment). 
 Died. A Category IV patient who dies for any reason during the course of 
MDR-TB treatment.
 Failed. Treatment will be considered to have failed if two or more of the 
five  cultures  recorded in  the final  12 months  of therapy are positive, or 
if any one of the final three cultures is positive. (Treatment will also be 
considered to have failed if a clinical decision has been made to terminate 
treatment early because of poor clinical or radiological response or adverse 
events. These latter failures can be indicated separately in order to do sub-
analysis). 
 Defaulted. A Category IV patient whose treatment was interrupted for two 
or more consecutive months for any reason without medical approval. 
 Transferred out. A Category IV patient who has been transferred to an-
other reporting and recording unit and for whom the treatment outcome is 
unknown. 
Patients who have transferred in should have their outcome reported back to the 
treatment centre from which they originally were registered. The responsibility 
of reporting their final outcomes belongs to the original treatment centre. 
4.7  Cohort analysis 
All patients should be analysed in two different cohorts (groups of patients) 
depending on the purpose:
 The treatment cohort includes only patients who start Category IV treat-
ment. It  is defined by the date of start of Category IV treatment. The  
purpose is mainly to assess result of treatment and trends over time.
 The diagnostic cohort includes patients diagnosed with MDR-TB (identi-
fied in the DST register by date of DST result) during a specific period of 
time. The purpose is mainly to assess the number of patients with DR-TB, 
in subgroups and over time. This allows the programme to evaluate delay 
in treatment start and proportion of patents who started treatment. 
The recommended timeframe for Category IV treatment cohort analysis re-
flects the long duration of Category IV regimens. Cohort analyses should be 
carried out at 24 months and, if needed, repeated at 36 months after the last 
patient starts treatment (see Chapter 18 and Form 07). For each treatment  
cohort, an interim status should be assessed at 6 months after the start of treat-
ment to monitor programme progress (see Chapter 18 and Form 06).
25
References
1.  Treatment  of  tuberculosis:  guidelines  for  national  programmes,  3rd  ed.  
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.313). 
(revision 2005).
2.  Revised TB recording and reporting forms and registers – version 2006. World 
Health  Organization,  2006  (WHO/HTM/TB/2006.373;  available  at 
(http://www.who.int/entity/tb/dots/r_and_r_forms/en/index.html).
3.  Laboratory  services  in  tuberculosis  control  [Parts  I,  II  and  III].  Geneva, 
World Health Organization, 1998 (WHO/TB/98.258).
4.  Laserson  KF  et  al.  Speaking  the  same  language:  treatment  outcome 
definitions  for  multidrug-resistant tuberculosis.  International  Journal of  
Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2005, 9(6):640–645.
4. DEFINITIONS: CASE REGISTRATION, BACTERIOLOGy AND TREATMENT OUTCOMES
BOx 4.1  hELpFUL hInTS On REGISTRATIOnS AnD DEFInITIOnS
Assigning the first outcome. All patients should be assigned the first out-
come they experience for recording and reporting purposes. For example, a 
patient defaults on a Category Iv regimen and returns 14 months later to be 
re-registered and is cured with a second Category Iv treatment. This patient 
should receive a final outcome of “defaulted” in the cohort in which he or she 
was first registered and “cured” in the second cohort. 
Transfer out. A patient who is “transferred out” must be transferred out to an-
other DR-TB treatment centre. For example, a patient in a district with a good 
DR-TB programme has completed 8 months of a Category Iv regimen and is 
doing well and has converted his sputum in month two. He informs the DR-
TB control programme that he is returning to his home district (500 km away) 
and that the district does not have a DR-TB control programme. His uncle is 
going to purchase the medicines, which he will swallow under the supervison 
of a local physician. There are no culture facilities in his home district. This 
patient should be counted as a default, because he is leaving a DR-TB control 
programme that will not be able to track him. A patient must go to another DR-
TB control programme that can report back the final result to be considered 
as transferred-out. 
Transferred in. A patient who “transfers in“ does not get counted in the cohort 
of the centre in which he completes his treatment. The receiving centre must 
report back the final outcome of the patient to the original treatment centre. 
The original centre should confirm with the receiving centre that the patient 
transferred in and the final treatment outcome. 
26
CHAPTER 5
Case-finding strategies
5.1  Chapter objectives 
26
5.2  Background information and general considerations 
27
5.3  Targeting risk groups for DST 
27
5.4  Strategies for programmes with minimal access to DST and  
limited resources 
29
5.5  DST specimen collection 
30
5.6  Case-finding in paediatric patients 
30
5.7  Case-finding in HIv-infected patients 
30
5.8  Case-finding of patients with mono- and poly-drug resistance 
31
5.9  Use of rapid drug-resistance testing 
31
5.10  Use of second-line DST in case-finding and diagnosing XDR-TB 
33
Table 5.1 
Target groups for DST 
28
Figure 5.1 
Algorithm for the use of rapid drug-resistance testing 
32
Box 5.1 
Country examples of case-finding strategies 
33
5.1  Chapter objectives 
This  chapter describes strategies  for  case-finding  and  diagnosis  of patients 
with either suspected or confirmed DR-TB. Several approaches to case-find-
ing and enrolment into DR-TB control programmes are discussed, taking into 
consideration that such programmes may have limited technical and financial 
capacity. The strategies range from testing all patients with TB to testing only 
a selected group of patients. 
The chapter reviews case-finding of patients with DR-TB with respect to:
 risk factors for drug resistance;
 strategies for case-finding in programmes with minimal access to DST and 
limited resources;
 information on DST collection;
 the use of rapid DST methods
1
to identify drug resistance;
1
Rapid DST methods in these guidelines refer to molecular techniques that detect the genetic de-
terminants of resistance. However, liquid, agar and other validated DST media that determine 
the presence of resistance within 2–3 weeks can often be substituted as rapid DST method when 
molecular methods are not available.
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested