c# pdf viewer component : How to reorder pages in pdf reader Library application class asp.net windows web page ajax who_htm_tb_2008_4029-part1125

67
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
period of time and when toxicity becomes a greater risk. If the patient was on 
an empirical regimen of five or six drugs, drugs other than the injectable can 
be considered for suspension once the DST results are available and the patient 
continues with at least three of the most potent agents. 
7.10  Duration of treatment
The  recommended  duration of  treatment  is guided  by  culture conversion. 
Despite  emerging evidence that shorter  regimens  may  be  efficacious,  these 
guidelines recommend continuing therapy for a minimum of 18 months after 
culture conversion until there is conclusive evidence to support a shorter du-
ration of treatment. Extension of therapy to 24 months may be indicated in 
chronic cases with extensive pulmonary damage.
7.11  Extrapulmonary DR-TB 
Extrapulmonary DR-TB is treated with the same strategy and duration as 
pulmonary DR-TB. If the patient has symptoms suggestive of central nerv-
ous system involvement and is infected with DR-TB, the regimen should use 
drugs that have adequate penetration into the central nervous system (40, 
41).  Rifampicin,  isoniazid,  pyrazinamide,  protionamide/ethionamide  and 
cycloserine have good penetration into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF); kan-
amycin, amikacin and capreomycin do so only in the presence of meningeal 
inflammation; PAS and ethambutol have poor or no penetration. The fluo-
roquinolones have variable CSF penetration, with better penetration seen in 
the later generations.
7.12  Surgery in Category Iv treatment 
The most common operative procedure in patients with pulmonary DR-TB 
is resection surgery (taking out part or all of a lung). Large case-series analysis 
has shown resection surgery to be effective and safe under appropriate surgi-
cal conditions (42). It is considered an adjunct to chemotherapy and appears 
to be beneficial for patients when skilled thoracic surgeons and excellent post-
operative care are available (43). It is not indicated in patients with extensive 
bilateral disease. 
Resection surgery should be timed to offer the  patient the  best possible 
chances of cure with the least morbidity. Thus, the timing of surgery may be 
earlier in the course of the disease when the patient’s risk of morbidity and 
mortality is lower, for example, when the disease is still localized to one lung 
or one lung lobe. In other words, surgery should not be considered as a last 
resort. Generally, at least two months of therapy should be given before resec-
tion surgery in order to decrease the bacterial infection in the surrounding 
lung tissue. Even with successful resection, an additional 12–24 months of 
chemotherapy should be given. 
How to reorder pages in pdf reader - re-order PDF pages in C#.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Support Customizing Page Order of PDF Document in C# Project
move pages within pdf; rearrange pdf pages reader
How to reorder pages in pdf reader - VB.NET PDF Page Move Library: re-order PDF pages in vb.net, ASP.NET, MVC, Ajax, WinForms, WPF
Sort PDF Document Pages Using VB.NET Demo Code
pdf page order reverse; reverse page order pdf online
68
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
Specialized  surgical  facilities  should  include  stringent  infection  control 
measures, since infectious substances and aerosols are generated in large quan-
tities during surgery and during mechanical ventilation and postoperative pul-
monary hygiene manoeuvres. 
Many programmes will have limited access to surgical interventions. Gen-
eral indications for resection surgery for programmes with limited access to 
surgery include patients who remain smear-positive, with resistance to a large 
number of drugs; and  localized  pulmonary disease. Computerized tomog-
raphy, pulmonary  function testing and quantitative lung perfusion/ventila-
tion are recommended as part of the preoperative work-up. Programmes with 
suboptimal surgical facilities and no trained thoracic surgeons should refrain 
from resection surgery, as the result may be an increase in morbidity or mor-
tality. 
7.13  Adjuvant therapies in DR-TB treatment 
A number of other modalities are used to lessen adverse effects and morbidity 
as well as improve DR-TB treatment outcomes. 
7.13.1 Nutritional support
In addition to causing malnutrition, DR-TB can be exacerbated by poor nu-
tritional status. Without nutritional support, patients, especially those already 
suffering from baseline hunger, can become enmeshed in a vicious cycle of 
malnutrition and disease. The second-line antituberculosis medications can 
also further decrease appetite, making adequate nutrition a greater challenge. 
Vitamin  B6  (pyridoxine)  should  also  be  given  to  all  patients  receiving  
cycloserine  or terizidone  to  prevent neurological  adverse  effects (see  Chap-
ter 11 for dosing and more information). Vitamin (especially vitamin A) and 
mineral supplements can be given in areas where a high proportion of patients 
have these deficiencies. If minerals are given (zinc, iron, calcium, etc.) they 
should be dosed apart from the fluoroquinolones, as they can interfere with 
the absorption of these drugs.
7.13.2 Corticosteroids
The adjuvant use of corticosteroids in DR-TB patients has been shown not 
to increase mortality and can be beneficial in conditions such as severe respi-
ratory insufficiency, and central nervous system or pericardial involvement. 
Prednisone is commonly used, starting at approximately 1 mg/kg and gradu-
ally decreasing the dose to 10 mg per week when a long course is indicated. 
Corticosteroids may also alleviate symptoms in patients with an exacerbation 
of obstructive pulmonary disease. In these cases, prednisone may be given in a 
short taper over 1–2 weeks, starting at approximately 1 mg/kg and decreasing 
the dose by 5–10 mg per day. Injectable corticosteroids are often used initially 
when a more immediate response is needed. 
C# TIFF: How to Reorder, Rearrange & Sort TIFF Pages Using C# Code
Reorder, Rearrange and Sort TIFF Document Pages in C#.NET Application. C# TIFF Page Sorting Overview. Reorder TIFF Pages in C#.NET Application.
change page order in pdf file; how to move pages around in pdf
VB.NET PowerPoint: Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides by Using VB.
Sort and Reorder PowerPoint Slides Range with VB amount of robust PPT slides/pages editing methods powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
change pdf page order reader; reverse page order pdf
69
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
7.14  Treatment of xDR-TB
Since it was first described, XDR-TB has been reported on 6 continents in at 
least 37 countries, constituting up to 10% of all MDR-TB strains (44, 45). It 
has proven much more difficult to treat than MDR-TB and is extremely dif-
ficult to treat in HIV-positive patients (36, 45–47). While reports of HIV-
positive patients being promptly diagnosed with XDR-TB and placed on an 
adequate regimen are non-existent to date, reports of cohorts of HIV-negative 
patients have been shown to have cure rates that exceed 50% (45, 46). Fig-
ure 7.3 summarizes the latest expert consensus on how to manage XDR-TB. 
There are very limited data on different clinical approaches to XDR-TB.
Figure 7.3  Management guidelines for patients with documented,  
or almost certain, xDR-TB
1.  Use any Group 1 agents that may be effective;
2.  Use an injectable agent to which the strain is susceptible and consider 
an extended duration of use (12 months or possibly the whole 
treatment). If resistant to all injectable agents, it is recommended to 
use one the patient has never used before;a 
3.  Use a later-generation fluoroquinolone such as moxifloxacin;
4.  Use all Group 4 agents that have not been used extensively in a 
previous regimen or any that are likely to be effective;
5.  Use two or more agents from Group 5;
6.  Consider high-dose isoniazid treatment if low-level resistance is 
documented;
7.  Consider adjuvant surgery if there is localized disease;
8.  Ensure strong infection control measures; 
9.  Treat HIv (as per Chapter 10);
10.  Provide comprehensive monitoring (see Chapter 11) and full adherence 
support (see Chapter 12). 
a This recommendation is made because, while the reproducibility and reliability of DST to inject-
ables are good, there are little data on clinical efficacy of the test. Options with XDR-TB are very 
limited and some strains may be affected in vivo by an injectable agent even though they are 
testing resistant in vitro. 
7.15  Conclusion
Programmatic management of DR-TB is a complex health intervention, and 
no one strategy will fit all situations. Programme managers need to consider 
the epidemiological, financial and operational factors when deciding which 
strategy to use. Table 7.3 summarizes the principles of designing regimens.
Read PDF in Web Image Viewer| Online Tutorials
Extract images from PDF documents; Add, reorder pages in PDF files; Save and print Document Viewer, make sure that you have install RasterEdge PDF Reader Add-on
reordering pages in pdf; reorder pdf pages in preview
C# PDF Page Rotate Library: rotate PDF page permanently in C#.net
Enable batch changing PDF page orientation without other PDF reader control. PDF page, delete certain PDF page, reorder existing PDF pages and split
how to move pages in pdf reader; rearrange pages in pdf reader
70
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
BOx 7.5  ExAMpLE OF xDR-TB TREATMEnT
Example 1. A patient in whom a standardized regimen of Z-km-Ofx-Eto failed 
remains sputum smear-positive after 8 months of treatment. The DST done 
from a specimen taken 4 months ago reveals resistance to HRZE-km-Cm and 
susceptibility to Ofx. 
what treatment regimen is recommended? 
Answer: This patient may now be resistant to Ofx. Eto and Ofx cannot be relied 
upon in a new regimen, limiting treatment options. A later-generation fluoroqui-
nolone may have some effect. The recommended regimen is: 
 Cm-Mfx-Cs-PAS plus two Group 5 drugs (Cfz and Amx/Clv are perhaps the 
two most common Group 5 drugs used in this circumstance).
Table 7.3  Summary of the general principles for designing treatment regimens 
bAsic summAry  
comments 
principles 
1.  Use at least 4 drugs   Effectiveness is supported by a number of factors (the
certain to be effective   more present, the more likely the drug will be effective in
If at least 4 drugs are   the patient):
not certain to be  
 DST results show susceptibility (for drugs in which there
effective, use 5–7  
is good laboratory reliability).
drugs depending on  
 No previous history of treatment failure with the drug.
the specific drugs and  
 No known close contacts with resistance to the drug.
level of uncertainty. 
 DRS documents resistance is rare in similar patients.
  
 The drug is not commonly used in the area. 
2.  Do not use drugs for  
 Many antituberculosis agents exhibit cross-resistance
which there is the  
both within and across drug classes. knowledge of these
possibility of cross-  
relationships is essential in designing regimens for DR-TB
resistance 
(see Box 7.1). 
3.  Eliminate drugs that  
 known severe allergy or unmanageable intolerance. 
are not safe in the 
 High risk of severe adverse effects such as renal failure,  
patient 
deafness, hepatitis, depression and/or psychosis. 
  
 Quality of the drug is unknown.
4. Include drugs from  
 Use any of the first-line oral agents (Group 1) that are
Groups 1–5 in a  
likely to be effective (see the first section in this table as
hierarchal order based     to what predicts effectiveness). 
on potency  
 Use an effective aminoglycoside or polypeptide by 
injection (Group 2).
  
 Use a fluoroquinolone (Group 3).
  
 Use the remaining Group 4 drugs to complete a regimen 
of at least 4 effective drugs. 
  
 For regimens with fewer than 4 effective drugs, consider 
adding Group 5 drugs. The total number of drugs will 
depend on the degree of uncertainty, and regimens often 
contain 5–7 drugs.
VB.NET TIFF: Modify TIFF File by Adding, Deleting & Sort TIFF
Users can use it to reorder TIFF pages in ''' &ltsummary> ''' Sort TIFF document pages in designed powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
reorder pdf pages in preview; reorder pages in pdf document
C# PDF: C# Code to Process PDF Document Page Using C#.NET PDF
just following attached links. C# PDF: Add, Delete, Reorder PDF Pages Using C#.NET, C# PDF: Merge or Split PDF Files Using C#.NET.
how to move pages in pdf files; move pdf pages in preview
71
References 
1.  Moadebi S et al. Fluoroquinolones for the treatment of pulmonary tuber-
culosis. Drugs, 2007, 67(14):2077–2099.
2.  Alvirez-Freites  EJ, Carter  JL,  Cynamon MH. In  vitro and in  vivo ac-
tivities of gatifloxacin  against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antimicrobial 
Agents and Chemotherapy, 2002, 46(4):1022–1025.
3.  Baohong JI et al. In vitro and in vivo activities of moxifloxacin and clin-
afloxacin  against  Mycobacterium  tuberculosis.  Antimicrobial  Agents  and 
Chemotherapy, 1998, 42:2006–2069.
4.  Yew WW et al. Comparative roles of levofloxacin and ofloxacin in the 
treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. Preliminary results of a ret-
rospective study from Hong Kong. Chest, 2003, 124:1476–1481.
5.  Yew WW et al. Comparative roles of levofloxacin and ofloxacin in the 
treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis: preliminary results of a ret-
rospective study from Hong Kong. Chest, 2003, 124(4):1476–1481. 
6.  Nunn PP et al. Thioacetazone commonly causes cutaneous hypersensi-
tivity reactions in HIV positive patients treated for tuberculosis. Lancet, 
1991, 337:627–630.
7.  Rom WN, Garay S, eds. Tuberculosis. Philadelphia, Lippincott Williams 
& Wilkins, 2004:751.
8.  Katiyar  SK et al. A randomized controlled trial of high-dose isoniazid 
adjuvant therapy for multidrug-reisistant tuberculosis. Internal Journal of 
Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 12(2):139–145.
9.  Chien HP et al. In vitro activity of rifabutin and rifampin against clini-
cal isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Taiwan. J Formos Med Assoc, 
2000, 99(5):408–411.
10.  Sintchenko V et al. Mutations in rpoB gene and rifabutin susceptibility 
of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains isolated in Aus-
tralia. Pathology, 1999; 31(3):257–260.
11.  Yang  B  et  al.  Relationship  between  antimycobacterial  activities  of  ri-
fampicin, rifabutin and KRM-1648 and rpoB mutations of Mycobacterium 
tuberculosis.  Journal  of  Antimicrobial  Chemotherapy,  1998,  42(5):621–
628.
12. Williams DL et al. Contribution of rpoB mutations to development of 
rifamycin  cross-resistance  in  Mycobacterium  tuberculosis.  Antimicrobial 
Agents and Chemotherapy, 1998, 42(7):1853–1857.
13.  Zhao BY et al. Fluoroquinolone action against clinical isolates of Mycobac-
terium tuberculosis: effects of a C-8 methoxyl group on survival in liquid 
media and in human macrophages. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemother-
apy, 1999, 43(3):661–666.
14.  Dong Y et al. Fluoroquinolone action against mycobacteria: effects of C-8 
substituents on growth, survival, and resistance. Antimicrobial Agents and 
Chemotherapy, 1998, 42(11):2978–2984.
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
VB.NET TIFF: VB.NET Sample Code to Process & Manage TIFF Page
certain TIFF page, and sort & reorder TIFF pages in Process TIFF Pages Independently in VB.NET Code. powerful & profession imaging controls, PDF document, image
rearrange pages in pdf reader; move pages in pdf reader
C# Word: How to Create Word Document Viewer in C#.NET Imaging
in C#.NET; Offer mature Word file page manipulation functions (add, delete & reorder pages) in document viewer; Rich options to add
how to move pages in a pdf document; change page order pdf acrobat
72
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
15.  Lounis N et al. Which aminoglycoside  or fluoroquinolone is more ac-
tive against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in mice? Antimicrobial Agents and 
Chemotherapy, 1997, 41(3):607–610.
16.  Alangaden G et al. Mechanism of resistance to amikacin and kanamy-
cin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 
1998, 42(5):1295–1297.
17.  Allen  BW,  DA  Mitchison.  Amikacin  in  the  treatment  of  pulmonary  
tuberculosis. Tubercle, 1983, 64:111–118.
18.  Morse WC et al. M. tuberculosis in vitro susceptibility and serum level ex-
periences with capreomycin. Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 
1966, 135(2):983–988.
19.  McClatchy  JK  et  al.  Cross-resistance  in  M.  tuberculosis  to kanamycin, 
capreomycin and viomycin. Tubercle, 1977, 58:29–34.
20. Cooksey RC et al.  Characterization of streptomycin  resistance  mecha-
nisms  among Mycobacterium tuberculosis  isolates from  patients in  New 
York City. Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, 1996, 40:1186–1188.
21.  Socios En Salud database 2002.
22. Tsukamura M et al. Cross  resistance  relationship among capreomycin, 
kanamycin,  viomycin  and  streptomycin  resistances  of  M.  tuberculosis. 
Kekkaku, 1967, 42:399–404.
23. Tsukamura M. Cross-resistance relationships between capreomycin, kan-
amycin and viomycin resistances in tubercle bacilli from patients. Ameri-
can Review of Respiratory Diseases, 1969, 99:780–782.
24. Tsukamura  M,  Mizuno  S.  Cross-resistant  relationships  among  the 
aminoglucoside antibiotics in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Journal of Gen-
eral and Applied Microbiology, 1975, 88(2):269–274.
25.  Canetti G. Present aspects of bacterial resistance in tuberculosis. Ameri-
can Review of Respiratory Diseases, 1965, 92:687–703.
26. Lefford  MJ.  The  ethionamide  susceptibility  of  British  pre-treatment 
strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Tubercle, 1966, 46:198–206.
27.  Canetti G et al. Current data on primary resistance in pulmonary tuber-
culosis in adults in France. 2d survey of the Centre d’Etudes sur la Resist-
ance Primaire: 1965–1966. Revue de tuberculose et de pneumologie, 1967, 
31(4):433–474. 
28. Lee H et al. Exclusive mutations related to isoniazid and ethionamide re-
sistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from Korea. Interna-
tional Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2000, 4(5):441–447.
29.  Banerjee A et al. inhA, a gene encoding a target for isoniazid and ethiona-
mide in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Science, 1994, 263(5144):227–230.
30. Tsukamura  M.  Cross-resistance  of  tubercle  bacilli.  Kekkaku,  1977, 
52(2):47–49.
73
31.  Lefford MJ. The ethionamide  susceptibility of East African strains of 
Mycobacterium  tuberculosis  resistant  to  thiacetazone.  Tubercle,  1969, 
50:7–13.
32. DeBarber AE et al. Ethionamide activation and susceptibility in multid-
rug-resistant Mycobacteriuim tuberculosis. Proceedings of the National Acad-
emy of Sciences, 2000, 97(17):9677–9682.
33.  Bartmann, K. Kreuzresistenz zwischen a-Athylthioisonicotanamid (1314 
Th) und Thiosemicarbazon [Cross-resistance between ethionomide and 
thioacetazone]. Tuberkuloseartz, 1960, 14:525.
34. Trnka L et al. Experimental evaluation of efficacy. In: Bartmann K, ed. 
Anti-tuberculosis medications: handbook of experimental pharmacology. Ber-
lin, Springer-Verlag, 1988:56.
35.  Suarez PG et al. Feasibility and cost-effectiveness of standardised second-
line drug treatment for chronic tuberculosis patients: a national cohort 
study in Peru. Lancet, 2002, 359(9322):1980–1989.
36. Gandhi  NR et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis  as a cause  of 
death in patients co-infected with tuberculosis and HIV in a rural area of 
South Africa. Lancet, 2006, 368:1575–1580. 
37.  Kim SJ. Drug susceptibility testing in tuberculosis: methods and reliabil-
ity of results. European Respiratory Journal, 2005, 25(3):564–569. 
38. Drug-resistant  tuberculosis: a survival guide for clinicians. San Francisco, 
Francis J.  Curry National Tuberculosis Center  and California  Depart-
ment of Health Services, 2004.
39.  Horne  NW, Grant  IWB. Development of drug resistance to isoniazid 
during desensitization: A report of two cases. Tubercle 1963; 44: 180–2.
40. Holdiness MR. Cerebrospinal fluid pharmokinetics of antituberculoisis 
drugs. Clinical Pharmacokinetics, 1985, 10:532–534.
41.  Daley  CL.  Mycobacterium  tuberculosis  complex.  In:  Yu  VL  et  al,  eds. 
Antimicrobial  therapy  and  vaccines.  Philadelphia, Williams  &  Wilkins, 
1999:531–536.
42. Francis RS, Curwen MP. Major surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis: final 
report. A national survey of 8232 patients operated on from April 1953 to 
March 1954 and followed up for five years. Tubercle, 1964, supp(4)5:5–
79.
43. Pomerantz BJ et al. Pulmonary resection for multi-drug resistant tubercu-
losis. Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, 2001, 121(3):448–
453.
44. XDR-TB  (extensively  drug-resistant  tuberculosis):  what,  where,  how  and  
action steps. Geneva, World Health Organization, 2007.
45.  Emergence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis with extensive resistance to sec-
ond-line drugs – worldwide, 2000–2004. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly 
Report, 2006, 55(11):301–305.
7. TREATMENT STRATEGIES FOR MDR-TB AND XDR-TB
74
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
46. Migliori GB et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis, Italy and Ger-
many [letter]. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases [serial on the Internet], May 
2007.
47.  Jeon CY et al. Extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis in South Korea: risk 
factors and treatment outcomes among patients at a tertiary referral hos-
pital. Clinical Infectious Diseases, 2008, 46(1):42–49.
75
CHAPTER 8
Mono- and poly-resistant strains 
(DR-TB other than MDR-TB)
8.1  Chapter objectives 
75
8.2  General considerations 
75
8.3  Consequences for reporting 
75
8.4  Treatment of patients with mono- and poly-resistant strains 
76
Table 8.1 
Suggested regimens for mono- and poly-drug resistance 
77
Box 8.1 
Example of regimen design for mono- and poly-resistant  
strains 
78
8.1  Chapter objectives 
This chapter describes the recommended treatment strategies for patients with 
DR-TB other than MDR-TB. These include patients with mono-resistant TB 
and patients with poly-resistant TB other than MDR-TB. Mono-resistance re-
fers to resistance to a single first-line drug, and poly-resistance refers to resist-
ance to two or more first-line drugs but not to both isoniazid and rifampicin.
8.2  General considerations
Cases with mono- or poly-resistance will be identified during the course of 
case-finding for MDR-TB. Treatment of patients infected with mono- or poly-
resistant strains using standardized SCC has been associated with increased 
risk of treatment failure and further acquired resistance, including the devel-
opment of MDR-TB (1–2). While the likelihood of poor outcomes is relatively 
low with many types of mono- and poly-resistance (i.e. the majority of patients 
with mono- or poly-resistant strains will be cured with SCC), programmes 
can use different regimens based on DST patterns as described below. 
8.3  Consequences for reporting
Patients whose  regimens  require  minor adjustments should  be  recorded in 
the traditional District Tuberculosis Register. These regimens are considered 
“modifications” of Category I or Category II treatment. They are not classified 
as Category IV treatments, which are regimens designed to treat MDR-TB. 
The adjustment should be noted in the comments section of the Register and 
the adjusted treatment continued for the indicated length of time. 
76
GUIDELINES FOR THE PROGRAMMATIC MANAGEMENT OF DRUG-RESISTANT TUBERCULOSIS
8.4  Treatment of patients with mono- and  
poly-resistant strains
Definitive randomized or controlled studies have not been performed to de-
termine the best treatment for various patterns of drug resistance, except for 
streptomycin resistance. The recommendations in these guidelines are based 
on evidence from the pre-rifampicin era, observational studies, general princi-
ples of microbiology and therapeutics in TB, extrapolations from established 
evidence and expert opinion. When a decision has been made to modify stand-
ardized SCC, the most effective regimen should be chosen from the start to 
maximize the likelihood of cure; effective drugs should not be withheld for 
later use. 
Table 8.1 gives suggested regimens for different DST patterns. When using 
this table, it is essential to consider whether resistance has been acquired to any 
of the drugs that will be used in the recommended regimen. 
 Development of further resistance. Further resistance should be suspect-
ed if the patient was on the functional equivalent of only one drug for a 
significant period of time (usually considered as one month or more, but 
even periods of  less than one month on inadequate therapy can lead to 
resistance). Sometimes resistance develops if the patient was on the func-
tional equivalent of  two  drugs, depending on  the drugs  concerned.  For 
example, pyrazinamide is not considered a good companion drug to pre-
vent resistance. If a patient was receiving functionally only rifampicin and 
pyrazinamide in the initial phase (because of resistance to isoniazid and 
ethambutol), resistance  to rifampicin may develop. Thus, it is crucial to 
consider which functional drugs the patient received between the time of 
DST specimen collection and the time of the new regimen design (i.e. con-
sider whether resistance has developed to any of the functional drugs). 
 DST results. The DST result that prompts a change in treatment may not 
accurately reflect the bacterial population at the time it is reported since it 
reflects the bacterial population at the time the sputum was collected. The 
regimens in Table 8.1 are based on the assumption that the pattern of drug 
resistance has not changed during this interval. Table 8.1 should therefore 
not be used if further resistance to any of the agents in the suggested regi-
men is suspected. It is also important to note that a high level of confidence 
in the laboratory is needed for effective use of Table 8.1. As mentioned in 
Chapters 6 and 7, DST of ethambutol and pyrazinamide is not highly re-
producible. 
Table 8.1 assumes that pyrazinamide susceptibility is being tested, which is 
not the case for many countries. If DST of pyrazinamide is not being car-
ried out, pyrazinamide cannot be depended upon as being an effective drug 
in the regimen. In such situations, regimens from Table 8.1 that assume the 
Documents you may be interested
Documents you may be interested