c# pdf viewer component : Moving pages in pdf Library SDK class asp.net .net web page ajax who_htm_tb_2008_4028-part1124

57
guidelines  strongly  recommend  confirming  treatment  failure by  culture 
and testing for DR-TB through the use of DST of at least isoniazid and  
rifampicin. 
 In the era of HIV and rapid spread of highly resistant (e.g. XDR) strains, 
a detailed history of previous tuberculosis treatment may not adequately 
predict the resistance pattern of the infecting strain, as many patients with 
DR-TB may have been infected originally with a resistant strain (36). 
Even in countries where reliable DST is available, standardized regimens may 
be chosen as a  strategy  over individualized  regimens for  the following rea-
sons: 
 Interpretation of DST to some of the first- and second-line drugs is difficult 
and could mislead regimen design. Standardized regimens can give guid-
ance to clinicians and prevent basing decisions on DST that is not reliable. 
These guidelines do not recommend using DST of ethambutol, pyrazina-
mide and the drugs in Groups 4 and 5 to base individual regimen design. 
 Turnaround time for many culture-based DST methods is long. In general, 
patients at increased risk for DR-TB should be placed on an empirical Cat-
egory IV regimen until DST results are available. 
 The laboratory may not perform DST of certain drugs, or may perform 
them at different times. Results from rapid methods (molecular) may be 
available within days, but only for  certain first-line drugs such as isoni-
azid and rifampicin. Many laboratories perform second-line DST only after  
resistance to first-line drugs is confirmed.
In summary, regular access to quality-assured DST is recommended for all 
programmes, even those using a standardized regimen. Delays in treatment 
while awaiting DST can result in increased morbidity and mortality, as well as 
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
BOx 7.2  ExAMpLES OF STAnDARD DRUG CODE USED TO DESCRIBE 
DRUG REGIMEnS
Example 7.1
6Z-Km(Cm)-Ofx-Eto-Cs/12Z-Ofx-Eto-Cs
The initial phase consists of five drugs and lasts for at least six months or six 
months past conversion, depending on country protocol. In this example, the 
phase without the injectable continues all the oral agents for a minimum of 
12 months, for a total minimum treatment of at least 18 months. The inject-
able is kanamycin, but there is an option for capreomycin. Sometimes only 
the initial treatment is written and the assumption is that either the regimen 
will be adjusted with DST or the injectable will be stopped according to the 
programme protocol. This type of notation is used without a coefficient, i.e. 
Z-KM-Ofx-Eto-Cs
Moving pages in pdf - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
pdf reverse page order preview; reorder pages pdf
Moving pages in pdf - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
how to reverse page order in pdf; rearrange pages in pdf
58
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
longer periods of infectiousness. DST to many of the second-line drugs should 
not be relied upon for individual regimen design (also see Chapter 6 for more 
discussion on DST). 
7.7  Designing a treatment regimen
This  section  describes  the  methods  for  designing  a  treatment  regimen.  It  
applies to standardized, empirical and individualized regimens.
7.7.1  General principles
The following are the basic principles involved in any regimen design: 
 Regimens should be based on the history of drugs taken by the patient.
 Drugs commonly used in the country and prevalence of resistance to first-
line and second-line drugs should be taken into consideration when design-
ing a regimen.
 Regimens should consist of at least four drugs with either certain, or almost 
certain, effectiveness. If the evidence about the effectiveness of a certain 
drug is unclear, the drug can be part of the regimen but it should not be 
depended upon for success. Often, more than four drugs may be started if 
the susceptibility pattern is unknown, effectiveness is questionable for an 
agent(s) or if extensive, bilateral pulmonary disease is present. 
 When possible, pyrazinamide, ethambutol and fluoroquinolones should be 
given once per day as the high peaks attained in once-a-day dosing may 
be more efficacious. Once-a-day dosing is permitted for other second-line 
drugs depending on patient tolerance, however ethionamide/protionamide, 
cycloserine and PAS have traditionally been given in split doses during the 
day to reduce adverse effects. 
 The drug dosage should be determined by body weight. A suggested weight-
based dosing scheme is shown in Annex 2.
 Treatment of adverse drug effects should be immediate and adequate in  
order to minimize the risk of treatment interruptions and prevent increased 
morbidity and mortality due to serious adverse effects (see Chapter 11). 
 An injectable agent (an aminoglycoside or capreomycin) is used for a mini-
mum of six months and at least four months past culture conversion (see 
Section 7.9 on duration of injectable use).
 The minimum length of treatment is 18 months after culture conversion 
(see Section 7.10 on duration of treatment).
 Each dose is given as directly observed therapy (DOT) throughout the 
treatment. A treatment card is marked for each observed dose.
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
In the following part, you will see a complete C# programming sample for moving the position of Tiff document pages. DLLs: Sort TIFF File Pages Order Using C#.
reorder pages in pdf preview; how to move pages in a pdf file
C#: How to Edit XDoc.HTML5 Viewer Toolbar Commands
That is to say, if you are in need of moving a tab in front of another one, you may directly use _viewerTopToolbar var _userCmdDemoPdf = new UserCommand("pdf");
how to rearrange pdf pages reader; switch page order pdf
59
 DST of drugs with high reproducibility and reliability (and from a depend-
able laboratory) should be used to guide therapy. It should be noted that 
the reliability and clinical value of DST of some first-line and most of the 
second-line antituberculosis drugs have not been determined (see Section 
7.6 and Chapter 6). DST does not predict with 100% certainty the effec-
tiveness or ineffectiveness of a drug (37). DST of drugs such as ethambutol, 
streptomycin and Group 4 and 5 drugs does not have high reproducibility 
and reliability; these guidelines strongly caution against basing individual 
regimens on DST of these drugs. 
 Pyrazinamide can be used for the entire treatment if it is judged to be effec-
tive. Many DR-TB patients have chronically inflamed lungs, which theo-
retically produce the acidic environment in which pyrazinamide is active. 
Alternatively, in patients doing well, pyrazinamide can be stopped with the 
injectable phase if the patient can continue with at least three certain, or 
almost certain, effective drugs.
 Early DR-TB detection and prompt initiation of treatment are important 
factors in determining successful outcomes.
Figure 7.2 describes the steps for building a regimen for DR-TB treatment. 
7.7.2  Dosing of drugs
Dosing of anti-tuberculosis drugs is based on the weight of the patient. Dos-
ing is described in Annexes 1 and 2. Dosing for pediatric patients is described 
in Chapter 9. 
7.7.3  Dose escalation (drug ramping)
Most drugs should be started at full dose,  except cycloserine, ethionamide 
and PAS, in which case the dose of the drug can be increased over a two-week 
period (38). 
7.8  Designing a programme treatment strategy
Treatment strategies for programmes may vary depending on access to DST, 
rates of DR-TB, HIV prevalence (see Chapter 10), technical capacity and fi-
nancial resources. Despite the variability, there are uniform recommendations 
for programme treatment strategies that the GLC has developed. Table 7.2 is 
a treatment strategy guide for programmes. It is based on different situations 
in resource-constrained areas with limited access to DST and what strategy 
the GLC has generally recommended in that situation. The table attempts to 
cover most situations; however, the NTP may need to adjust the strategy to 
meet special circumstances. It assumes that DST of isoniazid, rifampicin, the 
fluoroquinolones  and the injectable  agents is  fairly  reliable. It  also  assumes 
DST of other agents is less reliable and that basing individualized treatments 
on DST of these agents should be avoided. 
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
VB.NET Image: Add Callout Annotation on Document and Image in VB.
annotations on multiple document and image formats, such as PDF, Word, TIFF Support easily moving or resizing generated callout annotation using VB.NET code;
how to move pages in pdf; how to rearrange pdf pages
C#: Online Guide for Text Extraction from Tiff Using OCR SDK
Scan image and output OCR result to PDF document. Scan image and output OCR result to Word document. Before moving onto using C# demo codes below, please firstly
move pages in a pdf; how to reorder pdf pages in
60
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
Figure 7.2  how to build a treatment regimen for MDR-TB
a
a Adapted from Drug-resistant tuberculosis: a survival guide for clinicians. San Francisco, Francis J. 
Curry National Tuberculosis Center and California Department of Health Services, 2004.
b Thioacetazone is contraindicated in HIv-infected individuals given the serious risk of life-threaten-
ing adverse reaction.
STEP 1
Use any available
Group 1: First-line oral  
agents
pyrazinamide
ethambutol
STEP 2
Plus one of these
Group 2: Injectable 
agents
kanamycin (or amikacin)
capreomycin
streptomycin
STEP 3
Plus one of these
Group 3: Fluoroquinolones
levofloxacin
moxifloxacin
ofloxacin
STEP 4
Pick one or more of
Group 4: Second-line oral  
bacteriostatic agents
p-aminosalicylic acid
cycloserine (or terizadone)
ethionamide (or  
protionamide)
STEP 5
Consider use of these
Group 5: Drugs of unclear  
role in DR-TB treatment
clofazimine
linezolid
amoxacillin/clavulanate
thioacetazoneb
imipenem/cilastatin
high-dose isoniazid
clarithromycin
Begin with any first-line agents that 
have certain, or almost certain, ef-
ficacy. If a first-line agent has a high 
likelihood of resistance, do not use it. 
(For example, most Category Iv regi-
mens used in treatment failures of 
Category II do not include ethambu-
tol because it is likely to be resistant 
based on treatment history.) 
Add an injectable agent based on 
DST and treatment history. Avoid 
streptomycin, even if DST suggests 
susceptibility, because of high rates 
of resistance with DR-TB strains and 
higher incidence of ototoxicity. 
Add a fluoroquinolone based on DST 
and treatment history. In cases where 
resistance to ofloxacin or XDR-TB is 
suspected, use a higher-generation 
fluoroquinolone, but do not rely upon 
it as one of the four core drugs.
Add Group 4 drugs until you have at 
least four drugs likely to be effective. 
Base choice on treatment history, 
adverse effect profile and cost. DST 
is not standardized for the drugs in 
this group. 
Consider adding Group 5 drugs in 
consultation with an MDR-TB expert if 
there are not four drugs that are likely 
to be effective from Groups 1–4. If 
drugs are needed from this group, it 
is recommended to add at least two. 
DST is not standardized for the drugs 
in this group. 
C# Image: Create C#.NET Windows Document Image Viewer | Online
or image type, please see these pages respectively: C# multiple document & image formats (PDF, MS Word Resizing, burning, deleting and moving are all built in.
rearrange pages in pdf online; rearrange pdf pages in preview
VB.NET Image: Draw Linear RM4SCC Barcode on Document Image Using
item) rePage.MergeItemsToPage() REFile.SaveDocumentFile(doc, "c:/rm4scc.pdf", New PDFEncoder certain API, you can read detailed illustration by moving the mouse
change page order pdf; rearrange pages in pdf file
61
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
TABLE 7.2  Recommended strategies for different programmatic situations
pAtient Group 
bAcKGrounD  
recommenDeD strAteGyb 
susceptibility DAtAa 
new patient with   Resistance uncommon 
 Start Category I treatment
active TB 
to moderately common 
 Perform DST of at least H and R in
(i.e. a country where a 
patients not responsive to Category Ic
low to moderate rate of  
 Rapid DST techniques are preferable
new cases have MDR-TB) 
Resistance common  
 Perform DST of H and R in all patients
(i.e. a country where a  
before treatment starts
high rate of new cases  
 Rapid DST techniques are preferable
have MDR-TB) 
 Start Category I treatment while 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen to a Category Iv 
regimen if DST reveals DR-TB 
patient in whom   Low percentage of 
 Perform DST of H and R at a minimum
Category I failed  failures of Category I  
in all patients before treatment starts
have MDR-TB  
 Rapid DST is preferable
Second-line drug  
 Start Category II treatment while
resistance is rare 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen to a Category Iv 
regimen if DST reveals DR-TB
High percentage of  
 Perform DST of isoniazid and rifampicin
failures of Category I  
at a minimum in all patients before
have MDR-TB  
treatment starts
Second-line drug  
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ- two
resistance is rare 
Group 4 agents- +/– Z 
High percentage of  
 Perform DST of H, R, IA, FQ before
failures of Category I  
treatment starts
have MDR-TB  
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ- 
Second-line drug  
three Group 4 agents- +/– Z while
resistance is common 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen according to DST 
results if using an individualized 
approach
patient in whom   High percentage of 
 Perform DST of H and R at a minimum
Category II failed  failures of Category II  
in all patients before treatment starts
have MDR-TB  
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ- 
Second-line drug  
two Group 4 agents- +/– Z while
resistance is rare 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen according to DST 
results if using an individualized 
approach
High percentage of  
 Perform DST of H, R, IA, FQ before
failures of Category II  
treatment starts
have MDR-TB  
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ- 
Second-line drug  
three Group 4 agents- +/– Z while
resistance is common 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen according to DST 
results if using an individualized 
approach
C# Excel: View Excel File in Window Document Viewer Control
Resizing, burning, deleting and moving are all built in We are dedicated to provide powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image to pdf files and
how to reorder pdf pages in reader; reordering pdf pages
62
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
TABLE 7.2  (continued)
pAtient Group 
bAcKGrounD  
recommenDeD strAteGyb 
susceptibility DAtAa 
patient with  
Low to moderate rate 
 Perform DST of H and R at a minimum
history of relapse   of MDR-TB in this group    in all patients before treatment starts
or patient  
of patients is common 
 Start Category II treatment while
returning after  
awaiting DST
default 
 Adjust regimen to a Category Iv 
regimen if DST returns DR-TB 
Contact of  
Close contact with high 
 Perform rapid diagnosis and DST of H
MDR-TB patient   risk of having the same    and R at a minimum in all patients
now with active   strain 
before treatment starts
TB 
 Start Category Iv treatment based on
Contact  
the DST pattern and treatment history
resistance  
of the contact (see Chapter 14) while
pattern known 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen according to DST 
results
Casual contact with low  
 Perform rapid diagnosis and DST of H
risk of having the same     and R at a minimum in all patients
strain 
before treatment starts 
 
 
 Start Category I treatment while 
awaiting DST
 
 
 Adjust regimen according to DST 
results 
patient with  
Documented, or almost 
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ- 
documented  
certain, susceptibility 
two Group 4 agents- +/– Z
MDR-TB 
to a FQ and IA 
Documented, or almost  
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ- 
certain, susceptibility  
three Group 4 agents- +/– Z
to FQ  
 Use an IA with documented
Documented, or almost     susceptibility
certain, resistance to an  
 If the strain is resistant to all IAs, use
IA 
one for which resistance is relatively 
rare
Documented, or almost  
 Start Category Iv treatment: IA-FQ-
certain, resistance to  
three Group 4 agents- +/– Z
a FQ  
 Use a later-generation FQ
Documented, or almost 
certain, susceptibility 
to IA 
Documented, or almost  
 Start Category Iv treatment for XDR-
certain, resistance to a     TB (see section 7.14)
FQ and IA 
63
A number of principles in Table 7.2 require explanation. First, DST sur-
veillance data for different groups of patients (new, failures of Category I, fail-
ures of Category II, relapse and default, and failures of Category IV) will help 
greatly in determining rates of MDR-TB and of resistance to other antituber-
culosis drugs. This is essential for developing appropriate treatment strategies 
and for evaluating the impact of control programme interventions. 
Screening  all MDR-TB strains for second-line drug resistance is recom-
mended when capacity and resources are available. Because of the relatively 
good reliability and reproducibility of DST of aminoglycosides, polypeptides 
and fluoroquinolones, and since resistance to these drugs defines XDR-TB, 
DST  of these second-line  drugs  constitutes a  priority  for  surveillance  and 
treatment (see Chapter 6 for a recommended hierarchy of DST). 
For a standardized empirical regimen that will treat the vast majority of pa-
tients with four effective drugs, it is often necessary to use five or six drugs to 
cover all possible resistance patterns. As Table 7.2 illustrates, for most cases, an 
injectable agent and a fluoroquinolone make the core of the regimen. 
If using a standardized regimen, DR-TB control programmes are strongly 
encouraged to order other drugs that are not included in the standard regi-
men. For example, a programme that uses a standardized regimen that does 
not include PAS will still need PAS in the following situations: (i) patients 
intolerant to one of the core drugs; (ii) pregnant patients with DR-TB who 
cannot take all the drugs in the standard regimen; (iii) as part of a “salvage 
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
TABLE 7.2  (continued)
pAtient Group 
bAcKGrounD  
recommenDeD strAteGyb 
susceptibility DAtAa 
patient in whom   Moderate to high rate 
 Perform DST of IA and FQ (and H and R
Category Iv failed  of XDR-TB in this group 
if not already done) before treatment
or patient with  
of patients 
starts
documented  
 Start Category Iv treatment for
MDR-TB and  
XDR-TB (see section 7.14) while
history of  
awaiting DST
extensive second-   
 Adjust regimen according to DST
line drug use 
results 
patient with  
Documented resistance 
 Start Category Iv treatment for XDR-TB
documented  
to H, R, IA, and FQ 
(see section 7.14)
xDR-TB 
a All strategies in Table 7.2 assume they will be implemented in resource-constrained areas with 
limited access to DST. There are no absolute thresholds for low, moderate or high resistance. 
Programmes are encouraged to consult an expert on which recommended strategies in Table 7.2 
are best indicated based on resistance levels and available resources. 
b Whenever possible, perform DST of injectable agents (IA, aminoglycosides or capreomycin) and a 
fluoroquinolone (FQ) if MDR-TB is documented. 
c Persistently positive smears at 5 months constitute the definition of Category I failure; however 
some may wish to consider DST earlier based on overall clinical picture, for example if patient is 
HIv-positive. 
64
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
regimen” for those who fail the standardized regimen. In fact, all programmes 
are encouraged to have a “salvage regimen” for when the standardized regimen 
fails. See Box 7.3 for an example of how to design a standardized regimen. 
These guidelines caution against using DST of ethambutol, pyrazinamide 
and the drugs in Groups 4 and 5 to base the design of individual regimens. 
The reliability and reproducibility of these drugs are questionable. Individu-
ally designed regimens are based on history of previous drug use and DST of 
isoniazid, rifampicin, the second-line injectable agents and a fluoroquinolone. 
If DST results are not readily available, an empirical regimen based on the 
patient’s treatment history and contact history is strongly recommended since 
most DST methods have a turnaround time of several months. Placing a pa-
tient on an empirical regimen while DST results are pending is done to avoid 
BOx 7.3  ExAMpLES OF hOw TO DESIGn STAnDARDIZED REGIMEnS
Example 1. Survey data from 93 consecutively enrolled relapse patients from 
a resource-constrained area show that 11% have MDR-TB. Of these MDR-TB 
cases, 45% are resistant to E and 29% are resistant to S. Resistance to other 
drugs is unknown; however, there is virtually no use of any of the second-line 
drugs in the area. What re-treatment strategy is recommended in this group 
of relapse patients?
Answer: Given the relatively low rate of MDR-TB in this group, the following 
strategy is planned. All relapse patients will be started on the WHO Category 
II regimen (HRZES). DST of H and R will be done at the start of treatment to 
identify the 11% of MDR-TB patients who will not do well on Category II regi-
men. Those identified with MDR-TB will be switched to the standardized regi-
men 8Z-km-Ofx-Pto-Cs/12Ofx-Pto-Cs. The regimen contains four new drugs 
rarely used in the area, and is also relatively inexpensive. A small DST survey 
is planned to document the prevalence of resistance to the regimen’s five 
drugs in 30 relapse patients found to have MDR-TB. If this survey shows high 
resistance to any of the proposed drugs, redesign of the regimen will be con-
sidered. (Note: the regimen proposed in this answer is only one example of an 
adequate regimen; many others based on the principles in this chapter would 
be just as adequate.)
Example 2. A programme uses a standardized Category Iv regimen of Z-kM-
Ofx-Cs-Eto in patients in whom Category II regimen failed. For such patients, 
it is determined that 40% have XDR-TB. The programme has limited access to 
DST of fluoroquinolones and injectable agents and wishes to design a stan-
dard “salvage” regimen for patients in whom the standardized Category Iv 
regimen has failed. What regimen is recommended? 
Answer: Given the high rate of XDR-TB it is best to use a regimen designed to 
cure XDR-TB. An example of such a regimen is given below: 
CM-Mfx-PAS-2 or 3 Group 5 agents +/– Cs
Some experts would include Cs in the regimen because the rate of develop-
ment of resistance appears to be low. However, evidence about the true rate 
of development of resistance in patients who are not cured with a Cs-contain-
ing regimen is very limited. 
65
clinical deterioration and prevent transmission to contacts. There are a few 
exceptions. It may be convenient to wait for DST results if the laboratory uses 
a rapid method with a turnaround time of 1–2 weeks. In addition, in chronic 
cases who have been treated multiple times with second-line antituberculosis 
drugs, waiting for DST results may be prudent even if the turnaround time is 
several months, as long as the patient is clinically stable and appropriate infec-
tion control measures are in place.
Every effort should be made to supplement the patient’s memory with ob-
jective records from previous health-care providers. A detailed clinical history 
can help suggest which drugs are likely to be ineffective. Although resistance 
can develop in some cases in less than one month (39), as a general rule if a 
patient has used a drug for over a month with persistently positive smears or 
cultures, the strain should be considered as “probably resistant” to that drug, 
even if by DST it is reported as susceptible.
The results of DST should complement rather than invalidate other sources 
of data about the likely effectiveness of a specific drug. For example, if a his-
tory of previous antituberculosis drug use suggests that a drug is likely to be 
ineffective, this drug should not be relied on as one of the four core drugs 
in the regimen even if the strain is susceptible by DST. Alternatively, if the 
strain is resistant to a drug by DST, but the patient has never taken the drug 
and resistance to it is extremely uncommon in the community, this may be a 
case of a laboratory error or a result of the limited specificity of DST for some 
second-line drugs. 
Another important constraint is that because of the turnaround time nec-
essary for DST, the patient may have already received months of a standard-
ized or empirical treatment regimen by the time DST results become available 
from the laboratory. The possibility of further acquired resistance during this 
time must be considered. If there is a high probability of acquired resistance 
to a drug after the specimen for DST was collected, this drug should not be 
counted as one of the four drugs in the core regimen but can be included as 
an adjunctive agent.
Some laboratories may report that a strain has a low or intermediate level of 
resistance to a certain drug. There is very little clinical evidence to support this 
type of designation, particularly if the patient received the drug previously. 
Box 7.4 gives examples of how to design individualized regimens. 
7.9  Completion of the injectable agent (intensive phase)
The recommended duration of administration of the injectable agent, or the 
intensive phase, is guided by culture conversion. The injectable agent should 
be continued for at least six months and at least four months after the patient 
first becomes and remains smear- or culture-negative.
The use of an individualized approach that reviews the cultures, smears, 
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
66
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
X-rays and the patient’s clinical status may also help in deciding whether to 
continue an injectable agent longer than the above recommendation, particu-
larly in the case of patients for whom the susceptibility pattern is unknown, 
effectiveness is questionable for an agent(s), or extensive or bilateral pulmo-
nary disease is present. 
Intermittent therapy with the injectable agent (three times a week) can also 
be considered in patients in whom the injectable has been used for a prolonged 
BOx 7.4  ExAMpLES OF hOw TO DESIGn An InDIvIDUALIZED REGIMEn
Example 1. A patient in whom Category I and II treatments failed. DST re-
sults reveal that the infecting strain is resistant to H-R-S and susceptible to 
all other medications including E-km-Cm-Ofx; resistance to Z is unknown. The 
patient has received HRE for 3 months since the date of the DST. What indi-
vidualized regimen is recommended?
Answer: Since the patient received two courses containing E and Z, and was 
on functional monotherapy with E for at least 3 months, the utility of these 
drugs must be questioned despite the DST results. The same drugs can be 
included in the regimen but they should not be relied on as one of the four 
core drugs. The injectable choice may depend on the prevalence of resist-
ance in the community, but since this patient never received km, km is low 
in cost and the DST is reported to be susceptible, it may be the first choice 
in this case:
 km(Cm)-Ofx-Eto(Pto)-Cs 
(Many clinicians will add Z to this regimen; others may use PAS instead of 
Eto or Pto.) 
Example 2. A patient in whom Category I and II treatments failed. A review 
of DST results reveals that the infecting strain is resistant to H-R-Z-E-S-km 
and susceptible to the medications Cm-Ofx. The patient has not received any 
antituberculosis drugs since the date of the DST. What individualized regimen 
is recommended?
Answer: Below are two possible options in this case:
1. Cm-Ofx-Pto(Eto)-Cs 
Regimen 1 may have the advantage of increased compliance since it re-
quires the minimum number of drugs and avoids the adverse effects of 
the combination of PAS and Pto(Eto). However, if one or more of the DST 
results is wrong (and the reliability of DST of second-line drugs even to Cm 
and Ofx are only moderately reliable), the patient may be effectively on a 
regimen of only two or three drugs. Prevalence of resistance to second-line 
drugs and their availability in the country can help in the decision.
2. Cm-Ofx-Pto-Cs-PAS 
Regimen 2 takes into consideration the uncertainty of DST of second-line 
drugs. It places the patient on an additional drug as a precaution in case 
one of the DST results does not reflect the efficacy of any of the drugs test-
ed. Pto and PAS, while difficult to take together, are frequently tolerated by 
many patients, especially with good patient support. A regimen with these 
five drugs is also preferred if there is extensive damage to the lungs or if 
susceptibility to any of these drugs is uncertain, given a patient’s history. 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested