c# pdf viewer component : How to rearrange pages in pdf document application Library cloud html .net azure class who_htm_tb_2008_4025-part1121

27
5. CASE-FINDING STRATEGIES
 the use of DST of second-line drugs and case detection of XDR-TB;
 important issues in case-finding of drug resistance in the HIV-infected  
patient.
Key recommendations (* indicates updated recommendation)
 Patients at risk of DR-TB should be screened for drug resistance;
 In people living with HIv, when possible, DST should be performed at the 
start of anti-TB therapy to avoid mortality due to unrecognized DR-TB;*
 For the initial screening of DR-TB, rapid DST methods should be used when-
ever possible;
 Patients at increased risk of XDR-TB should be screened for resistance with 
DST of isoniazid, rifampicin, the second-line injectable agents and a fluoro-
quinolone.*
5.2  Background information and general considerations
Programme strategies strive to identify patients and initiate adequate treat-
ment for drug-resistant cases in a timely manner. Timely identification and 
prompt initiation of treatment prevent the patient from spreading the disease 
to others, acquiring further resistance and progressing to a state of permanent 
lung damage. 
It  is  strongly  recommended  that  programmes  have  representative  DRS 
data for new patients and for the different categories of re-treatment patients 
(failure of Category I, failure of re-treatment, default and relapse) as well as  
other high-risk groups. Without this information, or when it is only partially 
available, designing an effective case-finding strategy is difficult and may be 
impossible. DRS data also enable a programme to estimate the number of pa-
tients who should enrol, which in turn greatly facilitates strategy planning and 
drug procurement. 
5.3  Targeting risk groups for DST
These guidelines assume a general understanding of case-finding and diagno-
sis of active TB. This information can be reviewed in reference books on TB, 
including WHO publications (1, 2).
Routine DST  at  the start of treatment  may be indicated for  all TB pa-
tients or only in specific groups of patients at increased risk for drug resistance.  
Specific elements of the history that suggest an increased risk for drug resis-
tance are listed in Table 5.1. Stronger risk factors are placed higher in the table. 
Risk factors for XDR-TB are discussed in section 5.10.
The prevalence of resistance in specific risk groups can vary greatly across 
different settings. The routine use of DST and Category IV treatment for pa-
tients with any risk factor listed in Table 5.1 is therefore not recommended. 
Programmes should instead  examine  DRS data from  risk  groups,  together 
How to rearrange pages in pdf document - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
reverse pdf page order online; move pages in a pdf
How to rearrange pages in pdf document - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
change pdf page order online; move pages in pdf document
28
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
TABLE 5.1  Target groups for DST
risK fActors for  
comments 
DruG-resistAnt tb 
Failure of re-treatment  
Chronic TB cases are defined as patients who are still 
regimens and chronic  
sputum smear-positive at the end of a re-treatment 
TB cases 
regimen. These patients have perhaps the highest MDR-TB  
rates of any group, often exceeding 80% (1, 2).
Exposure to a known 
Most studies have shown close contacts of MDR-TB 
DR-TB case 
patients to have very high rates of MDR-TB. Management  
of DR-TB contacts is described in Chapter 14. 
Failure of Category I  
Failures of Category I are patients who while on treatment  
are sputum smear-positive at month 5 or later during the  
course of treatment. Not all patients in whom a regimen  
fails have DR-TB, and the percentage may depend on a  
number of factors, including whether rifampicin was used  
in the continuation phase and whether DOT was used  
throughout treatment. More information on regimen  
implications for Category I failures is given below in this  
chapter and in Chapter 7.
Failure of antituberculosis  Antituberculosis regimens from the private sector can  
treatment in the private   vary greatly. A detailed history of drugs used is essential.  
sector 
If both isoniazid and rifampicin were used, the chances of  
MDR-TB may be high. Sometimes second-line antituber- 
culosis drugs may have been used, and this is important  
information for designing the re-treatment regimen.
Patients who remain  
Many programmes may choose to do culture and DST on  
sputum smear-positive at   patients who remain sputum smear-positive at months 2  
month 2 or 3 of SCC 
and 3. This group of patients is at risk for DR-TB, but  
rates can vary considerably.
Relapse and return after   Evidence suggests that most relapse and return after  
default without recent  
default cases do not have DR-TB. However, certain  
treatment failure 
histories may point more strongly to possible DR-TB; for  
example, erratic drug use or early relapses.  
Exposure in institutions   Patients who frequently stay in homeless shelters,  
that have DR-TB out- 
prisoners in many countries and health-care workers in  
breaks or a high DR-TB  
clinics, laboratories and hospitals can have high rates of  
prevalence 
DR-TB.
Residence in areas with   DR-TB rates in many areas of the world can be high enough 
high DR-TB prevalence 
to justify routine DST testing in all new cases. 
History of using    
The percentage of DR-TB caused by use of poor-quality  
antituberculosis drugs  
drugs is unknown but considered significant. It is known  
of poor or unknown 
that poor-quality drugs are prevalent in all countries. All  
quality 
drugs should comply with quality-assured WHO standards.
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
C# TIFF - Sort TIFF File Pages Order in C#.NET. Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview.
rearrange pdf pages; reorder pages in pdf reader
VB.NET PDF File & Page Process Library SDK for vb.net, ASP.NET
page directly. Moreover, when you get a PDF document which is out of order, you need to rearrange the PDF document pages. In these
how to rearrange pdf pages in preview; move pages in pdf online
29
with their technical capacity and resources, to determine which groups of pa-
tients should get routine DST and/or inclusion into Category IV regimens. 
5.4  Strategies for programmes with minimal access to DST 
and limited resources
Access to DST is required in all programmes. Under exceptional circumstanc-
es, and while building the laboratory capacity to perform DST, programmes 
may use strategies to enrol patients with a very high risk of DR-TB in Cat-
egory IV regimens without individual DST. For example, the results of rep-
resentative DRS may identify a group or groups of patients with a very high 
percentage of DR-TB, which can justify the use of Category IV regimens in 
all patients in the group. 
The three groups that are most likely to be considered for direct enrolment 
in Category IV regimens are discussed below.
 Category II failures (chronic TB cases) (3, 4). Patients in whom Cate-
gory II treatment has failed in sound NTPs often have DR-TB (1, 2). If the 
quality of DOT is poor or unknown (i.e. if regular ingestion of the medi-
cines during Category II treatment is uncertain), patients may fail Catego-
ry II treatment for reasons other than DR-TB. 
 Close contacts of DR-TB cases who develop active TB disease. Close 
contacts of DR-TB patients who develop active TB disease can be enrolled 
for treatment with Category IV regimens. (See Chapter 14 for more detail 
on the management of contacts of DR-TB patients.) 
 Category I failures. Since the prevalence of DR-TB in this group of pa-
tients may vary greatly (4–8), the rate in this group must be document-
5. CASE-FINDING STRATEGIES
TABLE 5.1  (continued)
risK fActors for  
comments 
DruG-resistAnt tb 
Treatment in programmes   These are usually non-DOTS or DOTS programmes with 
that operate poorly  
poor drug management and distribution systems. 
(especially recent and/or  
frequent drug stock-outs)    
Co-morbid conditions  
Malabsorption may result in selective low serum drug levels 
associated with  
and may occur in either HIv-noninfected or -infected 
malabsorption or rapid-    patients. 
transit diarrhoea 
HIv in some settings 
Data from the 2002–2006 Global Surveillance project  
(9) suggest an association between HIv and MDR-TB in  
some parts of the world, and numerous DR-TB outbreaks  
have been documented in HIv patients (see Chapter 10).  
The data are still limited and specific factors involved in  
this association have not been determined. 
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
do if you want to change or rearrange current TIFF &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
reorder pages of pdf; how to change page order in pdf acrobat
C# PowerPoint - How to Process PowerPoint
It enables you to move out useless PowerPoint document pages simply with a few a very easy PPT slide dealing solution to sort and rearrange PowerPoint slides
pdf rearrange pages; reordering pages in pdf document
30
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
ed before deciding whether enrolment in DR-TB control programmes can 
take place without DST. Programmes should conduct DRS surveys is this 
group to determine whether the routine use of Category II regimens pro-
vides an adequate re-treatment regimen for patients in whom Category I 
treatment failed (also see Chapter 7, Table 7.2).
The rate of DR-TB in these three groups can vary. These guidelines strongly 
recommend confirming treatment failure by culture and testing for DR-TB 
through the use of DST to at least isoniazid and rifampicin for all patients 
who  start  a  Category  IV  regimen  following  this  strategy.  All  programmes 
should therefore have capacity for DST of at least isoniazid and rifampicin. 
5.5  DST specimen collection
If DST is chosen as part of the case-finding strategy, it is recommended that 
two sputum specimens be obtained for culture and that DST be performed 
with the specimen  that produces  the best  culture. DST does  not routinely 
need to be carried out in duplicate. Procedures for collecting and managing 
specimens for culture and DST are described in Chapter 6, which also ad-
dresses different techniques, limitations, quality assurance requirements and 
other issues of culture and DST. 
Previously treated patients may have had DST in the past but it may no lon-
ger reflect the resistance pattern of the strain they had at the time of enrolment 
in the DR-TB control programme. Programmes that base treatment on DST 
(see Chapter 7) should repeat DST in all patients who have received treatment 
since the collection of their previous DST specimen. 
5.6  Case-finding in paediatric patients
Paediatric cases require adjustments in diagnostic criteria and indications for 
treatment. Younger children in particular may not be able to produce spu-
tum specimens on demand. Programmes should not exclude children from 
treatment  solely  because  sputum  specimens  are  not  available;  smear-  and  
culture-negative children with active TB who are close contacts of patients 
with DR-TB can be started on Category IV regimens (see Chapter 9, section 
9.5 and Chapter 14, section 14.4).
5.7  Case-finding in hIv-infected patients
Cases of HIV infection also require adjustment in diagnostic criteria and in-
dications for treatment. The diagnosis of TB in HIV-infected people is more 
difficult and may be confused with other pulmonary or systemic infections. 
People living with HIV are more likely to have smear-negative TB or extrapul-
monary TB. These and other WHO guidelines (10) recommend the use of 
clinical algorithms that include the use of chest X-ray and culture to improve 
the ability to diagnose TB in smear-negative patients living with HIV. Because 
unrecognized MDR- and XDR-TB are associated with such high mortality 
Online Merge PDF files. Best free online merge PDF tool.
By dragging your pages in the editor area you can rearrange them or delete single pages. We try to make it as easy as possible to merge your PDF files.
how to change page order in pdf document; reorder pdf pages
VB.NET Word: How to Process MS Word in VB.NET Library in .NET
well programmed Word pages sorter to rearrange Word pages extracting single or multiple Word pages at one & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to reorder pdf pages; reorder pages in pdf online
31
in these patients, many programmes perform culture and DST testing for all 
patients living with HIV and with active TB. Programmes without facilities 
or resources to screen all patients living with HIV for DR-TB should put sig-
nificant efforts into obtaining them, especially if DR-TB rates are moderate 
or high. Some programmes may adopt a strategy of targeted DST for patients 
with increased risk of DR-TB or low CD4 count (See Chapter 10, Section 
10.4). Rapid diagnostic techniques for people living with HIV with active TB 
can be very useful to promptly identify those with DR-TB (see section 5.9). 
If XDR-TB is prevalent, people living with HIV who have MDR-TB should 
be screened for XDR-TB with the use of liquid media or another validated  
rapid technique for DST of second-line injectable agents and a fluoroquinolo-
ne (see Section 5.9). In some cases (as described in Chapters 7 and 10), smear- 
negative patients may need to be enrolled empirically into Category IV regi-
mens. 
5.8  Case-finding of patients with mono- and poly-drug 
resistance
Mono- and poly-drug resistant strains are strains that are resistant to antitu-
berculosis  drugs  but  not  to  both  isoniazid and  rifampicin.  Most  diagnos-
tic strategies used by DR-TB control programmes will also identify cases of 
mono- and poly-drug resistance, in addition to MDR-TB cases. Patients with 
mono- or poly-drug resistance may require modifications to their SCC regi-
mens or to be moved to Category IV regimens (see Chapter 8).
5.9  Use of rapid drug-resistance testing
Case-finding strategies can  be  greatly enhanced  with  rapid  drug-resistance 
testing, which significantly improves the ability to identify earlier cases of DR-
TB that can be isolated and started on treatment.
Rifampicin is the most potent antituberculosis drug of the first-line regi-
men,  and  rifampicin  resistance  most  commonly  occurs  with  concomitant 
isoniazid resistance. A positive rapid test for rifampicin resitance is a strong in-
dicator that a patient may have MDR-TB (11, 12), while a negative test makes 
a final diagnosis of MDR-TB highly unlikely. 
Figure  5.1  is a  suggested  algorithm  on  the use of  rapid  drug-sensitivity 
testing for identification and initial management of patients suspected of TB 
who are at increased risk of DR-TB. It is based upon the important consider-
ations outlined in this chapter regarding risk factors and case-finding strate-
gies and is applicable to situations of both high and low HIV prevalence. The 
algorithm relies on determining the risk of drug resistance and involves HIV 
testing of all TB suspects, sputum smear microscopy and results from rapid 
sensitivity testing for at least rifampicin. It also includes the indications for the 
use of empirical treatment regimens for DR-TB while awaiting more complete 
DST results. 
5. CASE-FINDING STRATEGIES
Process Images in Web Image Viewer | Online Tutorials
used document types are supported, including PDF, multi-page easy to process image and file pages with the deleting a thumbnail, and you can rearrange the file
how to move pages within a pdf document; moving pages in pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
page will teach you to rearrange and readjust amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to
how to reorder pages in pdf preview; how to rearrange pages in a pdf document
32
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
a Improving the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis among adults and adolescents: recommendations for HIV-prevalent and 
resource-constrained settings. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2007 (WHO/HTM/TB/2007.379; WHO/HIv/2007.01).
b Where rapid rifampicin testing is not available, the algorithm can be followed using liquid methods. 
c Because of the high and quick possibility of death with XDR-TB in HIv-infected individuals, liquid media and other validated rapid techniques for DST of first- and second-line 
drugs (H, R, km (or Amk), Cm and a fluoroquinolone) are recommended for HIv-infected individuals with risk factors for XDR-TB. 
d Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV Infection in Adults and Adolescents. 2006 revision WHO, Geneva, 2004
e Treatment of tuberculosis: guidelines for national programmes, 3rd ed. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.313).
Follow WHO guidelines for 
the diagnosis of smear 
anegative TB
Smear negative and highly 
likely to have DR-TB may 
require empirical Category 
Iv treatment. 
If culture positive, perform 
rapid resistance testing for 
rifampicin on the growth 
from the culture.
Figure 5.1 Algorithm for the use of rapid drug-resistance testing
PATIENT DETERMINED TO BE AT INCREASED RISk for DR-TB (see Table 5.1)
OR PATIENT LIvING WITH HIv
• Begin SCC treatment as per 
WHO guidelinese
• Perform DST to H, R, km (or Amk), Cm and 
a fluoroquinolonec
d• Determine if ART is indicated
• Treat according to Chapters 7, 8 and 10.
• Perform DST to H, R, km (or Amk), Cm and 
a fluoroquinolonec
• Treat according to Chapter 7 and 8.
• Perform first-line DST
• Begin SCC treatment as per WHO guidelinese
d• Determine if ART is indicated
• If DR-TB identified, treat according to Chapters 7, 8, and 10. 
HIv +
rapid rifampicin test +
HIv –
rapid rifampicin test +
HIv –
rapid rifampicin test –
HIv +
rapid rifampicin test –
• hIv test (or confirm result)
• Smear microscopy
SMEAR 
pOSITIvE
b• Rapid Resistance testing for rifampicin
Ensure infection control measures
SMEAR 
nEGATIvE
33
Administrative infection control measures including isolation should start 
as soon as a patient is identified as a TB suspect. Rapid testing can identify 
DR-TB quickly and allows patients to be taken off general TB wards where 
they may infect others with resistant strains. (See Chapter 15 for more infor-
mation about infection control and HIV.) 
5.10  Use of second-line DST in case-finding and  
diagnosing xDR-TB
Not all  DR-TB control programmes have the capacity to perform DST  of  
second-line drugs. These guidelines recommend that all programmes devel-
op the ability to do DST to isoniazid and rifampicin and, when proficient 
at those, to develop the ability to test the second-line injectable agents (kan-
5. CASE-FINDING STRATEGIES
BOx 5.1 COUnTRy ExAMpLES OF CASE-FInDInG STRATEGIES
Example  1. Country A has an MDR-TB prevalence  of 8%  in  new TB cases 
(patients who have received no or less than one month of antituberculosis 
therapy). The country has quality-assured DST laboratories for the first-line 
antituberculosis drugs. The national TB control programme has decided their 
programme has the capacity and resources to do DST in all new patients. 
Patients identified with resistance will enter Category Iv (options on how to 
design Category Iv regimens and whether to do further DST testing are dis-
cussed in Chapters 7 and 8). 
Example 2. Country B has an MDR-TB incidence of 3% in new cases, and there 
has been minimal use of second-line drugs for the treatment of TB. The coun-
try has a very high incidence of TB, exceeding 350 new cases per 100 000 
people per year. It has access to quality-assured DST laboratories for first-line 
drugs but not the capacity or resources to conduct DST for every TB case. The 
national TB control programme has decided to test all failures, relapses and 
returns after default for resistance to HRES. In addition it will apply a rapid 
rifampicin test to all patients living with HIv and follow the algorithm in Figure 
5.1. A standardized Category Iv regimen is designed for all patients with DR-
TB (options on how to design Category Iv regimens and whether to do further 
DST testing are discussed in Chapters 7 and 8).
Example 3. Country C has fairly good access to DST and resources to do test-
ing. Rates of MDR-TB in new cases without history of previous antituberculosis 
treatment are low at 1.2%. Country C chooses to do DST to H,R, E, S, km, Cm, 
and Ofx for any patient who remains sputum smear-positive after month 2 of 
SCC and for all HIv-infected patients at the start of SCC. When DST results 
return, regimens are adjusted if resistance is found. 
Example 4. Country D has high rates of HIv, TB, MDR-TB and XDR-TB. The 
country decides to quickly develop rapid molecular testing for rifampicin resis-
tance and rapid liquid testing for H, R, km, Cm and FQ. All patients with a posi-
tive smear get a rapid rifampicin test and all smear-negative TB suspects with 
HIv are worked-up with chest x-rays and culture. If culture is positive a rapid 
rifampicin test is performed. All positive rifampicin tests get DST to H, R, km, 
Cm and FQ. Treatment is according to Chapters 7, 8 and 10.
34
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
amycin, amikacin and capreomycin) and a fluoroquinolone. This will enable 
programmes to perform case-finding for XDR-TB and to assure proper treat-
ment. 
The two strongest risk factors for XDR-TB are:
(i)  Failure of an anti-TB regimen that contains second-line drugs including 
an injectable agent and a fluoroquinolone. 
(ii)  Close  contact  with  an  individual  with  documented  XDR-TB  or  with 
an individual for whom treatment with a regimen including second-line 
drugs is failing or has failed.
All suspects of XDR-TB should have DST of isoniazid and rifampicin, the 
second-line injectable  agents and a  fluoroquinolone. For people living with 
HIV who are at risk of XDR-TB, given the high and rapid risk of death with 
coinfection, liquid or other validated rapid techniques for DST of first- and 
second-line drugs is recommended. 
References
1.  Treatment of tuberculosis: guidelines for national programmes, 3rd ed. Ge-
neva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003.313). 
2.  Ait-Khaled N, Enarson DA. Tuberculosis: a manual for medical students. 
Geneva, World Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/99.272).
3.  Heldal E et al. Low failure rate in standardised retreatment of tuberculo-
sis in Nicaragua: patient category, drug resistance and survival of ‘chron-
ic’ patients. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2001, 
5(2):129–136.
4.  Saravia  JC  et  al.  Re-treatment  management  strategies  when  first-line  
tuberculosis therapy fails. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung 
Disease, 2005, 9(4):421–429.
5.  Harries AD et al. Management and outcome of tuberculosis patients who 
fail  treatment  under  routine  programme  conditions  in  Malawi.  Inter-
national  Journal  of  Tuberculosis  and  Lung  Disease,  2003,  7(11):1040–
1044.
6.  Quy HT et al. Drug resistance among failure and relapse cases of tubercu-
losis: is the standard re-treatment regimen adequate? Interational Journal 
of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2003, 7(7):631–636.
7.  Trébucq A et al. Prevalence of primary and acquired resistance of Myco-
bacterium tuberculosis to antituberculosis drugs in Benin after 12 years of 
short-course chemotherapy. International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung 
Disease, 1999, 3(6):466–470.
8.  Kritski AL et al. Retreatment tuberculosis cases. Factors associated with 
drug resistance and adverse outcomes. Chest, 1997, 111(5):1162–1167.
35
9.  Anti-tuberculosis  drug  resistance  in  the  world.  Fourth  global  report.  The 
WHO/IUATLD global project on anti-tuberculosis drug resistance surveil-
lance, 2002–2007. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2008 (WHO/
HTM/TB/2008.394).
10.  Improving the diagnosis and treatment of smear-negative pulmonary and ex-
trapulmonary tuberculosis among adults and adolescents: recommendations 
for HIV-prevalent and resource-constrained settings. Geneva, World Health  
Organization,  2007  (WHO/HTM/TB/2007.379,  WHO/HIV/2007. 
01).
11.  Skenders  G  et  al.  Multidrug-resistant  tuberculosis  detection,  Latvia. 
Emerging Infectious Diseases, 2005, 11(9):1461–1463. 
12. Abdel Aziz M et al. Epidemiology of antituberculosis drug resistance (the 
Global  Project  on  Anti-tuberculosis Drug Resistance  Surveillance):  an 
updated analysis. Lancet, 2006, 368(9553):2142–2154.
5. CASE-FINDING STRATEGIES
36
CHAPTER 6
Laboratory aspects
6.1  Background 
36
6.2  Chapter objectives 
37
6.3  General definitions for the laboratory and DST 
37
6.4  General considerations 
38
6.5  Essential laboratory services and structure 
38
6.6  Organization of the laboratory network 
39
6.7  Transport of infectious substances 
41
6.8  Microscopy, culture and identification of M. tuberculosis in  
DR-TB control programmes 
41
6.8.1  Microscopy 
41
6.8.2  Culture 
42
6.8.3  Identification of M. tuberculosis 
42
6.8.4  Drug susceptibility testing 
42
6.8.5  Limitations of DST 
44
6.9  Rational use of DST in DR-TB control programmes 
45
6.10  Time for testing and reporting: turnaround time 
46
6.11  Infection control and biosafety in the laboratory 
46
6.12  Quality control and quality assurance 
48
Table 6.1 
Functions and responsibilities of the different levels  
of laboratory services 
40
Figure 6.1 
Systematic approach to implementation of DST under  
routine programmatic conditions 
47
6.1  Background
A definitive diagnosis of DR-TB requires that M. tuberculosis be isolated on 
culture, identified and DST completed. Major challenges remain around the 
capacity of laboratories to meet the demand for scaling-up DR-TB treatment 
programmes within the context of routine TB control. Laboratory constraints 
relate  to  infrastructure, equipment,  quality assurance and biosafety. Com-
pounded  by an urgent  need  for reliable and  reproducible methodologies –  
especially for second-line DST – rational use of culture and DST in treatment 
programmes is therefore imperative. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested