c# pdf viewer component : Reorder pages in pdf reader control application system web page azure wpf console who_htm_tb_2008_4027-part1123

47
6. LABORATORy ASPECTS
Figure 6.1  Systematic approach to implementation of DST under routine  
programmatic conditions (1)
Step 1: 
High proficiency in DST of isoniazid and rifampicin
isoniazid 
should first be established as DST of these drugs
rifampicin 
is the most reliable and reproducible. As a 
minimum performance indicator, proficiency 
testing should correctly identify resistance to 
isoniazid and rifampicin in more than 90% in two 
out of three recent rounds of proficiency testing.
Step 2:  
Steps 1 and 2 may be merged if indicated by
ethambutol 
epidemiological considerations and/or treatment
streptomycin 
modalities (e.g. standardized or individualized
pyrazinamide 
MDR-TB regimens still involving fist-line drugs) 
and if resources allow extended DST capacity.
Step 3:  
Steps 1 and 3 may be merged in settings where
amikacin, kanamycin,  
XDR is a concern in order to rapidly allow the
capreomycin 
identification of XDR-TB patients.
ofloxacina 
(or fluoroquinolone of  
Given the variability in cross-resistance
choice in treatment  
reported for the aminoglycosides and
strategy) 
polypeptides, it is recommended that all
aminoglycosides (including streptomycin) as well 
as capreomycin be tested for resistance where 
possible.
Selection of the most appropriate fluoroquinolone 
for use is based on treatment strategy.a 
a Strains should be tested for resistance to the fluoroquinolone(s) used in a programme’s treat-
ment strategy. Because cross-resistance is not complete between older-generation and newer-
generation fluoroquinolones. it cannot be assumed that resistance to one confers resistance to 
all fluoroquinolones. 
Health and medical surveillance of laboratory personnel involved in my-
cobacteriological culture and DST are strongly recommended. Surveillance 
should include a detailed medical history, targeted baseline health assessment, 
monitoring of respiratory signs and symptoms, and a proactive plan for appro-
priate medical investigations when indicated. 
Laboratory workers who choose to disclose that they are living with HIV, 
should be offered safer work responsibilities and should be discouraged from 
working with DR-TB specimens. Pregnant women should be reassigned until 
after childbirth and lactation. 
Routine BCG vaccination is not recommended as a means of preventing 
DR-TB in laboratory workers. The use of infection control measures is dis-
cussed in more detail in Chapter 15.
Reorder pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pdf pages online; how to rearrange pages in pdf using reader
Reorder pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
move pages in pdf file; how to rearrange pdf pages online
48
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
6.12  Quality control and quality assurance
A diagnosis of DR-TB has profound implications for the individual patient; 
therefore, accuracy of the laboratory diagnosis is crucial, and a comprehensive 
laboratory quality assurance programme must be in place to ensure the accu-
racy, reliability and reproducibility of DST results. Quality control or qual-
ity assurance procedures should be performed regularly as an integral part of 
laboratory operations. 
Procedures for quality assurance of microscopy, culture and DST are de-
scribed in detail in laboratory manuals and technical documents. 
Central  reference  laboratories  involved  in  DR-TB  control  programmes 
should establish formal links with one of the laboratories in the SRL network 
to help ensure the quality of laboratory services and the validation of DST 
results. The SRL network consists – at the time of press – of 26 laboratories, 
including a global coordinating centre in Belgium. 
The SRL network ensures DST standards by a system of external quality 
assurance that should preferably be established before the implementation of 
DR-TB control programmes. As a minimum, external quality assurance with 
an SRL should comprise: 
 an initial assessment visit;
 proficiency testing with an adequate number of coded isolates;
 periodic rechecking of isolates obtained within the DR-TB control pro-
gramme.
Proficiency testing by the SRL involves regular distribution to national TB ref-
erence laboratories of panels of coded M. tuberculosis strains with predefined 
drug resistance profiles. The test results by the reference laboratory are com-
pared with the coded SRL results in blinded fashion and specific performance 
indicators (sensitivity, specificity, reproducibility) calculated for each drug and 
for the reference laboratory as a whole. 
As a minimum performance indicator, proficiency testing should correctly 
identify resistance to isoniazid and rifampicin in more than 90% in two out 
of three recent rounds of panels.
The SRL network is in agreement that panels for second-line proficiency 
testing should not include XDR strains of M. tuberculosis; rather, panels with 
different permutations of mono-resistance to second-line drugs are currently 
being developed, which will be compiled to allow reliable assessment of the 
overall capability of national reference laboratories to identify XDR-TB. Pan-
els including isolates with second-line drug resistance will be made available 
through the SRL network in 2008. 
References
1.  Drug susceptibility testing of second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs: WHO policy 
guidance. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2008 [in press].
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
how to move pages in a pdf; how to move pages in pdf files
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
pdf reorder pages online; pdf reorder pages
49
2.  Guidelines for surveillance of drug resistance in tuberculosis. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 2003 (WHO/CDS/TB/2003/320; WHO/CDS/
CSR/RMD/2003.3).
3.  Laboratory services in tuberculosis control. Parts I, II and III. Geneva, World 
Health Organization, 1998 (WHO/TB/98.258).
4.  The public health service national tuberculosis reference laboratory and the 
national laboratory network: minimum requirements, roles, and operation in 
low-income countries. Paris, International Union Against Tuberculosis and 
Lung Disease, 1998.
5.  http://www.who.int/tb/dots/laboratory/policy/en/index3.html
6.  Joshi R et al. Tuberculosis among health-care workers in low- and mid-
dle-income countries: a systematic review. PLoS Med, 2006, December 
3(12):e494.
7.  Laboratory biosafety manual, 3rd ed. Geneva, World Health Organization, 
2004 (WHO/CDS/CSR/LYO/2004.11). 
8.  Recommendations on the transport of  dangerous  goods: model  regulations, 
12th rev. ed. New York, United Nations, 2002 (ST/SG/AC.10/1/Re.12). 
9.  Infectious substances  shipping  guidelines, 3rd ed.  Montreal,  International 
Air Transport Association, 2002.
10.  International standards for tuberculosis care. The Hague, Tuberculosis Co-
alition for Technical Assistance, 2006 (available at http://www.who.int/
tb/publications/2006/istc_report.pdf; accessed May 2008).
11.  World Health Assembly (WHA) Resolution EB120.R3. Geneva: 2007
12. Zhao BY et al. Fluoroquinolone action against clinical isolates of Mycobac-
terium tuberculosis: effects of a C-8 methoxyl group on survival in liquid 
media and in human macrophages. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemother-
apy, 1999, 43(3):661–666.
13.  Dong Y et al. Fluoroquinolone action against mycobacteria: effects of C-8 
substituents on growth, survival, and resistance. Antimicrobial Agents and 
Chemotherapy, 1998, 42(11):2978–2984.
14.  Lounis  N  et  al.  Which  aminoglycoside  or  fluoroquinolone  is  more  
active  against  Mycobacterium tuberculosis in  mice?  Antimicrobial  Agents 
and Chemotherapy, 1997, 41(3):607–610.
15.  Alvirez-Freites  EL,  Carter  JL,  Cynamon  MH.  In  vitro  and  in  vivo  
activities of gatifloxacin against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antimicro-
bial Agents and Chemotherapy, 2002, 46:1022–1025. 
16.  Somasundaram  S,  Paramasivan  NC.  Susceptibility  of  Mycobacterium  
tuberculosis strains to gatifloxacin and moxifloxacin by different meth-
ods. Chemotherapy, 2002, 46:1022–1025.
17.  Yew WW et al. Comparative roles of levofloxacin and ofloxacin in the 
treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: preliminary results of a ret-
rospective study from Hong Kong. Chest, 2003, 124(4):1476–1481.
6. LABORATORy ASPECTS
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print Document Viewer, make sure that you have install RasterEdge PDF Reader Add-on
reorder pdf pages reader; move pdf pages in preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
pdf rearrange pages online; move pages in pdf document
50
CHAPTER 7
Treatment strategies  
for MDR-TB and xDR-TB
7.1  Chapter objectives 
51
7.2  Essential assessments before designing a treatment strategy 
51
7.3  Definitions of terms used to describe treatment strategies 
52
7.4  Classes of antituberculosis drugs 
52
7.5  Standard code for antituberculosis treatment regimens 
56
7.6  Role of drug susceptibility testing 
56
7.7  Designing a treatment regimen 
58
7.7.1  General principles 
58
7.7.2  Dosing of drugs 
59
7.7.3  Dose escalation (drug ramping) 
59
7.8  Designing a programme treatment strategy 
59
7.9  Completion of the injectable agent (intensive phase) 
65
7.10  Duration of treatment 
67
7.11  Extrapulmonary DR-TB 
67
7.12  Surgery in Category Iv treatment 
67
7.13  Adjuvant therapies in DR-TB treatment 
68
7.13.1  Nutritional support 
68
7.13.2  Corticosteroids 
68
7.14  Treatment of XDR-TB 
69
7.15  Conclusion 
69
Table 7.1 
Alternative method of grouping antituberculosis agents 
54
Table 7.2 
Recommended strategies for different programme situations  61
Table 7.3 
Summary of the general principles for designing treatment  
regimens 
70
Figure 7.1 
Common treatment strategies for DR-TB 
53
Figure 7.2 
How to build a treatment regimen for MDR-TB 
60
Figure 7.3 
Management guidelines for patients with documented,  
or almost certain, XDR-TB 
69
Box 7.1 
known cross-resistance between antituberculosis agents  
56
Box 7.2 
Examples of standard drug code used to describe drug  
regimens 
57
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to move pages around in pdf file; how to reorder pages in a pdf document
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
how to reorder pages in pdf file; reorder pdf page
51
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
Box 7.3 
Examples of how to design standardized regimens 
64
Box 7.4 
Examples of how to design an individualized regimen 
66
Box 7.5 
Example of XDR-TB treatment 
70
7.1  Chapter objectives
Any  patient  with  chronic or DR-TB requiring  treatment  with second-line 
drugs falls under WHO diagnostic category IV and will require specialized 
regimens (termed “Category IV regimens” in these guidelines). This chapter 
provides guidance on the strategy options, including standardized, empirical 
and individualized approaches, to treat MDR-TB as well as the more highly 
resistant strains such as XDR-TB. In the absence of large-scale randomized 
clinical trials, these  recommendations  are largely based on  expert  opinion 
and results of cohort and case series analyses. For a complete description and 
weight-based dosing of drugs used in these guidelines, see Annexes 1 and 2. 
Key recommendations (* indicates updated recommendation)
 Design treatment regimens with a consistent approach based on the hier-
archy of the five groups of antituberculosis drugs;
 Promptly diagnose DR-TB and initiate appropriate therapy;
 Use at least four drugs with either certain, or almost certain, effective-
ness;
 DST should generally be used to guide therapy; however do not depend on 
DST in individual regimen design for ethambutol, pyrazinamide, and Group 
4 and 5 drugs;
 Do not use ciprofloxacin as an antituberculosis agent;*
 Design a programme strategy that takes into consideration access to high-
quality DST, rates of DR-TB, HIv prevalence, technical capacity and finan-
cial resources (Table 7.2);
 Treat for 18 months past culture conversion;
 Use adjunctive measures appropriately, including surgery and nutritional 
and social support;
 Aggressively treat XDR-TB whenever possible;
 Treat adverse effects immediately and adequately.
7.2  Essential assessments before designing a  
treatment strategy
Programmes should design a treatment strategy when both the DRS data and 
the frequency of use of antituberculosis drugs in the country have been as-
sessed. Programmes that plan to introduce a treatment strategy for DR-TB 
should  be familiar  with  the  prevalence  of  drug  resistance  in  new  patients 
as well as in different groups of re-treatment cases (failures, relapse, return  
after default, and chronic cases). It is essential to determine which, and with 
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
how to rearrange pages in pdf document; rearrange pdf pages online
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
how to move pages in pdf converter professional; pdf change page order acrobat
52
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
what frequency, second-line antituberculosis drugs have been used in the area 
served by the DR-TB control programme. Some second-line antituberculosis 
drugs may have been used only rarely and will likely be effective in DR-TB 
regimens, while others may have been used extensively and therefore have a 
high probability of ineffectiveness in patients with resistant strains. 
It is recognized that some programmes may have to design strategies based 
on limited data, as treatment for many patients cannot wait until the full as-
sessment information has been obtained. In these cases, the programme can 
still follow the basic principles put forth in this chapter on how to design an 
effective regimen and continue  to collect the information described in this 
section. 
7.3  Definitions of terms used to describe treatment strategies
The following are definitions of terms often used to describe treatment strat-
egies:
 Standardized treatment. DRS data from representative patient popula-
tions are used to base regimen design in the absence of individual DST. All 
patients in a defined group or category receive the same regimen. Suspected 
MDR-TB should be confirmed by DST whenever possible. 
 Empirical treatment. Each regimen is individually designed based on the 
patient’s previous history of antituberculosis treatment and with considera-
tion of DRS data from the representative patient population. Commonly, 
an empirical regimen is adjusted when DST results on the individual pa-
tient become available.
 Individualized treatment. Each regimen is designed based on the patient’s 
previous history of antituberculosis treatment and individual DST results. 
Combinations of these treatment  strategies  are often  used  as  illustrated in  
Figure 7.1. These strategies are discussed in more detail in section 7.8, which 
addresses using these strategies under programmatic conditions. 
7.4  Classes of antituberculosis drugs 
The classes of antituberculosis drugs have traditionally been divided into first- 
and second-line drugs, with isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol 
and streptomycin being the primary first-line drugs. These guidelines often 
refer to this classification but also use a group system based on efficacy, experi-
ence of use and drug class. These groups are referred to in the following sec-
tions and are very useful for the design of treatment regimens. The different 
groups are shown in Table 7.1. Not all drugs in the same group have the same 
efficacy  or safety. For  more  information, see the  individual descriptions  of 
each group in this section and the drug information sheets provided for each 
individual drug in Annex 1.
53
Group 1. Group 1 drugs, the most potent and best tolerated, should be used 
if there is good laboratory evidence and clinical history to suggest that a drug 
from this group is effective. If a Group 1 drug was used in a previous regimen 
that failed, its efficacy should be questioned even if the DST result suggests 
susceptibility. For patients with strains resistant to low concentrations of iso-
niazid but susceptible to higher concentrations, the use of high-dose isoniazid 
may have some benefit (when isoniazid is used in this manner it is considered a 
Group 5 drug; see below). The newer-generation rifamycins, such as rifabutin, 
have very high cross-resistance to rifampicin. 
Group 2. All patients should receive a Group 2 injectable agent if susceptibil-
ity is documented or suspected. These guidelines suggest the use of kanamy-
cin or amikacin as the first choice of an injectable agent, given the high rates of 
streptomycin resistance in DR-TB patients. In addition, both these agents are 
low cost, have less otoxicity than streptomycin and have been used extensively 
for the treatment of DR-TB throughout the world. Amikacin and kanamycin 
are considered to be very similar and have a high frequency of cross-resistance. 
If an isolate is resistant to both streptomycin and kanamycin, or if DRS data 
show high rates of resistance to amikacin and kanamycin, then capreomycin 
should be used. 
Group 3. All patients should receive a Group 3 medication if the strain is 
susceptible  or  if the  agent  is thought  to  have efficacy. Ciprofloxacin is no 
longer recommended to treat drug-susceptible or drug-resistant TB (1). Cur-
rently, the most potent available fluoroquinolones in descending order based 
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
Figure 7.1  Common treatment strategies for DR-TB
Representative DRS data in well-defined 
patient populations are used to design the 
regimen. All patients in a patient group or 
category receive the same regimen.
Initially, all patients in a certain group 
receive the same regimen based on 
DST survey data from representative 
populations. The regimen is adjusted 
when DST results become available (often 
DST is only done to a limited number of 
drugs).
Each regimen is individually designed 
on the basis of patient history and then 
adjusted when DST results become 
available (often the DST is done of both 
first- and second-line drugs)
standardized 
treatment 
standardized 
treatment followed 
by individualized 
treatment
empirical treatment 
followed by 
individualized 
treatment
54
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
on in vitro activity and animal studies are: moxifloxacin = gatifloxacin > lev-
ofloxacin  > ofloxacin (2, 3). While ofloxacin is commonly used because  of 
relatively lower cost, the later-generation fluoroquinolones, moxifloxacin and 
levofloxacin, are more effective and have similar adverse effect profiles (1, 4). 
Furthermore, the later-generation fluoroquinolones may have  some efficacy 
against ofloxacin-resistant strains (5).  Although  similar to  moxifloxacin in 
its efficacy against TB, gatifloxacin is associated with serious cases of hypo-
glycaemia, hyperglycaemia and new-onset diabetes. If gatifloxacin is used, it 
should undergo close monitoring and follow-up; gatifloxacin has been removed 
from the markets of many countries. For this reason, it has not been placed in 
the tables throughout this guideline. While levofloxacin or moxifloxacin are 
considered to be more effective against M. tuberculosis than ofloxacin, based 
on animal and EBA data, levofloxacin is, for the time being, the fluoroqui-
nolone of choice until more data confirm the long-term safety of moxifloxacin.
In resource-constrained areas, ofloxacin is an acceptable choice for ofloxacin-
susceptible DR-TB. Gatifloxacin should only be used when there is no other 
option of a later-generation fluoroquinolone and where close follow up can be 
assured. A later-generation fluoroquinolone is recommended for treatment of 
XDR-TB (see section 7.14), although there is inadequate evidence on whether 
this is an effective strategy. Because the data on long-term use of fluoroqui-
nolones are limited, vigilance in monitoring is recommended for all fluoroqui-
nolones (see Chapter 11). 
Group 4. Group 4 medications are added based on estimated susceptibility, 
drug history, efficacy, side-effect profile and cost. Ethionamide or protioma-
mide is often added because of low cost; however, these drugs do have some 
TABLE 7.1  Alternative method of grouping antituberculosis agents 
GroupinG 
DruGs
Group 1 – First-line oral agents 
isoniazid (H); rifampicin (R); ethambutol (E);  
pyrazinamide (Z); rifabutin (Rfb)
a
Group 2 – Injectable agents 
kanamycin (km); amikacin (Am);  
capreomycin (Cm); streptomycin (S) 
Group 3 
moxifloxacin (Mfx); levofloxacin (Lfx);   
Fluoroquinolones 
ofloxacin (Ofx)
Group 4 – Oral bacteriostatic  
ethionamide (Eto); protionamide (Pto);  
second-line agents  
cycloserine (Cs); terizidone (Trd); p-aminosalicylic  
acid (PAS)
Group 5 – Agents with unclear 
clofazimine (Cfz); linezolid (Lzd); amoxicillin/ 
efficacy (not recom mended by 
clavulanate (Amx/Clv); thioacetazone (Thz); 
WHO for routine use in MDR-TB  
imipenem/cilastatin (Ipm/Cln); high-dose 
patients) 
isoniazid (high-dose H);b clarithromycin (Clr)
a Rifabutin is not on the WHO List of Essential Medicines. It has been added here as it is used rou-
tinely in patients on protease inhibitors in many settings. 
b High-dose H is defined as 16–20 mg/kg/day.
55
cross-resistance with isoniazid. If cost is not a constraint, PAS may be added 
first, given that the enteric-coated formulas are relatively well tolerated and it 
shares no cross-resistance to other agents. When two agents are needed, cyclo-
serine is used often in conjunction with ethionamide or protionamide or PAS. 
Since the combination of ethionamide or protionamide and PAS often causes 
a high incidence of gastrointestinal adverse effects and hypothyroidism, these 
agents are usually used together only when three Group 4 agents are needed: 
ethionamide or protionamide, cycloserine and PAS. Terizidone contains two 
molecules of cycloserine. Terizidone is being used in some countries instead of 
cycloserine and is assumed tto be as efficacious; however, there are no direct 
studies comparing the two drugs, and terizidone is therefore not yet recom-
mended by WHO. The approach of slowly escalating drug dosage is referred 
to as “drug ramping”. The drugs in Group 4 may be started at a low dose and 
escalated over two weeks (for more on drug ramping, see section 7.7.3).
Group  5. Group 5 drugs are not recommended by WHO for routine use 
in DR-TB treatment because their contribution to the efficacy of multidrug 
regimens is unclear. Although they have demonstrated some activity in vitro 
or in animal models, there is little or no evidence of their efficacy in humans 
for the treatment of DR-TB. Most of these drugs are expensive, and in some 
cases require intravenous administration. However, they can be used in cases 
where adequate regimens are impossible to design with the medicines from 
Groups 1–4. They should be used in consultation with an expert in the treat-
ment of DR-TB. If a situation requires the use of Group 5 drugs, these guide-
lines recommend using at least two drugs from the group, given the limited 
knowledge of efficacy. While thioacetazone is a drug with known efficacy 
against TB, it is placed in Group 5 because its role in DR-TB treatment is not 
well established. Thioacetazone has cross-resistance with some of the other 
antituberculosis agents  (see Table  7.3)  and  overall is a weak bacteriostatic 
drug. Thioacetazone is not recommended in  HIV-positive individuals  (6) 
given the serious risk of adverse reaction that can result in Stevens-Johnson 
syndrome and death. People of Asian descent also have a higher incidence of 
Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Many experts feel that high-dose isoniazid can 
still be used in the presence of resistance to low concentrations of isoniazid 
(>1% of bacilli resistant to 0.2 µg/ml but susceptible to 1 µg/ml of isoniazid), 
whereas isoniazid is not recommended for high-dose resistance (>1% of ba-
cilli resistant to 1 µg/ml of isoniazid) (7). One study from a low-resource set-
ting where a standardized regimen is used (and DST of isoniazid at different 
concentrations is not available) suggests that routine inclusion of high-dose 
isoniazid (16–20 mg/kg/day) could improve outcomes (8).
There is well-known cross-resistance between some of the antibiotics used in 
treating TB. Cross-resistance between specific antituberculosis agents is sum-
marized in Box 7.1.
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
56
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
7.5  Standard code for antituberculosis treatment regimens
There is a standard code for writing out antituberculosis regimens. Each drug 
has an abbreviation (shown in Table 7.1 and in the list of abbreviations at the 
front of these guidelines). A DR-TB regimen consists of two phases: the first 
phase is the period in which the injectable agent is used and the second phase 
is after it has been stopped. The number shown before each phase stands for 
phase duration in months and  is the minimum amount of time that  stage 
should last. The number in subscript (e.g., 
3
) after a letter is the number of 
drug doses per week. If there is no number in subscript, treatment is daily. 
An alternative drug(s) appears as a letter(s) in parentheses. The drugs in the 
higher groups are written first followed by the others in descending order of 
potency. Examples are given in Box 7.2.
BOx 7.1  KnOwn CROSS-RESISTAnCE BETwEEn AnTITUBERCULOSIS AGEnTS
 All rifamycins have high levels of cross-resistance (9–12). Fluoroquinolones 
are believed to have variable cross-resistance between each other, with in 
vitro data showing that some later-generation fluoroquinolones remain sus-
ceptible when earlier-generation fluoroquinolones are resistant (13–15). In 
these cases, it is unknown if thelater-generation fluoroquinolones remain 
effective clinically.
 Amikacin and kanamycin have very high cross-resistance (16, 17). Capre-
omycin and viomycin have high cross-resistance (18). Other aminoglyco-
sides and polypeptides have low cross-resistance (19–24). Protionamide 
and  ethionamide  have  100%  cross-resistance.  Ethionamide  can  have 
cross-resistance to isoniazid if the inhA mutation is present (25–29). Thio-
acetazone cross-resistance to isoniazid, ethionamide and PAS has been 
reported but is generally considered to be low (30–34).
7.6  Role of drug susceptibility testing 
Countries vary greatly in their access to reliable mycobacterial laboratories, 
and many do not have regular access to DST. The inability to do routine DST 
in all patients should not be a barrier for patients that need Category IV treat-
ment. Fully standardized regimens using second-line antituberculosis drugs 
have been shown to be feasible and cost-effective in DR-TB treatment (35).
In countries where reliable DST  is not  available,  every effort should  be 
made to improve laboratory capacity, for the following reasons: 
 DST surveys are needed to identify groups of patients that are at high risk 
for DR-TB. General nationwide surveys may not reflect DST patterns of 
specific groups of patients. For example, the DST patterns of all previously 
treated patients may be very different from those that failed SCC. 
 Even in the setting of a strong DOTS programme, some patients in 
high-risk groups (e.g.  Category II failures) will not  have DR-TB. These 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested